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Encyclopedia > New York Herald Tribune

The New York Herald Tribune was a newspaper created in 1924 when the New York Tribune acquired the New York Herald. The Herald Tribune was a leading Republican paper, and a voice for moderate "internationalist" Republicans as opposed to the "isolationist" variety represented by the Chicago Tribune. With a nation-wide readership, the "Herald Tribune" was a respected and influential paper, often rivaling The New York Times in the quality of its reporting. It was home to respected writers like Dorothy Thompson, Red Smith, and Walter Kerr. 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The New York Tribune was established by Horace Greeley in 1841 and was long considered one of the leading newspapers in the United States. ... The New York Herald was a large distribution newspaper based in New York City that existed between May 6, 1835 and 1924. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... The Chicago Tribune, formerly self-styled as the Worlds Greatest Newspaper, remains one of the principal daily newspapers of the midwestern United States. ... The New York Times is a newspaper published in New York City by Arthur O. Sulzberger Jr. ... Disambiguation:- (Dorothy Thompson (nee Towers) (1923- ) is also the historian wife of the late E. P. Thompson; she is a leading expert on the Chartist movement. ... Walter Wellesley Red Smith (September 25, 1905 in Green Bay, Wisconsin - January 15, 1982 in Stamford, Connecticut) was an American sportswriter who rose to become Americas most widely read sportwriter. ... Walter Kerr (July 8, 1913 – October 9, 1996) was an American writer and Broadway theater critic. ...


Origins

The New York Herald and the New York Tribune were established in 1835 and 1841, respectively. The papers were very different: The Herald was a penny press newspaper whose editor, James Gordon Bennett was a firm Democrat and a pioneer of crime-reporting. The Tribune, founded by Horace Greeley, was a Whig (and later Republican) newspaper sold as a sober alternative to some of the excesses of the penny press. Penny press newspapers were cheap, tabloid-style papers produced in the middle of the 19th century. ... James Gordon Bennett (1795-1872)- biography unavailable at this time. ... Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811–November 29, 1872) was an American editor of a leading newspaper, a founder of the Republican party, reformer and politician. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ...


It is worth noting that in 1851, The New York Herald, during Horace Greeley's prominence had on its payroll one London correspondent Karl Marx who earned five dollars per installment. Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811–November 29, 1872) was an American editor of a leading newspaper, a founder of the Republican party, reformer and politician. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818, Trier, Germany – March 14, 1883, London) was an immensely influential German philosopher, political economist, and socialist revolutionary. ...


The Herald was the largest circulation newspaper in New York City until the 1880s (when Joseph Pulitzer's World over took it), while the Tribune's weekly publication was circulated throughout the United States. Joseph Pulitzer Joseph Joe Pulitzer (April 10, 1847 – October 29, 1911) was an American publisher best known for posthumously establishing the Pulitzer Prizes and (along with William Randolph Hearst) for originating yellow journalism. ... The New York World was a newspaper published in New York from 1860 until 1931. ...


The Tribune went into decline in the 1870s, after Greeley died. The paper was taken over by Whitelaw Reid, who used it to further his ambitions in the Republican Party; circulation gradually declined under his leadership. The Herald, taken over by James Gordon Bennett, Jr. in 1867, continued to perform well through the century. Bennett had a strong committment to international news, and financed Henry Stanley's expedition to find David Livingstone. He later founded the Paris Herald as an English-language paper for the continent. Whitelaw Reid (October 27, 1837 - December 15, 1912) was a U.S. politician and newspaper editor. ... James Gordon Bennett, Jr. ... See: Henry Stanley, 4th Earl of Derby (1531-1593) Henry Morton Stanley This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... David Livingstone David Livingstone (19 March 1813 – 1 May 1873) was a Scottish medical missionary and explorer of the Victorian era, now best remembered because of his meeting with Henry Morton Stanley which gave rise to the popular quotation, // Victoria Falls In the period 1852–56, he explored the African... The International Herald Tribune (www. ...


Bennett moved permanently to Paris in 1877 following a scandal in New York: The publisher, arriving drunk at a party at his fiancee's parents' mansion, reportedly urinated in the fireplace or the piano (the exact location differed in witness' memories). The engagement was broken off, and Bennett remained a bachelor into his 70s. Despite the move, Bennett continued to direct New York operations, usually by telegram, and his distance hurt the overall quality of the paper.


20th Century and merger

Whitelaw Reid died in 1912 and was succeeded as publisher by his son, Ogden Mills Reid. The younger Reid devoted more time and resources to his newspaper, and gradually started increasing circulation. Bennett died in 1918, and his paper was sold to Frank Munsey, an inveterate collector of publications who developed a reputation for selling or merging newspapers, to the animus of the newspapermen around the country. Whitelaw Reid (October 27, 1837 - December 15, 1912) was a U.S. politician and newspaper editor. ... Frank Andrew Munsey (21 August 1854, Mercer, Maine, U.S. - 22 December 1925, New York City) was an American newspaper and magazine publisher and author. ...


Neither the Herald nor the Tribune was doing well in the 1920s, but the Herald, with its larger circulation, was in better shape than the Tribune. A merger was expected, with the widespread belief that the larger paper would absorb the smaller one. It came as a surprise, then, when Reid purchased the Herald from Munsey in 1924: At the Herald, a sign was hung up that said "Jonah just swallowed the whale."


New York Herald Tribune

The newly merged paper was not profitable, and the Reid family had to subsidize the paper in its first few years of existence. But the Herald Tribune quickly began establishing a reputation as a "newspaperman's newspaper," with literary writing encouraged by city editor Stanley Walker. After losing $650,000 in 1932, the Herald Tribune turned a marginal profit the following year, and would remain relatively healthy for the next two decades.


After the death of publisher Ogden Mills Reid in 1947, the Herald Tribune, despite some star writers and columnists, went into a decline under his widow Helen Rogers Reid, and sons Whitelaw Reid II and Ogden R. Reid (later a Congressman). In 1958 the Reids sold control to John Hay Whitney. Under Whitney, the paper regained some of its lustre, deciding that since it could not compete with the Times in sheer volume of news it would be faster, feistier and funnier. In this period the Herald Tribune was radically re-designed, and new writers like Tom Wolfe were encouraged to contribute. But the key to success was still advertising dollars, and on that count the Times was the leader. A series of strikes throughout the sixties did not help the paper's balance sheet. 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Ogden Rogers Reid (born June 24, 1925) was a member of the House of Representatives. ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Hay Jock Whitney (b. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


In 1966 Whitney attempted to organize what would have been New York's first joint operating agreement with the Hearst-owned New York Journal American and the Scripps-owned New York World-Telegram and Sun; under the proposed agreement, the Herald Tribune world have continued publication as the morning partner and a merged Journal-American and World-Telegram would have been the afternoon paper. The JOA was to take effect on May 1, 1966, but the unions immediately threw up a strike, and as the months dragged on, a compromise three-way merger was arrived at on August 15. 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... The Joint Operating Agreement as an agreement between The Seattle Times Company and the New York-based Hearst Corporation, owners of The Seattle Times and Seattle Post-Intelligencer (Seattle P-I), respectively. ... The Hearst Corporation is a large privately-held media conglomerate based in New York City. ... The New York Journal American was a newspaper purchased by William Randolph Hearst in 1895 (at the time called the New York Morning Journal, then the New York Journal). ... Edward W. Scripps was a United States publisher and media financier. ... The New York World-Telegram was formed by the 1931 merger of the New York World, formerly owned by Joseph Pulitzer and sold to Scripps Howard in 1930, and the Evening Telegram. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ...


The result was the short-lived afternoon New York World Journal Tribune. The first weeks' editions were dominated by the input of the Hearst and Scripps papers, but after a time, the "Widget" (as the merged publication was nicknamed) took on the appearance and style of the late-era Herald Tribune. But the paper was not a success, and folded for good on May 5, 1967. The New York World Journal Tribune was a newspaper that grew out of an attempt to save several historic New York City newspapers by a merger in 1966. ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ...


Following the collapse of the World Journal Tribune, the New York Times and Washington Post became joint owners with Whitney of the Herald Tribune's European edition, the International Herald Tribune, which is still published. New York Magazine is also a descendent of the Herald Tribune, having originally been the Herald Tribune's Sunday magazine, a livelier version of the New York Times Magazine. Following the death of the World Journal Tribune, New York Magazine editor Clay Felker organized a group of investors who bought the name and rights, and successfully revived the weekly in 1968. The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... ... World map showing Europe Political map Europe is one of the seven continents of Earth which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiographic one, leading to various perspectives about Europes borders. ... The International Herald Tribune (www. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ...


In the movie Á Bout De Souffle by Jean-Luc Godard, Jean Seberg's character famously sells the New York Herald Tribune along the Champs-Élysées. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Jean-Luc Godard. ... Jean Seberg (November 13, 1938 - September 8, 1979) was an American actress who spent an important part of her career in France. ... The Champs-Elysées (pronounced , literally the Elysian fields) is a broad avenue in the French capital, Paris. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
New York Herald Tribune - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (980 words)
The Herald Tribune was a leading Republican paper, and a voice for moderate "internationalist" Republicans as opposed to the "isolationist" variety represented by the Chicago Tribune.
The Herald was the largest circulation newspaper in New York City until the 1880s (when Joseph Pulitzer's World over took it), while the Tribune's weekly publication was circulated throughout the United States.
New York Magazine is also a descendent of the Herald Tribune, having originally been the Herald Tribune's Sunday magazine, a livelier version of the New York Times Magazine.
New York Herald - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (396 words)
The New York Herald was a large distribution newspaper based in New York City that existed between May 6, 1835 and 1924.
After Gordon Bennett's death, the New York Herald was merged with its bitter rival, the New York Tribune, in 1922.
When the Herald was still under the authority of its original publisher Bennett, it was considered to be the most invading and sensationalist of the leading New York papers at the time.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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