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Encyclopedia > New York City Police Department
New York City Police Department
Common name New York Police Department
Abbreviation NYPD
Motto Fidelis ad Mortem
Faithful Till Death
Agency Overview
Formed 1845
Preceding agency
  • Municipal Police
Legal personality Governmental agency
Jurisdictional Structure
Divisional agency City of New York in the State of New York , United States
General nature
Operational Structure
Sworn members 36,127 (November, 2007)
Elected officer responsible
Agency executive
Units
Boroughs
Facilities
Precincts 76
Police boats 9
Helicopters 7
Website
http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd

The New York City Police Department (NYPD), which was established in 1845, is currently the largest police force in North America, with primary responsibilities in law enforcement and investigation within the five boroughs of New York City. The NYPD is considered to be one of the first "modern" style police departments in the United States along with the Boston Police Department. N.Y.P.D. can refer to: a television crime drama the New York City Police Department This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... NYPD Blue was an Emmy Award-winning hour long-running American television police drama set in New York City. ... Image File history File links Nypdpatch. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... New York, New York redirects here. ... For other uses, see State (disambiguation). ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Law Enforcement Agency (LEA) is a generic term used for local and state police, as well as federal agencies (such as the FBI, the BATF, DHS, Europol, Interpol, etc. ... Raymond Walter Kelly (born September 4, 1941) is the current Commissioner of the New York City Police Department (NYPD) and the first person to hold the post for two nonconsecutive tenures. ... Commissioner is a designation that may be used for a variety of official positions, especially referring to a high-ranking public (administrative or police) official, or an analogous official in the private sector (e. ... Chief of Police is the title typically given to the head of a police department, particularly in the United States and Canada. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... The Five Boroughs redirects here. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Current BPD Uniform Patch The Boston Police Department (BPD) has the primary responsibility for law enforcement and investigation within the city of Boston, Massachusetts. ...

Contents

Overview

The NYPD has a broad array of specialized services, including tactical operations, K-9, harbor patrol, air support, bomb disposal, counter-terrorism, intelligence, anti-gang, narcotics, public transportation, and public housing. NYPD has extensive crime scene investigation and laboratory resources, as well as units which assist with computer crime investigations. The NYPD's headquarters houses an anticrime computer network, essentially a large search engine and data warehouse operated by detectives to assist officers in the field with their investigations.[1] According to the department, its mission is to "enforce the laws, preserve the peace, reduce fear, and provide for a safe environment." Police dog getting ready to search a vehicle for drugs A policemans dog is a dog that is trained specifically to assist police and similar law-enforcement personnel with their work. ... Criminal intelligence is information gathered, collated and disseminated by law enforcement agencies concerning types of crime and particular criminals and criminal groups. ... Mara Salvatrucha suspect bearing gang tattoos is handcuffed. ... 19th century Heroin bottle This article is about the drug classification. ... A local authority tower block in Cwmbrân, South Wales Public housing or project homes are forms of housing tenure in which the property is owned by a government authority, which may be central or local. ... A crime scene is a location where an illegal act took place such as molestation, rape or illegal turnip smoking, and comprises the area from which most of the physical evidence is retrieved by [[forensics|forensic scientists] for example the reknowned criminal investigator and skilled forensic scientist, who is unfortunately... Computer crime, cybercrime, e-crime, hi-tech crime or electronic crime generally refers to criminal activity where a computer or network is the source, tool, target, or place of a crime. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ...


The New York City Transit Police and Housing Police were fully integrated into the NYPD in 1995; Police officers are randomly assigned to the Transit and Housing units upon graduation of the police academy.[citation needed] Members of the NYPD are frequently referred to by the nickname New York's Finest. The NYPD is headquartered at One Police Plaza located on Park Row across the street from City Hall. Established in 1935, the New York City Transit Police Department was responsible for the protection of New York City Subway lines for 60 years. ... The New York City Police Department Housing Bureau is responsible for providing the security and delivery of police services to about 420,000 people using public housing throughout New York City. ... Park Row, circa 1900 Park Row is a street located in Lower Manhattan; during the late 1800s, it was nicknamed Newspaper Row due to most of New York Citys Newspapers located on the street. ... ...


The size of the force has fluctuated, depending on crime rates, politics, and available funding. The overall trend, however, shows that the number of sworn officers is decreasing. In June 2004, there were about 40,000 sworn officers plus several thousand support staff; In June 2005, that number dropped to 35,000. As of November 2007, it had increased to slightly over 36,000 with the graduation of several classes from the Police Academy. The NYPD's current authorized uniformed strength is 37,838.[2] There are also an approximate 4,500 Auxiliary Police Officers, 5,000 School Safety Agents, 2,300 Traffic Agents, and 370 Traffic Agent Supervisors. The New York City Police Department Auxiliary Police is an unpaid volunteer police force which acts as a unit of the New York City Police Department. ...

The NYPD flag.

Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ...

History

The New York City Police Department was established in 1845. At the time, New York City's population of 320,000 was served by an archaic force, consisting of one night watch, one hundred city marshals, thirty-one constables, and fifty-one police officers.[3] Peter Cooper, at request of the Common Council, drew up a proposal to create a police force of 1,200 officers. John Watts de Peyster was an early advocate of implementing military style discipline and organization to the force.[4]The state legislature approved the proposal which authorized creation of a police force on May 7, 1844, along with abolition of the nightwatch system.[3] Under Mayor William Havemeyer, the NYPD was reorganized on May 13, 1845, with the city divided into three districts, with courts, magistrates, and clerks, and station houses set up.[3] The NYPD was closely modeled after the Metropolitan Police Service in London, which in turn used a military-like organizational structure, with rank and order. Peter Cooper (February 12, 1791 – April 4, 1883) was an American industrialist, inventor, philanthropist, and candidate for President of the United States. ... Common Council may refer to: Buffalo Common Council, the legislative branch of the Buffalo, NY City Government Los Angeles Common Council, the predecessor of the Los Angeles City Council which serves the City of Los Angeles, California today Category: ... For his son, see John Watts de Peyster Jr. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... Night Watch or Nightwatch can refer to: Night Watch, a painting by Rembrandt Night Watch, a novel in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series Night Watch, a novel in Sergey Lukyanenkos Watch trilogy Night Watch, a fictional intelligence organization in the science fiction television series Babylon 5 Nightwatch, an album... William Frederick Havemeyer (1804-1874) The death of William Havemeyer, originally appearing as Sudden Death of the Hon. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) is the name currently used by the territorial police force which is responsible for Greater London other than the City of London (the responsibility of the City of London Police). ...


In 1857, a new Metropolitan police force was established and the Municipal police abolished. The Metropolitan police bill consolidated the police in New York, Brooklyn, Staten Island, and Westchester County (which then included The Bronx), under a governor-appointed board of commissioners.[5] Mayor Fernando Wood and the Municipals, unwilling to be abolished, resisted for several months. This article is about the New York City borough, or Kings County, New York. ... This article is about the borough in New York City. ... Westchester County is a suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... For other uses, see The Bronx (disambiguation). ... Fernando Wood (June 14, 1812–February 14, 1881) is famous for being one of the most colorful mayors in the history of New York City. ...


Throughout the years, the NYPD has been involved with a number of riots in New York City. In July 1863, the New York State Militias were absent to aid Union troops, when the 1863 Draft Riots broke out, leaving the police who were outnumbered to quell the riots.[6] The Tompkins Square Riot occurred on January 13, 1874 when police crushed a demonstration involving thousands of unemployed in Tompkins Square Park.[7] Newspapers, including The New York Times, covered numerous cases of police brutality during the latter part of the 19th century. Cases often involved officers using clubs to beat suspects and persons who were drunk or rowdy, posed a challenge to officers' authority, or refused to move along down the street. Most cases of police brutality occurred in poor immigrant neighborhoods, including Five Points, the Lower East Side, and Tenderloin.[8] New York Guard MPs on post in New York City. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Combatants Anti-Union rioters United States of America Commanders Unknown John E. Wool Casualties 100 civilians The New York Draft Riots (July 13 to July 16, 1863; known at the time as Draft Week[1]) were a series of violent disturbances in New York City that were the culmination of... The Tompkins Square Park Riot occurred on January 13, 1874 when police crushed a demonstration involving thousands of unemployed in New York Citys Tompkins Square Park, located in the East Village. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... CIA figures for world unemployment rates, 2006 Unemployment is the state in which a person is without work, available to work, and is currently seeking work. ... Tompkins Square Park is a 10. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... January 31 1919: David Kirkwood on the ground after being struck by batons of the Glasgow police Police brutality is a term used to describe the excessive use of physical force, assault, verbal attacks, and threats by police officers and other law enforcement officers. ... “Truncheon” redirects here. ... Five Points may refer to any of several small census-recognized communities in the U.S.: Five Points, Alabama Five Points, Florida Five Points, North Carolina Five Points, Ohio Five Points, Pennsylvania Five Points may also refer to various U.S. neighborhoods: Five Points (Athens), in Athens, Georgia Five Points... Categories: Manhattan neighborhoods | Stub ... Tenderloin was a neighborhood of the West Side of Manhattan north and east of Chelsea on the far West Side, which stretched south to West 14th Street and up to West 57th Street, from the mid 1800s to the 1920s. ...


Beginning in the 1870s, politics and corruption of Tammany Hall, a political machine supported by Irish immigrants infiltrated the NYPD, which was used as political tool, with positions awarded by politicians to loyalists. Many officers and leaders in the police department took bribes from local businesses, overlooking things like illegal liquor sales. Police also served political purposes such as manning polling places, where they would turn a blind eye to ballot box stuffing and other acts of fraud.[8] Tammany Hall was the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in controlling New York City politics from the 1790s to the 1960s. ... In this 1899 cartoon from Puck, all of New York City politics revolves around boss Richard Croker A political machine is an unofficial system of a political organization based on patronage, the spoils system, behind-the-scenes control, and longstanding political ties within the structure of a representative democracy. ... A politician is an individual involved in politics, sometimes this may include political scientists. ... Bribery is the practice of offering a professional money or other favours in order to circumvent ethics in a variety of professions. ...

Former HQ at Mulberry and Broome Streets
Former HQ at Mulberry and Broome Streets

The Lexow Committee was established in 1894 to investigate corruption in the police department.[9] The committee made reform recommendations, including the suggestion that the police department adopt a civil service system. Around the turn of the century, the NYPD began to professionalize under leadership of then Police Commissioner, Theodore Roosevelt. The NYPD also began to emphasize training, and took advantage of technological innovations such as fingerprinting. Lexow Committee (1894 - 1895). ... The Roman civil service in action. ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... This article is about human fingerprints. ...


The economic downturn of the 1970s led to some extremely difficult times for the city. The Bronx, in particular, was plagued by arson, and an atmosphere of lawlessness permeated the city. In addition, the city's financial crisis led to a hiring freeze on all city departments, including the NYPD, from 1976 to 1980. For other uses, see Bronx (disambiguation). ... The Skyline Parkway Motel in Afton, Virginia after an arson fire on July 9, 2004. ...


This was followed by the crack epidemic of the late 1980s and early 1990s that was one factor that caused the city's homicide rate to soar to an all-time high. By 1990, New York set a record of 2,262 murders, a record that has yet to be broken by any US major city. Petty thefts associated with drug addiction were also increasingly common. For other uses, see Cocaine (disambiguation). ...


In 1993, Mayor David Dinkins appointed the Mollen Commission, chaired by Milton Mollen, to investigate corruption in the department. The commission found that "Today's corruption is not the corruption of Knapp Commission days. Corruption then was largely a corruption of accommodation, of criminals and police officers giving and taking bribes, buying and selling protection. Corruption was, in its essence, consensual. Today's corruption is characterized by brutality, theft, abuse of authority and active police criminality."[citation needed] David Norman Dinkins (born July 10, 1927 in Trenton, New Jersey) was the Mayor of New York City from 1990 through 1993, being the first and to date only African American to hold that office. ... The Mollen Commission is formally known as The City of New York Commission to Investigate Allegations of Police Corruption and the Anti-Corruption Procedures of the Police Department. ...


In the 1990s, under Mayor Rudy Giuliani, the NYPD oversaw a large reduction in crime across the city, which has been attributed to the NYPD's implementation of CompStat under Bill Bratton, broken windows policing, as well as general demographic changes, and subsiding of the crack cocaine epidemic. Rudolph William Louis Giuliani III, (born May 28, 1944) is an American lawyer, prosecutor, businessman, and Republican politician from the state of New York. ... CompStat - or COMPSTAT - (short for COMPuter STATistics or COMParative STATistics) is the name given to the New York City Police Departments accountability process. ... William J. Bratton is the chief of the Los Angeles Police Department. ... Fixing Broken Windows: Restoring Order and Reducing Crime in Our Communities by George L. Kelling and Catherine Coles is a sociology book about petty urban crime and strategies to contain it. ... A pile of crack cocaine ‘rocks’. Crack cocaine is a solid, smokeable form of cocaine and is a highly addictive drug popular for its intense psychoactive high. ...


On September 11, 2001, 23 NYPD officers were killed when the World Trade Center collapsed due to terrorist attacks. More lives were lost that year than in any other year in the department's history. A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... For other uses, see World Trade Center (disambiguation). ...


Gun control problems in the city came to the forefront during the last two weeks of 2005, when two officers were shot to death by criminals using illegal weapons. Most of these weapons come from the South, through Interstate 95 which has been called the "iron pipeline".[10] Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 95 Interstate 95 (I-95) is the main highway on the East Coast of the United States,[1] paralleling the Atlantic Ocean from Maine to Florida and serving some of the best-known cities in the country including Boston, New York City, and...


Allegations of police misconduct and the Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB)

Over the years, NYPD officers have come under public scrutiny with allegations of corruption, brutality, excessive use of force, and poor firearm discipline. Individual incidents have tended to receive more publicity; a portion of which have been substantiated while others have not. The Knapp Commission in the 1970s, and the Mollen Commission in 1994 have led to reforms within the NYPD aimed to improve police accountability. However in recent years, likely due to low salaries and declining morale, many more off-duty NYPD officers are being arrested and charged in and outside the city for crimes ranging from drunk driving to homicide. [11] The Civilian Complaint Review Board is an all-civilian board tasked with investigating civil complaints about alleged misconduct on the part of the New York Police Department. ... The Knapp Commission (officially known as the Commission to Investigate Alleged Police Corruption) stemmed from a five member panel initially formed in April 1970 by Mayor John V. Lindsay to investigate corruption within the New York City Police Department. ... The Mollen Commission is formally known as The City of New York Commission to Investigate Allegations of Police Corruption and the Anti-Corruption Procedures of the Police Department. ...


One of the department's most spectacular cases of corruption was that of Lt. Charles Becker, who holds the dubious distinction of being the only NYPD officer ever to die in the electric chair. Charles Becker (July 26, 1870 - July 30, 1915) was a New York police officer executed for allegedly ordering the murder of a Manhattan gambler, Herman Rosenthal. ... The electric chair is an execution method in which the person being put to death is strapped to a chair and electrocuted through electrodes placed on the body. ...


Due to repeated public outcry over these and many other incidents, specifically, the Tompkins Square Riot of the 1988, and the Crown Heights Riot, prompted the creation of the Civilian Complaint Review Board (known commonly by its acronym, the CCRB) in 1993, an independent investigative unit comprised of entirely civilian investigators (with some being former Members of Service), who investigate allegations of Force, Discourtesy, Offensive Language and Abuse of Authority made by members of the public against members of the NYPD. Complaints are made directly to the CCRB, through the city's 311 information system, online at nyc.gov/ccrb, or at any Precinct within the city limits. This was the third iteration (after an attempt by Mayor Lindsay and Mayor Koch before to create, "mixed," review boards), but was the first to employ an all civilian Board and investigative staff. [12]


The CCRB exits today as a fully independent civil department, staffed with 142 investigators and about a dozen miscellaneous employees. Additionally, three officers from the NYPD's Internal Affairs Bureau work with the CCRB at their office at 40 Rector Street as, "IAB Liason," officers, including a senior Detective Lieutenant. Their role is to provide the Investigators with access to certain restricted NYPD documentation quickly and efficiently without having to wait the lengthy processing period document requests normally take (sometimes outlasting the course of an investigation).


The agency is headed by the 13 board members, who defer day-to-day operational command to an Executive Director (currently Ms. Joan Thompson, as of September 18, 2007, formally Ms. Florence Finkle, Esq.), who is then followed by a newly created position called, "First Deputy Executive Director," which was formerly known as the Assistant Deputy Executive Director before that position was transformed into its new form. The Agency then separates into several divisions, the largest being the Investigative division, led by a Deputy Executive Director of Investigations, followed by five Assistant Deputy Executive Directors (a newly created series of positions, occupied by only one Assistant Deputy Executive Director, Mr. Dorsh, prior to his promotion).[13] The division is then broken down into 8 Investigative Teams, lead by an Investigative Manager, along with a Supervising Investigator and an Assistant Supervising Investigator. Promotions to Assistant Supervising Investigator and Supervising Investigator are not granted to Investigators based on tenure or results, but rather are arbitrarily chosen by senior management.[13] The remaining Investigators fall into Level I and Level II, which simply denotes tenure, experience and pay grade.


The agency is also broken down into an Administrative Division, which includes Human Resources, Information Management Unit and the Case Management Unit (which stores all records of past cases), amongst others, which is lead by the Deputy Executive Director of Administration. [13]There are then four other directorships, including the new, "Research and Strategic Initiatives Director," as well as the Mediation Unit Director. There is also an accomplished attorney, Mr. Ghram Daw, Esq., who serves as the Agency's legal counsel. These units compliment and serve the Investigations Unit, which acts as the main focal point of the Agency.[13]


Each complaint the agency receives is assessed by one of the Investigative Managers on a daily rotating basis, and has its merits checked for proper jurisdiction. Jurisdiction is first assessed by type of allegations. Only allegations that fall under the jurisdiction of the CCRB are investigated by the CCRB. These include Force, Abuse of Authority (which includes Stop and Questions, unauthorized searches and seizures, inappropriate entry onto property, etc.), Discourtesy (using foul language, acting rude, flashing rude gestures, etc.) and Offensive Language which is more specific than Discourtesy and includes racial slurs, ethnic slurs, sexist slurs, homophobic slurs and comments of that nature. Jurisdiction is also determined by the officers involved. As many types of officers work in the City of New York (such as the MTA Police, the Port Authority Police and the New York State Police), complainants encounter all of these officers in their day-to-day lives. Only incidents involving members of the NYPD are investigated by the CCRB. Cases that do not fall within the CCRB's jurisdiction are then forwarded to the respective jurisdiction (usually, the NYPD Internal Affairs Bureau, the Office of the Chief of Department or the respective organization in question, such as another police department).[14]


The cases are then assigned to one of 142 civilian investigators, who are members of one of 8 teams (as of 2006), who then attempts to contact the civilian who initially complained. After initial assignment, there are four conclusive dispositions that result only from a full investigation, and five other "miscellaneous," or inconclusive dispositions. These are Substantiated, Unsubstantiated, Exonerated and Unfounded along with Complainant Uncooperative, Complainant Unavailable, Officers Unidentified, Miscellaneous (i.e. the MOS has retired since the incident occurred) and Mediated, respectively.[15] If contact with the civilian complainant is not achieved after five contact attempts by telephone and two letters by mail, and the contact information is confirmed the case is automatically closed with a disposition of, "Complainant Uncooperative." If the civilian can not be located after a diligent search and/or did not provide accurate or correct contact information, the case is automatically closed as, "Complainant Unavailable." These types of cases are not considered, "full investigations," but are tallied together with the total number of complaints for statistical purposes. It should be noted that while not stated on their web page, all communications with Investigators and both civilians and Members of Service are tape recorded as well as transcribed, to ensure accuracy. Additionally, contrary to popular (and occasionally published belief, see a former CCRB Investigator's misstatements and an Officer's misunderstanding in Vice Magazine's article on the CCRB)[16], all statements made to a CCRB Investigator on the record are considered sworn testimony, and are treated as such legally. All Investigators are Commissioners of Deeds by requirement and may depose anyone within New York City limits.


If the civilian is contacted, a statement is initially taken over the phone by the investigator to further ensure proper jurisdiction and to gain a basic understanding of the broad facts within the complaint. An in-person interview is then scheduled at the CCRB's office at 40 Rector Street, at which point, the investigator meets with the civilian and any witnesses s/he brings with them that were present at the time of the incident and interviews each person separately. The investigator then transcribes the interview, submits a, "case plan," to one of their three supervisors (each team having an Assistant Supervising Investigator, a Supervising Investigator and an Investigative Manager).[15] Once the case plan is approved, the investigator must then begin their investigation, which involves identifying all subject and witness officers involved. If the investigator fails to identify the officers, the case is closed as, "Officers Unidentified." Once the officers are identified, which is done by obtaining a variety of NYPD documents, including SPRINTS/911 tapes to identify which officer(s) responded to the call in question, roll calls from specific commands, to see which officers were working in the area of question during the time of the incident, Command Logs from respective commands, to determine if the incident was logged and which officer logged it, Memo Books of Officers or DD5s of Detectives, to search for possible notes about the incident, along with arrest records, court records, photographs, Complaint Reports, Accident Reports, AIDED reports, Stop, Question and Possibly Frisk Reports (UF-250s), to name only a few. [15]


Once the officer is identified, s/he is then scheduled to give a statement to the investigator and must attend according to Patrol Guide 211.13. An officer failing to appear or lying to an investigator is, in itself, a violation that could result in severe discipline up to and including suspension and termination. Each officer and their partner at the time, along with any witness officers are interviewed and questioned about the incident by the investigator. This interview is also taped and transcribed, and based upon the officers testimony, further information is obtained by the investigator, including subpoenaed medical records, further department documentation, field canvasses and their resulting information, and so on. [15]


After all civilians and members of service are interviewed and all possible relevant documentation has been received and analyzed, the investigator then collects any relevant case law and begins their, "recommendation," which is their report, averaging about 10-12 pages, on the case in question. The report is broken down in to relatively strict (each team has their own, "style," dictated by the Team Managers and Supervisors, and even then, can and often does vary between internal team supervision), template of investigative analysis. The report includes a summary of all complaints made, an explanation of the circumstances of the case, a summation of the statements by the officers and civilians, a credibility assessment of the officers and the civilians (at which point, the investigator is supposed to weigh in criminal history of civilians and CCRB history of officers, as well as inconsistencies between accounts, motivation of the civilian and the overall possibility of an incident occurring), a summation of criminal and CCRB history of the civilians and officers respectively and finally a recommendation for disposition on each complaint, which breaks down into four main categories (beyond the technical variants mentioned in part earlier): Substantiated, meaning the officer committed the act in question and it consisted of misconduct; Unsubstantiated, meaning that there is not a preponderance of evidence either way to determine if the incident occurred as described and/or the incident consisted of misconduct; Exonerated meaning that the incident occurred but did not consist of misconduct, either because the officers actions were justified or did not actually consist of misconduct; Unfounded meaning that the incident did not occur as described and no misconduct occurred.[17]


The recommendations are then reviewed by at least two team level supervisors who then approve or instruct the investigator to, "correct," their findings, and upon approval submit the case to the Board, which is comprised of 13 members of the NYC community, five of whom are appointed by the mayor, five of whom are appointed by the City Council (with each borough represented), and three appointed by the Police Commissioner.[18] The Board is currently headed by Ms. Franklyn Stone, Esq., the first woman to chair the Board. Once the Board receives the complaint, either as a full board, or, more likely, as a three member sub-unit, they meet to discuss the case and then vote on the recommendations of the investigator. If the Board agrees with the investigator, the dispositions stand and the case is then closed or forwarded to the Police Commissioner in cases that involve Substantiations. All cases sent to the Police Commissioner come with recommendation of discipline made by the Board, which the Commissioner has the privilege to review and enforce or overrule. In fact, if s/he so chooses, the Commissioner can essentially dismiss the complaint once he receives it. However, it remains on an Officers' record for the length of their career, regardless of the disposition. [19] Public meetings are held to communicate recent statistics and "snapshots," of some of the more straightforward cases are published as examples for the public's understanding and announced at this page.[20]


In 2006, the CCRB received 7,669 complaints from civilians, and closed 7,399 cases, of which 2,680 were full investigations (meaning that the civilian participated, the officer(s) were identified and an investigation was closed after doing a full and through investigation). [21]Approximately 6% of the full investigations resulted in a Substantiated disposition.[22] 262 cases were mediated, which is an option for certain complaints provided the officer does not have an extensive CCRB history, there was no arrest made and severe force or abuse of authority were not involved. In mediation, the officer and civilian both voluntarily bypass the investigative process and meet each other one-on-one with a third party mediator to discuss the incident and resolve it. This results in no disciplinary action being taken against the officer and often results in a more satisfied civilian as an outcome.[23] CCRB Homepage


The CCRB remains the only completely civilian oversight of the New York Police Department in the City, and is complimented by the NYPD's Internal Affairs Bureau, and the Mayor's Task Force on Police Corruption, each charged with investigating different types of allegations. The CCRB and its acronym FADO (for the first letter of the allegations it investigates) has permeated all ranks of the NYPD and is part of all officers' training at the Police Academy. Additionally, the number of complaints has risen steadily since 2002 [24] as the 311 system was implemented and public awareness of the program grew.


NYPD Crime Laboratory Scandal

In 2007 The New York state inspector general said that the New York City Police Department's crime lab cut corners analyzing evidence and submitted results in drug cases without having done the required tests in 2002.


Serious errors were made by the police lab under since-reformed practices, Inspector General Kristine Hamann said in referring her report to the Queens District Attorney's office for possible criminal investigation. She said past officials failed to appropriately monitor some lab workers' performance and enforce standards.


"The integrity of evidence is a cornerstone of law enforcement," Hamann said. "These lapses were a threat not only to the prosecution of drug crimes, but to the public's trust in our criminal justice system."


She noted that the city has made significant improvements since the improper practices in 2002.


City police Deputy Commissioner Paul Browne noted that the police department made the failures public and the lab workers involved have been removed or left their positions. The lab staff has been increased and more rigorous safeguards are in place, Browne said. He said the crime lab received a 98.4 percent grade in its most recent accreditation assessment by the American Society of Crime Laboratory/Laboratory Assessment Board, which was done in October.


Browne said former lab director W. Mark Dale retired in 2004 and his successor, Dr. Peter Pizzola, found "the lapse in notification and made the necessary notifications in April to state officials, district attorneys and a national accreditation body."


Hamann said her investigation began after the state Division of Criminal Justice Services asked her to investigate allegations of "dry labbing" - sending results to police and prosecutors without doing the actual lab tests - in 2002.


She said her investigators found that lab officials were told in April 2002 an assistant chemist skipped steps when analyzing narcotics evidence and many others did the same. But the lab staff wasn't questioned and the claim wasn't investigated. She said a double check of two lab workers' results found incorrect answers, but no immediate action was taken against the employees.


The lab is now searching past cases for any erroneous reports, Hamann said. The prosecutors in all five boroughs have been alerted.


Knapp Commission

Main article: Knapp Commission

In 1970, police officer Frank Serpico and other officers, testified before the Knapp Commission about the corruption he witnessed in the department. The Commission's findings led to reforms within the department, developed by Commissioner Patrick Murphy. Reforms included decentralizing corruption control, within Field Investigative Units, which were intended to be closer and more in touch with the streets where the problems were.[11] The Knapp Commission (officially known as the Commission to Investigate Alleged Police Corruption) stemmed from a five member panel initially formed in April 1970 by Mayor John V. Lindsay to investigate corruption within the New York City Police Department. ... Francisco Vincent Serpico (born April 14, 1936) is a retired New York City Police Department (NYPD) officer who is most famous for testifying against police corruption in 1971[1]. The majority of Serpicos fame, however, came after the release of the 1973 film, Serpico, which starred Al Pacino in... The Knapp Commission (officially known as the Commission to Investigate Alleged Police Corruption) stemmed from a five member panel initially formed in April 1970 by Mayor John V. Lindsay to investigate corruption within the New York City Police Department. ... // Patrick Murphy (Civil War sailor) (1823-?), American Civil War sailor and Medal of Honor recipient Patrick Murphy (politician), United States politician, first Iraq War Veteran elected to the United States House of Representatives in 2006. ...


Other incidents

Some of the higher-profile incidents involving allegations of police misconduct within the NYPD are summarized as follows:

  • In 1962, the future convicted Bonanno crime family mobster Frank Lino was arrested for his alleged involvement in the shootings of two Brooklyn police detectives. The detectives, aged 28 and 56, were shot dead during a holdup of a tobacco store in Gravesend, Brooklyn, where Lino and two others netted $5,000. Lino was charged with the murders after supplying a getaway vehicle for one of the "stick-up men" so that he could then flee to Chicago. Lino was one of the five men charged after being taken to the 66th Precinct for an interrogation. During Lino's interrogation, he claimed that police officers drove staples into his hands and a broomstick up his rectum. He alleged that the abuse resulted in a broken leg and arm. Lino was later released with three years probation after he threatened to sue the city for police brutality. He also claimed that the uncontrollable blinking of his eyes was a direct result of the alleged beating.
  • In August 1988, a riot erupted in Alphabet City's Tompkins Square Park in the East Village of Manhattan when police attempted to enforce a newly-passed curfew for the park. Bystanders, artists, residents, homeless people and political activists clashed with police on the night of August 6 and the early morning of the following day.[25] In a report released by Commissioner Benjamin Ward, the police department's actions were "not well planned, staffed, supervised or executed... which culminated in a riot."
  • On September 16, 1992, at a political rally at New York City Hall led by then-mayoral candidate Rudolph W. Giuliani, police officers were encouraged to vent their frustration with Mayor David Dinkins and ultimately rioted, overturning and stomping vehicles belonging to city officials. In fear for the safety of the building and its inhabitants, Dinkins ordered City Hall to be locked down to prevent the police from entering.
  • On December 22, 1994, 29-year old Anthony Baez was choked to death by police officer Francis X. Livoti in the University Heights section of the Bronx. In 1998, Livoti was convicted of violating Baez' civil rights, and two other officers were convicted of lying on the witness stand at Livoti's trial.[26]
  • On August 9, 1997, Police Officer Justin Volpe in Brooklyn sodomized Abner Louima with a broken broom handle in the 70th Precinct bathroom. Officer Volpe eventually pled guilty and received a sentence of 30 years in federal prison. Other officers were also implicated and convicted on charges stemming from the initial cover-up.[citation needed]
  • On March 16, 2000, undercover narcotics detectives shot Patrick Dorismond to death during a scuffle on Eighth Avenue in Manhattan. The detectives had approached Dorismond, an unarmed security guard, to purchase drugs. He attacked the undercover officer and was killed with one shot by the officer in self-defense.[citation needed]
  • On January 24, 2004, Housing Bureau officer Richard Neri, Jr. accidentally shot to death Timothy Stansbury, a 19-year-old black man who was trespassing on the roof landing of a Bedford-Stuyvesant housing project. Stansbury was unarmed but had apparently startled Neri upon opening the roof door coming upon the officer. At that point, Neri discharged his service firearm and mortally wounded Stansbury. Although Commissioner Kelly stated that the shooting appeared "unjustified", a Brooklyn jury found that no criminal act occurred and that the event was a tragic accident. Neri was thus cleared of all charges.[28] The city later agreed to pay $2 million to settle a lawsuit filed by the Stansbury family. A grand jury declined to indict Neri but Kelly later suspended him for 30 days without pay and permanently stripped him of his weapon.[29]
  • On November 25, 2006, plainclothes police officers shot and killed Sean Bell and wounded two of his companions, one critically, outside of the Kalua Cabaret in Queens. No weapon was recovered.[30] According to the police, Bell rammed his vehicle into an undercover officer and hit an unmarked NYPD minivan twice, prompting undercover officers to fire fifty rounds into Bell's car. A bullet piercing the nearby AirTrain JFK facility startled two Port Authority patrolmen stationed there. [31] An undercover officer claims he heard one of the unarmed man's companions threaten to get his gun to settle a fight with another individual.[32]
  • On November 12, 2007, five NYPD police officers shot and killed 18-year-old Khiel Coppin. The officers responded to a 911 call where Coppin could be heard saying he had a gun. When the officers arrived at the scene, Khiel approached officers with a black object, which was later identified as a hairbrush, in his hand and repeatedly ignored orders to stop. This prompted officers to open fire at Coppin. Of the 20 shots fired, 8 hit Khiel, who died at the scene. This shooting has been ruled to be with both NYPD rules for the use of deadly force and the New York State Penal Law provisions, so no charges, criminal or administrative, will be filed against these officers.

The Bonanno crime family is one of the Five Families that controls organized crime activities in New York City, USA, within the nationwide criminal phenomenon known as the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra). ... Mobster is a slang term for a person who participates in organized crime, which is known as belonging to the Mob. In western stories and movies, cowboys as mobsters are known as outlaws. ... Frank Lino a. ... Afternoon by the Sea (Gravesend Bay), a pastel by William Merritt Chase, ca 1888 shows traditional catboats in the bay and the Navesink Highlands across Lower New York Bay. ... This article is about the New York City borough, or Kings County, New York. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In August 1988, a riot erupted in Tompkins Square Park when police brutally attempted to enforce a newly-passed curfew for the park. ... Alphabet City, formerly considered a slum, is now a trendy part of the East Village in the New York City borough of Manhattan. ... Tompkins Square Park is a 10. ... Looking south from 6th Street down Second Avenue, one of the main thoroughfares through the East Village. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Rudolph William Louis Rudy Giuliani III, KBE (born May 28, 1944) served as the Mayor of New York City from January 1, 1994 through December 31, 2001. ... David Norman Dinkins (born July 10, 1927 in Trenton, New Jersey) was the Mayor of New York City from 1990 through 1993, being the first and to date only African American to hold that office. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Francis X. Livoti (1959-) a PBA union delegate for the 46th precinct in the Bronx was the primary officer involved in the death of Anthony Baez, under police custody in December 1994. ... University Heights is the name of several places in the United States of America: University Heights, Iowa University Heights, Ohio University Heights is also the name of several urban neighborhoods in the United States: University Heights in San Diego, California University Heights in Gainesville, Florida University Heights in Newark, New... For other uses, see Bronx (disambiguation). ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... This article is about the New York City borough, or Kings County, New York. ... Abner Louima (b. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Eighth Avenue is a north-south avenue on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City, carrying northbound traffic. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ousmane Zongo (1960-May 22, 2003) in Burkina Faso) was an African arts trader from Burkina Faso living in New York City. ... Converted townhouses along 23rd Street. ... Negligent homicide is a charge brought against persons, who by inaction, allow others under their care to die. ... Wrongful death is a claim in tort against a person who can be held liable for a death. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Timothy Stansbury, Jr. ... Bedford Stuyvesant (aka Bed-Stuy) is a neighborhood in central Brooklyn, New York City. ... Public housing describes a form of housing tenure in which the property is owned by a government authority, which may be central or local. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sean Bell, his fiancee Nicole Paultre, and their daughter For the actor, see Sean Bell (actor). ... For other uses, see Queens (disambiguation) and Queen. ... AirTrain JFK is a 13 km (8. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

Salary and retention issues

NYPD graduation ceremony in Madison Square Garden, July 2005.
NYPD graduation ceremony in Madison Square Garden, July 2005.

Pay for new officers fell precipitously in the latest contract negotiations as the result of a state arbitration panel judge's decree in 2005, During training, new hires earn $25,100 a year. Upon the completion of the Police Academy (six months), the annual salary increases to $32,700. Adjusted for inflation, this is the lowest pay in history for rookie NYPD officers. In 2007, the Municipal Credit Union began issuing Visa credit cards to Police Academy recruits, as a way to borrow the money needed for mandatory equipment purchases.[33] Image File history File linksMetadata NYPD_swearing_in_July_2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata NYPD_swearing_in_July_2005. ... Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, and known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City. ... A credit union is a cooperative financial institution that is owned and controlled by its members. ...


Top pay for experienced officers is $59,588, not including overtime and other forms of compensation.(Los Angeles Police recruits start at $58,000. a year)[34] Nearby departments pay considerably more, up to $50,000 for new hires or over $100,000 for experienced.[35] Over the years, hundreds of city officers have left for higher paying jobs with other agencies, notably the Nassau County Police Department, the Suffolk County Police Department, Westchester County police departments, and the Port Authority Police of New York and New Jersey.[36] Discontent over pay issues has become so widespread and so well-known that higher-paying departments in lower cost-of-living areas, such as the Rochester, New York Police,[37] the Albuquerque, New Mexico Police,[38] and the Seattle, Washington Police,[39] are actively recruiting NYPD officers to join their forces. Shoulder patch of the NCPD. It features the arms of the Dutch royal House of Orange-Nassau, after which the county is named. ... The shoulder patch of the Suffolk County Police Department Suffolk County Police Department provides county police services to Suffolk County, New York. ... The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Police Department, or PAPD, is one of the largest police departments in the United States with 1,600 officers as of 2006. ... This article is about the city of Rochester in Monroe County. ... Albuquerque redirects here. ... Seattle redirects here. ...


Police departments in neighboring Rockland County and Westchester County have top base salaries ranging from around $85,000 to $105,000, not counting longevity, uniform pay, overtime and benefits. In 2007 a Westchester County Department of Public Safety officer reportedly made over $250,000 (with overtime), making him the highest paid police officer in the United States. Rockland County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Westchester County is a suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ...


Large numbers of NYPD officers have also migrated to the New York City Fire Department, where, even though pay is comparable with that of the NYPD, work schedules are more attractive and relations with the public more amicable.[40] Contract changes in 2006, however, now forbid the prior practice of allowing police officers who join the fire department to transfer their seniority for compensation purposes. With all new firefighters now compelled to begin working at the same starting pay, the number of NYPD officers "rolling over" to the FDNY is likely to fall considerably.[41] The New York City Fire Department or the Fire Department of New York (FDNY) has the responsibility for protecting the citizens and property of New York Citys five boroughs from fires and fire hazards, providing emergency medical services, technical rescue as well as providing first response to biological, chemical...


Some NYPD officers charge that the department's leadership is seeking to stem the flow of officers to other jurisdictions by administrative means.[42] In January 2006, 35 NYPD officers seeking to move to the Port Authority Police sued the New York department, claiming that it was refusing to make their personnel records available to PAPD background investigators. The plaintiffs won an injunction at the trial level, but the Appellate Division in January 2007 overturned that ruling and ordered the case to trial.


For its part, the NYPD claims its actions are merely in line with the personnel practices of other employers and that there is no "stealth" effort to prevent officers from moving elsewhere. Nonetheless, it is a fact that no NYPD officers have been included in the last two PAPD police academy classes as a result.[43]


Despite these obstacles, there are signs that the exodus from the NYPD may be accelerating. In 2006, 902 officers resigned before becoming eligible for retirement, on top of 867 who left in 2005 and 635 in 2004, which makes for an attrition rate of around two percent. While Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly insists that figure compares positively with turnover rates in private industry, police union officials note that the proper comparison should be with prior years on the NYPD. In 1991, for example, only 159 officers left early, for an attrition rate of less than one half of one percent.[44] Raymond W. Kelly Raymond W. Kelly is the current NYPD Commissioner under Mayor Michael Bloomberg. ...


Ranks of the NYPD

NYPD Parking Enforcement vehicle
NYPD Parking Enforcement vehicle
NYPD officers on horseback
NYPD officers on horseback
NYPD Command Unit

There are twelve sworn titles (referred to as ranks) in the New York City Police Department: Image File history File links Rank. ... Image File history File links Rank. ... A piece of fabric. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 1292 KB) Description: A NYPD car in Times Square Aurthor: Julius Schorzman (User:Quasipalm) File links The following pages link to this file: New York City Police Department Ford Crown Victoria Police car User:Quasipalm Metadata This file contains additional... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 1292 KB) Description: A NYPD car in Times Square Aurthor: Julius Schorzman (User:Quasipalm) File links The following pages link to this file: New York City Police Department Ford Crown Victoria Police car User:Quasipalm Metadata This file contains additional... For the standard version, see Ford Crown Victoria. ... Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor of the United States Federal Protective Service. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (974x635, 206 KB) This image has been (or is hereby) released into the public domain by its creator, Omnibus. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (974x635, 206 KB) This image has been (or is hereby) released into the public domain by its creator, Omnibus. ... The Ford Explorer is a mid-size sport utility vehicle sold in North America and built by the Ford Motor Company since 1990. ... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (642x733, 402 KB) Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): New York City Police Department User:Soman User:Soman/Template:SomanPhotos ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (642x733, 402 KB) Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): New York City Police Department User:Soman User:Soman/Template:SomanPhotos ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 680 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,569 × 1,384 pixels, file size: 513 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 680 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,569 × 1,384 pixels, file size: 513 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ...

Title Insignia
Chief of Department
Bureau Chief (referred to as "Super Chiefs" by members of the Department)
Assistant Chief
Deputy Chief
Inspector
Deputy Inspector
Captain
Lieutenant
Sergeant
Detective Investigator (Note: These are the traditional criminal investigators, with grades from 3rd to 1st and higher pay with each.)
Detective Specialist (Note: Rank and pay awarded for special merit or technical competence. These are not criminal investigators.)
Police Officer

Promotion from Police Officer to Detective- Specialist is based on merit. Generally each Precinct has one member designated "Detective-Specialist", which is a non-investigative rank. Promotion to Detective-Investigator is based on investigative experience. Generally a Police Officer who is assigned to an investigative assignment for 18 months will be designated "Detective-Investigator". The rank of Detective holds no supervisors responsibilities. Inspector is a rank in many police forces. ... For other uses, see Captain (disambiguation). ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... Image File history File links US-OF1B.svg Summary US 2nd Lt (and equivalents) insignia Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Second Lieutenant Table of ranks in Battlefield 2 User:CShuts14 ... For other uses, see Sergeant (disambiguation). ... Police officers in South Australia A police officer (or policeman/policewoman) is a warranted worker of a police force. ...


Promotion to Sergeant, Lieutenant and Captain is bases on a civil service promotion exam, in which an officer answers 100 multiple choice questions based on Department procedures and the law.


Promotion to Deputy Inspector and above is based on merit and those promotions are made by the Police Commissioner.


The Department is ultimately administered and governed by the Police Commissioner, who is appointed by the Mayor and technically serves a five-year term; however as a practical matter and custom, the Police Commissioner serves at the Mayor's pleasure. The Police Commissioner also appoints numerous Deputy Commissioners. The Police Commissioner and his subordinate Commissioners are civilians under an oath of office, as opposed to the uniformed members of the force who are sworn officers of the law. However, a police commissioner who comes up from the ranks of the sworn members, will retain that status while serving as police commissioner. This has ramifications on their police pensions and the fact that any police commissioner who is considered sworn does not need a pistol permit to carry a firearm, and does retain the statutory powers of a police officer. Some police commissioners (like Ray Kelly) do carry a personal firearm, but they also have a full-time security detail from the Police Commissioner's (Detective) Squad. A First Deputy Police Commissioner may have a security detail when he/she acts as commissioner or under other circumstances as approved by the police commissioner. The New York City Police Commissioner is the head of the New York City Police Department, appointed by the Mayor of New York City. ... For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. ...


Commissioner titles:

Title Insignia
Police Commissioner
First Deputy Commissioner
Deputy Commissioner

These individuals are administrators who supersede the Chief of Department, and they usually specialize in areas of great importance to the Department, such as counter-terrorism, operations, training, public information, legal matters, intelligence, and information technology. Despite their role, as civilian administrators of the Department, they are prohibited from taking operational control of a police situation (with the exception of the First Deputy Commissioner). Police Commissioner (or Commissioner of Police) is the title of the chief officer of many law enforcement agencies. ...


Within the rank structure, there are also designations, known as "grades", that connote differences in duties, experience, and pay. However, supervisory functions are generally reserved for the rank of sergeant and above. The title "Detective" is not a chain of command supervisory rank within the New York City Police Department. A "Detective-Investigator" has the equivalent rank of a police officer with the specification "Detective First Grade" (highest), "Detective Second Grade", and "Detective Third Grade". Movies and TV have only perpetuated this misunderstanding by portraying detectives as having supervisory powers. While a First Grade Detective may supervise other detectives in his/her squad, he/she is still outranked in the chain of command by a uniformed police sergeant.


Common designations of the various ranks are listed below:

  • Police Officer - First Grade: "Grades" are actually only used to refer to pay "steps" or annual salary increasing gradually until the final "step" which is a large raise. Pay steps for a police officer are predetermined through service time and determined through a negotiated contract. Currently there are six "grades" including a substantial pay reduction for the first six months while training in the Police Academy. After graduating from the academy, the probationary police officer will receive small raises of one to two thousand dollars annually until they have completed five full years whereupon they will receive a large raise (10 to 15 thousand dollars) to "top pay". All police officer "grades" are the same rank, though seniority is respected.

All "Detective Investigators" start at Detective Third Grade, which has a pay rate roughly between that of Police Officers and Sergeants; they can then get "promoted" to Detective Second Grade which has roughly the salary of Sergeants or Detective First Grade which has a pay rate roughly that of Lieutenants.


All "Detective-Specialists" start at third grade, but can be promoted to second or first grade status. It is common knowledge in the NYPD that detective investigators resent the detective specialist rank as these officers are not "detecting" crimes. NYPD is the only police force in the world that uses this rank. Most other reward technical skills or special merit with ranks such as senior patrol officer, technical sergeant or corporal. The detective specialist title was created during the Edward I. Koch mayoralty and has been controversial ever since. They carry the same "gold" shield as detective investigators, further adding to the resentment for the title.

  • Sergeant: Supervisor Detective Squad, Special Assignment
  • Lieutenant: Commander Detective Squad, Special Assignment

Promotion from Police Officer to Sergeant, Sergeant to Lieutenant, and Lieutenant to Captain all occur via a civil service formula that factors: performance on the civil service written examination for that rank, length of service, citations awarded, optional physical fitness test (for extra points). Promotion beyond the rank of Captain is discretionary.


Promotion to grades within the detective rank is also discretionary.


Badges in the New York City Police Department are referred to as "shields" (traditional term). Lower rank police officers are identified by their shield number, and tax registry number. Lieutenants and above do not have shield numbers and are identified by tax registry number. All sworn members of NYPD have their I.D. card photos taken against a red background. Civilian employees of the NYPD have their I.D. card photos taken against a blue background, signifying that they are not commissioned to carry a firearm. ID's all have an expiration date. Sworn police officers are referred to as "MOS" or, members of the service.


Organization

An NYPD boat patrols the New York Harbor.
An NYPD boat patrols the New York Harbor.
NYPD officers patrol on scooters.
NYPD officers patrol on scooters.

The NYPD is headed by the New York City Police Commissioner, a civilian administrator appointed by the Mayor of New York City, with the senior sworn uniformed member of the service titled "Chief of Department". The Police Commissioner appoints a number of Deputy and Assistant Commissioners. The Department is divided into ten bureaus, six of which are enforcement bureaus. Each enforcement bureau is sub-divided into sections, divisions and units, and into patrol boroughs, precincts and detective squads. Each Bureau is commanded by a Bureau Chief (such as the Chief of Patrol, the Chief of Housing, Chief of Internal Affairs). There are also a number of specialized units (such as the Operations Unit and Compstat) that are not part of any of the Bureaus and report to the Chief of the Department. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2552x1896, 2122 KB)A NYPD patrol boat in the New York Harbor. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2552x1896, 2122 KB)A NYPD patrol boat in the New York Harbor. ... New York Harbor, a geographic term, refers collectively to the rivers, bays, and tidal estuaries near the mouth of the Hudson River in the vicinity of New York City. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (807x381, 356 KB) Date: January 1, 2006. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (807x381, 356 KB) Date: January 1, 2006. ... A modern scooter The Piaggio MP3. ... The New York City Police Commissioner is the head of the New York City Police Department, appointed by the Mayor of New York City. ... CompStat - or COMPSTAT - (short for COMPuter STATistics or COMParative STATistics) is the name given to the New York City Police Departments accountability process. ...


The following is an example of the Department's bureau hierarchy:

The internal affairs (United States terminology) division of a law enforcement agency investigates incidents and plausible suspicions of lawbreaking and professional misconduct attributed to officers on the force. ... Gumshoe redirects here. ... Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ... The NYPD Transportation Bureau is one of the ten bureaus that comprise the New York City Police Department. ...

Aviation Unit

Founded in 1928, it claims the distinction of being the oldest police aviation unit in the world, but there is a competing claim from the London Metropolitan Police Service ("The Met"). Based in Brooklyn, the Aviation Unit responds to various emergencies and tasks, supporting other units of the N.Y.P.D. Among its capabilities are the deployment of divers for water rescues. From a standing start, the unit claims it can be anywhere in the five boroughs within 15 minutes, but this has been disputed and is dependent on weather conditions and air traffic congestion..[45] This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) is the name currently used by the territorial police force which is responsible for Greater London other than the City of London (the responsibility of the City of London Police). ...


Since 9/11 the department has undertaken a major overhaul of the Aviation Unit. Once equipped exclusively with Bell helicopters, it recently re-equipped its fleet with seven Agusta A 119 Koala helicopters. The centerpiece is a $9.8 million "unmarked" helicopter, which can fly at night without lights. However, this function will require approval from the Federal Aviation Administration and local Air Traffic Control on a case-by-case basis, due to the hazards it could present in the heavily congested New York air corridors. The department has also purchased a state-of-the-art helicopter flight simulator, so officers can practice flying without actually having to take up a helicopter.[46] Bell Helicopter Textron is an American helicopter and tiltrotor manufacturer headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas. ... The AgustaWestland AW119 Koala (Agusta A119 Koala prior to the Agusta-Westland merger) is an eight-seat utility helicopter powered by a single turboshaft engine and produced for the civil market. ... For flight simulator software from Microsoft, see Microsoft Flight Simulator. ...


Famed US cyclist Mile-a-Minute Murphy claimed to be the first police officer able to fly a plane in the US (possibly the entire world) as of 1914 as a member of the NYPD. He envisioned the use of airplanes to fight crime around the same time, though the Aviation Unit came into being 11 years after Murphy retired. United States may refer to: Places: United States of America SS United States, the fastest ocean liner ever built. ... A cyclist is a person who engages in cycling whether as a sport or rides a bicycle for recreation or transportation. ... Charles Minthorn Murphy (Oct, 1870 – Feb 16, 1950), but more popularly known as Mile-a-Minute Murphy, was an American cycling star from the late 19th century and early 20th century. ...


Emergency Service Unit

New York City Police Department Emergency Service Unit Hummer.
New York City Police Department Emergency Service Unit Hummer.

The Emergency Service Unit, a component of the Special Operations Division, provides specialized support and advanced equipment to other NYPD units. For example, its Canine Unit helps with searches for perpetrators and missing persons.[47] The Emergency Service Unit also functions as a Special Weapons and Tactical Unit (SWAT) and assists and secures the safety of NYPD hostage negotiators. Members of "ESU" are cross trained in multiple disciplines for police and rescue work. They are always on patrol (all three tours, 365 days a year) with 10 Large Trucks, each manned by a police officer and a sergeant, and often more than twice as many smaller "Adam" and "Boy" vehicles containing two ESU police officers. There are also two or more patrol lieutenants in unmarked vehicles on duty at all times to supervise ESU operations where needed. These are called "E-Cars on the NYPD radio, for example, "E-5". ESU vehicles operate on the "SOD (Special Operations Division)" radio frequency, but they also have the capabilities to transmit on local precinct frequencies. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x627, 52 KB) Summary LRAD device mounted on NYPD vehicle, Republican National Convention, New York City, 2004 Photographer: http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x627, 52 KB) Summary LRAD device mounted on NYPD vehicle, Republican National Convention, New York City, 2004 Photographer: http://www. ... New York City Police Department Hummer. ... Hummer is a brand of off-road vehicles sold by General Motors, also known as GM. The H1 version is based on the military High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV, or Humvee). ... New York City Police Department Hummer. ... This article is about Special Weapons And Tactics. ...


Organized Crime Control Bureau

The Organized Crime Control Bureau (O.C.C.B.) is charged with the investigation and prevention of organized crime within New York City. This is mainly done through standard police investigation and the use of confidential informants. The Organized Crime Control Bureau has numerous units and sub-units that investigate matters such as organized auto larceny rings, unlawful firearms, and prostitution. The Organized Crime Control Bureau utilizes undercover police officers to infiltrate various criminal organizations. The Organized Crime Control Bureau has been effective against the Five Families of the Sicilian Mafia, "the westies" of the Irish mob, and Russian organized criminal elements. The Organized Crime Control Bureau's Joint Organized Crime Task Force works in cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Investigation's New York Field Division (the largest FBI office in the US). Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Five Families are the major crime families of the Italian-American Mafia based in New York City which have dominated traditional organized crime in New York. ... This article is about the organized crime groups. ... The Irish Mob, or Irish Mafia, is one of the oldest organized crime groups in the United States, in existence since the early 19th century. ... F.B.I. and FBI redirect here. ...


Harbor Unit and Scuba Team

Randall's Island base
Randall's Island base

On March 15, 1858 five members of the New York City Police Department rowed out into New York Harbor to combat piracy aboard merchant ships lying at anchor. The NYPD Harbor Unit has existed ever since, protecting life and property. With hundreds of miles of inland waterways to cover, the unit operates 27 boats from three bases.[48]


For underwater work, the department used to contract with private diving companies when weapons or other evidence had to be recovered from the bottom of New York's many rivers and waterways. In the early 1970s, however, the Harbor Unit formed a specialized scuba team that today numbers around 30 officers. Unlike many police dive units, whose members dive only part-time, NYPD divers are assigned to the unit full-time. (The exception are some scuba-trained officers in regular patrol units who are detailed to the team temporarily during the busy summer months.)[49] In addition to the normal duties of evidence recovery, the Scuba Team's mission has expanded since 9/11 to include a counter-terrorism role. For air-sea rescue work, the Harbor Unit keeps two divers assigned to the Aviation Unit 24 hours a day, seven days per week, all year round. These divers will work with their counterparts in the FDNY, who arrive at incidents by fireboat or rescue company. Royal Navy search and rescue Westland Sea King helicopter Canadian search and rescue EH101 helicopter and Canadian Coast Guard ship For the TV series of this title, see Search and Rescue (TV series). ... The fireboat Guardian was a gift of survivors of the Loma Prieta earthquake to supplement San Franciscos fireboat Phoenix. ...


Special Victims Unit

The Special Victims Unit is housed in the detective borough commands of the NYPD. The Special Victims Unit is part of the Detective Bureau and investigates the following types of cases:

  • Any child under 13 years of age that is the victim of any sex crime or attempted sex crime by any person.
  • Any child under 11 years of age who is the victim of abuse by a parent or person legally responsible for the care of the child.
  • Any victim of Rape (all degrees) or Attempted Rape (all degrees)
  • Any victim of Criminal Sexual Act (all degrees) or Attempted Criminal Sexual Act (all degrees)
  • Victims of Aggravated Sexual Abuse (all degrees)
  • Victims of sexual abuse 1st Degree

The TV show Law & Order: Special Victims Unit describes fictionalizations of some of the Special Victims Unit's cases. Bad Touch redirects here. ... Law & Order: Special Victims Unit - Season 5 DVD Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (also known as Law & Order: SVU) is the first of three spin-offs of Law & Order (the other two being Law & Order: Criminal Intent and Law & Order: Trial by Jury; all series are presented on the NBC...


Major Case Squad

The Major Case Squad is located at One Police Plaza in Manhattan. It handles the following cases.

  • Kidnappings as directed by the Chief of Detectives
  • Burglary or Attempted Burglary of a bank or bank safe
  • Larceny by extortion or attempt, from a bank
  • Robbery or attempted of a bank by a perpetrator not armed
  • Burglary of a truck contents over $100,000
  • Larceny of a truck contents over $100,000
  • Robbery of a truck and contents by hijacking
  • All robberies in warehouse depots or similar locations where the objects of the crime is a truck or its contents
  • All commercial burglaries in which the value of the property stolen exceeds $100,000
  • Art Theft

Unlike the Major Case Squad as depicted in Law & Order: Criminal Intent, however, the Squad does not investigate homicides. All homicide investigations are conducted by precinct detective squads and borough homicide squads, as Law & Order makes clear. Law & Order: Criminal Intent is a United States crime drama television series that began in 2001. ... This article is about the original television series. ...


Taxi Squad

On October 19, 1999, the S.O.D. Taxi Squad was established as a separate unit that reports directly to the Special Operations Division of the New York City Police Department. The general mission of the Taxi Squad is of plainclothes, anti-crime assignment.


It was basically the re-establishment of the police Hack Bureau which had overseen yellow cabs in New York before the Taxi and Limousine Commission (TLC) was formed in the 1970's. Today the TLC Police only enforce laws concerning livery cars and other cars for hire that are not yellow cabs with medallions.


Task Forces

The task forces are organized within each Patrol Borough and specialize in rapid mobilization for disorder control. The task forces can quickly respond to an incident location and mobilize to a precision suppression force to disperse disorderly groups and provide perimeter security. The task forces also assist patrol units in a variety of different elements such as in wide area searches for missing persons, DWI vehicle checkpoints, and supplemental patrol in high crime areas.


Movie and Television Unit

Founded in 1966, the NYPD Movie/TV Unit was the first of its kind in the country. Because of its relationship with the NYPD, the Unit has the greatest knowledge on how to assist productions, particularly with complex shooting situations, in a City that is dense with vehicular and pedestrian traffic. In addition to this expertise, their services are free to productions filming in the City.


Whether it conducts filming on bridges, highways, or busy intersections, the Unit controls traffic to ensure that companies can get shots that may otherwise be impossible. In addition, the City's many police related shows, such as Law & Order and Third Watch, generate "crime scenes" which are supervised by the Movie/TV Unit. The Unit's responsibilities do not end there; the Unit also monitors child work permits, stunts, prop firearms, placement of equipment, pedestrian safety, and parking. This article is about the original television series. ... Third Watch is an NBC television drama set in New York City that ran from 1999 to 2005. ... A crime scene is a location where an illegal act took place such as molestation, rape or illegal turnip smoking, and comprises the area from which most of the physical evidence is retrieved by [[forensics|forensic scientists] for example the reknowned criminal investigator and skilled forensic scientist, who is unfortunately...


While filming on busy New York City streets presents countless challenges, the Unit has, over the years, developed a strong working relationship with the film industry. The unit makes an effort to ensure that New York City remains a popular location for filming. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Until the election of Mayor Rudolph Giuliani in 1994, the Unit occasionally assisted with pornographic productions. But Giuliani put a stop to this as part of his effort to clean up the streets of New York City. In 1997, porn producer Michael Lucas filed a lawsuit against the Police Department and Giuliani citing discriminating practices used by the Movie / TV Unit against porn productions. The lawsuit was dropped in September of 1998 when a district Judge granted a motion to dismiss on behalf of the NYPD.[citation needed] Michael Bloomberg's election as mayor had not led to a reinstatement of the Unit's assistance with pornographic productions as of mid-March 2008. Rudolph William Louis Rudy Giuliani III, KBE (born May 28, 1944) served as the Mayor of New York City from January 1, 1994 through December 31, 2001. ... Pornography (from Greek πορνογραφια pornographia — literally writing about or drawings of harlots) is the representation of the human body or human sexual behaviour with the goal of sexual arousal, similar to, but (according to some) distinct from, erotica. ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, founder of Bloomberg L.P., and the current Mayor of New York City. ...


School Safety Division

The mission of the School Safety Division is to provide a safe environment, conducive to learning, where students and faculty can be free from hostility and disruptions which could negatively impact on the educational process. In 2006, NYPD School Safety Agents were classified Civil Service Status with the first NYC DCAS Civil Service Exam June 9, 2007. Starting salary is $ 28,491 and the Union is Local 237 Teamsters .



There are seven different ranks within the NYPD's School Safety Division:


1. Director of Patrol Operations: Assists in the implementation of Division-wide programs, oversees field operations and directly supervises and coordinates the activities of all Borough Managers.


2. Administrative School Manager: Plans, directs and supervises the entire operation of school security within an assigned geographic area: identifies training needs; assists in preparation of proposals; implements policies; allocates budget resources; initiates changes on a daily basis; meets with community superintendents, principals, community board officials, parent association, high-level police commanders and assistant district attorneys.



3. Associate Supervisor of School Safety: Responsible for the deployment, administration, evaluation and supervision of all members assigned to the command; maintains personnel records; deploys vehicles assigned to the office; serves as liaison between the division and all city agencies, parents associations, community school boards and civic groups in the development of security reform; handles all grievances and disciplinary actions involving personnel.



4. Supervisor of School Security: Meets and discusses issues and problems with subordinates and effectively communicates suggestions and conclusions in oral and written form. Oversees performance issues for all including attendance and lateness violations, and field inspections. Trains subordinates in procedure and disseminates policies to subordinates.



5. School Safety Agent III: Performs supervisory duties inside the schools; maintains work schedules; observes performance of subordinates; administers roll calls; monitors and responds to incidents; maintains full knowledge of school safety plans; documents and takes all corrective action necessary towards addressing emergency situations.



6. School Safety Agent II: Knowledgeable of arrest procedures and police forms, and is readily available for assignment changes. Quickly responds to emergency incidents within assigned borough.



7. School Safety Agent I: Appears at specified time and location, is alert and prepared for post assignment; regulates flow of students at entrances and maintains order of school interior, checks outer perimeters for unauthorized persons; checks student ID, challenges visitors and adheres to visitor control procedures; immediately reports possible child abuse, drugs, alcohol, gang participation or psychological problems; uses minimal force necessary to effect arrest; interprets and reviews X-ray machine screens.


School Safety Training Unit

The mission of the School Safety Training Unit (SSTU) is to provide entry-level School Safety Agents with a fundamental understanding of Department procedures, policies, and the limits of their authority. The Basic Course for Peace Officers without Firearms is a 14-week program geared to instructing School Safety Agents on the fundamentals of law enforcement. Topics include Behavioral Science, Police Science, Law, and Physical Training/Tactics (including CPR/First Aid Training.)


In 2004, SSTU conducted three entry-level courses for a total of 551 School Safety Agents. Assistance was also provided to the NYPD’s School Safety Division’s In-Service Training Unit. Another 1,107 Agents were trained during these sessions.


Also in 2004, continued emphasis was placed on Counter Terrorism Training. School Safety Agents received instruction on current events and conditions that are directly related to terrorism. Other additions to the curriculum included the introduction of facilitated role-play exercises on Bomb/Explosive Device recognition and gang-related incidents.


In 2005, SSTU plans to implement a new curriculum for School Safety Agents that more accurately reflects the day-to-day functions of a School Safety Agent. A pilot program for baton training for School Safety Agents Level 2 assigned to the Mobile Task Force has also been approved and training will commence during 2005. The Program is run using facilities at Brooklyn Technical High School.


Real Time Crime Center

Located on the eighth floor of Police Headquarters, at One Police Plaza, the Real Time Crime Center is essentially a data warehouse and search engine operated by a staff of detectives that assists in providing relevant and timely information to officers conducting an investigation. The computer network stores facts about convicted persons, suspects, encounters, nicknames and items of seemingly trivial value whose correlation could assist in an investigation. The computer network's control room can display real-time satellite and surveillance camera images and hosts a wireless link to police vehicles equipped to generate sketches at crime scenes and transmit them for comparison to stored data.[50]


Auxiliary Police

Further information: New York City Police Department Auxiliary Police

The NYPD has an unpaid reserve police force known as the Auxiliary Police. NYPD Auxiliary Police Officers assist the Police Department with uniformed patrols and provide crowd and vehicular control at special events, riots,accidents and fire scenes. The New York City Police Department Auxiliary Police is an unpaid volunteer police force which acts as a unit of the New York City Police Department. ... Image File history File links NYPDAuxiliary. ...


In 1950, the 81st Congress passed the Public Law #920, entitled The Civil Defense Act of 1950 authorizing a Federal Civil Defense Program. In 1951, the New York State Legislature enacted The Defense Emergency Act requiring New York City to recruit, train, and equip volunteer Auxiliary Police Officers, who would provide traffic and crowd control and other assistance to Police Officers in the event of an emergency or natural disaster. NYS State Penal law provided Peace Officer status to the officers during the event of a disaster or emergency.


In 1967, a Mayoral Executive Order closed the Civil Defense Headquarters and placed full responsibility of the Auxiliary Police Program with the NYPD. During the 1960s when crime was on the rise, uniform Auxiliary Police Officer patrols were an effective means to deter crime. After completing their training, they are Certified by New York State as "Part-Time" Peace Officers.


Before becoming Auxiliary Police Officers, recruits must complete 16 weeks of training mandated by the NYS Municipal Police Training Counsel.The training course is classified by the Municipal Training Counsel as a "Part Time Peace Officer Training" course and as such Auxiliary Police Officers are listed in the New York State DCJS Peace Officer Registry. The NYS Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) requires Auxiliary Police Officers to pass an annual refresher course in the use of force with the nightstick, arrest procedures, and Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) in order maintain their part time peace officer certification.


Recently, a directive dated July 14, 2005, two weeks after the 2005 London bombings, stated that the City would institute a citywide Transit Auxiliary Police program. This will help reduce crime and fight terrorism in the Transit System. The Transit Auxiliary Police is the youngest Auxiliary Police addition and one of the most highly trained units. [51][52] is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 7 July 2005 London bombings (also called the 7/7 bombings) were a series of coordinated terrorist bomb blasts that hit Londons public transport system during the morning rush hour. ...


Shooting of 2 Auxiliary Police Officers

On March 14, 2007, two Auxiliary Police officers were killed. Auxiliary Police Officer Marshalik and Auxiliary Police Officer Nicholas Pekearo were shot and killed while following a suspect who had just murdered a pizza shop employee in Greenwich Village. The suspect had entered the shop, asked for a menu, and then shot the employee in the back fifteen times after the man turned around. is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Auxiliary Police Officer Pekearo and Auxiliary Police Officer Marshalik, both of whom were unarmed and on foot patrol in the area of the shooting, heard the description of the suspect that had been transmitted over the radio. They spotted the suspect and immediately began to follow him. After a short distance the man suddenly turned and opened fire, fatally wounding both officers.


Several plainclothes officers who were responding to the scene encountered the suspect, who fled on foot and began firing at them. The suspect was killed in an exchange of gunfire with the officers. The suspect was found to be carrying two handguns and over 100 rounds of ammunition.


Crime Scene Unit

The Crime Scene Unit (CSU) is a part of the NYPD Detective Bureau's Forensic Investigations Division, responsible for forensic investigations of all homicides and sexual assaults, as well as other crimes as deemed necessary by an investigating supervisor. Members of the Crime Scene Unit assist the precinct detectives in the processing of a crime scene as well as determining the proper routing of evidence between the NYC Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, the NYPD Police Lab and the NYPD Property Clerk. Forensics redirects here. ... Homicide (Latin homicidium, homo human being + caedere to cut, kill) refers to the act of killing another human being. ... Sexual assault is any physical contact of a sexual nature without voluntary consent. ... A typical suburban police station in the United States (this one is in San Bruno, California). ... A crime scene is a location where an illegal act took place such as molestation, rape or illegal turnip smoking, and comprises the area from which most of the physical evidence is retrieved by [[forensics|forensic scientists] for example the reknowned criminal investigator and skilled forensic scientist, who is unfortunately... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Crime Scene Unit is composed of NYPD detectives (or occasionally police officers that are awaiting their promotion to detective), not civilian technicians like crime scene units in other parts of the U.S. Generally these detectives come from an Evidence Collection Team which is operated at the borough level. For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ...


The Crime Scene Unit covers all of the boroughs of New York City, but is staffed with less than 1% of the total number of detectives in the NYPD. These detectives are dedicated to doing what is necessary to ensure that the precinct detectives and the District Attorney have as much evidence to identify the perpetrator of the crime and convict them at trial. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... A district attorney is, in some U.S. jurisdictions, the title of the local public official who represents the government in the prosecution of criminals. ...


The Crime Scene Unit has at its disposal many tools to process a crime scene including the materials needed to develop fingerprints, cast footwear and tire impressions, follow the trajectory of bullets fired through windows and the chemicals necessary to observe blood under special lighting conditions that would otherwise be invisible to the naked eye. The unit is also trained to process a crime scene in a hazardous environment, for example following a nuclear, biological or chemical attack. This article is about human fingerprints. ...


The NYPD Crime Scene Unit will handle in excess of 1,000 runs a year, a large drop from the busy days of the Crack-Wars in the 1980s where 3,000 runs a year was common. Although there are fewer runs, each crime scene involves much more work these days. The common use of modern equipment unavailable previously, as well as the increase in computer generated case work and sketches means the amount of time spent on each individual case has drastically increased. The modern-era case load of 1,000 also takes into account the fact that the patrol borough based Evidence Collection Teams handle the vast majority of burglaries and robberies as well as assaults where the victim is not likely to die, leaving the Crime Scene Unit to focus on more serious incidents.


Recently the NYPD Crime Scene Unit has come under scrutiny by higher ranking members of the NYPD as well as the local press. Claims that the unit has incorrectly processed multiple high-profile cases have been leveled against the unit. Claims against the current Commanding Officer of the Crime Scene Unit Deputy Inspector Gary Gomula as well as the Executive Officer Michael Kletzel have been made citing their mismanagement of Detectives during major investigations has led to evidence being mishandled or missed completely.


A February 1, 2008 article in the NY Daily News leveled accusations that both Gomula and Kletzel have had the Police Commissioner's attention drawn to them after ballistic evidence was missed in investigations involving shot police officers. According to the article there was also concern about the recent spike in disciplinary issues in the unit. A former Crime Scene Investigator was quoted as saying "More panic management, the top people don't know what they are doing, so they panic and slap people for every little thing. A sign of trouble." The Police Commissioner is reported as being so concerned he has hired an outside expert to look into the practices of the unit. [53]


Another article in the NY Daily News on February 2, 2008 mentioned a lack of manpower and shortcuts demanded by D.I. Gomula led to cases being compromised again and again. The article mentions claims from sources that on the day of the Sean Bell shooting a rush to prepare charts and diagrams for a briefing led to ballistic evidence being overlooked. Ballistic evidence was later found by the Internal Affairs Bureau according to the article. [54]


In yet another story printed in the Daily News on March 3, 2008 a retired Detective named Ira Scott claimed that he was injured in an incident while assigned to the Crime Scene Unit and that he was retaliated against by the supervisors in the unit for filing a claim for the injury. The article also states that at least four other Detectives are considering filing charges that they were denied promotions or specialized training by the Commanding Officer or other supervisors. Detective Scott's lawyer Eric Sanders was quoted as saying "The collective managerial incompetence has led to the downfall of this elite unit." Claims were also made that the Commanding Officer Gary Gomula fired his service weapon during a training session almost striking two Detectives and that he improperly removed a shotgun from a crime scene to show it in a press briefing before it was photographed in the scene, something that would violate most common practices for processing a crime scene. [55]


most recently an article printed on March 4, 2008 in the Daily News attributed a major error in the handling of the crime scene involving the police shooting of Sean Bell to the Executive Officer Captain Michael Kletzel. The article claims that in a rush to try and find a firearm in the car belonging to Sean Bell, Captain Kletzel ordered members of the Crime Scene Unit to dismantle the vehicle's door before the scene was finished being processed. They claim that this was done in such a rushed and unorganized manner that the door's hinges were lost and replacements had to be purchased from a local junkyard. The door being removed becomes an issue according to the article because a reconstruction of the shooting was to be done at a later date and the door being removed could alter the results. Assistant Chief Michael Collins stated that these accusations were a smear campaign against the supervisors in the unit by disgruntled unit members and that the door being removed was a non-issue and had no bearing on the investigation. [56]


Evidence Collection Teams

The Evidence Collection Teams are tasked with the collection of evidence at crime scenes in their respective boroughs that are not determined to be at the level necessary to require the Crime Scene Unit. Each patrol borough (Manhattan South, Manhattan North, Bronx, Staten Island, Queens North, Queens South, Brooklyn North and Brooklyn South) has their own Evidence Collection Team under the control of the respective borough commander. The Evidence Collection Teams are staffed by Police Officers, Sergeants and usually headed by a Lieutenant.


The Evidence Collection Teams were started in Manhattan South by Lt. James Robert (Ret.) to take some of the pressure off the Crime Scene Unit and the precinct detective squads by forming a forensic unit to bridge the gap between precinct latent print officers and the Crime Scene Unit. The Evidence Collection Team handles burglaries, robberies, assaults where the victim is not likely to die, suicides and any other crime determined by the borough commanders.


Many of the Police Officers that originally started in the Evidence Collection Team have gone on to transfer to the Crime Scene Unit and become Detectives. This transfer is difficult (due to the change from the Patrol Services Bureau to the Detective Bureau, as well as the fact that there are over 150 members of the various Evidence Collection Teams usually vying for one or two slots in Crime Scene.


Although Crime Scene is expected to handle many of the newsworthy or high-profile cases in the city quite often the Manhattan South Evidence Collection Team is called out to jobs in the Midtown Manhattan area that involve celebrities and wind up on the cover of national news papers. Recent examples of this include the shooting involving Remy Ma (the rapper) as well as the incident involving Sean "Puffy" Combs and Jennifer Lopez in December 1999. Here is a link to an evidence voucher prepared by a police officer in Manhattan South http://www.thesmokinggun.com/archive/puffyprop3.html


Transit Bureau

Further information: New York City Transit Police

The NYPD Transit Bureau is a separate branch of the NYPD that patrols and responds to emergencies within the New York City transit system. Its responsibility includes the NYC Subways in Manhattan, the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Queens. However, there are certain units that have citywide responsibilities such as the Homeless Outreach Unit and the Vandals Task Force. Established in 1935, the New York City Transit Police Department was responsible for the protection of New York City Subway lines for 60 years. ... Times Square–42nd Street station entrance The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system owned by the City of New York and leased to the New York City Transit Authority , an affiliate of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and also known as MTA New York City Transit. ...


The Transit Bureau is divided into Transit Borough Commands. These Borough Commands generally follow the boundaries of the City's geographical boroughs, although there are some notable exceptions. Since there are no subways on Staten Island, there are only four Transit Boroughs: Queens, Bronx, Brooklyn, and Manhattan. Each Transit Borough is further divided into Transit Districts.


As a general rule, each Borough is commanded by an Inspector while Transit Districts tend to be commanded by Captains. The NYPD Detective Bureau investigates all crimes that occur in Transit. Each borough office has assigned detectives from the Detective Bureau similar to the Precinct Detective Squad. As of June 15, 2006 all detectives assigned to investigate transit crimes will fall under a unified command [Central Robbery Section] of the Detective Bureau's Special Investigations Division.


Housing Bureau

Further information: New York City Police Department Housing Bureau

The Housing Bureau is responsible for providing the security and delivery of police services to 420,000 residents, employees and guests of public housing (projects) throughout New York City. They are stationed in Police Service Areas (PSA), which are almost identical to police precincts, with nine PSAs in total located throughout the five boroughs. Officers often do vertical patrols, making sure illegal activity does not take place in the halls, stairways, or the roof. The New York City Police Department Housing Bureau is responsible for providing the security and delivery of police services to about 420,000 people using public housing throughout New York City. ...


Highway Patrol

Further information: New York City Police Department Highway Patrol

The NYPD Highway Patrol -- also known as the NYPD Highway District -- is a specialized unit under the auspices of the NYPDs Transportation Bureau primarily responsible for patrolling and maintaining traffic safety on limited-access highways within New York City. ...

Transportation Bureau

Further information: New York City Police Department Transportation Bureau

Structure

NYPD patrol mounted on horseback (New Year's Eve 2005/06)
NYPD patrol mounted on horseback (New Year's Eve 2005/06)

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1007x345, 94 KB) This image has been (or is hereby) released into the public domain by its creator, Omnibus. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1007x345, 94 KB) This image has been (or is hereby) released into the public domain by its creator, Omnibus. ...

Patrol Boroughs

For management purposes, police precincts are grouped collectively based on their jurisdiction into the Patrol Boroughs. There are eight Patrol Boroughs. They are: Manhattan North, Manhattan South, Brooklyn North, Brooklyn South, Queens North, Queens South, Bronx, and Staten Island. Each Patrol Borough has a number of police precincts and the grand total of police precincts in New York City is 76. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Police precincts

Each Patrol Borough is composed of precincts. Each precinct is responsible for safety and law enforcement within a designated geographic area. Police units based in these precincts patrol and respond to emergencies. A precinct is a space enclosed by the walls or other boundaries of a particular place or building, or by an arbitrary and imaginary line drawn around it. ...


Staten Island currently has three precincts: the 120, 122, and 123. A 122 satellite precinct opened in December 2005 adjacent to the Staten Island Mall on Richmond Avenue. A picture of the main entrance to the Staten Island Mall. ...


Queens South began operating a satellite for the large 105 Precinct in the southern part of the precinct next to the Rosedale LIRR station in July, 2007. This building was, until then, the quarters for the Queens South Task Force, the Q.S. Auto-Larceny Unit, the Q.S. Anti-Crime Unit, the Q.S. Evidence Collection Team and the Detective Bureau's Queens Major Case Squad.


Line of duty deaths

NYPD Line of Duty deaths[57]
Type number
9/11 related illness 10
Accidental 10
Aircraft accident 7
Animal related 17
Asphyxiation 3
Assault 31
Automobile accident 50
Bicycle accident 4
Boating accident 5
Bomb 2
Drowned 12
Duty related illness 10
Electrocuted 5
Explosion 8
Exposure 1
Fall 12
Fire 14
Gunfire 321
Gunfire (Accidental) 23
Heart attack 44
Motorcycle accident 36
Stabbed 24
Struck by streetcar 7
Struck by train 5
Struck by vehicle 37
Structure collapse 3
Terrorist attack 24
Vehicle pursuit 12
Vehicular assault 20

From December 25, 1806 to November 5, 2007, the NYPD has lost 757 officers in the line of duty. This figure includes officers from agencies that were absorbed or became a part of the modern NYPD in addition to the modern department itself. The NYPD lost 23 officers on September 11, 2001.[58]
is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


NYPD medals[59]

The department presents a number of medals to its members for meritorious service. The medals the NYPD awards are as follows (from lowest medal to highest): A medal is a small metal object, usually engraved with insignia, that is awarded to a person for athletic, military, scientific, academic or some other kind of achievement. ...

  • Excellent Police Duty (EPD)is awarded for:

a. An intelligent act materially contributing to a valuable accomplishment, OR b. Submission of a device or method adopted to increase efficiency in an administrative or tactical procedure.

  • Meritorious Police Duty (MPD)is awarded for:

a. An act of intelligent and valuable police service demonstrating special faithfulness or perseverance, OR b. Highly creditable acts of police service over a period of time.

  • Meritorious Police Duty - Integrity
  • Commendation - Community Service (Displayed wearing the MPD medal with a light blue star in the middle)is awarded for:

a. An act which demonstrates devotion to a Community service. b. An idea implemented that improves conditions within a Community.

  • Commendation or Commendation - Integrity (Displayed wearing the MPD medal with a bronze star in the middle)
  • Exceptional Merit (Displayed wearing the MPD medal with a green star in the middle)
  • Honorable Mention (Displayed wearing the MPD medal with a silver star in the middle)is awarded for:

An act of extraordinary bravery intelligently performed in the line of duty at imminent and personal danger to life. Image File history File links Blueribbon. ... Image File history File links Greenribbon. ... Texas Medal of Honor This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ...

Acts of outstanding personal bravery intelligently performed in the line of duty at imminent personal hazard to life under circumstances evincing a disregard of personal consequences. As the Departments third highest medal, the Medal for Valor is conferred upon police officers for acts of outstanding personal bravery intelligently performed in the line of duty at imminent personal hazard to life under circumstances evincing a disregard of personal consequences. ...

Members who have successfully and intelligently performed an act of extraordinary heroism, while engaged in personal combat with an armed adversary under circumstances of imminent personal hazard to life. ...

  • Medal of Honor (Solid green bar speckled tiny gold stars)is awarded for:

Individual acts of extraordinary bravery intelligently performed in the line of duty at imminent and personal danger to life. Specifically, the Department Medal of Honor is awarded for acts of gallantry and valor performed with knowledge of the risk involved, above and beyond the call of duty. The New York City Police Department Medal of Honor is the highest law enforcement medal of the New York City Police Department. ...


The department also awards a Purple Shield to those injured or killed in the line of duty. An example of a Police Purple Heart A Police Purple Heart is a generic term to describe a United States law enforcement medal which may be issued to any police officer who is wounded or killed in the line of duty. ...


Demographics

The NYPD is majority white with an increasing number of minority officers. Amongst minorities 17.4% of the officers are African American, 26.5% Hispanic, and 3.8% Asian American.[60] This compares to a city population that is 27% Hispanic, 26.6% African American, and 9.8% Asian American. In 1970, there were only 300 sworn Hispanic officers on the force, in today's department there are over 9,000 sworn Hispanic officers. 2005 marked the first academy class that was majority minority where only 45.2% of the graduates were non-Hispanic Whites.[61] An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ...


Affiliations

  • The department is affiliated with the New York City Police Museum.
  • The department also runs a Summer Youth Police academy to provide positive interaction with police officers and to educate young people about the challenges and responsibility of police work.
  • The department also provides a citizen Police Academy which educates the public on basic law and policing procedures.

The New York City Police Museum (NYCPM) celebrates the history and contributions of the 158-year history of the New York City Police Department. ...

Service Pistols

Officers of the NYPD are issued a 9mm Service pistol that fires in DAO (Double Action Only). Currently authorized pistols for new officers to select from include the SIG P226 (DAO), Smith & Wesson 5946 (DAO), and Glock 19 (All modified to a nominal 12 pound trigger pull). Senior officers who joined prior to 1993 are still authorized to carry Smith & Wesson Model 64 .38 Special Revolvers. Ball and hollowpoint 9mm Luger rounds are popular handgun ammunition. ... A service pistol is any handgun (revolver, or semi-automatic) issued to military personnel, or in some contexts, law enforcement officers. ... Double Action Only (DAO) is a type of semi-automatic pistol trigger system whereby the hammer remains down when not firing and must be raised and cocked by the pull of the trigger in order to fire. ... The Schweizerische Industrie Gesellschaft (SIG)-Sauer P226 is a full-sized, service type pistol originally chambered for 9 mm Luger. ... The Smith & Wesson 5906 is a third-generation pistol manufactured starting in 1990 by Smith & Wesson. ... The Glock 19 is a pistol designed and manufactured by Glock. ... The Smith and Wesson Model 64 is the stainless steel version of its Model 10 Heavy Barrel. ... Left to right: .38 Special, .17 HMR and . ...


Fictional portrayals

Further information: List of fictional portrayals of the NYPD

The NYPD is behind perhaps only cowboys and gangsters in terms of public fascination, as measured by movie and television treatments. Over the years, countless fictional or fictionalized depictions of the department have emerged into popular culture--and not all such depictions have shown the department or its personnel as being above reproach. The New York Police Department (NYPD) has been the subject of many fictional or fictionalized portrayals in popular culture. ... For other uses, see Gangster (disambiguation). ... This article is about motion pictures. ...


See also

New York Portal
Law enforcement/Law enforcement topics Portal
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New York City Police Department

Download high resolution version (1106x1105, 229 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Portal. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... This is a list of law enforcement agencies in the state of New York. ... The New York City Police Commissioner is the head of the New York City Police Department, appointed by the Mayor of New York City. ... The New York City Police Department Auxiliary Police is an unpaid volunteer police force which acts as a unit of the New York City Police Department. ... The NYPD Highway Patrol -- also known as the NYPD Highway District -- is a specialized unit under the auspices of the NYPDs Transportation Bureau primarily responsible for patrolling and maintaining traffic safety on limited-access highways within New York City. ... The NYPD Rodmans Neck Firing Range is a police training base operated by The NYPD Firearms and Tactics Section on Rodmans Neck in the Bronx, New York City. ... Port Authority Police Patch The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Police Department, or PAPD, is one of the largest police departments in the United States with approximately 1,600 officers, sergeants, lieutenants, and detectives. ... NYPD emblem The first centralized technology center for the NYPD (New York Police Department), whose primary purpose is to give field officers and detectives comprehensive, instant information to help identify patterns and stop emerging crime. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Inspector Thomas Byrnes Inspector Thomas F. Byrnes (1842-1910) was born in Dublin, Ireland and emigrated to New York as a child. ...

References

  1. ^ From database to crime scene
  2. ^ http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/html/misc/pdfaq2.html#41
  3. ^ a b c Lankevich, George L. (1998). American Metropolis: A History of New York City. NYU Press, p. 84-85. ISBN 0814751865. 
  4. ^ Randolph, Lewis Hamersly. Biographical Sketches of Distinguished Officers of the Army and Navy, pp 82-88. Henry E. Huntington Library: New York, 1905.
  5. ^ Fosdick, Raymond (1920). American Police Systems. The Century Co., p. 82. 
  6. ^ Schouler, James (1899). History of the United States of America, Under the Constitution. Dodd, Mead & Company, p. 418. 
  7. ^ Gordon, Michael Allen (1993). The Orange Riots: Irish Political Violence in New York City, 1870-1871. Cornell University Press, p. 203. 
  8. ^ a b Johnson, Marilynn S. (2003). Street Justice: A History of Political Violence in New York City. Beacon Press, p. 12-41. 
  9. ^ Johnson, Marilynn S. (2003). Street Justice: A History of Political Violence in New York City. Beacon Press, p. 50-56. 
  10. ^ http://www.barrypopik.com/article/680/iron-pipeline-i-95
  11. ^ a b Walker, Samuel (2005). The New World of Police Accountability. Sage, p. 17. 
  12. ^ NYC Civilian Complaint Review Board - History
  13. ^ a b c d NYC Civilian Complaint Review Board - Agency Structure
  14. ^ http://nyc.gov/html/ccrb/pdf/ccrbann2006.pdf
  15. ^ a b c d NYC Civilian Complaint Review Board - The Investigative Process
  16. ^ Viceland - POLICING THE POLICE - And You Thought 911 Was a Joke
  17. ^ http://nyc.gov/html/ccrb/pdf/ccrbann2006.pdf
  18. ^ NYC Civilian Complaint Review Board - FAQs
  19. ^ http://nyc.gov/html/ccrb/pdf/ccrbann2006.pdf
  20. ^ NYC Civilian Complaint Review Board - Case Profiles
  21. ^ NYC Civilian Complaint Review Board - CCRB Performance
  22. ^ http://nyc.gov/html/ccrb/pdf/ccrbann2006.pdf
  23. ^ nyc.gov/ccrb
  24. ^ http://nyc.gov/html/ccrb/pdf/ccrbann2006.pdf
  25. ^ "Melee in Tompkins Sq. Park: Violence and Its Provocation," by Todd Purdham, The New York Times, August 14, 1988, Section 1; Part 1, Page 1, Column 4; Metropolitan Desk
  26. ^ Metro Briefing | New York: Manhattan: Officers Fired For Perjury - New York Times
  27. ^ 1010 WINS - On-Air, Online, On Demand - *
  28. ^ Grand jury exonerates New York cop who shot 19-year-old youth
  29. ^ City to pay $2 million for NYPD shooting of unarmed teenager atop housing project - International Herald Tribune
  30. ^ New York on edge as police kill unarmed man in hail of 50 bullets on his wedding day | World news | The Guardian
  31. ^ Democracy Now! | EXCLUSIVE...Surveillance Film Shows Police, Passengers Diving For Cover as Bullets in Sean Bell Shooting Hit Train Station
  32. ^ http://www.cnn.com/2006/US/11/26/nyc.shooting.ap/index.html
  33. ^ NY Daily News March 12, 2007
  34. ^ "Police See First Rise in Exam Applicants Since Recruit Pay Cut", New York Sun, September 19, 2006. 
  35. ^ "2005 Duties, 1985 Pay", New York Daily News, June 29, 2005. 
  36. ^ "They're Tried, They're True, But How Long Do They Stay?", The New York Times, October 8, 1995. 
  37. ^ "Offers Higher Salary: Upstate City Makes Case to NYPD Cops", The Chief-Leader, October 6, 2006. 
  38. ^ "Unlikely Recruits Heed the Call of the Sagebrush", The New York Times, January 7, 2008. 
  39. ^ "Seattle Police Department Scheming to Steal cops from the Shrinking NYPD", The New York Daily News, April 4, 2008. 
  40. ^ "To Protect and Serve On Another Front; In an Increasing Job Migration, Police Officers Make the Switch From Crime Fighter to Firefighter," by Kevin Flynn, The New York Times, May 31, 1999, Section B; Page 1, Column 2; Metropolitan Desk
  41. ^ "Cops Entering FDNY Back At Bottom on Pay; Council Enacts Deal Made Under UFA Wage Accord," by Ginger Adams Otis, The Chief-Leader, April 14, 2006
  42. ^ "P.D. Holds Hostage Its PAPD Applicants," by Reuven Blau, The Chief-Leader, Jan. 26, 2007, Page 1, Column 2;
  43. ^ "Rule NYPD Can Withhold Officer Files From PA; Has Effect of Blocking Transfers to Gain Higher Pay," by Reuven Blau, The Chief-Leader, Jan. 26, 2007, Page 1, Column 4;
  44. ^ "Alarm Over Cop Exodu$," by Larry Celona and Bill Sanderson, The New York Post, Jan. 25, 2007, Page 4, Column 1;
  45. ^ "Instead of Walking a Beat, Flying One", The New York Times, July 2, 2006. 
  46. ^ "New Tools for N.Y. Robocop", The New York Post, September 30, 2007. 
  47. ^ Emergency Service Unit. New York City Police Department. Retrieved on 2007-07-10.
  48. ^ "New York Police Department: Scuba Team"
  49. ^ "NYPD's Air-Sea Rescue Teams"
  50. ^ From database to crime scene
  51. ^ APBA (Auxiliary Police Benevolent Association)
  52. ^ New York Post Online Edition: News
  53. ^ After recent mishaps, NYPD's crime scene unit gets forensic inspection
  54. ^ High-profile cases are jeopardized by NYPD unit's lapses: sources
  55. ^ CSI members: unit is falling apart
  56. ^ Crime scene detectives scrambled to find 'gun' at Bell shooting scene
  57. ^ The Officer Down Memorial Page (http://odmp.org/agency/2758-new-york-city-police-department-new-york)
  58. ^ 9/11 by the Numbers. New York Magazine (September 11, 2002).
  59. ^ Page Title
  60. ^ NYPD
  61. ^ NYPD

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • NYPD Homepage
  • On the Front Line in the War on Terrorism, City Journal, Summer 2007
  • NYPD-Badges
  • Auxiliary Police Benevolent Association
  • Unofficial School Safety Myspace Page
  • Full listing of NYPD Officers who have been killed in the line of duty
  • NYCPR and COPP NYC police misconduct organizations
  • NY Daily News March 12, 2007
  • From database to crime scene: Network is potent police weapon, by Thomas Lueck, New York Times, June 7, 2007
  • AM New York, December 8, 2006
  • Google Earth NYPD Car Model
  • Site with instruments used by Stephen Hasbrouck, First Surgeon General of the Department *Homepage for the Civilian Complaint Review Board, the only official Civilian Oversight of Police Misconduct in NYC
  • Collection of NYPD-Badges and Informations about the NYPD
New York City has been a metropolitan municipality with a strong mayor-council form of government since its consolidation in 1898. ... For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. ... New York City Hall The New York City Council is the lawmaking body of the City of New York. ... The New York City court system consists of civil, criminal, and family courts. ... The Main Branch, Brooklyn Public Library, Grand Army Plaza, 2003 The Brooklyn Public Library (BPL), is the public library system of the borough of Brooklyn in New York City. ... The New York City Department of Buildings is the branch of municipal government in New York City that enforces the Citys building codes and zoning regulations, issues building permits, and inspects new and existing buildings. ... The Department of City Planning is a governmental agency of New York City responsible for setting the framework of citys physical and socioeconomic planning. ... The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym: IPA pronunciation: ), is the public university system of New York City. ... Infobox Correction Department The New York City Department of Correction is responsible for over 13,000 of New York Citys inmates, housing the majority of them on Rikers Island. ... The New York City[1] Economic Development Corporation[2] works with the private and public sectors on economic development initiatives to revitalize businesses, create jobs, and generate revenues for the City. ... The Official Seal of the City of New York The New York City Department of Education is the branch of municipal government in New York City that manages the citys public school system. ... The New York City Fire Department or the Fire Department of New York (FDNY) has the responsibility for protecting the citizens and property of New York Citys five boroughs from fires and fire hazards, providing emergency medical services, technical rescue as well as providing first response to biological, chemical... NYCHA, Sheepshead Houses The New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) provides housing for low and moderate income residents throughout the five boroughs of New York City. ... The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission is the New York City agency charged with administering New Yorks Landmarks Preservation Law. ... The Lower Manhattan Development Corporation (LMDC) was formed after the September 11 attacks to plan the reconstruction of Lower Manhattan and distribute nearly $10 billion in federal funds aimed at rebuilding downtown Manhattan. ... The New York Public Library (NYPL) is one of the leading public libraries of the world and is one of Americas most significant research libraries. ... The New York City Office of Emergency Management (OEM) was originally formed in 1996 as part of the Mayors Office under Rudolph W. Giuliani. ... The New York City Department of Parks and Recreation is the branch of government of the City of New York responsible for maintaining the citys parks system, preserving and maintaining the ecological diversity of the citys natural areas, and furnishing recreational opportunities for citys residents. ... The Queens Borough Public Library, or QBPL is the public library for the Borough of Queens and one of three library systems serving New York City. ... The Official Seal of the Department of Sanitation The New York City Department of Sanitation, or DSNY, is a uniformed force of unionized sanitation workers in New York City. ... The New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT or DOT) is responsible for the management of much of New York Citys transportation infrastructure. ... The Five Boroughs redirects here. ... For other uses, see The Bronx (disambiguation). ... This article is about the New York City borough, or Kings County, New York. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... For other uses, see Queens (disambiguation) and Queen. ... This article is about the borough in New York City. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: New York City Police Department (1109 words)
According to the department, its mission is to "enforce the laws, preserve the peace, reduce fear, and provide for a safe environment." Primarily, this involves preventing and responding to crime.
The New York City Transit Police and Housing Police were fully integrated into the NYPD in 1995; some new police officers are randomly assigned to the Transit and Housing units.
In New York, the administration of Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg persuaded a federal judge in 2003 to enlarge the Police Department's authority to conduct investigations of political, social and religious groups.
New York City Police Department (2111 words)
New York City’s Office of Emergency Management (OEM), which is located in World Trade Center Building 7, organizes a bio-terrorism drill where militant extremists attack the city with bubonic plague and Manhattan is quarantined.
He is in contact with New York Governor George Pataki, high-ranking New York Police Department officers, and Navy Admiral Robert Natter, the commander of the US Atlantic Fleet (see (Shortly After 9:59 a.m.) September 11, 2001).
The New York Police and FBI are investigating the theft of over 250 tons of steel from the remains of the collapsed WTC towers.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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