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Encyclopedia > New York Marble Cemetery

The New York Marble Cemetery (0.5 acres) is a cemetery is located in the center of the block between East 2nd and 3rd Streets, Second Avenue, and the Bowery in the East Village, Manhattan, New York City. It should not be confused with the nearby New York City Marble Cemetery which is entirely separate and established one year later. Graves at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York A cemetery is a place in which dead bodies and cremated remains are buried. ... Looking south from 6th Street down Second Avenue, one of the main thoroughfares through the East Village. ... The Borough of Manhattan, highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham, NYC Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1613  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ...


The cemetery opened on July 13, 1830, as a commercial undertaking, and is the city's oldest nonsectarian cemetery. Its entrance consists of a narrow passageway with iron gate from Second Avenue. The grounds contain 156 underground vaults, made of Tuckahoe marble, without monuments, laid out in three broad avenues of some 200 feet in length, with crosswalks about 85 feet long.


The cemetery is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Some 1,500 burials are recorded, many of well-known families from New York history. Notable graves include those for John Lloyd Stephens (author of Incidents of Travel in Egypt, Arabia Petraea, and the Holy Land), and Benjamin Wright, Chief Engineer for the Erie Canal. A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... John Lloyd Stephens in 1839 John Lloyd Stephens (November 28, 1805–October 13, 1852) was an American explorer, writer, and diplomat. ... The Erie Canal (currently part of the New York State Canal System) is a canal in New York State, United States, that runs from the Hudson River to Lake Erie, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ...


References

  • Matthew A. Postal, Andrew S. Dolkart, Guide to New York City Landmarks, New York (N.Y.). Landmarks Preservation Commission, John Wiley and Sons, 2003, page 56. ISBN 0471369004.
  • Charles Burr Todd, In Olde New York: Sketches of Old Times and Places in Both the State and the City, New York : The Grafton Press, 1907, page 29.
  • Find-A-Grave

 
 

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