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Encyclopedia > New York Navy Yard

The New York Naval Shipyard (NYNSY), also known as the Brooklyn Navy Yard, the New York Navy Yard and United States Navy Yard, New York, is located 1.7 miles northeast of the Battery on the Brooklyn side of the East River in Wallabout Basin, a semicircular bend of the East River. For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... This entry is about the East River in New York City. ...


The Navy Yard was established by the federal government in 1801. By the American Civil War, the Yard had expanded to employ about 6000 men. On the eve of World War II, the yard contained more than five miles (8 km) of paved streets, four drydocks ranging in length from 326 to 700 feet (99 to 213 meters), two steel shipways, and six pontoons and cylindrical floats for salvage work, barracks for marines, a power plant, a large radio station, and a railroad spur, as well as the expected foundries, machine shops, and warehouses. In 1938 the Yard employed about ten thousand men, of whom one-third were Works Progress Administration (WPA) workers. At its peak, during World War II, the Yard employed 70,000 people, 24 hours a day. 1801 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons like the atom bomb World War II, also known as the Second World War, was by far the bloodiest, most expensive, and most significant war in... 1938 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Works Progress Administration (later Works Projects Administration, abbreviated WPA), was created on May 6, 1935 with the signing of Executive Order 7034. ... World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons like the atom bomb World War II, also known as the Second World War, was by far the bloodiest, most expensive, and most significant war in...


The Yard was the site for the construction of Robert Fulton's steam frigate, Fulton, launched in 1815. In 1890, USS Maine (ACR-1) was launched from the Yard's ways. In 1937 the battleship North Carolina (BB-55) was laid down. The battleship Iowa (BB-61) was completed in 1942. On January 12, 1953, test operations began on USS Antietam (CVA-36) which emerged in December 1952 from the Yard as America's first angled-deck aircraft carrier. Robert Fulton Fultons monster, the Clermont or North River Steamer Robert Fulton (November 14, 1765 – February 24, 1815) was an US engineer and inventor widely credited with developing the first steam-powered ship. ... Frigate is a name which has been used for several distinct types of warships at different times. ... The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1890 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The first USS Maine (ACR-1), a 6682-ton second-class battleship of the United States Navy, was originally designated as Armored Cruiser #1. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... 1937 was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... HMS Victory in 1884 In naval history, battleships were the most heavily armed and armored warships afloat. ... The third USS North Carolina (BB-55) was a United States Navy battleship, the lead ship of her class. ... USS Iowa (BB-61), the lead ship of her class of dreadnought battleship, was the fourth ship of the United States Navy, but second to be commissioned, to be named in honor of the 29th state. ... This article is about the year. ... January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1953 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... The second Antietam (CV-36) was laid down on 15 March 1943 by the Philadelphia Navy Yard; launched on 20 August 1944 sponsored by Mrs. ... 1952 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... An aircraft carrier is a warship whose main role is to deploy and recover aircraft—in effect acting as a sea-going airbase. ...


The Navy decommissioned the Yard in 1966 and sold it to the City of New York. It then became an area of private manufacturing and commercial activity. Now the Yard has over 200 tenants with more than 3500 employees, and is managed and operated by the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation for the City of New York. 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (link goes to calendar) // Events January January 1 - In a coup, Colonel Jean-Bédel Bokassa ousts president David Dacko and takes over the Central African Republic. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, the most densely populated major city in North America, and is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture. ... -1...


The Yard has three piers, owned by the City of New York and operated by Seatrain Shipbuilding and Coastal Drydock and Repair Corporation, and a total of 10 berths ranging from 350 to 890 feet long, with ten-foot deck height and 25 to 40 feet (7 to 12 meters) of depth alongside. A Federal project maintains a channel depth of 35 feet (10 m) from Throgs Neck to the Yard, about two miles from the western entrance, and thence 40 feet (12 m) of depth to the deep water in the Upper Bay. Current in the East River is strong and congestion is heavy. Access to the piers requires passage under the Manhattan Bridge (a suspension span with a clearance of 134 feet or 41 m) and the Brooklyn Bridge (a suspension span with a clearance of 127 feet or 39 m). Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, the most densely populated major city in North America, and is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture. ... Throgs Neck, shown in red, in the Bronx, New York City Throgs Neck (sometimes spelled Throggs Neck) is a narrow spit of land in the southeastern Bronx in New York City. ... View from the East River Cross section The Manhattan Bridge is a suspension bridge that crosses the East River in New York City, connecting Lower Manhattan with Brooklyn. ... View from the East River (2002) Plan of one tower for the Brooklyn Bridge, 1867. ...


External Links

  • The Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation
  • Google Maps Satellite Image

  Results from FactBites:
 
New York Navy Yard (374 words)
The New York Naval Shipyard (NYNSY), also known as the Brooklyn Navy Yard, the New York Navy Yard and United States Navy Yard, New York, is located 1.7 miles northeast of the Battery on the Brooklyn side of the East River in Wallabout Basin, a semicircular bend of the East River.
The Navy Yard was established by the federal government in 1801.
Now the Yard has over 200 tenants with more than 3500 employees, and is managed and operated by the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation for the City of New York.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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