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Encyclopedia > New York Post
New York Post

One of the paper's most famous headlines
Type Daily newspaper
Format Tabloid

Owner News Corporation
Editor Col Allan
Founded 1801
Headquarters 1211 Avenue of the Americas
New York, New York 10036
Flag of United States United States
Circulation 724,748 Daily[1]
439,202 Sunday[2]

Website: nypost.com

The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily.[3] Since 1976, it has been owned by Australian-born billionaire Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation and, as of April 2007, is one of the 10 largest newspapers in the United States.[4] Its editorial offices are located at 1211 Avenue of the Americas, in Manhattan. Image File history File links NYPost. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: NWS, LSE: NCRA) is one of the worlds largest media conglomerates. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Manhattan is a borough of New York City, New York, USA, coterminous with New York County. ... NY redirects here. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the 1976 Gregorian calendar. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born, American citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: NWS, LSE: NCRA) is one of the worlds largest media conglomerates. ...

Contents

Paper's history

Hamilton
Hamilton
Bryant
Bryant

The paper was founded by Alexander Hamilton with about $10,000 from a group of investors in the autumn of 1801 as the New-York Evening Post,[5] a broadsheet quite unlike today's tabloid. Hamilton's co-investors included other New York members of the Federalist Party, such as Robert Troup and Oliver Wolcott,[6] who were dismayed by the election of Thomas Jefferson and the rise in popularity of the Democratic-Republican Party.[7] The meeting at which Hamilton first recruited investors for the new paper took place in the country weekend villa that is now Gracie Mansion.[8] Hamilton chose for his first editor William Coleman,[9] but the most famous 19th century Evening Post editor was the poet and Abolitionist William Cullen Bryant.[10] So well respected was the Evening Post under Bryant's editorship, it received praise from the English philosopher, John Stuart Mill, in 1864.[11] Image File history File links AlexanderHamilton. ... Image File history File links WCBryant. ... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757–July 12, 1804) was an Army officer, lawyer, Founding Father, American politician, leading statesman, financier and political theorist. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The label Federalist refers to two major groups in the history of the United States of America: (1. ... Robert Troup (1757–January 14, 1832) was a soldier, lawyer and jurist from New York. ... Oliver Wolcott (December 1, 1726–December 1, 1797), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of Connecticut. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... The Democratic-Republican party was a United States political party, which evolved early in the history of the United States. ... Gracie Mansion is the official residence of the Mayor of New York City. ... Abolition is the act of formally destroying something through legal means, either by making it illegal, or simply no longer allowing it to exist in any form. ... William Cullen Bryant William Cullen Bryant (November 3, 1794 - June 12, 1878) an American Romantic poet, journalist, political adviser, and homeopath, was born in Cummington, Massachusetts, the second son of Peter Bryant, a doctor and later a state legislator, and Sarah Snell; the William Cullen Bryant Homestead, his boyhood home... John Stuart Mill (20th May 1806 – 8th May 1873), a British philosopher and political economist, was an influential liberal thinker of the 19th century. ...


In 1881 Henry Villard took control of the Evening Post,[12] which in 1897 passed to the management of his son, Oswald Garrison Villard,[13] a founding member of both the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People[14] and the American Civil Liberties Union.[15] Villard sold the paper in 1918, after widespread allegations of pro-German sympathies during World War I hurt its circulation. The buyer was Thomas Lamont, a senior partner in the Wall Street firm of J.P. Morgan. Unable to stem the paper's financial losses, he sold it to a consortium of 34 financial and reform political leaders, headed by Edwin F. Gay, dean of the Harvard Business School, whose members included Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Conservative Cyrus H. K. Curtis[16] -- publisher of the Ladies Home Journal -- purchased the New York Evening Post in 1924[17] and briefly turned it into a non-sensational tabloid in 1933.[18] J. David Stern purchased the paper in 1934, changed its name to the New York Post,[19] and restored its size and liberal perspective.[20] Henry Villard (April 10, 1835 – 1900), was an American journalist and financier of German origin. ... Oswald Garrison Villard (1872 in Wiesbaden/Germany - 1949) was a U.S. journalist. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP, generally pronounced as EN Double AY SEE PEE) is one of the oldest and most influential civil rights organizations in the United States. ... The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is a major American non-profit organization with headquarters in New York City, New York, whose stated mission is to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed to every person in this country by the Constitution and laws of the United States... Thomas William Lamont was a partner of the J.P. Morgan bank in the early 20th century, ascending to the position of chairman after J.P. Morgan, Jr. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... Cyrus Hermann Kotzschmar Curtis (1850 - 1933) was a significant U.S. publisher. ... A cover of Ladies Home Journal from 1906 Ladies Home Journal is a magazine first published February 16, 1883 as a womens supplement to the Tribune and Farmer. ...


Dorothy Schiff purchased the paper in 1939; her husband, George Backer, was named editor and publisher.[21] Her second editor (and third husband) Ted Thackrey became co-publisher and co-editor with Schiff in 1942,[22] and recast the paper into its current tabloid format.[23] James Wechsler became editor of the paper in 1949, running both the news and the editorial pages; in 1961, he turned over the news section to Paul Sann and remained as editorial page editor until 1977. Under Schiff's tenure the Post was devoted to liberalism, supporting trade unions and social welfare, and featured some of the most popular columnists of the time, such as Drew Pearson, Eleanor Roosevelt, Max Lerner, Murray Kempton, Pete Hamill, and Eric Sevareid. In 1976 the Post was bought by Rupert Murdoch for $30 million.[24] The Post at this point was the only surviving afternoon daily in New York City, but its circulation under Schiff had grown by two-thirds.[25] Dorothy Schiff (March 11, 1903—August 30, 1989) was an American publisher of the New York Post, and was owner and publisher for nearly 40 years. ... James Wechsler (31 October 11 September 1915—September 1983) was an American journalist. ... Drew Pearson Drew Pearson (December 13, 1897–September 1, 1969), born in Evanston, Illinois was one of the most prominent American newspaper and radio journalists of his day. ... Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American political leader who used her stature as First Lady of the United States from 1933 to 1945 to promote her husbands (Franklin D. Roosevelts) New Deal, as well as civil rights. ... Maxwell Max Alan Lerner (December 20, 1902—June 5, 1992) was an American journalist and educator known for his controversial syndicated column. ... Murray Kempton (b. ... Pete Hamill Pete Hamill (born 1935) is a prominent American journalist, novelist, and short story writer. ... Pioneering broadcast journalist Eric Sevareid. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the 1976 Gregorian calendar. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born, American citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ...


The Murdoch years

While in the past the newspaper had been a long-established politically liberal stalwart, in recent years the paper has adopted a conservative slant, reflecting Murdoch's politics. Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... This article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ...


Murdoch imported the sensationalist "tabloid journalism" style of his British tabloid papers such as The Sun, typified by the Post's famous April 15, 1983 headline: HEADLESS BODY IN TOPLESS BAR. The Post also recycled The Sun's famous GOTCHA headline, this time in reference to the death of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi instead of the Falklands War. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ... April 15 is the 105th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (106th in leap years). ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Wikinews has news related to: Abu Musab al-Zarqawi killed in airstrike Abu Musab al-Zarqawi (Arabic: , , Translation: Father of Musab from Zarqa) (October 20, 1966 – June 7, 2006) was a Jordanian born Palestinian who ran a militant training camp in Afganistan alongside Osama bin Laden. ... Combatants Argentina United Kingdom Commanders Presidente Leopoldo Galtieri Vice Admiral Juan Lombardo Brigadier General Ernesto Crespo Brigade General Mario Menéndez Prime minister Margaret Thatcher Admiral Sir John Fieldhouse Rear-Admiral Sandy Woodward Major General Jeremy Moore Casualties 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner 75 fixed wing...


Because of the institution of federal regulations limiting media cross-ownership, Murdoch was forced to sell the paper for $37.6 million in 1988 to Peter S. Kalikow, a real estate magnate with no news experience.[26] When Kalikow declared bankruptcy in 1993,[27]the paper was temporarily managed by Steven Hoffenberg,[28] a financier who later pled guilty to securities fraud;[29] and, for two weeks, by Abe Hirschfeld,[30] who made his fortune building parking garages. The Post was repurchased in 1993 by Murdoch's News Corporation, after numerous political officials, including Democratic New York Governor Mario Cuomo, persuaded the Federal Communications Commission to grant Murdoch a permanent waiver from the cross-ownership rules that had forced him to sell the paper five years earlier.[31] Under Murdoch's renewed direction, the paper continued its conservative editorial viewpoint. Peter S. Kalikow (b. ... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ... Notice of closure stuck on the door of a computer store the day after its parent company, Granville Technology Group Ltd, declared bankruptcy (strictly, put into administration - see text) in the UK. Bankruptcy is a legally declared inability or impairment of ability of an individual or organizations to pay their... Abraham Jacob Abe Hirschfeld (1919—9 August 2005), was a Polish-born New York real estate developer known for his eccentric endeavors, love for publicity, $2 neckties, and strong Yiddish accent. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: NWS, LSE: NCRA) is one of the worlds largest media conglomerates. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Mario Matthew Cuomo (born June 15, 1932) served as the Governor of New York from 1983 to 1995. ... The FCCs official seal. ...


Highlights

The paper is well known for its sports section, which has been praised for its comprehensiveness; it begins on the back page, and among other coverage, contains columns about sports in the media by Phil Mushnick. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 390 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1584 × 2436 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 390 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1584 × 2436 pixel, file size: 2. ... Cindy Adams on WNBCs Live at Five in July of 2006. ... Phil Mushnick is a sportswriter who writes a sports media column for the New York Post. ...


The New York Post is also well known for its gossip columnists Liz Smith and Cindy Adams. The best known gossip section is "Page Six", edited by Richard Johnson. (Despite the name, since the end of the 20th century the feature has usually been printed on page 10 or page 12.) It is reported that "Page Six" is the first thing many celebrities turn to each morning.[citation needed] Feb. 2006 saw the debut of Page Six: the magazine, distributed free inside the paper. Neighborly gossips in the Altstadt in Sindelfingen, Germany Gossip consists of casual or idle talk of any sort, sometimes (but not always) slanderous and/or devoted to discussing others. ... Liz Smith (born February 2, 1923 in Fort Worth, Texas) is a popular gossip columnist. ... Cindy Adams on WNBCs Live at Five in July of 2006. ...


Sales

The daily circulation of the Post slumped in the final years of the Schiff era from 700,000 in the late 1960s[citation needed] to approximately 418,000.[citation needed] A resurgence in the 21st century boosted circulation to 724,748 in April, 2007,[2] achieved partly by lowering the price from 50 to 25 cents. In October, 2006, the Post for the first time ever passed its rival, the Daily News, in circulation. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


One commentator has suggested that the Post cannot become profitable as long as the competing Daily News survives, and that Murdoch may be trying to force the Daily News to fold or sell out.[32] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Criticisms

Murdoch's Post has been criticized from the beginning for what many consider its lurid headlines, sensationalism, and blatant advocacy, and conservative bias. In 1980, the Columbia Journalism Review asserted that "the New York Post is no longer merely a journalistic problem. It is a social problem - a force for evil."[33] Sensationalism is a manner of being extremely controversial, loud, attention-grabbing, or otherwise sensationalistic. ... The Columbia Journalism Review (CJR) is an American magazine for professional journalists published bimonthly by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism since 1961. ...


Perhaps the most serious allegation against the Post is that it is willing to contort its news coverage to suit the business needs of Murdoch, in particular that the paper has avoided reporting unflattering to the government of China. Murdoch has invested heavily in satellite television there and wants to maintain the favor of Chinese media regulators.[34]


Ian Spiegelman, a former reporter for the paper's Page Six gossip column, said in a statement for a law suit against the paper that in 2001 he was ordered to kill an item on Page Six about a Chinese diplomat and a strip club because it would have "angered the Communist regime and endangered Murdoch’s broadcast privileges."[35]


Critics say that the Post allows its editorial positions to shape its story selection and news coverage. But as the Post executive editor, Steven D. Cuozzo, sees it, it was the Post that "broke the elitist media stranglehold on the national agenda." Editing may also refer to audio or film editing. ... Elitism is the belief or attitude that the people who are considered to be the elite — a selected group of persons with outstanding personal abilities, wealth, specialised training or experience, or other distinctive attributes — are the people whose views on a matter are to be taken the most seriously, or...


According to a survey conducted by Pace University in 2004, the New York Post was rated the least credible major news outlet in New York, and the only news outlet to receive more responses calling it "not credible" than credible (44% not credible to 39% credible).[36] Pace University is a private, co-educational and comprehensive multi-campus university in the New York metropolitan area with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York. ...


There have been numerous controversies surrounding the Post:

  • On November 8, 2000, the Post printed "BUSH WINS!" in a huge headline, although the election remained in doubt because of the recount needed in Florida. Like the Post, many other newspapers around the country published a similar headline after the four major TV networks called the election for Bush.
  • On October 17, 2003, the Post printed an editorial congratulating the Boston Red Sox for having defeated the New York Yankees for the American League pennant. In fact, the Yankees had won the game and taken the pennant. The paper had written two editorials in advance, based on the possible outcomes, and a computer glitch resulted in the wrong editorial being published. As a result, the paper announced that it would no longer write advance editorials.
  • On July 4, 2004, the Post ran an article claiming to have learned exclusively that Senator John Kerry, the Democratic Party's Presidential nominee-in-waiting, had selected former House Minority Leader Dick Gephardt to be the Party's Vice Presidential nominee. The article, under the headline "KERRY'S CHOICE," ran without a byline [3]. The next day, the Post had to print a new story, "KERRY'S REAL CHOICE," reporting Kerry's actual selection of Senator John Edwards of North Carolina as his running mate.
  • On April 21, 2006, several Asian-American advocacy groups protested the use of the headline "Wok This Way" for a Post article about President Bush's meeting with the president of the People's Republic China.[37]
  • On September 27, 2006 the Post published an article called "Powder Puff Spooks Keith" that made fun of Countdown host Keith Olbermann receiving an anthrax threat from an unknown terrorist later revealed to be Chad Castagana [4].
  • On December 7, 2006 the Post doctored a front-page photo to depict the co-chairmen of the Iraq Study Group in primate fur, under the headline "SURRENDER MONKEYS", inspired by a once used line from The Simpsons.

The Post and the Daily News often take potshots at each other's articles and their accuracy, particularly in their respective gossip-page items, saying that the juicy information printed about some celebrity or other has been checked, and that the celebrity or his/her publicist has denied it. November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 53 days remaining. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Map The U.S. presidential election of 2000 took place on Election Day, Tuesday, November 7. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... October 17 is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds (1901-1911) Major league titles World Series titles (6) 2004... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Al Gore (born December 11, 1943) is a Vietnam Veteran and the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... Richard Andrew Dick Gephardt (born January 31, 1941) is senior counsel at the global law firm DLA Piper and a former prominent American politician of the Democratic Party. ... The byline on a newspaper or magazine article gives the name, and often the position, of the writer of the article. ... Johnny Reid John Edwards [1] (born June 10, 1953), is an American politician who was the Democratic nominee for Vice President in 2004 and a one-term U.S. Senator from North Carolina. ... April 21 is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 27 is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Countdown with Keith Olbermann is an hour-long nightly newscast on MSNBC which airs live at 8:00 p. ... Keith Olbermann (born January 27, 1959) is an American news anchor, commentator and radio sportscaster. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Chad Conrad Castagana, 39, is a American from Woodland Hills, California. ... December 7 is the 341st day (342nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Cover of the report The Iraq Study Group (ISG), also known as the Baker-Hamilton Commission,[1] was a ten-person bipartisan panel appointed on March 15, 2006, by the United States Congress, that was charged with assessing the situation in Iraq and the US-led Iraq War and making... Cheese-eating surrender monkeys is an insulting phrase, referring to the French, which gained notoriety in the United States, particularly in the run-up to the war in Iraq. ... Simpsons redirects here. ...


In certain editions of the February 14, 2007, newspaper, an article referring to Senator Hillary Clinton's support base for her 2008 presidential run referred to United States Senator Barack Obama as "Osama" (Bin Laden),[38] the paper realized its error and corrected it for the newer editions and the website.[39] The Post noted the error and apologized in the February 15, 2007[40] edition. Earlier, on January 20, 2007, the New York Post received some criticism[41] for running a potentially misleading headline, "Osama' Mud Flies at Obama",[42] for a story that discussed rumors that Sen. Obama had been raised as a Muslim and concealed it. The story itself never mentioned the Saudi terrorist, and the rumor is false. The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... “Obama” redirects here. ... Osama bin Muhammad bin Awad bin Laden (Arabic: ‎; born March 10, 1957[1]), most often mentioned as Osama bin Laden or Usama bin Laden, is a Saudi Arabian militant Islamist and is widely believed to be one of the founders of the organization called al-Qaeda. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Trivia

  • The New York Post, established 1801, describes itself as the nation's oldest continuously published daily newspaper. The Hartford Courant, which describes itself as the nation's oldest continuously published newspaper, was founded in 1764 as a semi-weekly paper; it did not begin publishing daily until 1836. The New Hampshire Gazette, which has trademarked its claim of being The Nation's Oldest Newspaper, was founded in 1756, also as a weekly. Moreover, since the 1890s it has only been published on weekends.
  • When Rupert Murdoch once asked the chairman of Bloomingdale's why he was not buying ads in the Post, he was allegedly told "because your readers are my shoplifters." (This anecdote has also been told about other publications, and the Bloomingdale's chairman, Marvin Traub, has denied ever saying this about the Post.)[43]
  • The Public Enemy song "A Letter to the New York Post" from their album Apocalypse '91...The Enemy Strikes Black is a complaint about what they believed to be negative and inaccurate coverage the group received from the paper.
  • In 2004, The Post received The Hundred Year Association of New York's Gold Medal Award "in recognition of outstanding contributions to the City of New York."

The Hartford Courant is Connecticuts largest daily newspaper, and is a morning newspaper for most of the state north of New Haven and east of Waterbury. ... The New Hampshire Gazette is a non-profit, alternative, bi-weekly newspaper published in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. ... Bloomingdales is a chain of upscale American department stores owned by Federated Department Stores, which is also the parent company of Macys. ... Commercialism redirects here. ... Public Enemy, also known as PE, is a hip hop group from Long Island, New York, known for their politically charged lyrics, criticism of the media, and active interest in the concerns of the African American community. ... Apocalypse 91. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The logo of The Hundred Year Association of New York The Hundred Year Association of New York was founded in 1927 to recognize and reward dedication and service to the City of New York by businesses and organizations that have been in operation in the City for a century or...

Fictional references

  • In the Spider-Man films, the Daily Bugle appears to be based on the Post. The Post explicitly takes the place of the Bugle in the Daredevil film.
  • In the 2006 flim The Devil Wears Prada, Miranda Priestly played by Meryl Streep makes a reference to the New York Post by telling her assistant Andie Sachs played by Anne Hathaway that Rupert Murdoch should cut her a check for all the papers she sells for him.
  • A fictional paper, the New York Ledger, clearly modeled on the New York Post, with similar layout and loud tabloid style often appears on the television show Law & Order.
  • In the spy farce film Top Secret!, one of the villain's henchmen is introduced as "Klaus . . . a moron, who knows only what he reads in the New York Post." Actor John Carney, a large man with a blank, rather unintelligent looking expression on his face, is holding a copy of the New York Post as this is said.
  • The Post has also appeared in such films as The Manchurian Candidate (the original version with Frank Sinatra), Men in Black and Working Girl.
  • In the 1988 film Married to the Mob, an FBI agent played by Oliver Platt holds up a newspaper to his partner, played by Matthew Modine. Although the paper is called the New York News, it is otherwise a perfect match for the Post. The headline, "HAMBURGER HOMICIDE," discusses a mob shootout at a fictional fast food chain called Burger World, in which a boss played by Dean Stockwell not only survived an attempted hit which killed his driver, but also killed the opposing hitmen, including the drive-thru attendant wearing the chain's mascot clown uniform and makeup, leading to the line, "Some clown just tried to kill me!"
  • The New New York Post has occasionally appeared in Futurama.[44]
  • In October 1984, a parody called "The Post New York Post" was published, ostensibly the issue from the day after the start of World War III. The front-page headline was "KABOOM!" The subhead read, "Michael Jackson, 80 million others dead."[45]
  • In the show Entourage, there have been numerous occasions of the New York Post being seen

Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... The Daily Bugle is a fictional New York City newspaper that is a regular fixture in the Marvel Universe, most prominently in Spider-Man and its derivative media. ... Daredevil is a 2003 movie directed by Mark Steven Johnson, who also wrote the screenplay. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The Devil Wears Prada is a 2003 novel by Lauren Weisberger about a young woman who, fresh from college, gets a job working as a personal assistant to a powerful fashion magazine editor that turns increasingly hellish as she struggles to keep up with her bosss capricious and demeaning... Mary Louise Streep, mostly known as Meryl Streep (born June 22, 1949) is a two-time Academy Award-winning, six-time Golden Globe-winning, two-time SAG-winning, Grammy Award-nominated and BAFTA Award-winning American actress who has worked in theatre, television, and film. ... Anne Hathaway can refer to at least two people: Anne Hathaway, an American actress, star of The Princess Diaries films and Ella Enchanted Anne Hathaway, the wife of William Shakespeare Anne received critical acclaim for her role as Jack Twists [played by Jake Gyllenhaal] wife in Brokeback Mountain, a controversial... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born, American citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... The New York Ledger is a fictional newspaper often seen in the Law & Order franchise. ... Law & Order is an American television police procedural and legal drama set in New York City. ... Top Secret! is a 1984 comedy directed by Jim Abrahams, David Zucker and Jerry Zucker. ... John J. Carney is a British actor. ... The Manchurian Candidate is a film adapted from the 1959 thriller novel written by Richard Condon. ... Men in Black is a 1997 science fiction comedy action film directed by Barry Sonnenfeld, starring Tommy Lee Jones, Will Smith and Vincent DOnofrio. ... Working Girl is an Academy Award nominee for Best Picture and an Academy Award winner for Best Song (Let the River Run by Carly Simon), which tells the story of a Staten Island-raised secretary, Tess McGill, working in the mergers and acquisitions department of a Wall Street investment bank. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Married to the Mob is a 1988 comedy film. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... Oliver Platt as The West Wings Oliver Babish Oliver Platt (born January 12, 1960 in Windsor, Ontario, Canada) is a Canadian film and television actor. ... Matthew Avery Modine (born March 22, 1959 in Loma Linda, California is an American actor. ... Fast food is food prepared and served quickly at a fast-food restaurant or shop at low cost. ... Dean Stockwell (born March 5, 1936 in North Hollywood, California) is an Oscar-nominated American film and television actor. ... A hitman (alternately, hit man), also referred to as a contract killer, is a hired assassin, usually in the employ of organized crime. ... Futurama is an Emmy Award-winning animated American sitcom created by Matt Groening (creator of The Simpsons) and David X. Cohen for the Fox network. ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Mob Influence At The Newspaper

Robert Perrino was the Superintendent of Deliveries at the newspaper's Upper East Side, Manhattan distribution center from the early 1970's to his murder in 1992. The Bonnano crime family had its hooks deeply embedded in the distribution arm of the newspaper with the help of Perrino. Perrino had the labor pool infested with mob associates, including at least three made men in the Bonnano crime family. The Bonanno mobsters were paid wages for which some of which amounted to $50,000 a year for no less than fifty-one "no-show" employees. In addition to the labor scam, distribution contracts went to friends of the Bonnano crime family, who kicked some money back as a way of returning the favor. For years Bonnano mobsters stole thousands of copies of the tabloid a day and sold them to other vendors for twenty, thirty cents each, (when at the time they cost fifty cents). Over time the Bonnano crime family became so entrenched at the newspaper that Perrino eventually set up a loanshark operation, performed gun running and organized drug trafficking directly from the building. The NYPD then planted a wire tap in the office of Perrino. Perrino was the one responsible for handing out the no-show jobs and doctored the ledgers so that the stolen newspaper bundles were not missed. Perrino even performed a little shylocking on the side for himself. He was later murdered over implicating himself on the wire recordings and over the threat of him becoming an informant. The Bonanno crime family was correct in their judgement, as Perrino agreed to testify about the racketeering conducted by the Bonanno crime family at the newspaper. Perrino's body remained hidden until December 2003 when his skeleton was found embedded in the concrete floor of a construction company in Staten Island. He had been shot multiple times in the head. His death was ordered by Vitale and Richard Cantarella. After Perrino's disappearance, the government lost their star witness and a group of Bonnano crime family soldiers were sent to Riker's Island, but Salvatore Vitale, Richard Cantarella and many other mobsters widely avoided prosecution. Richard Cantarella, Joseph D'Amico and Patrick "Patty Muscles" Romanello are being charged with the murder of Perrino in 2006. Robert Perrino a. ... The Upper East Side is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, that lies between Central Park and the East River. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... The Bonanno crime family is one of the Five Families that controls organized crime activities in New York City, USA, within the nationwide criminal phenomenon known as the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra). ... The Bonanno crime family is one of the Five Families that controls organized crime activities in New York City, USA, within the nationwide criminal phenomenon known as the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra). ... The Bonanno crime family is one of the Five Families that controls organized crime activities in New York City, USA, within the nationwide criminal phenomenon known as the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra). ... Usury (from the Latin usus meaning used) was defined originally as charging a fee for the use of money. ... Gunrunning is trafficking in (smuggling) contraband weapons and ammunition. ... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events... The New York City Police Department (NYPD) , the largest police department in the United States, has primary responsibility for law enforcement and investigation within the five boroughs of New York City. ... The Bonanno crime family is one of the Five Families that controls organized crime activities in New York City, USA, within the nationwide criminal phenomenon known as the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra). ... The Bonanno crime family is one of the Five Families that controls organized crime activities in New York City, USA, within the nationwide criminal phenomenon known as the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra). ... The Bonanno crime family is one of the Five Families that controls organized crime activities in New York City, USA, within the nationwide criminal phenomenon known as the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra). ... View of Rikers Island Rikers Island is New York Citys largest jail facility, sitting on a 415 acre (1. ... Salvatore Good Looking Sal Vitale (September 22, 1947)is a New York City mafioso in the Bonanno crime family. ... Richard Cantarella Lower East Side, Manhattan c. ... Richard Cantarella Lower East Side, Manhattan c. ... Joseph DAmico born (Lower East Side, Manhattan c. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Notable New York Post Employees

  • Robert Perrino, Superintendent of Deliveries
  • Albert Embarrato, delivery truck driver
  • Joseph D'Amico, delivery truck driver
  • Richard Cantarella, "tail man" and delivery truck driver
  • Frank Cantarella, delivery truck driver
  • Paul Cantarella, delivery truck driver
  • Joseph Padavano, delivery truck driver
  • Anthony Vitale, printing press worker
  • John Vispisiano, News and Mail Deliverer's Union (NMDU) business agent for The New York Post
  • Vincent DiSario, Director of Circulation
  • Anthony Turzio,
  • Michael Diana, News and Mail Deliverer's Union (NMDU) business agent for The New York Post
  • Leo D'Angelo, general foreman at Metropolitan News Company affiliate
  • James Galante,
  • Jackie Piervencenti, Assistant delivery foreman
  • Thomas Carrube, Assistant delivery foreman
  • Joseph Torre, Citiwide News Corporation agent
  • Joseph Steo, newspaper distribution foreman
  • Anthony Michele, Director of Circulation
  • Gerard Bilboa, newspaper distribution foreman
  • Corey Ellenthal, newspaper distribution foreman
  • Michael Fago, newspaper distribution foreman

Robert Perrino a. ... Mugshot of former Bonanno family capo Albert Al Walker Embarrato. ... Joseph DAmico born (Lower East Side, Manhattan c. ... Richard Cantarella Lower East Side, Manhattan c. ... Paul Cantarella born Lower East Side, Manhattan is the son of Richard Cantarella and Lauretta Castelli and related to Bonanno crime family soldiers, Albert Embarrato, Anthony Mirra, Joseph DAmico, Joseph Padavano and Frank Cantarella. ... Anthony Vitale is an Italian-American Bonanno crime family associate and is the son of Bonanno crime family underboss Salvatore Vitale and nephew of Bonanno crime family don Joseph Massino from Little Italy, Brooklyn. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Joseph Paul Torre (born July 18, 1940 in Brooklyn, New York) is the manager of the New York Yankees and a former Major League Baseball player in the National League for the Milwaukee/Atlanta Braves, St. ...

See also

The Fox News Channel (FNC), sometimes called Fox News or even just Fox, is a United States-based cable and satellite news channel. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born, American citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: NWS, LSE: NCRA) is one of the worlds largest media conglomerates. ... The media of New York City is internationally influential, with some of the most important newspapers, largest publishing houses, most prolific television studios, and biggest record companies in the world. ... Phil Mushnick is a sportswriter who writes a sports media column for the New York Post. ...

References

  1. ^ "Circulation at the Top 20 Newspapers", The Associated Press, 2007-04-30. Retrieved on 2007-04-30. 
  2. ^ a b 2007 Top 100 Daily Newspapers in the U.S. by Circulation (PDF). BurrellesLuce (2007-03-31). Retrieved on 2007-05-28.
  3. ^ Michael & Edward Emery, The Press and America, 7th edition, Simon & Schuster, 1992, p. 74
  4. ^ Top 200 Newspapers by Largest Reported Circulation. Audit Bureau of Circulation (September 30, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-03-07.
  5. ^ Allan Nevins, The Evening Post: Century of Journalism, Boni and Liveright, 1922, p. 17
  6. ^ Nevins, p. [14 INSERT TITLE]. Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  7. ^ Emery & Emery, op. cit.
  8. ^ Nevins, pp. [17-18 INSERT TITLE]. Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  9. ^ Emery & Emery, op. cit.
  10. ^ Emery & Emery, p. 90
  11. ^ Nevins, p. [341 INSERT TITLE]. Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  12. ^ Nevins, p. [438 INSERT TITLE]. Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  13. ^ Webster's Biographical Dictionary, G. & C. Miriam Co., 1964, p. 1522
  14. ^ Christopher Robert Reed, The Chicago NAACP and the Rise of Black Professional Leadership, 1910-1966, Indiana University Press, 1997, p. 10
  15. ^ Emery & Emery, p. 257
  16. ^ New York Newspapers and Editors. Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  17. ^ ketupa.net media profiles: curtis. Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  18. ^ Ibid.
  19. ^ Ibid.
  20. ^ Emery & Emery, p. 292
  21. ^ Deborah G. Felder & Diana L. Rosen, Fifty Jewish Women Who Changed the World, Citadel Press, 2003, p. 164
  22. ^ "Dolly's Goodbye," Time Magazine, 31 January 1949. Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  23. ^ Emery & Emery, p. 556
  24. ^ "News Corp: Historical Overview," The Hollywood Reporter, 14 November, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  25. ^ Emery & Emery, op cit.
  26. ^ Neil Hickey, "Moment of Truth," Columbia Journalism Review, January/February 2004. Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  27. ^ Ibid.
  28. ^ Ibid.
  29. ^ "ABS Credit Migrations," Nomura Fixed Income Research, 5 March 2002, p. 20 (PDF). Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  30. ^ Bob Fenster, Duh! The Stupid History of the Human Race, McMeel, 2000, p. 13
  31. ^ Hickey, op cit.
  32. ^ Anthony Bianco, "Profitless Paper in Relentless Pursuit," Business Week, Feb. 21, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  33. ^ Columbia Journalism Review, volume 18 number 5 (Jan/Feb 1980), page 22-23.
  34. ^ The New York Times. "Page Six, Staple of Gossip, Reports on Its Own Tale", 2007-05-19. Retrieved on 2007-05-19. 
  35. ^ The New York Times. "Page Six, Staple of Gossip, Reports on Its Own Tale", 2007-05-19. Retrieved on 2007-05-19. 
  36. ^ Jonathan Trichter, "Tabloids, Broadsheets, and Broadcast News," Pace Poll Survey Research Study, 16 June 2004 (PDF). Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  37. ^ Paul H.B. Shin, "Post's 'Wok' Head No Joke to Asians," New York Daily News, 22 April 2006. Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  38. ^Bill Snares Osama GuyNew York Times Blog February 14, 2007, The Empire Zone. Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  39. ^ BILL SNARES OBAMA GUY, New York Post, By-Maggie Haberman, February 14, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  40. ^ CORRECTION, New York Post, February 15, 2007"Due to an editing mistake, a small number of copies of yesterday's Post carried a headline referring to "Osama" over a story about Sen. Barack Obama on Page 2. The Post regrets the error."
  41. ^ Presidential Candidate Barack Obama Educated At Radical Islamist School, Oh, Wait. No, That's Not True... But Let's Pretend He Was Anyway, Your New Reality, Tuesday, January 23, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  42. ^ "Osama" Mud Flies at Obama, New York Post, By Maggie Haberman, January 20, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  43. ^ Marvin Traub, Like No Other Store...:The Bloomingdale's Legend and the Revolution in American Marketing, Crown, 1993
  44. ^ [1]
  45. ^ [2]

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 7 is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... The Columbia Journalism Review (CJR) is an American magazine for professional journalists published bimonthly by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism since 1961. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ...

Further reading

  • The Post's New York : Celebrating 200 Years of New York City As Seen Through the Pages and Pictures of the New York Post, 2001
  • The Last Godfather: The Rise and Fall of Joey Massino by Simon Crittle

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
BIGpedia - New York Post - Encyclopedia and Dictionary Online (587 words)
The New York Post is the oldest continuously-published newspaper in the United States.
As Steven D. Cuozzo, the Post executive editor, sees it, it was the Post that "broke the elitist media stranglehold on the national agenda." Post supporters cite a series of recent scandals at the supposedly-reputable broadsheet New York Times as proof that this problem is scarcely unique to the Post.
The Post was repurchased in 1988 by Murdoch's News Corporation, after his receiving American citizenship ended any restriction upon his ownership of U.S. media.
ABC News: New York Post: Gossip Writer Suspended (498 words)
A gossip writer for the New York Post has been suspended pending the outcome of a federal investigation into whether he tried to extort money from Burkle, the newspaper said.
NEW YORK Apr 7, 2006 (AP)— A gossip writer for the New York Post has been suspended pending a federal investigation into whether he tried to extort money from a billionaire California financier, the newspaper reported Friday.
Stern's conduct would be morally and journalistically reprehensible, a gross abuse of privilege, and in violation of the New York Post's standards and ethics," editor in chief Col Allen said in a statement.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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