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Encyclopedia > New York Public Library
New York Public Library
Location New York, New York
Established 1895
Number of branches 87
Population served 8,143,198 (New York City)
Budget $50,171,798
Director Paul LeClerc
Employees 3,147
Website http://www.nypl.org/

The New York Public Library (NYPL) is one of the leading public libraries of the world and is one of America's most significant research libraries. It is unusual in that it is composed of a very large circulating public library system combined with a very large non-lending research library system. It is simultaneously one of the largest public library systems in the United States and one of the largest research library systems. It is a privately managed, nonprofit corporation with a public mission, operating with both private and public financing. Its flagship building, on Fifth Ave. running from 40th to 42nd Street in Manhattan, is a National Historic Landmark. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Paul LeClerc is president and chief executive officer of the New York Public Library. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...


The historian David McCullough has described the New York Public Library as one of the five most important libraries in America, the others being the Library of Congress, the Boston Public Library, and the university libraries of Harvard and Yale.[citation needed] Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... The Boston Public Librarys McKim building The Boston Public Library was established in 1848. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... YALE (Yet Another Learning Environment) is an environment for machine learning experiments and data mining. ...


Although it is called the New York Public Library it does not cover all five boroughs of America's largest city. New York City does not have a single public library system but three of them. The other two are the Brooklyn Public Library and the Queens Borough Public Library, serving the boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens, respectively. The Main Branch, Brooklyn Public Library, Grand Army Plaza, 2003 The Brooklyn Public Library (BPL), is the public library system of the borough of Brooklyn in New York City. ... The Queens Borough Public Library, or QBPL is the public library for the Borough of Queens and one of three library systems serving New York City. ...


Currently, the New York Public Library consists of 86 libraries in the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island: four non-lending research libraries, four main lending libraries, a library for the blind and physically handicapped, and 77 neighborhood branch libraries. All libraries in the NYPL system may be used free of charge by all visitors.

Contents

History

New York Public Library
(U.S. National Historic Landmark)
New York Public Library, central block, in June 2003
Location: New York, NY
Coordinates: 40°45′11.93″N, 73°58′56.34″W
Built/Founded: 18971911
Architect: Carrère and Hastings
Architectural style(s): Beaux Arts
Designated as NHL: December 21, 1965[1]
Added to NRHP: October 15, 1966[2]
NRHP Reference#: 66000546
Governing body: Local

An early beneficiary of the New York Public Library was New York governor and presidential candidate Samuel J. Tilden, who left the bulk of his fortune -- about $2.4 million -- to "establish and maintain a free library and reading room in the city of New York." At the time of Tilden's death in 1886, New York already had two important libraries: the Astor Library, and the Lenox Library. For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Image File history File links New_York_Public_Library_030616. ... New York, New York redirects here. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... New York Public Library, central block, built 1897–1911, Carrère and Hastings, architects (June, 2003) Carrère and Hastings, the firm of John Mervin Carrère (November 9, 1858 – March 1, 1911) and Thomas Hastings (1860 - 1929), sited in New York City, was one of the outstanding Beaux-Arts... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... Lenox Library is one of the cornerstones of the New York Public Library. ...


The Astor Library was created by John Jacob Astor, an immigrant who became the wealthiest man in America. When he died in 1848, he left $400,000 in his will for the establishment of a library in New York City. The Astor Library opened the following year, 1849. Although it was not a circulating library, it was a major reference library for research. John Jacob Astor, detail of an oil painting by Gilbert Stuart, 1794 John Jacob (originally either Johann Jakob or Johann Jacob) Astor (July 17, 1763 - March 29, 1848) was the first of the Astor family dynasty and the first millionaire in the United States, the creator of the first Trust... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


New York's other main library was established by James Lenox and consisted mainly of his extensive collection of rare books (which included the first Gutenberg Bible to come to the New World), manuscripts, and Americana. The Lenox Library was intended primarily for bibliophiles and scholars. While it was free of charge, tickets of admission (such as those that are still required to gain access to the British Library) were still needed by potential users. James Lenox (19 August 1800 - 17 February 1880) was an American bibliophile and philanthropist, born in New York City. ... British Library main building, London The British Library (BL) is the national library of the United Kingdom. ...


So although there were already two fine libraries in New York City in 1886 and both were open to the public, neither could be termed a truly public institution in the sense that Tilden seems to have envisioned. But Tilden's vision was soon to come into fruition not only because of the generous bequest he left in his will but because of a man who was a trustee of his estate.


By 1892, both the Astor and Lenox libraries were experiencing financial difficulties. Almost as if fate would have it, John Bigelow, a New York attorney, and Tilden trustee, formulated a plan to combine the resources of the financially-strapped Astor and Lenox libraries with the Tilden bequest to form "The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations". Bigelow's plan, signed and agreed upon on May 23, 1895, was hailed as an example of private philanthropy for the public good. John Bigelow (November 25, 1817 - December 19, 1911) was an American lawyer and statesman. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


The newly established library consolidated with The New York Free Circulating Library in February, 1901, and the philanthropist Andrew Carnegie donated $5.2 million to construct branch libraries, with the requirement that they be maintained by the City of New York. Later in 1901 the New York Public Library signed a contract with the City of New York to operate 39 branch libraries in the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island. Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Andrew Carnegie (last name pronounced IPA: )[1] (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish industrialist, businessman, a major philanthropist, and the founder of Pittsburghs Carnegie Steel Company which later became U.S. Steel. ... A Carnegie library, opened in 1913 in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, designed in Spanish Colonial style Carnegie libraries for both public use and academic institutions were built with money donated by Scottish-American businessman Andrew Carnegie, earning him the nickname, the Patron Saint of Libraries. ...


Unlike most other great libraries, such as the Library of Congress, the New York Public Library was not created by government statute. From the earliest days of the New York Public Library, a tradition of partnership of city government with private philanthropy began. A tradition which continues to this day. Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ...


Having the books and the money to create and build a great library befitting the nation's largest city, the next step was to find a new home for the library. Fortunately one was already at hand. The Croton Reservoir that occupied a two-block section of Fifth Avenue between 40th and 42nd Streets was obsolete and no longer needed. Dr. John Shaw Billings who was named first director of the New York Public Library seized the opportunity. He knew exactly what he wanted there. His design for the new library became the basis of the landmark building that became the central Research Library (now known as the Humanities and Social Science Library) on Fifth Avenue. Brick walls surrounded the above-ground reservoir. ... Street sign at Fifth Avenue and East 57th street Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in New York City. ...


Billings's plan called for a huge reading room on top of seven floors of bookstacks combined with the fastest system for getting books into the hands of those who requested to read them. Following a competition among the city's most famous architects, the relatively unknown firm of Carrère and Hastings was selected to design and construct the new library. The result, regarded as the apex of Beaux-Arts design, was the largest marble structure ever attempted in America. The cornerstone was laid in May 1902. New York Public Library, central block, built 1897–1911, Carrère and Hastings, architects (June, 2003) Carrère and Hastings, the firm of John Mervin Carrère (November 9, 1858 – March 1, 1911) and Thomas Hastings (1860 - 1929), sited in New York City, was one of the outstanding Beaux-Arts... For other uses, see May (disambiguation). ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

Cross-view of classical details in the entrance portico
Cross-view of classical details in the entrance portico

Work progressed slowly but steadily on the Library which eventually cost $9 million to build. During the summer of 1905, huge columns were put into place and work on the roof was begun. By the end of 1906, the roof was finished and the designers commenced five years of interior work. In 1910, 75 miles of shelves were installed to house the collections that were set to make their home there, with plenty of space left for future acquisitions. It took a whole year to move and install the books that were in the Astor and Lenox libraries. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (768 × 1,024 pixels, file size: 225 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (768 × 1,024 pixels, file size: 225 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ...


On May 23, 1911, the New York Public Library was officially opened. The ceremony was presided over by President William Howard Taft and was attended by Governor John Alden Dix and Mayor William J. Gaynor. is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other persons named William Howard Taft, see William Howard Taft (disambiguation). ... John Alden Dix (December 25, 1860 - April 9, 1928) was Governor of New York from 1911 to 1913. ... William Jay Gaynor William J. Gaynor (1849 – September 10, 1913) was an American politician from New York City, associated with the Tammany Hall political machine. ...

Entrance to the Public Catalog Room
Entrance to the Public Catalog Room

The following day, May 24, the public were invited. The response was sensational. Tens of thousands thronged to the Library's "jewel in the crown." The opening day collection consisted of more than 1,000,000 volumes. The New York Public Library instantly became one of the nation's largest libraries and a vital part of the intellectual life of America. True to Dr. Billings' plan, library records for that day show that one of the very first items called for was N. I. Grot's Nravstvennye idealy nashego vremeni ("Ethical Ideas of Our Time") a study of Friedrich Nietzsche and Leo Tolstoy. The reader filed his slip at 9:08 a.m. and received his book just six minutes later. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 768 pixels, file size: 235 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 768 pixels, file size: 235 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a nineteenth-century German philosopher. ... Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy(Lyof, Lyoff) (September 9 [O.S. August 28] 1828 – November 20 [O.S. November 7] 1910) (Russian: , IPA:  ), commonly referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy, was a Russian writer – novelist, essayist, dramatist and philosopher – as well as pacifist Christian anarchist and educational reformer. ...


But to those who came not to read but just to see the new library there was a lot to see. First there were two stone lions that stood at the stairway to the entrance. The famous lions guarding the entrance were sculpted by Edward Clark Potter. They were originally named Leo Astor and Leo Lenox, in honor of the library's founders. These names were transformed into Lord Astor and Lady Lenox (although both lions are male). In the 1930s they were nicknamed "Patience" and "Fortitude" by Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia. He chose these names because he felt that the citizens of New York would need to possess these qualities to see themselves through the Great Depression. Patience is on the south side (the left as one faces the main entrance) and Fortitude on the north. Edward Clark Potter (November 26, 1857 - June 21, 1923) was an American sculptor. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... Fiorello Henry LaGuardia (December 11, 1882–September 20, 1947) was the Mayor of New York from 1934 to 1945. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ...

The Map Division
The Map Division

Then there is the famous main reading room of the Research Library (Room 315) - a majestic 78 feet (23.8 m) wide by 297 feet (90.5 m) long, with 52 feet (15.8 m) high ceilings - lined with thousands of reference books on open shelves along the floor level and along the balcony; lit by massive windows and grand chandeliers; furnished with sturdy wood tables, comfortable chairs, and brass lamps. Today it is also equipped with computers with access to library collections and the Internet and docking facilities for laptops. Readers study books brought to them from the library's closed stacks. There are special rooms for notable authors and scholars, many of whom have done important research and writing at the Library. But the Library has always been about more than scholars, during the Great Depression, many ordinary people, out of work, used the Library to improve their lot in life (just as they still do). Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 768 pixels, file size: 376 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 768 pixels, file size: 376 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ...


The building was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965.[1] This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...


Over the decades, the library grew with more branch libraries with more books serving more people. However the famous research collection grew until, by the 1970s, it was clear that eventually the collection would outgrow the existing structure. So it was decided to make the library bigger by burrowing underground toward Bryant Park. In the 1980s the central research library added more than 125,000 square feet (12,000 m²) of space and literally miles of bookshelf space to its already vast storage capacity to make room for future acquisitions. This expansion required a major construction project in which Bryant Park, directly west of the library, was closed to the public and excavated. The new library facilities were built below ground level. The park was then restored on top of the underground facilities and re-opened to the public. Bryant Park, August 2003 Bryant Park is a 9. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ...


Even though the central research library on 42nd Street had greatly expanded its capacity, in the 1990s the decision was made to remove that portion of the research collection devoted to science, technology, and business to a new location. The new location was the abandoned B. Altman department store on 34th Street. In 1995, the 100th anniversary of the founding of the New York Public Library, the $100 million Science, Industry and Business Library, designed by Gwathmey Siegel & Associates of Manhattan, finally opened to the public. Upon the creation of the SIBL, the central research library on 42nd Street was renamed the Humanities and Social Sciences Library. For the band, see 1990s (band). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Today there are four research libraries that comprise the NYPL's outstanding research library system which hold approximately 40,000,000 items. The Humanities and Social Sciences Library on 42nd Street is still the heart of the NYPL's research library system but the Science, Industry and Business Library with approximately 2 million volumes and 60,000 periodicals is quickly gaining greater prominence in the NYPL's research library system because of its up-to-date electronic resources available to the general public. The SIBL, the nation's largest public library devoted solely to science and business, provides users with broad access to science, technology, and business information via 150 networked computer work stations. The NYPL's two other research libraries are the Schomburg Center for Black Research and Culture, located at 135th Street and Lenox Avenue in Harlem and the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, located at Lincoln Center. In addition to their reference collections, the Library for the Performing Arts and the SIBL also have circulating components that are administered by the NYPL's Branch Libraries system. For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ... The Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. ...


On July 17, 2007, the building was briefly evacuated and the surounding area was cordoned off by New York police because of a suspicious package found across the street. It turned out to be a bag of old clothes.[3] is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

A panoramic view of the Rose Main Reading Room, facing south.
A panoramic view of the Rose Main Reading Room, facing south.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (4160x1798, 2481 KB) Summary A panorama of a research room taken at the New York Public Library with a Canon 5D and 24-105mm f/4L IS in January 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (4160x1798, 2481 KB) Summary A panorama of a research room taken at the New York Public Library with a Canon 5D and 24-105mm f/4L IS in January 2006. ...

Branch Libraries

The Donnell Library Center in midtown Manhattan.
The Donnell Library Center in midtown Manhattan.

The New York Public Library system maintains its commitment to being a public lending library through its branch libraries in The Bronx, Manhattan and Staten Island, including the Mid-Manhattan Library, The Donnell Library Center, The Andrew Heiskell Braille and Talking Book Library, the circulating collections of the Science, Industry and Business Library, and the circulating collections of the Library for the Performing Arts. These circulating libraries offer a wide range of collections, programs, and services, including the renowned Picture Collection at Mid-Manhattan Library and the Media Center at Donnell. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 480 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,304 × 2,876 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 480 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,304 × 2,876 pixels, file size: 1. ... Entrance to library Winnie the Pooh and friends in the Childrens Reading Room The Donnell Library Center is a branch of the New York City Library at 20 West 53rd Street just north of Rockefeller Center. ... Midtown Manhattan viewed from the World Trade Center. ... For other uses, see The Bronx (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Staten Island (disambiguation) Staten Island, shown in an enhanced satellite image Staten Island is one of the five boroughs of New York City, located on an island of the same name on the west side of the Narrows at the entrance of New York Harbor. ...


Of its 82 branch libraries, 35 are in Manhattan, 34 are in the Bronx, and 11 are in Staten Island.


Telephone Reference Service

The New York Public library has a telephone-reference system that was organized as a separate library unit in 1968 and remains one of the largest. Located in the Mid-Manhattan Library branch at 455 Fifth Avenue, the unit has 10 researchers with degrees ranging from elementary education, chemistry, mechanical engineering and criminal justice, to a Ph.D. in English literature. They can consult with as many as 50 other researchers in the library system.

New York Public Library Elevation
New York Public Library Elevation

Under their rules, each inquiry must be answered in under five minutes, meaning the caller gets an answer or somewhere to go for an answer — like a specialty library, trade group or Web site. Researchers cannot call questioners back. Although the majority of calls are in English, the staff can get by in Chinese, Spanish, German and some Yiddish. Specialty libraries, like the Slavic and Baltic division, can lend a hand with, for example, Albanian. Image File history File linksMetadata New_York_Public_Library_Wikipedia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata New_York_Public_Library_Wikipedia. ...


Internet inquiries make up only a third of the questions, but they can take up to 35 minutes each and 85% of total staff time. Internet inquiries come by e-mail (13,398 in 2005) and a one-on-one chat that resembles instant messaging (7,220 in 2005). While telephone calls have declined recently to fewer than 150 a day from more than 1,000, they still made up two-thirds, or 41,715, of all inquiries in 2005; the rest were by computer.


Every day, except Sundays and holidays, between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, anyone, of any age, from anywhere in the world can telephone 212-340-0849 and ask a question. The library staff will not answer crossword or contest questions, do children's homework, or answer philosophical speculations.[4]. The business reference desk number is 212-592-7000, ext 3.


Website

Postcard, ca. 1920.

The New York Public Library website provides access to the library's catalogs, online collections and subscription databases, and has information about the library's free events, exhibitions, computer classes and English as a Second Language classes. The two online catalogs, LEO (which searches the circulating collections) and CATNYP (which searches the research collections) allow users to search the library's holdings of books, journals and other materials. New York Public Library Building, Manhattan, c. ... New York Public Library Building, Manhattan, c. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The NYPL gives cardholders free access from home to thousands of current and historical magazines, newspapers, journals and reference books in subscription databases, including EBSCOhost, which contains full text of major magazines; full text of the New York Times (1995-present), Gale's Ready Reference Shelf which includes the Encyclopedia of Associations and periodical indexes, Books in Print; and Ulrich's Periodicals Directory.


The NYPL Digital Gallery is a database of half a million images digitized from the library's collections. The Digital Gallery was named one of Time Magazine's 50 Coolest Websites of 2005 and Best Research Site of 2006 by an international panel of museum professionals.


Other databases available only from within the library include Nature, IEEE and Wiley science journals, Wall Street Journal archives, and Factiva.


The NYPL in popular culture

At the entrance to the New York Public Library.
At the entrance to the New York Public Library.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1500x1200, 363 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): New York Public Library Edward Clark Potter Piccirilli Brothers Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1500x1200, 363 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): New York Public Library Edward Clark Potter Piccirilli Brothers Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from...

Film

The NYPL has frequently appeared in feature films. It serves as the backdrop for a central plot development in the 2002 film Spider-Man and a major location in the 2004 apocalyptic science fiction film The Day After Tomorrow. It is also featured prominently in the 1984 film Ghostbusters—a librarian in the basement reports seeing a ghost, which becomes violent when approached. In the 1978 film, The Wiz, Dorothy and Toto stumble across the Library and one of the Library Lions comes alive and joins them on their journey out of Oz. This article is about motion pictures. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Tobey Maguire in Spider-Man Spider-Man is the name of an extremely successful movie (released on May 3, 2002) which stars Tobey Maguire, Kirsten Dunst and Willem Dafoe and was directed by Sam Raimi. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Apocalyptic science fiction is a sub-genre of science fiction that is concerned with the end of the world or civilization, through nuclear war, plague, or some other general disaster. ... For other uses, see The Day After Tomorrow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see Ghostbusters (disambiguation). ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the stage musical. ...


Other films in which the library appears include 42nd Street (1933), Portrait of Jennie (1948), Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961), You're a Big Boy Now (1966), Chapter Two (1979), Escape from New York (1981), Regarding Henry (1991), The Thomas Crown Affair (1999), and The Time Machine (2002). 42nd Street is a 1933 musical film, set on the famous Manhattan street of that name, which was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. ... Portrait of Jennie movie poster Portrait of Jennie is a 1948 fantasy film based on the novella by Robert Nathan. ... This article is about the 1961 film starring Audrey Hepburn. ... Youre a Big Boy Now was a 1966 film with Geraldine Page, Julie Harris and Karen Black, written and directed by Francis Ford Coppola based on a novel by David Benedictus. ... Chapter Two is a 1979 film which tells the story of a man whose first wifes death interferes with his starting a new relationship. ... Escape from New York is a 1981 science fiction/action film directed and scored by John Carpenter. ... Regarding Henry is a film by Mike Nichols featuring Harrison Ford and Annette Bening. ... The Thomas Crown Affair is the name of two films: The original The Thomas Crown Affair was a 1968 film starring Steve McQueen as Thomas Crown and Faye Dunaway as Vicki Anderson. ... The Time Machine is a 2002 science fiction film directed by Simon Wells as a remake of The Time Machine (1960), and starring Guy Pearce, Jeremy Irons, Orlando Jones, Samantha Mumba, Mark Addy, Sienna Guillory, and Phyllida Law with a cameo by Alan Young from the earlier film. ...


Television

  • The NYPL was featured in the pilot episode of ABC's hit series Traveler, as the Drexler Museum Of Art, most often as backdrop or a brief meeting place for characters.
  • The NYPL is the setting for much of '"The Persistence of Memory," the eleventh part of Carl Sagan's Cosmos TV series.

Traveler is a drama-thriller television series that ran from May 10, 2007 until July 18, 2007 on ABC in the United States. ... The Day the Earth Stood Stupid is the seventh episode in season three of Futurama. ... This article is about the television series. ... Philip J. Fry Philip J. Fry is the central character of the television series Futurama. ... The Library is a third season episode of the NBC sitcom Seinfeld. ... Seinfeld is an Emmy Award-winning American sitcom that originally aired on NBC from July 5, 1989 to May 14, 1998, running a total of 9 seasons. ... Cosmo Kramer is a fictional character on the American television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Michael Richards. ... For other persons named Michael Richards, see Michael Richards (disambiguation). ... This article is about the comedian. ... Philip Baker Hall (born September 10, 1931) is an American actor. ... George Louis Costanza is a fictional character in the United States-based television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Jason Alexander. ... Jason Alexander (born Jason Scott Greenspan on September 23, 1959) is a Jewish American television, cinema and musical theatre actor, best known for his role as George Costanza on the hit television series Seinfeld. ... Cosmos: A Personal Voyage was the name of a thirteen part television series produced by Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan which was first broadcast by the Public Broadcasting Service in 1980. ...

Novels

  • Lynne Sharon Schwartz's The Writing on the Wall (2005), features a language researcher at NYPL who grapples with her past following the September 11, 2001 attacks.
  • In 1985, novelist Jerome Badanes based his novel The Final Opus of Leon Solomon on the real-life tragedy of an impoverished scholar who stole books from the Jewish Division, only to be caught and commit suicide.
  • In the 1984 murder mystery by Jane Smiley, Duplicate Keys, an NYPL librarian stumbles on two dead bodies, circa 1930.
  • Allen Kurzweil's The Grand Complication is the story of an NYPL librarian whose research skills are put to work finding a missing museum object.
  • Donna Hill, who was herself an NYPL librarian in the 1950s, set her 1965 novel Catch a Brass Canary at an NYPL branch library.
  • Lawrence Blochman's 1942 mystery Death Walks in Marble Halls features a murder committed using a brass spindle from a catalog drawer.

A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Cynthia Ozick (born April 17, 1928, New York City), is an American writer, the daughter of William Ozick and Celia Regelson. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Karaite Judaism is a Jewish denomination characterized by reliance on the Tanakh as the sole scripture, and rejection of the Oral Law (the Mishnah and the Talmuds) as halakha (Legally Binding, i. ... Contest is the first published novel by Australian thriller writer Matthew Reilly, and established his career as one of the most popular writers among young Australians, as well as people all over the world. ... Matthew John Reilly, (born 2 July 1974 in Sydney), is an Australian action/thriller writer. ... Intergalactic redirects here. ... For other uses, see Gladiator (disambiguation). ... Jane Smiley (born September 26, 1949) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist. ... Allen Kurzweil (born December 16, 1960) is an American Novelist, Children’s Writer, Editor, Essayist, and Journalist. ... Lawrence Goldtree Blochman (1900 - 1975) was an American writer and a prominent translator of Georges Simenon. ... Abraham Cahan (July 7, 1860 - 1951) was a leading writer and lecturer for socialist and labor movements in New York City. ... Henry Sydnor Harrison (1880-1930) was an American novelist, born at Sewanee, Tenn. ... Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse, KBE (15 October 1881 – 14 February 1975) (IPA: ) was a comic writer who has enjoyed enormous popular success for more than seventy years. ... Christopher Morley (5 May 1890–28 March 1957) was an American journalist, novelist, and poet. ... James Baldwin may refer to: James Baldwin (editor and author) (1841–1925) James Baldwin (writer) (1924–1987) James Baldwin (baseball player) (born 1971) J. Baldwin (born 1934), industrial designer, author, educator James Mark Baldwin (1861–1934), philosopher and psychologist Category: ... Bernard Malamud (April 26, 1914 – March 18, 1986) was an American writer, allegorist, and a well-known Jewish-American author. ... For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... FireStarter (Japanese ファイスタ Fai Suta) is the second episode of the anime FLCL. Spoiler warning: Summary The Episode starts out with Mamimi playing some handheld videogame about burning stuff to please a dark god Cantide. ... Sarah Miriam Schulman (born July 28, 1958, in New York City) is an American novelist, historian and playwright. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Shadows on the Hudson is a novel by Isaac Bashevis Singer. ...

Poetry

Both branches and the central building have been immortalized in numerous poems, including: This article is about the art form. ... The Chinese poem Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong (Song Dynasty) Poetry (from the Greek , poesis, making or creating) is a form of art in which language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its ostensible meaning. ...

  • Richard Eberhart’s “Reading Room, The New York Public Library” (in his Collected Poems, 1930-1986 [1988])
  • Arthur Guiterman’s “The Book Line; Rivington Street Branch, New York Public Library” (in his Ballads of Old New York [1920])
  • Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s “Library Scene, Manhattan” (in his How to Paint Sunlight [2001])
  • James Haug’s “Heat: a Composite” (in his The Stolen Car [1989])
  • Muriel Rukeyser’s “Nuns in the Wind” (in The Collected Poems of Muriel Rukeyser [2005])
  • Paul Blackburn’s “Graffiti” (in The Collected Poems of Paul Blackburn [1985])
  • E.B. White's "A Library Lion Speaks" and "Reading Room" (Poems and Sketches of E.B. White [1981])
  • James Turcotte’s poem series “The New York Public Library,” his moving meditation on his advancing AIDS, which appeared in the Minnesota Review (1993)
  • Ted Mathys’ "Inventory Entering the New York Public Library" (Gulf Coast [2005])
  • Jennifer Nostrand’s "The New York Public Library" (Manhattan Poetry Review [1989])
  • Susan Thomas’ "New York Public Library" (the anthology American Diaspora [2001])
  • Aaron Zeitlin's poem about going to the library, included in his 2-volume Ale lider un poemes [Complete Lyrics and Poems] (1967 and 1970)

Richard Ghormley Eberhart (April 5, 1904 – June 9, 2005) was a prolific American poet who published more than a dozen books of poetry and approximately twenty works in total. ... Arthur Guiterman (November 20, 1871 - January 11, 1943) was an American writer best known for his humorous poems. ... Lawrence Ferlinghetti Lawrence Ferlinghetti (born Lawrence Ferling[1] on March 24, 1919) is an American poet who is known as the co-owner of the City Lights Bookstore and publishing house, which published early literary works of the Beats, including Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg. ... Muriel Rukeyser Muriel Rukeyser (December 15, 1913–February 12, 1980) was an American poet and political activist, best known for her poems about equality, feminism, social justice, and Judaism. ... Paul Blackburn (November 24, 1926 – September 13, 1971) was born in St. ... Elwyn Brooks White (July 11, 1899–October 1, 1985) was an American essayist, author, and noted prose stylist. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... Susan Petronella Thomas, Baroness Thomas of Walliswood OBE, DL (born 20 December 1935) is a British businesswoman and Liberal Democrat politician. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Other

Excerpts from several of the many memoirs and essays mentioning The New York Public Library are included in the anthology Reading Rooms (1991), including reminiscences by Alfred Kazin, Henry Miller, and Kate Simon. A memoir, as a literary genre, forms a sub-class of autobiography. ... Essay, a short work that treats of a topic from an authors personal point of view, often taking into account subjective experiences and personal reflections upon them. ... Alfred Kazin (June 5, 1915 – June 5, 1998) was an American writer and literary critic, many of whose writings depicted the immigrant experience in early twentieth century America. ... Henry Miller photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1940 Henry Valentine Miller (December 26, 1891 – June 7, 1980) was an American writer and, to a lesser extent, painter. ...


Other New York City library systems

"Patience" and "Fortitude" : the "Library Lion" statues; New York Public Library with mantle of snow (record snowfall of Dec. 1948)
"Patience" and "Fortitude" : the "Library Lion" statues; New York Public Library with mantle of snow (record snowfall of Dec. 1948)

The New York Public Library, serving Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island, is one of three separate and independent public library systems in New York City. The other two library systems are the Brooklyn Public Library and the Queens Borough Public Library. The three library systems combined operate a total of 208 library branches. Download high resolution version (1379x1111, 251 KB)The lion statues at the New York Public Library, with a mantle of snow during the record December 1948 snowfall. ... Download high resolution version (1379x1111, 251 KB)The lion statues at the New York Public Library, with a mantle of snow during the record December 1948 snowfall. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bronx (disambiguation). ... This article is about the borough in New York City. ... The Main Branch, Brooklyn Public Library, Grand Army Plaza, 2003 The Brooklyn Public Library (BPL), is the public library system of the borough of Brooklyn in New York City. ... The Queens Borough Public Library, or QBPL is the public library for the Borough of Queens and one of three library systems serving New York City. ...


According to the latest Mayor’s Management Report, New York City’s three public library systems had a total library circulation of 35 million broken down as follows: the NYPL and BPL (with 143 branches combined) had a circulation of 15 million, and the QBPL system had a circulation of 20 million through its 62 branch libraries. Altogether the three library systems also hosted 37 million visitors in 2006.


Private libraries in New York City, some of which can be used by the public, are listed in Directory of Special Libraries and Information Centers (Gale)


References

  1. ^ a b New York Public Library. National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service (2007-09-16).
  2. ^ National Register Information System. National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service (2007-01-23).
  3. ^ New York Public Library being evacuated. Twitter (17 July, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-17.
  4. ^ "Library Phone Answerers Survive the Internet." The New York Times 19 June 2006.[1]

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... New York City is home to hundreds of cultural institutions and historic sites, many of which are internationally known. ... Education in New York City is provided by a vast number of public and private institutions. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
About The New York Public Library (290 words)
Libraries are the memory of humankind, irreplaceable repositories of documents of human thought and action.
The New York Public Library is such a memory bank par excellence, one of the great knowledge institutions of the world, its myriad collections ranking with those of the British Library, the Library of Congress, and the Bibliothèque nationale de France.
The New York Public Library comprises simultaneously a set of scholarly research collections and a network of community libraries, and its intellectual and cultural range is both global and local, while singularly attuned to New York City.
New York Public Library - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1230 words)
John Bigelow (1817–1911), a New York attorney, was a trustee of the Tilden will, and formulated a plan to combine the resources of the financially-strapped Astor and Lenox libraries with the Tilden bequest to form "The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations".
The library consolidated with The New York Free Circulating Library in February, 1901, and Andrew Carnegie donated $5.2 million to construct branch libraries, with the proviso that the City of New York fund their maintenance and operations.
The NYPL maintains 80 neighborhood branch libraries and five central circulating libraries throughout The Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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