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Encyclopedia > New York City, NY
Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005
Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005

New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, the most densely populated major city in North America, and is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture. New York City is one of the world's global cities, home to an almost unrivaled collection of world-class museums, galleries, performance venues, media outlets, international corporations, and stock exchanges. The city is also home to all of the international embassies to the United Nations, itself headquartered in New York City. Image File history File links The skyline of Midtown Manhattan, looking North from the Empire State Building. ... Image File history File links The skyline of Midtown Manhattan, looking North from the Empire State Building. ... View of Midtown from Empire State Building. ... The Empire State Building Entrance lobby The Empire State Building, a 102-story contemporary Art Deco style building in New York City, was designed by Shreve, Lamb and Harmon Associates and built in 1931. ... This page lists United States Metropolitan Statistical Areas in order of population. ... World map showing location of North America A satellite composite image of North America North America is a continent in the northern hemisphere, bounded on the north by the Arctic Ocean, on the east by the North Atlantic Ocean, on the south by the Caribbean Sea, and on the west... London New York City Paris Tokyo For a city spanning an entire planet, see Ecumenopolis A global city (also known as a world city or world-class city) is a city which has a direct and tangible impact on global affairs through socioeconomic, cultural, and/or political means. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945. ...


Located in the state of New York, New York City has a population of 8,104,079 people contained within 309 square miles (800 km²), and is the heart of the New York Metropolitan Area, which is one of the largest urban conglomerations in the world with a population of over 22 million. New York City proper comprises five boroughs: Brooklyn, the Bronx, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island — each of which would be a major city in its own right. State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York City Governor George Pataki (R) Senators Charles Schumer (D) Hillary Rodham Clinton (D) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... A map highlighting Brooklyn and the rest of New York City. ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States. ... Manhattan Borough,highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... Queens Borough in New York City Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the United States, is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City. ... Staten Island lies to the South West of the rest of New York City. ...


The city includes large populations of immigrants from over 180 countries who help make it one of the most cosmopolitan places on earth. Many people from all over the United States are also attracted to New York City for its culture, energy, and cosmopolitanism, and by their own hope of making it big in the "Big Apple." The city serves as an enormous engine for the global economy, and is home to more Fortune 500 companies than any other place in the United States. The city is estimated to have a Gross Metropolitan Product of nearly $500 billion. If it were a nation, the city would have the 16th highest gross domestic product in the world exceeding that of Belgium ($388 billion). Cosmopolitanism pertains to wide international experience. ... The Big Apple - Manhattan viewed from atop the World Trade Center The Big Apple is a nickname or alternate toponym for New York City. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... In economics, gross domestic product (GDP) is a measure of the value of economic production of a particular territory in financial capital terms during a specified period. ...


A resident of New York City is referred to as a New Yorker.

City of New York, New York
Official flag of City of New York, New York Official seal of City of New York, New York
City flag City seal
City nickname: "The Big Apple"
Location
Location of City of New York, New York
Location in the state of New York
Government
Counties
(Boroughs)
Bronx (The Bronx)
New York (Manhattan)
Queens (Queens)
Kings (Brooklyn)
Richmond (Staten Island)
Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R)
Physical characteristics
Area
     Land
     Water
1,214.4 km²
     800.31 km²
     414.09 km²
Population
     Total (2004)
     Density
21,766,731 (metropolitan area)
     8,104,079 (city proper)
     10,292 (land)/km²
Latitude 40°47' N
Longitude 73°58' W
Time zone
     Summer (DST)
EST (UTC−5)
     EDT (UTC−4)
Official website: City of New York

Contents

New York city flag, image made by Joe McMillan and found at http://fotw. ... New York City Seal, image made by Dov Gutterman, and posted at http://fotw. ... A flag is a piece of coloured cloth flown from a pole or mast, usually for purposes of signalling or identification. ... Seal on envelope A seal is an impression printed on, embossed upon, or affixed to a document (or any other object) in order to authenticate it, in lieu of or in addition to a signature. ... A nickname is a short, clever, cute, derogatory, or otherwise substitute name for a person or things real name (for example, Tom is short for Thomas). ... The Big Apple - Manhattan viewed from the World Trade Center The Big Apple is a nickname or alternate toponym for New York City. ... Above photo of New York State. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York City Governor George Pataki (R) Senators Charles Schumer (D) Hillary Rodham Clinton (D) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... The definitions of the political subdivisions of the state of New York differ from those in certain other countries or even various other U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ... The definitions of the political subdivisions of the state of New York differ from those in certain other countries or even various other U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States. ... Manhattan Borough,highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... Queens Borough in New York City Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the United States, is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City. ... A map highlighting Brooklyn and the rest of New York City. ... Staten Island lies to the South West of the rest of New York City. ... A mayor (from the Latin maÄ«or, meaning larger,greater) is the politician who serves as chief executive official of some types of municipalities. ... Michael Bloomberg Michael Rubens Mike Bloomberg (born February 14, 1942) is a prominent businessman, the founder of Bloomberg L.P., and the 108th and current Mayor of New York City. ... This article explains the meaning of area as a physical quantity. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 1,000 km² and 10,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Latitude, denoted by the Greek letter φ, gives the location of a place on Earth north or south of the Equator. ... Map of Earth showing curved lines of longitude Longitude, sometimes denoted by the Greek letter λ, describes the location of a place on Earth east or west of a north-south line called the Prime Meridian. ... Time zones are areas of the Earth that have adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Daylight saving time (also called DST, or summer time) is the portion of the year in which a regions local time is advanced by (usually) one hour from its official standard time. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time or Z, is an atomic realization of Universal Time (UT) or Greenwich Mean Time, the astronomical basis for civil time. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC - 4. ... Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time or Z, is an atomic realization of Universal Time (UT) or Greenwich Mean Time, the astronomical basis for civil time. ...


History of New York City

Main article: History of New York City

Long before the arrival of European settlers, the New York City area was inhabited by the Lenape people, including such tribes as the Manahattoes, Canarsies and Raritan; Lenape in canoes met Giovanni da Verrazzano, the first European explorer to enter New York Harbor, in 1524. Following the 1609 voyage of Henry Hudson, European settlement began with the founding of the Dutch fur trading settlement in Lower Manhattan in 1613 later called New Amsterdam (Nieuw Amsterdam) in the southern tip of Manhattan in 1624. Later in 1626, Peter Minuit established a long tradition of shrewd real estate investing when he purchased Manhattan Island and Staten Island from Algonquin tribesmen in exchange for trade goods (legend, now long disproved, has it that the island was purchased for $24 worth of glass beads). Minuit's settlement was also a haven for Huguenots seeking religious freedom. This article traces the history of New York City, part of present day New York State. ... The Lenape or Lenni-Lenape (later named Delaware Indians by Europeans) were, in the 1600s, loosely organized bands of Native American people practicing small-scale agriculture to augment a largely mobile hunter-gatherer society in the region around the Delaware River, the lower Hudson River, and western Long Island Sound. ... The Raritan people were a tribe of Lenape Indians who inhabited the areas around the present Raritan Bay in northern New Jersey and Staten Island, New York. ... Giovanni da Verrazano (his last name is also spelled Verrazzano) was born, on his familys castle, Castello Verrazzano, near Val di Greve, 30 miles south of Florence. ... New York Harbor is a geographic term that refers collectively to the bays and tidal estuaries near the mouth of the Hudson and adjacent rivers in the vicinity of New York City. ... Events March 1, 1524/5 - Giovanni da Verrazano lands near Cape Fear (approx. ... // Events April 4 – King of Spain signs an edit of expulsion of all moriscos from Spain April 9 – Spain recognizes Dutch independence May 23 - Official ratification of the Second Charter of Virginia. ... . - Thomas A. Janvier, biographer of Henry Hudson. ... The fur trade was a huge part in the early economic development of North America. ... Woolworth Building, looking south along Broadway The Lower Manhattan skyline as viewed from Hoboken, New Jersey. ... Events January - Galileo observes Neptune, but mistakes it for a star and so is not credited with its discovery. ... Dutch Revival buildings from the early 20th century on Pearl Street in lower Manhattan recall the Dutch origins of the city. ... Events January 24 - Alfonso Mendez, appointed by Pope Gregory XV as Prelate of Ethiopia, arrives at Massawa from Goa. ... Events September 30 - Nurhaci, chieftain of the Jurchens and founder of the Qing Dynasty dies and is succeeded by his son Hong Taiji. ... Peter Minuit (1580 - 1638), born in Wesel, Duchy of Cleves (present-day Germany), was the Director General of the Dutch colony of New Netherland from 1626 until 1633. ... Algonquian Indians are one of the most populous and widespread North American Native groups, with tribes originally numbering in the hundreds, and hundreds of thousands who still identify with various Algonquian peoples. ... In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, or historically as the French Calvinists. ...

History of New York City

Periods
Lenape and New Netherland
British and Revolution
Federal and early American
Tammany and Consolidation
Early 20th century
Post–World War II
Modern and post-9/11
This article traces the history of New York City, part of present day New York State. ... New York City Seal, image made by Dov Gutterman, and posted at http://fotw. ... The history of New York City (prehistory-1664) began with the geological formation of the peculiar territory of what is today New York City. ... The history of New York City (1665-1783) began with the establishment of British rule over formerly Dutch New Amsterdam and New Netherland. ... The history of New York City (1784-1854) began with the establishment of the city as the temporary capital of the new United States in 1785. ... The history of New York City (1855-1897) started with the inauguration in 1855 of Fernando Wood as the first mayor from Tammany Hall, an institution that would dominate the city throughout this period. ... The history of New York City (1898-1945) began with the formation of the consolidated city of the five boroughs in 1898. ... The history of New York City (1946-1977) saw the emergence of New York immediately after World War II as the unquestioned leading city of the world. ... The history of New York City (1978-present) has seen a modest boom and a bust in the 1980s, followed by a major boom in the 1990s, with mixed prospects since then. ...

New York City and the East River, 1848
New York City and the East River, 1848
The Twin Towers of the World Trade Center, 1973 – 2001.
The Twin Towers of the World Trade Center, 1973 – 2001.
Image:CentralPark.jpg
Central Park, in Manhattan, is still considered one of the finest examples of landscape architecture in the world.

In 1664, English ships captured the city without struggle, and the Dutch formally ceded it to the English in the Treaty of Breda at the conclusion of the Second Anglo-Dutch War in 1667. The city was renamed New York, after James, Duke of York, and became a royal colony in 1685 when James succeeded his brother as King of England. Image File history File links New York City as seen from Williamsburg, 1848. ... Image File history File links New York City as seen from Williamsburg, 1848. ... New York City waterways: 1. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x707, 165 KB) Note: There should be a higher quality version of this image available when it is completely processed by the Library of Congress. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x707, 165 KB) Note: There should be a higher quality version of this image available when it is completely processed by the Library of Congress. ... The twin towers, photographed from the west The World Trade Center in New York City was a complex of seven buildings designed by American architect Minoru Yamasaki and leased by Larry Silverstein from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey around a central plaza, near the south end... A wintry aerial view, looking south: ice on the frozen lakes, the Metropolitan Museum in the park at left, the East River and the Empire State Building in the distance Central Park (40°46′59″ N 73°58′20″ W) is a large urban public park (843 acres or 3. ... Manhattan Borough,highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... Landscape architecture is the art, planning, design, management, preservation and rehabilitation of the land and the design of man-made constructs. ... Events March 12 - New Jersey becomes a colony of England. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... The Treaty of Breda was signed at the Dutch city of Breda, July 31, 1667, by England, the Dutch Republic, France, and Denmark. ... The Royal Prince and other vessels at the Four Days Fight, 11–14 June 1666 by Abraham Storck depicts a battle of the Second Anglo-Dutch War. ... // Events January 20 - Poland cedes Kyiv, Smolensk, and eastern Ukraine to Russia in the Treaty of Andrusovo that put a final end to the Deluge, and Poland lost its status as a Central European power. ... James II of England and VII of Scotland ( 14 October 1633–16 September 1701 ) became King of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 6 February 1685. ... Events February 6 - James Stuart, Duke of York becomes King James II of England and Ireland and King James VII of Scotland. ... Charles II (29 May 1630–6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ...


New York was greatly damaged by fire during the Battle of Brooklyn at the start of the American Revolutionary War, and was occupied by the British until November 25, 1783. On this date, marked annually thereafter as "Evacuation Day," George Washington returned to the city and the last British forces left the United States. On September 13, 1788 the United States Constitutional Convention sets New York City as the temporary capital of the U.S. Also, the Continental Congress met in New York City under the Articles of Confederation. On April 30, 1789 the first President of the United States, George Washington, was inaugurated at Federal Hall on Wall Street. New York City remained the capital of the US until 1790. The Battle Pass area, also known as Flatbush Pass in the area of Prospect Park and Green-Wood Cemetery. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen North American colonies. ... November 25 is the 329th (in leap years the 330th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732–December 14, 1799) was an American planter, political figure, and military leader. ... September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... A constitutional convention is a gathering of delegates for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution. ... The Articles of Confederation The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, commonly known as the Articles of Confederation, formed the first governing document of the United States of America. ... April 30 is the 120th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (121st in leap years), with 245 days remaining, as the last day in April. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The President of the United States (often abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... J.Q.A. Wards statue of George Washington in front of Federal Hall, on the site where Washington was inaugurated as the first U.S. President Federal Hall, once located at 26 Wall Street in New York City, was the first capitol building of the United States. ... For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


During the 19th century, the city was transformed by immigration, a visionary development proposal called the Commissioners' Plan of 1811, which expanded the city street grid to encompass all of Manhattan, and the opening of the Erie Canal, which connected the Atlantic port to the vast agricultural markets of the Mid-western United States and Canada in 1819. By 1835, New York City overtook Philadelphia as the largest city in the United States. Local politics became dominated by Tammany Hall, a Democratic Party political machine. Public-minded members of the old merchant aristocracy pressed for a Central Park, which was opened to a design competition in 1857: it was the first landscape park in an American city. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... An 1807 version of the Commissioners Grid plan for Manhattan, a few years before it was adopted in 1811. ... The white section highlights the general area of the canal, with the actual canal shown in blue The Erie Canal (later replaced by part of the New York State Barge Canal system, which was renamed the Erie Canal) is a canal in New York State, United States, that runs from... Midwest States (United States of America, ND to OH) The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... 1819 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Philadelphia is a village located in Jefferson County, New York. ... The Tammany Hall on 14th Street, New York City Tammany Hall was the name given to the Democratic Party political machine that dominated New York City politics from the mayoral victory of Fernando Wood in 1854 through the election of Fiorello LaGuardia in 1934. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... A political machine is an unofficial system of political organization based on patronage, the spoils system, and behind-the-scenes control within the structure of a representative democracy. ... A wintry aerial view, looking south: ice on the frozen lakes, the Metropolitan Museum in the park at left, the East River and the Empire State Building in the distance Central Park (40°46′59″ N 73°58′20″ W) is a large urban public park (843 acres or 3. ...


During the American Civil War (18611865), the city's strong commercial ties to the South, its growing immigrant population, and anger about conscription led to divided sympathy for both the Union and Confederacy, culminating in the Draft Riots of 1863, the worst civil unrest in American history. After the Civil War, the rate of immigration from Europe grew steeply, and New York became the first stop for millions seeking a new and better life in the United States, a role acknowledged by the dedication of the Statue of Liberty in 1886. The American Civil War was fought in North America from 1861 until 1865 between the United States of America – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... The U.S. Southern states or The South, known during the American Civil War era as Dixie, is a distinctive region of the United States with its own unique historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans February 4, 1861 until captured May... The New York Draft Riots of 1863 initially represented protests in response to President Abraham Lincolns Enrollment Act of Conscription to draft men to fight in the ongoing Civil War. ... 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... World map showing location of Europe When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second-smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ... Statue of Liberty The Statue of Liberty, in full Liberty Enlightening the World, is a statue, given to the U.S. by France in the late 19th century, that stands at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor as a welcome to all returning Americans, visitors, and... 1886 is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 18 - Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ...


In two separate actions in 1874 and 1895, New York City (and New York County) annexed sections of southern Westchester County known as the Bronx. In 1898, New York City took the political form in which it exists to this day. Manhattan and the Bronx, though still one county, were established as two separate boroughs and joined together with three other boroughs created from parts of adjacent counties to form the new municipal government originally called "Greater New York". The Borough of Brooklyn incorporated the independent City of Brooklyn, recently joined to Manhattan by the Brooklyn Bridge, and several municipalities in eastern Kings County, New York; the Borough of Queens was created from western Queens County (with the remnant established as Nassau County in 1899); and The Borough of Staten Island contained all of Richmond County. All municipal (county, town and city) governments contained within the boroughs were abolished. In 1914, the New York State Legislature created Bronx county, making five counties coterminous with the five boroughs. 1874 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1895 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Annexation is the legal merging of some territory into another body. ... Westchester County is a suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States. ... 1898 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... A borough is a local government administrative subdivision used in the Canadian province of Quebec, in some states of the United States, and formerly in New Zealand. ... A map highlighting Brooklyn and the rest of New York City. ... View from the East River (2002) Plan of one tower for the Brooklyn Bridge, 1867. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... Queens Borough in New York City Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the United States, is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City. ... Location in the state of New York Formed 1899 Seat Mineola Area  - Total  - Water 1,173 km² (453 mi²) 431 km² (166 mi²) 36. ... 1899 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Staten Island (disambiguation) Staten Island, shown in an enhanced satellite image Staten Island is one of the five boroughs of New York City, located on an island of the same name on the west side of the Narrows at the entrance of New York Harbor. ... 1914 is a common year starting on Thursday. ...


On June 15, 1904 over 1,000 people, mostly German Immigrants, were killed when the steamship General Slocum caught fire and burned on North Brother Island, in the East River; and on March 25, 1911 the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in Greenwich Village took the lives of 145 female garment workers, which would eventually lead to great advancements in the city's fire department, building codes, and workplace regulations. June 15 is the 166th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (167th in leap years), with 199 days remaining. ... 1904 is a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Wreckage of the General Slocum Victims of the General Slocum washed ashore at North Brother Island The General Slocum was a steamship launched in 1891. ... North Brother Island is an island in the East River situated between the Bronx and Rikers Island. ... New York City waterways: 1. ... March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ... 1911 was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City on March 25, 1911, was a major industrial disaster, causing the death of more than one hundred garment workers who either died in the fire or jumped to their deaths. ... Greenwich Village (also known as the West Village or simply the Village) is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City. ...


Throughout the first half of the 20th century, the city became a world center for industry, commerce, and communication. Interborough Rapid Transit (the first new york subway company) began operating in 1904, and the railroads operating out of Grand Central Terminal thrived. New York City became the most populous city in the world in 1925, overtaking London, which had reigned for a century. Despite the effects of the Great Depression, the 1930s saw the building of some of the world's tallest skyscrapers, including numerous Art-Deco masterpieces that are still part of the city's skyline today. Both before and after World War II, vast areas of the city were also reshaped by the rise of the bridges, parks and parkways of coordinator Robert Moses, the greatest proponent of automobile-centered modernist urbanism in America. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was the operator of the original New York Subway line that opened in 1904 and additional rapid transit lines in the City of New York. ... 1904 is a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The clock in the Main Concourse © 2004 Metropolitan Transportation Authority Grand Central Terminal (often still called Grand Central Station, although technically that is the name of the nearby post office and New York City Subway station on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line) is a train station at 15 Vanderbilt Avenue... 1925 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... // Events and trends The 1930s were spent struggling for a solution to the global depression. ... Asheville City Hall, 1926–1928 epitomizes the American Art Deco style. ... Robert Moses. ...


A post-World War II economic and residential boom was associated with returning veterans and immigration from Europe, and huge tracts of new housing were constructed in eastern Queens. In 1951, the United Nations relocated from its first headquarters in Flushing Meadows Park, Queens, to the East Side of Manhattan. Like many US cities, New York suffered population decline, an erosion of its industrial base, and race riots in the 1960s, and by the 1970s, the city had gained a reputation for being a crime-ridden relic of history. In 1975, the city government was on the brink of financial collapse and had to restructure its debt through the Municipal Assistance Corporation, headed by Felix Rohatyn. The city was also forced to accept increased scrutiny of its finances by an agency of New York State called the Financial Control Board. World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons like the atom bomb World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a mid-20th-century conflict that engulfed much of the globe... 1951 was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945. ... Flushing Meadows Park, also sometimes referred to as Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, is located in northern Queens, New York City, USA at the intersection of the Long Island Expressway and the Grand Central Parkway. ... The 1960s, or The Sixties, in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1960 and 1969, but the expression has taken on a wider meaning over the past twenty years. ... This article provides extensive lists of events and significant personalities of the 1970s. ... 1975 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... Felix G. Rohatyn (b. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ...


The 1980s saw a rebirth of Wall Street, and the city reclaimed its role at the center of the world-wide financial industry. In the 1990s, crime rates dropped drastically and the outflow of population turned around, as the city once again became the destination not only of immigrants from around the world, but of many U.S. citizens seeking to live a cosmopolitan lifestyle that only New York City can offer. In the late 1990s, the city benefited disproportionately from the success of the financial services industry during the dot com boom, one of the factors in a decade of booming residential and commercial real estate value increases. // Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 1960s and 1970s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... // Events and trends The 1990s are generally classified as having moved slightly away from the more conservative 1980s, but otherwise retaining the same mindset. ... // Events and trends The 1990s are generally classified as having moved slightly away from the more conservative 1980s, but otherwise retaining the same mindset. ... Dot-com (also dotcom or redundantly dot. ...


New York City was the site of a terrorist attack on September 11, 2001 when nearly 3,000 people were killed by an Islamic terrorist strike on the World Trade Center, including New Yorkers employed in the buildings, passengers and crew on two commercial jetliners, and hundreds of firemen, policemen, and rescue workers who came to the aid of the disaster. Thick, acrid smoke continued to pour out of its ruins for months following the Twin Towers' fiery collapse. The city has since rebounded and the physical cleanup of Ground Zero was completed ahead of schedule. The Freedom Tower, intended to be exactly 1,776 feet tall (a symbolic number as the year the Declaration of Independence was written), is to be built on the site and is slated to be constructed between 2006 and 2010. The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of suicide attacks against civilians of the United States conducted on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... The twin towers, photographed from the west The World Trade Center in New York City was a complex of seven buildings designed by American architect Minoru Yamasaki and leased by Larry Silverstein from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey around a central plaza, near the south end... A jetliner is an airliner powered by jet engines (usually of the turbofan type). ... The New York City Fire Department (FDNY) has the responsibility of protecting citizens and property in New York Citys five boroughs from fires and fire hazards, as well as first response to biological, chemical and radioactive hazards. ... Ground zero is the exact location on the ground marking the detonation point of any bomb; in the case of a bomb designed to explode in the air, it refers to the point on the ground directly below the bomb at the moment of detonation. ... For the tower in Miami, see Freedom Tower (Miami) The Freedom Tower is the name given to the piece of crap that is most likely going to be created in the space of the lost World Trade Center. ... U.S. Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is a document in which the Thirteen Colonies declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2010 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Over the next ten years, the city expects a wave of public and private-sector building projects to reshape large sections of the city, and a residential construction boom has resulted in permits being issued for over 25,000 new residential units every year.


Boroughs and neighborhoods

The five boroughs: 1: Manhattan, 2: Brooklyn, 3: Queens, 4: Bronx, 5: Staten Island
The five boroughs: 1: Manhattan, 2: Brooklyn,
3: Queens, 4: Bronx, 5: Staten Island

Residents of the city often refer to the city itself as "the Five Boroughs," reserving the phrase "the City" for Manhattan, and referring to the other boroughs as "the Outer Boroughs." However, as more Manhattanites migrate outwards, fleeing sky-high rents, this usage is on the decline. Nonetheless, those less familiar with the city often (incorrectly) think Manhattan is synonymous with New York City. Through the boroughs, there are hundreds of neighborhoods (or nabes, in the local vernacular) in the city, many with a definable history and character all their own. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2652x2582, 6650 KB) A map showing the five boroughs of New York City, as well as airports. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2652x2582, 6650 KB) A map showing the five boroughs of New York City, as well as airports. ... The Five Boroughs of New York City The Five Boroughs is a colloquialism often used by residents of New York City to unambiguously refer to the city itself, as opposed to any particular borough or to the greater metropolitan area. ... Manhattanite refers to a resident of the island of Manhattan in New York City, typically carrying connotations of snobbery and elitism. ... Neighbourhood is also a term in topology. ...

  • Manhattan (New York County, pop. 1,564,798) is the business center of the city, and the most superlatively urban. It is the most densely populated, and the home of most of the city's skyscrapers.

See: List of Manhattan neighborhoods Manhattan Borough,highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... Taipei 101, considered the worlds tallest skyscraper. ... This is a complete list of neighborhoods in Manhattan, one of five boroughs of New York City, stated in geographic order, moving from north to south: Marble Hill Inwood Washington Heights Hudson Heights Harlem Central Harlem Bradhurst Mount Morris Park Strivers Row West Harlem Hamilton Heights - Sugar Hill Manhattanville East...

  • The Bronx (Bronx County, pop. 1,363,198) is known as the purported birthplace of hip hop culture, as well as being the home of the New York Yankees. It is the only borough of the city on the mainland of the United States.

See: List of Bronx neighborhoods The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States. ... Hip hop is a cultural movement that began amongst urban African American youth in New York and has since spread around the world. ... The New York Yankees are a Major League baseball team based in The Bronx, New York City. ... This is a list of neighborhoods in the Bronx, one of five boroughs of New York City. ...

  • Brooklyn (Kings County, pop. 2,472,523) is the most populous borough, with a strong native identity. It ranges from a business district downtown to large residential tracts in the central and south-eastern areas.

See: List of Brooklyn neighborhoods A map highlighting Brooklyn and the rest of New York City. ... These are the neighborhoods of Brooklyn, one of five boroughs of New York City. ...

  • Queens (Queens County, pop. 2,225,486) is the most diverse county in the U.S., with more immigrants than anywhere else. Geographically it is the largest of the boroughs, and the legacy of its old constituent towns is still evident. It is also the borough that houses Shea Stadium, home of the New York Mets, two of the three major airports, and Flushing Meadows Corona Park home to the 1939 and 1964 World Fairs.

See: List of Queens neighborhoods Queens Borough in New York City Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the United States, is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... Flushing Meadows Park, also sometimes referred to as Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, is located in northern Queens, New York City, USA at the intersection of the Long Island Expressway and the Grand Central Parkway. ... This is a list of neighborhoods in Queens, one of five boroughs of New York City. ...

  • Staten Island (Richmond County, pop. 459,737) is somewhat isolated and the most suburban in character of the five boroughs, but has become gradually more integrated into city life in recent decades, particularly since the opening of the Verrazano Narrows Bridge in 1964, an event that bred controversy and even a recent attempt at secession.

See: List of Staten Island neighborhoods Staten Island lies to the South West of the rest of New York City. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... The Verrazano Narrows Bridge and Staten Island, New York at dawn The Verrazano Narrows Bridge (often written as the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge) is a suspension bridge that connects the boroughs of Staten Island and Brooklyn in New York City at the Narrows, the reach connecting the relatively protected upper bay... 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... This is list of neighborhoods in Staten Island, one of five boroughs of New York City. ...

Neighborhood rebranding in New York City has been a constant phenomenon for decades as real estate promoters, community groups and residents all sometimes rename communities to increase prestige and move away from an older negative reputation. ...

New York City government

Main article: Government of New York City
New York's City Hall
New York's City Hall

New York City is governed pursuant to the New York City Charter, as amended. The charter is enacted and amended by the New York State legislature, and occasionally through referendum. Though subservient to the State of New York, the city enjoys a high degree of legislative and executive autonomy. Like most governmental entities in the United States, the city government is divided into executive, legislative and judicial branches. This article discusses the government of New York City. ... New Yorks City Hall File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... New Yorks City Hall File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A charter is a document bestowing certain rights on a town, city, university or institution; sometimes used as a loan of money. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... Chamber of the Estates-General, the Dutch legislature. ... The judiciary, also referred to as the judicature, consists of justices, judges and magistrates among other types of adjudicators. ...


The executive branch of New York City is headed by the Mayor, who is elected by direct popular vote. The Mayor of New York City appoints several Deputy Mayors to head major offices within the executive branch of the city government. Deputy Mayors report directly to the Mayor. They are: For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. ...

  • Deputy Mayor for Operations
  • Deputy Mayor for Economic Development and Rebuilding
  • Deputy Mayor for Policy
  • Deputy Mayor for Administration
  • Deputy Mayor for Legal Affairs

Legislative power in New York City is vested in a unicameral City Council, which contains 51 members, each representing a district of approximately 157,000 people. Council members are elected every four years, and the leader of the majority party is called the Speaker. Like most legislative bodies, the City Council is divided into committees which have oversight of various functions of the city government. Bills passed by a simple majority are sent to the mayor, who may sign it into law. If the mayor vetoes the bill, the Council has 30 days to override the veto by a two-thirds majority vote. Unicameralism is the practice of having only one legislative or parliamentary chamber. ...


Unlike the rest of New York State, New York City does not have typical county courts. Instead, there is a single Civil Court, with a presence in each borough and city-wide jurisdiction, and a Criminal Court for each New York City county which handles lesser criminal offenses and domestic violence cases, a responsibility shared with the Family Court. Unlike other counties in New York, judges for Family Courts in New York City are appointed for ten year terms by the mayor, instead of being elected. Domestic violence, by barest definition, is violence within a home. ...


Geography and climate

Central Park in Manhattan looking south, February 2005, when the Christo installation The Gates was on display in the park (orange "gates" visible in photo)
Central Park in Manhattan looking south, February 2005, when the Christo installation The Gates was on display in the park (orange "gates" visible in photo)
  • 40°42′51″ N 74°0′23″ W

New York City is situated among an archipelago of islands astride the Atlantic Ocean off the Eastern Seaboard of North America, surrounding the fine New York Harbor, which was the very reason for the city's founding. The city itself has been built on the three major islands of Manhattan, Staten Island, and on western Long Island (Brooklyn and Queens), as well as on the mainland in the Bronx. There are also some smaller islands in the surrounding waters. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2652x2582, 6343 KB) A map showing the major waterways in New York City. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2652x2582, 6343 KB) A map showing the major waterways in New York City. ... View of the Hudson in the 1880s showing Jersey City The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, is a river running mainly through New York State but partly forming the boundary between the states of New York and New Jersey. ... New York City waterways: 1. ... Long Island Sound near Guilford, Connecticut Long Island Sound is an estuary of the Atlantic Ocean and various rivers in the United States. ... Newark Bay, as seen from the waterfront of Bayonne, New Jersey Newark Bay is shown highlighted on a TERRA image of New York Harbor Newark Bay is a body of water, a tiday back bay of New York Harbor formed at the confluence of the Passaic and Hackensack rivers. ... Upper New York Bay, sometimes called Upper New York Harbor or the Upper Bay, is the northern area of New York Harbor inside the Narrows. ... Lower New York Bay is the section of New York Bay outside of the Narrows and open directly to the Atlantic Ocean. ... Jamaica Bay is a bay that lies in the shadow of New York Citys skyscrapers and is adjacent to one of the nations busiest airports. ... Download high resolution version (2035x1667, 1626 KB)Photo from a plane taken of Central Park, NYC by User:RoySmith, who has given permission to crop it and upload it. ... Download high resolution version (2035x1667, 1626 KB)Photo from a plane taken of Central Park, NYC by User:RoySmith, who has given permission to crop it and upload it. ... A wintry aerial view, looking south: ice on the frozen lakes, the Metropolitan Museum in the park at left, the East River and the Empire State Building in the distance Central Park (40°46′59″ N 73°58′20″ W) is a large urban public park (843 acres or 3. ... Christo Yavasheff (born June 13, 1935) is an artist popularly known as Christo. ... A section of the Gates between the Great Lawn oval and the 86th Street Transverse (Feb. ... An archipelago is a landform which consists of a chain or cluster of islands. ... Categories: US geography stubs ... World map showing location of North America A satellite composite image of North America North America is a continent in the northern hemisphere, bounded on the north by the Arctic Ocean, on the east by the North Atlantic Ocean, on the south by the Caribbean Sea, and on the west... New York Harbor is a geographic term that refers collectively to the bays and tidal estuaries near the mouth of the Hudson and adjacent rivers in the vicinity of New York City. ... Image of Long Island taken by NASA. Long Island is an island off the North American coast. ... This article is about the geomorphological/geopolitical term; MAINLAND is also a cheese brand owned by Fonterra, a New Zealand dairy company. ...


The Hudson River flows from the Hudson Valley into New York Bay, becoming a tidal estuary that separates the Bronx and Manhattan from New Jersey. The East River and Harlem River, really a single tidal strait, stretch from the Long Island Sound to New York Bay, separating the Bronx and Manhattan from Long Island. View of the Hudson in the 1880s showing Jersey City The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, is a river running mainly through New York State but partly forming the boundary between the states of New York and New Jersey. ... The Hudson Valley refers to the canyon of the Hudson River and its adjacent communities in New York State, generally from northern Westchester County northward to the city of Albany. ... New York Bay is the collective term for the marine areas surrounding the entrance of the Hudson River into the Atlantic Ocean. ... The tide is the regular rising and falling of the oceans surface caused by changes in gravitational forces external to the Earth. ... Estuaries and coastal waters are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth, providing numerous ecological, economic, cultural, and aesthetic benefits and services. ... State nickname: The Garden State Other U.S. States Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Governor Richard Codey (D)Acting Senators Jon Corzine (D) Frank Lautenberg (D) Official languages None defined Area 22,608 km² (47th)  - Land 19,231 km²  - Water 3,378 km² (14. ... New York City waterways: 1. ... The Harlem River, shown in red, between the Bronx and Manhattan in New York City The Harlem River is a tidal strait in New York City, USA that flows 8 miles between the East River and the Hudson River, separating the borough of Manhattan from the Bronx. ... Simplified diagram A strait is a narrow channel of water that connects two larger bodies of water, and thus lies between two land masses. ... Long Island Sound near Guilford, Connecticut Long Island Sound is an estuary of the Atlantic Ocean and various rivers in the United States. ...


Upper New York Bay is surrounded by Manhattan, Brooklyn, Staten Island, and the coast of New Jersey, and is connected by the Narrows between Brooklyn and Staten Island to Lower New York Bay, which is partially surrounded by Brooklyn, Staten Island, and the coast of New Jersey, and opens to the Atlantic Ocean. Upper New York Bay, sometimes called Upper New York Harbor or the Upper Bay, is the northern area of New York Harbor inside the Narrows. ... New York Harbor, as seen in a TERRA satellite image. ... Lower New York Bay is the section of New York Bay outside of the Narrows and open directly to the Atlantic Ocean. ...


The shape of the land has been altered substantially by human intervention, with considerable land reclamation along the waterfronts since Dutch times, most dramatically in Lower Manhattan, and continuing in modern developments like Battery Park City. Much of the natural variations in topography have been evened out, particularly in Manhattan (one possible meaning for Manhattan is "island of hills"; in fact, the island was quite hilly before European settlement). A number of smaller islands have been artificially enlarged, and the map of islands in Jamaica Bay has been completely transformed. Land reclamation is either of two distinct practices. ... Woolworth Building, looking south along Broadway The Lower Manhattan skyline as viewed from Hoboken, New Jersey. ... Battery Park City is a 90 acre (0. ... Before Mexico City, Tenochtitlan was an artificial island of 250,000 (Dr Atl) Dejima, not allowed direct contact with nearby Nagasaki Formoza (Gdynia) An artificial island is an island that has been formed by human, rather than natural means. ... Jamaica Bay is a bay that lies in the shadow of New York Citys skyscrapers and is adjacent to one of the nations busiest airports. ...


New York has a humid continental climate, though being adjacent to water it suffers less temperature fluctuation than inland areas. New York winters are typically cold (though not severely so; temperatures below 0 °F (-18 °C) only occur about once per decade on average), and sometimes feature snowstorms that can paralyze the city with over a foot (30 cm) of snow. Springs are mild, averaging in the 50s °F (10 to 15 °C) in late March to the lower 80s °F (25 to 30 °C) in early June. Summers in New York are hot and humid, with temperatures commonly exceeding 90 °F (32 °C), although high temperatures above 100 °F (38 °C) are about as rare as subzero (F) lows in winter. Autumns are comfortable in New York and similar to spring in temperature. However, the weather is notably unpredictable, with mild, almost snowless winters (such as in 1997-98) and relatively cool summers (such as in 1992) an occasional surprise, and huge snowstorms arriving as late as the second week in April (significant snow after mid-March is fairly rare though). Temperatures have been as high as 106 °F (38 °C) set on July 9th, 1936 or have dipped as low as -15 °F (-26 °C) set on February 9th, 1934. These temperatures are not common and have not been matched or surpassed in more than six decades. Travelers are advised to check forecasts and bring several layers of clothing in late fall and in the early spring months (e.g., November, March, April). The humid continental climate is found over large areas of land masses in the temperate regions of the mid latitudes where there is a zone of conflict between polar and tropical air masses. ... July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 175 days remaining. ... 1936 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... February 9 is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1934 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... This is a list of decades which have articles with more information about them. ...


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1,214.4 km² (468.9 mi²). 785.6 km² (303.3 mi²) of it is land and 428.8 km² (165.6 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 35.31% water. Although most of the city is adequately above sea level, parts of it could be threatened in the future if the current patterns of global warming continue. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile (symbol sq. ...

This article provides an index of natural geographic features of the extended area of New York Harbor. ...

Demographics

A typically diverse group of New Yorkers on Fifth Avenue in Midtown Manhattan.
A typically diverse group of New Yorkers on Fifth Avenue in Midtown Manhattan.
Main article: Demographics of New York City

As of the census2 of 2000, there are 8,008,278 people, 3,021,588 households, and 1,852,233 families residing in the city. The population density is 10,194.2/km² (26,402.9/mi²). There are 3,200,912 housing units at an average density of 4,074.6/km² (10,553.2/mi²). The racial makeup of the city is 44.66% White, 26.59% Black or African American, 0.52% Native American, 9.83% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 13.42% from other races, and 4.92% from two or more races. 26.98% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. 35.9% of the population is foreign born (18.9% born in Latin America, 8.6% Asia, 7.0% Europe). The ethnic makeup is 11.5% African-American, 9.8% Puerto Rican, 8.7% Italian, 5.3% Irish, 5.1% Dominican, and 4.5% Chinese. Fifth Avenue in Midtown, New York City crowd, mid-December 2004. ... Fifth Avenue in Midtown, New York City crowd, mid-December 2004. ... Street sign at Fifth Avenue and East 57th street Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in New York City. ... View of Midtown from Empire State Building. ... New York City is one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the world, and has a long history of absorbing immigrants from nations all over the globe. ... A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The following is a list of sources used in the creation of Wikipedia articles on various geographic topics and locations, such as cities, counties, states, and countries. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The term Asian in a geographical sense simply refers to something or someone from Asia. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans, Black Americans, or simply blacks are an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to West and Central Africa. ...

City of New York
Population by year [1]
1790 33,131
1800 60,515
1810 96,373
1820 123,706
1830 202,589
1840 312,710
1850 515,547
1860 813,669
1870 942,292
1880 1,206,299
1890 1,515,301
1900 3,437,202
1910 4,766,883
1920 5,620,048
1930 6,930,446
1940 7,454,995
1950 7,891,957
1960 7,781,984
1970 7,894,862
1980 7,071,639
1990 7,322,564
2000 8,008,278

New York City is also home to the nation's largest community of American Jews, with an estimate of 972,000 in 2002, and is the worldwide headquarters of the Hasidic Lubavitch sect and the Bobover and Satmar branches of Hasidism. 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1800 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1890 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1900 is a common year starting on Monday. ... 1910 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1920 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... 1930 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... 1940 was a leap year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1950 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1970 was a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1980 is a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... History See main article: History of the Jews in the United States Though Jews arrived in the United States are early as the 17th century, Jewish immigration grew in the 19th century. ... Hasidic Judaism (Hebrew: Chasidut חסידות) is a Haredi Jewish religious movement. ... Chabad Lubavitch, also known as Lubavitch Chabad, is a large branch of Hasidic Judaism. ... Bobov is a Hasidic group within Judaism with its headquarters in the neighborhood of Borough Park in Brooklyn, New York. ... Satmar is the largest Hasidic group in existence today. ...


There are 3,021,588 households with a median income of $38,293; 29.7% contain children under the age of 18 and 37.2% are married couples living together. 19.1% have a single female householder, and 38.7% are non-families. 31.9% of all households are made up of individuals and 9.9% are single residents 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.59 and the average family size is 3.32. Marriage is a legal, social, and religious relationship between individuals which has formed the foundation of the family for most societies. ...


Per capita income is $22,402; men and women have a median income of $37,435 and $32,949 respectively. 21.2% of the population and 18.5% of families are below the poverty line, of whom 30.0% are under the age of 18 and 17.8% are 65 and older. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the number of people. ... The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


In the city the population is spread out with 24.2% under the age of 18, 10.0% from 18 to 24, 32.9% from 25 to 44, 21.2% from 45 to 64, and 11.7% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 34 years. For every 100 females there are 90.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 85.9 males.


New York City's unemployment rate in March of 2005 was 5.2%, identical to the nationwide rate. Dorothea Langes Migrant Mother depicts destitute pea pickers in California during the Great Depression. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Crime

Since 1991, New York City has seen a continuous fifteen-year trend of decreasing crime and is now the safest large city in America. Neighborhoods that were once considered dangerous are now thriving with new businesses and housing, and many residents feel safe to walk the streets late at night. Violent crime in the city has dropped by 75% in the last twelve years and the murder rate in 2004 was at its lowest level in over forty years: there were 572 murders that year compared to 2,245 in 1990. Some feel that the implementation of COMPSTAT crime analysis by the New York Police Department in 1994 is responsible for the positive changes. 1991 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... CompStat (short for COMPuter STATistics or COMParitive STATistics) is the name given to the New York City Police Departments management accountability process. ... The New York City Police Department (NYPD) , the largest police department in the United States, has primary responsibility for law enforcement and investigation within the five boroughs of New York City. ...


Overall, New York City had a rate of 2,801.6 crimes per 100,000 in 2004, compared with 8,959.7 in Dallas; 7903.7 in Detroit; 7,402.3 in Phoenix; 7,346.8 in San Antonio; 7,194.8 in Houston; 5,470.5 in Philadelphia; 4,376.0 in Los Angeles; and 4,102.7 in San Diego. 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Downtown Dallas City nickname: Big D Location Location in the state of Texas Government Counties Dallas County Collin County Denton County Kaufman County Rockwall County Mayor Laura Miller Physical characteristics Area      Land      Water 385. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Michigan Founded  -Incorporated July 24, 1701 1816  County Wayne County Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick... Phoenix was incorporated as a city on February 5, 1881. ... Downtown San Antonio as viewed from the Tower of the Americas Nickname: Alamo City Location in Texas Founded  -Incorporated 1731 {{{incorporated}}}  County Bexar County Mayor Phil Hardberger Area  - Total  - Water 1,067. ... Houstons downtown skyline. ... Independence Hall Philadelphia (sometimes referred to as Philly or the City of Brotherly Love) is the fifth most populous city in the United States and the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, both in area and population. ... The City of Los Angeles (from Spanish Los Ángeles , meaning the angels), also known as L.A., is the second-largest city in the United States in terms of population, as well as one of the worlds most important economic, cultural, and entertainment centers. ... City nickname: Americas Finest City Location Location of San Diego within San Diego County Government County San Diego Mayor vacant Physical characteristics Area      Land      Water 372. ...


Source: NYC.gov


New Yorkers are famous for doing things "bigger and better," and this sometimes applies to criminal activity: Organized crime has been associated with New York City since the early 20th Century, when legendary mobsters Arnold Rothstein, Meyer Lansky, and Lucky Luciano transformed it, although later decades are more famous for Mafia prosecutions (and prosecutors like Rudolph Giuliani) than for the influence of the Five Families. Another notorious crime story is the serial killings by the "Son of Sam", who on July 29, 1976 began a series of attacks that terrorized the city for the next year. Organized crime is crime carried out systematically by formal criminal organizations. ... Organized crime is crime carried out systematically by formal criminal organizations. ... Arnold Rothstein (January 17, 1882 - November 4, 1928) was a New York businessman and gambler chiefly famous for his role as a kingpin of organized crime. ... Meyer Lansky (born Majer Suchowliński, July 4, 1902 – January 15, 1983), was a gangster born in Grodno, then part of Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth occupied by the Russian Empire but now in Belarus. ... Lucky Luciano. ... Rudolph William Louis Rudy Giuliani III, KBE (born May 28, 1944) served as the Mayor of New York City from January 1, 1994 through December 31, 2001. ... This article is about the organized crime groups. ... David Falco Berkowitz (born June 1, 1953), better known by his nickname Son of Sam, is an infamous 1970s New York City serial killer who killed six people and wounded several others. ... July 29 is the 210th day (211th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 155 days remaining. ... 1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ...


For New York City crime Statistics see http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/html/pct/cspdf.html.

The following is a timeline of New York City crimes and disasters. ...

Economy

Historically, the city developed because of New York Harbor, widely considered one of the finest natural ports in the world. The value of this port was greatly expanded upon in 1819 with the opening of the Erie Canal, which gave New York an enormous advantage over the competing ports of Boston and Philadelphia. The old port facility was at the South Street Seaport in Manhattan, but today there is only residual activity remaining at Red Hook in Brooklyn, and the Howland Hook Marine Terminal in Staten Island. Since the 1950s, most shipping activity in the area has shifted to Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal in New Jersey. But despite changes in international shipping, trade and the tertiary sector have always remained the real basis of New York's economy. Download high resolution version (586x798, 93 KB) Photograph taken by Colin Gregory Palmer of the New York Stock Exchange in New York City in 2003. ... Download high resolution version (586x798, 93 KB) Photograph taken by Colin Gregory Palmer of the New York Stock Exchange in New York City in 2003. ... New York Stock Exchange (June 2003) The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is the largest stock exchange in the world, although its trading volume was exceeded by that of NASDAQ (historic comparison graph {pdf}) during the 1990s. ... Seaport, a painting by Claude Lorrain, 1638 A port is a facility at the edge of an ocean, river, or lake for receiving ships and transferring cargo and persons to them. ... The white section highlights the general area of the canal, with the actual canal shown in blue The Erie Canal (later replaced by part of the New York State Barge Canal system, which was renamed the Erie Canal) is a canal in New York State, United States, that runs from... Alternative meanings: Boston (disambiguation) The 18th-century Old State House in Boston is surrounded by tall buildings of the 19th and 20th centuries. ... Philadelphia is a village located in Jefferson County, New York. ... A view of the South Street Seaport in New York with the Brooklyn, Manhattan, and Williamsburg bridges. ... Red Hook is a neighborhood of the Borough of Brooklyn, New York. ... The Howland Hook Marine Terminal is a container port facility located in northwestern Staten Island in New York City. ... // Events and trends The 1950s in Western society was marked with a sharp rise in the economy for the first time in almost 30 years and return to the 1920s-type consumer society built on credit and boom-times, as well as the height of the baby-boom from returning... Container port facilities at Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal, seen from Bayonne, New Jersey. ... State nickname: The Garden State Other U.S. States Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Governor Richard Codey (D)Acting Senators Jon Corzine (D) Frank Lautenberg (D) Official languages None defined Area 22,608 km² (47th)  - Land 19,231 km²  - Water 3,378 km² (14. ... A fruit stand at a market. ... The tertiary sector of industry, also called the service sector or the service industry, is one of the three main industrial categories of a developed economy, the others being the secondary industry (manufacturing and primary goods production such as agriculture), and primary industry (extraction such as mining and fishing). ...


Manufacturing first became a major economic base for New York City in the mid-nineteenth century with the advent of industrialization and the railroad. New York was formerly a national center for clothing manufacture, and some continues, sometimes in sweatshops. Like international shipping, though, manufacturing gradually declined in the late-twentieth century with rising land values. The city was also a first center of the American film industry, along with Chicago, Illinois, until it moved to Hollywood, California, and still has some television and movie production. (See also List of types of clothing and Clothing terminology) Humans nearly universally wear articles of clothing (also known as dress, garments, or attire) on the body. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The cinema of the United States, sometimes simply referred to as Hollywood, can perhaps be summed up by the title American film critic Pauline Kael gave a 1968 collection of her reviews: Kiss Kiss Bang Bang. ... Chicago, colloquially known as the Second City and the Windy City, is the third-largest city in population in the United States and the largest inland city in the country. ... Greetings from Hollywood Hollywood is a district of the city of Los Angeles, California, U.S.A., that extends from Vermont Avenue on the east to just beyond Laurel Canyon Boulevard above Sunset and Crescent Heights Boulevards on the west; the north to south boundary east of La Brea Avenue...


Today, New York City is the chief center of finance in the world economy, with Wall Street in Lower Manhattan's Financial District. Financial markets based in the city include the New York Stock Exchange, NASDAQ, American Stock Exchange, New York Mercantile Exchange, and New York Board of Trade. Many corporations also have their headquarters in New York. Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses and organizations raise, allocate and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... The world economy can be represented in various ways, and broken down in various ways. ... For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... Woolworth Building, looking south along Broadway The Lower Manhattan skyline as viewed from Hoboken, New Jersey. ... A view up Broad Street in the Financial District in Manhattan Federal Hall The Financial District is the neighborhood in New York City on the southernmost section of the island of Manhattan which comprises the offices and headquarters of many of the citys major financial institutions, including the New... In finance, financial markets facilitate: The raising of capital (in the capital markets); The transfer of risk (in the derivatives markets); and International trade (in the currency markets). ... New York Stock Exchange (June 2003) The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is the largest stock exchange in the world, although its trading volume was exceeded by that of NASDAQ (historic comparison graph {pdf}) during the 1990s. ... NASDAQ MarketSite (Times Square, New York City) at night NASDAQ (originally an acronym for National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations) is a U.S. electronic stock exchange. ... The American Stock Exchange (AMEX) is a stock exchange operated by American Stock Exchange LLC, a subsidiary of the United States of America. ... The New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) is the worlds largest physical commodity futures exchange located in New York City. ... The New York Board of Trade (NYBOT) is a physical commodity futures exchange located in New York, New York. ... This is a list of major corporations based in New York City. ...


New York is also the center of many of the service sector industries in the U.S., with more Fortune 500 companies headquartered in the city than anywhere else in the country (including companies as prominent and diverse as Altria Group, Time Warner, American International Group, Pfizer, Bristol-Myers Squibb, JetBlue, DC Comics, Estée Lauder, Sony Music Entertainment, and many others). The city is by far the most important center for American mass media, journalism and publishing. Manhattan's Madison Avenue is synonymous with the American advertising industry, while Seventh Avenue is nicknamed "fashion avenue" as it serves as an important center for the fashion industry. New York also has the most important scenes for art, music, and theater in the U.S., with an increasingly active artist's community. The city also has a large tourism industry. The tertiary sector of industry, also called the service sector or the service industry, is one of the three main industrial categories of a developed economy, the others being the secondary industry (manufacturing and primary goods production such as agriculture), and primary industry (extraction such as mining and fishing). ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... Altria Group, Inc. ... Time Warner Inc. ... AIG may also refer to the abbreviation of the creationist organization Answers in Genesis. ... Pfizer, Incorporated (NYSE: PFE), is a global pharmaceutical company, with headquarters in New York City. ... Bristol-Myers Squibb (NYSE: BMY), colloquially referred to as BMS, is a pharmaceutical corporation, formed by a 1989 merger between pharmaceutical companies Bristol-Myers Company and Squibb Corporation. ... jetBlue Airways (NASDAQ: JBLU) is an American low-cost airline. ... The current DC Comics logo, adopted in May 2005. ... Estée Lauder Companies Inc. ... In 1988 Sony Corporation acquired CBS Records for $2 Billion and renamed the label to Sony Music Entertainment. ... Mass media is a term used to denote, as a class, that section of the media specifically conceived and designed to reach a very large audience (typically at least as large as the whole population of a nation state). ... Journalism is a discipline of collecting, verifying, analyzing and presenting information gathered regarding current events, including trends, issues and people. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Madison Avenue is a north-south avenue in the borough of Manhattan in New York City which carries northbound one-way traffic. ... Generally speaking, advertising is the paid promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas by an identified sponsor. ... Seventh Avenue is the name of a: Street in Manhattan (Seventh Avenue (Manhattan)) Band (Seventh Avenue (Band)) ... For the 80s New Wave band, see Fashion The term fashion applies to a characteristic means of expression or presentation; fashions may follow trends, in which they gain or lose popularity. ... Resources ArtLex. ... Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Music Look up Music on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wikisource, as part of the 1911 Encyclopedia Wikiproject, has original text related to this article: Music Wikicities has a wiki about Music: Music MusicNovatory: the science of music encyclopedia Science of Music... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle — indeed... A tourist boat travels the River Seine in Paris, France Beaches make popular tourist resorts Tourist redirects here; for the album by Athlete, see Tourist (album) Tourism can be defined as the act of travel for the purpose of recreation, and the provision of services for this act. ...


New York City's estimated gross metropolitan product of US$488.8 billion in 2003 was the largest of any city in the U.S. and the sixth largest if compared to any U.S. State. If it were a nation, the city would have the 16th highest gross domestic product in the world, exceeding that of Belgium ($387 billion), and the second highest per capita GDP in the world, at about $59,000/head, about $7,000/head lower than Luxembourg. 2003(MMIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In economics, gross domestic product (GDP) is a measure of the value of economic production of a particular territory in financial capital terms during a specified period. ...

This is a list of major corporations based in New York City. ...

Culture of New Yorkers

Manhattan's Lower East Side (2004)
Manhattan's Lower East Side (2004)
Main article: Culture of New York City

New York City, sometimes called "The City That Never Sleeps," is famously fast-paced and active, and the American idiom "in a New York minute" means "immediately." The stereotypical "hard-boiled New Yorker" has a reputation as self-centered, rude, and impatient, and takes pride in the crowds, noise, and hardships of city life. New York City residents are called "New Yorkers," although this term may also refer to suburbanites, and there is some use of borough-specific identifications, such as Manhattanites, Bronxites, Brooklynites, Queensites and Staten Islanders. Residents of the metropolitan area generally refer to New York City (or sometimes just Manhattan) as "The City," or "New York," and the acronym "NYC", as opposed to just "NY", helps to avoid confusing references to the State of New York. Other nicknames attributed to New York City include "the Big Apple", "Gotham", "the Naked City", "the Capital of the World", and the slogan introduced in 2005 by Mayor Bloomberg in an effort to win a bid for the 2012 Olympic Games, "the World's Second Home." I, Moncrief, took this picture of the corner of Orchard and Rivington Streets, Lower East Side, New York City, August 2004 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... I, Moncrief, took this picture of the corner of Orchard and Rivington Streets, Lower East Side, New York City, August 2004 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Categories: Manhattan neighborhoods | Stub ... Chinatown in Manhattan, 1995 The people of New York City, New Yorkers, share a unique culture rooted in centuries of immigration and city life. ... Look up Idiom on Wiktionary, the free dictionary An idiom is an expression whose meaning is not compositional—that is, whose meaning does not follow from the meaning of the individual words of which it is composed. ... In modern usage, a stereotype is a simplified view of a recognisable group of people who share certain characteristic (or stereotypical) qualities. ... It has been suggested that Suburbia be merged into this article or section. ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of United States. ... A map highlighting Brooklyn and the rest of New York City. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... The Big Apple - Manhattan viewed from the World Trade Center The Big Apple is a nickname or alternate toponym for New York City. ... Gotham can refer to several things Gotham, Nottinghamshire is a village in Nottinghamshire, England, from which comes the tales of the Wise Men of Gotham Gotham is also a nickname for New York City, New York, first used by Washington Irving in the Salmagundi Papers (1807) referencing The Wise Men...


Immigration and international flavor

The Statue of Liberty in Upper New York Bay has welcomed many immigrants to the city.
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The Statue of Liberty in Upper New York Bay has welcomed many immigrants to the city.
Jackson Heights, Queens is among the world's most diverse communities.
Jackson Heights, Queens is among the world's most diverse communities.

New York absorbs a greater diversity of immigrant groups than any other American city, and it absorbs a larger number of immigrants every day than all other U.S. cities except Los Angeles, giving New York an international flavor, and making it the archetype of the American ideal of a melting pot – a nation of immigrants. The city government employs translators in 180 languages. Download high resolution version (2589x1878, 837 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2589x1878, 837 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Statue of Liberty The Statue of Liberty, in full Liberty Enlightening the World, is a statue, given to the U.S. by France in the late 19th century, that stands at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor as a welcome to all returning Americans, visitors, and... Upper New York Bay, sometimes called Upper New York Harbor or the Upper Bay, is the northern area of New York Harbor inside the Narrows. ... Download high resolution version (1800x1200, 725 KB)74th Street in Jackson Heights, one of the neighborhoods many commercial areas. ... Download high resolution version (1800x1200, 725 KB)74th Street in Jackson Heights, one of the neighborhoods many commercial areas. ... Jackson Heights is a neighborhood in northern Queens, New York. ... Queens is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States. ... This article is about the largest city in California. ... Alternate meaning: crucible (science) The melting pot is a metaphor for the way in which heterogenous societies develop, in which the ingredients in the pot (iron, tin; people of different backgrounds and religions, etc. ...


The five boroughs are home to many distinct ethnic enclaves of Irish, Italians, Greeks, Chinese, Koreans, Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, Jamaicans, African-Americans, Iranians, Arabs, Jews, South Asians and many others, and there are also many multi-ethnic neighborhoods where people of different backgrounds coexist comfortably. Regardless of ethnic origin, all groups share a common identity as New Yorkers. The New Yorkistan cover of The New Yorker mocks urban Americas prosensity to huddle into cultural or ethnic enclaves—that said, many of New Yorks neighborhoods are amongst the most integrated in the world. ... Harlem is a neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City, long known as a major African American cultural and business center. ... The Arab world The Arab world comprises twenty-three countries stretching from Morocco in the west to Oman in the east. ... Composite satellite image of the Indian subcontinent Map of South Asia. ...


Some celebrated ethnic/racial neighborhoods include Harlem, Little Italy, Chinatown, Washington Heights, and the Lower East Side. Harlem is a neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City, long known as a major African American cultural and business center. ... Mulberry Street looking north from Canal Street, Manhattan, New York City Little Italy is a neighborhood in lower Manhattan, New York City, once known for its large population of Italian immigrants. ... New York City is home to one of the largest Chinatowns in North America, and is centered around Canal Street in Manhattan. ... Washington Heights is located in Upper Manhattan. ... Categories: Manhattan neighborhoods | Stub ...


The Lower East Side and The East Village are where the term "The Melting Pot" came to be, referring to the droves of people from diverse European nations squeezing into this small, 100 block or so area of tenements, learning to live together for the first time. Categories: Manhattan neighborhoods | Stub ... Avenue A from Tompkins Square Park The East Village is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan, New York City. ...


Commuter culture

Because of traffic congestion and the well-designed New York Subway, six in ten residents, including many middle class professionals, commute to work via public transportation, making the everyday lifestyle and "pedestrian culture" of New Yorkers substantially different from the "car culture" that dominates most American cities. This pattern is strongest in Manhattan, where subway service is better and traffic is worse than in the outer boroughs. Even the city's billionaire mayor, Michael Bloomberg, is a "straphanger" (subway commuter), and can be encountered on the train to City Hall each morning. South Ferry station 125th Street station The New York City Subway is a large rapid transit system in New York City, New York, United States. ... Michael Bloomberg Michael Rubens Mike Bloomberg (born February 14, 1942) is a prominent businessman, the founder of Bloomberg L.P., and the 108th and current Mayor of New York City. ... Straphanger is a nickname for someone who is a standing subway or bus passenger who grips a hanging strap for support. ... New York City Hall is the center of New York Citys municipal government. ...


The great majority of Manhattan residents live in apartments in what is usually seen as a very expensive and crowded housing market, although there are immense neighborhoods of suburban-style homes in the outer boroughs. The median sale price of a Manhattan apartment in 2004 was $670,000 [2], with prices in the outer boroughs lower but rising. Many residents rent apartments, and some areas are under rent control and rent stabilization laws. With space at a premium, lack of closet space is a common problem, and self-storage is a strong local industry. Rent Control refers to laws or ordinances that regulate how much a property can be rented for or how much rent can be increased at certain times, such as the renewal of a lease. ... Self-storage is a business in which customers pay a monthly fee to rent small usually uninhabitable rooms to store personal affects that cannot be accomodated in the customers usual living arrangements, usually due to a lack of storage space. ...


Current issues

New York City is home to the largest Chinatown in North America, which is centered around Canal Street in Manhattan.
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New York City is home to the largest Chinatown in North America, which is centered around Canal Street in Manhattan.

No other American city has experienced the effects of gentrification to the same degree that New York City has. Beginning primarily in the 1990s, although in some cases earlier, neighborhoods that had been seen as less desirable or unsafe became entirely transformed by the arrival of young professionals, often preceded by artists and "hipsters". This process is exemplified by the cases of Williamsburg in Brooklyn and Manhattan's East Village and Lower East Side. Even such cultural landmarks such as CBGB have been forced to close because of the process. Although gentrification generally has led to lower crime, more business activity, and higher land values, many of the native residents of these communities have been adversely affected by the skyrocketing housing costs associated with these rapid changes. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2452x1769, 1507 KB) Canal Street in Chinatown in New York City. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2452x1769, 1507 KB) Canal Street in Chinatown in New York City. ... New York City is home to one of the largest Chinatowns in North America, and is centered around Canal Street in Manhattan. ... Canal Street is a major street in New York City, crossing lower Manhattan to join New Jersey in the west (via the Holland Tunnel) to Brooklyn in the east (via the Manhattan Bridge). ... Manhattan Borough,highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... This once impoverished part of Jersey Citys historic downtown is quickly becoming gentrified. ... // Events and trends The 1990s are generally classified as having moved slightly away from the more conservative 1980s, but otherwise retaining the same mindset. ... Soho is an area of Londons West End in the City of Westminster. ... A hipster is a person who derives their identity largely through their association with a subculture which has been deemed hip, a word taken from African American Vernacular English (AAVE). ... The Williamsburg Bridge connects the Brooklyn neighborhood to Manhattan Williamsburg is a neighborhood in northern Brooklyn, New York City. ... Avenue A from Tompkins Square Park The East Village is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan, New York City. ... Categories: Manhattan neighborhoods | Stub ... CBGB, also CBGBs or CBs is a club in the Manhattan Bowery district of New York City, New York. ...


After the September 11, 2001 attacks, pride in the city and the New York way of life increased for many, though others may have shown signs of paranoia. Nationally, Americans felt increased solidarity with New Yorkers. Today, there is a palpable sense of optimism in New York, fear of terrorism has lessened dramatically, and a massive confluence of transportation infrastructure projects promises to greatly expand the city's economic potential. Drastic reductions in crime have changed "the ungovernable city" of the past into a remarkably civilized place, and recent polls show that a vast majority of New Yorkers think the city "is moving in the right direction." The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of suicide attacks against civilians of the United States conducted on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. ...

This is a list of famous people from New York City. ...

Tourism and recreation

The Empire State Building, New York City's tallest building
The Empire State Building, New York City's tallest building

Tourism is a major local industry, with hundreds of attractions and 39 million tourists visiting the city each year on average. Many visitors make it a point to visit the Empire State Building, Times Square, Radio City Music Hall, the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, Wall Street, United Nations Headquarters, the American Museum of Natural History, St. Patrick's Cathedral and the Brooklyn Bridge, among other attractions. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x2000, 1455 KB) auteur : slonecker There are no usage restrictions for this photo. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x2000, 1455 KB) auteur : slonecker There are no usage restrictions for this photo. ... The Empire State Building Entrance lobby The Empire State Building, a 102-story contemporary Art Deco style building in New York City, was designed by Shreve, Lamb and Harmon Associates and built in 1931. ... The Empire State Building Entrance lobby The Empire State Building, a 102-story contemporary Art Deco style building in New York City, was designed by Shreve, Lamb and Harmon Associates and built in 1931. ... Times Square Times Square is also the name of a station on the Detroit People Mover, a shopping mall in Hong Kong, and a 1980 movie. ... Radio City Music Hall in 1996 Radio City Music Hall is an entertainment venue located in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Statue of Liberty The Statue of Liberty, in full Liberty Enlightening the World, is a statue, given to the U.S. by France in the late 19th century, that stands at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor as a welcome to all returning Americans, visitors, and... Immigration Museum on Ellis Island Ellis Island, located in New York Harbor at the mouth of the Hudson River, was at one time the main immigration port for immigrants entering the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ... For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... United Nations headquarters, view from East River United Nations headquarters in New York City The United Nations headquarters is a distinctive complex in New York City that has served as the United Nationss headquarters since its completion in 1952. ... The American Museum of Natural History is a landmark of Manhattans Upper West Side in New York, at 79th Street and Central Park West. ... St. ... View from the East River (2002) Plan of one tower for the Brooklyn Bridge, 1867. ...


There are over 28,000 acres (113 km²) of parkland found throughout New York City, comprising over 1,700 separate parks and playgrounds. The best known of these is Central Park, which is one of the finest examples of landscape architecture in the world, as well as a major source of recreation for New Yorkers and tourists alike. Other major parks in the city include Riverside Park, Battery Park, Bryant Park, Prospect Park, Flushing Meadow-Corona Park, Washington Square Park, and Forest Park. The city also has 578 miles of waterfront and over 14 miles of public beaches. A wintry aerial view, looking south: ice on the frozen lakes, the Metropolitan Museum in the park at left, the East River and the Empire State Building in the distance Central Park (40°46′59″ N 73°58′20″ W) is a large urban public park (843 acres or 3. ... Landscape architecture is the art, planning, design, management, preservation and rehabilitation of the land and the design of man-made constructs. ... Riverside Park is a scenic waterfront public park on the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City, consisting of a narrow four-mile strip of land between the Hudson River and the gently curving rise-and-fall of Riverside Drive. ... The promenade of Battery Park City is an extension of Battery Park. ... Bryant Park, August 2003 Bryant Park is a 9. ... Prospect Park is A park in Brooklyn, New York A neighborhood in Minneapolis, Minnesota A neighborhood in Prospect Park, New Jersey This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Flushing Meadows Park is located in northern Queens, New York at the intersection of the Long Island Expressway and the Grand Central Parkway. ... A view of the park showing the Washington Square Arch and the central fountain Washington Square Park is a public park located within the New York City borough of Manhattan. ... Forest Park is the name of at least three towns, three parks, a church, and a neighborhood in the United States: Forest Park, Georgia Forest Park, Illinois Forest Park, Ohio Forest Park in Saint Louis, Missouri Forest Park in Portland, Oregon Forest Park in Springfield, Massachusetts Forest Park is a...


Maritime attractions include the South Street Seaport, site of a historic port, and the Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum, housed in a World War II aircraft carrier docked on the Hudson River. A view of the South Street Seaport in New York with the Brooklyn, Manhattan, and Williamsburg bridges. ... The Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum is a museum in New York City located at Pier 86 on the West Side of Manhattan. ... World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons like the atom bomb World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a mid-20th-century conflict that engulfed much of the globe... An aircraft carrier is a warship whose main role is to deploy and recover aircraft—in effect acting as a sea-going airbase. ... View of the Hudson in the 1880s showing Jersey City The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, is a river running mainly through New York State but partly forming the boundary between the states of New York and New Jersey. ...


Shopping is popular with many visitors, with Fifth Avenue being a famous shopping corridor for luxury items. Macy's, the nation's largest department store, and the surrounding area of Herald Square are a major destination for more moderately-priced goods. In recent years 23rd Street has become a major location for "big-box" retailers. In southern Manhattan, Greenwich Village is home to hundreds of independent music and book stores, while the East Village continues to prevail as purveyors of all things "strange" and unusual which you can't find anywhere else. The "diamond district" (located on 47th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues) is the city's main location for jewelry shopping, and SoHo, formerly the center of the New York art scene, is now famous for high-priced clothing boutiques, and the art galleries are now concentrated in Chelsea. There are also large shopping districts found in Downtown Brooklyn and along Queens Boulevard in Queens. Street sign at Fifth Avenue and East 57th street Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in the center of the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx in New York City, USA. It runs through the heart of Midtown and along the eastern side of Central Park, and because of the... Macys Department Store on Seventh Avenue in Manhattan Looking down on Macys. ... Categories: Stub | Manhattan ... 23rd Street runs from river to river across Manhattan, carrying two-way traffic. ... Greenwich Village (also known as the West Village or simply the Village) is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City. ... Avenue A from Tompkins Square Park The East Village is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan, New York City. ... The Diamond District is an area of New York City found along 47th Street (between 5th Avenue and Avenue of the Americas) in the neighborhood of Midtown in the borough of Manhattan. ... Sixth Avenue looking south from 18th Street Sixth Avenue is a major avenue in New York Citys borough of Manhattan. ... Soho is an area of Londons West End in the City of Westminster. ... Chelsea is located on the West Side of Manhattan, New York City. ... Skyline of Downtown Brooklyn seen from the East River Downtown Brooklyn is the third largest central business district in New York City (following Midtown Manhattan and Downtown Manhattan), and is located in the northwestern section of the borough of Brooklyn. ... Queens Boulevard is a major thoroughfare in the New York City borough of Queens. ...

The first Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade was held in New York on November 27, 1924. Since then this has been an annual event drawing tens of thousands of spectators and in later years millions of television viewers. Annually on New Year's Eve, hundreds of thousands of people congregate in Times Square to watch the ball drop as millions watch on television. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (583x778, 142 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (583x778, 142 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... St. ... The Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade, originally called the Macys Christmas Parade, is an annual parade sponsored by Macys Department Store. ... November 27 is the 331st day (332nd on leap years) of the year. ... 1924 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Opera House and Sydney Harbour Bridge illuminated under New Years Eve Fireworks 2005 New Years Eve is a celebration held the day before New Years Day, on December 31, the final day of the year. ... The Opera House and Sydney Harbour Bridge illuminated under New Years Eve Fireworks 2005 New Years Eve is a celebration held the day before New Years Day, on December 31, the final day of the year. ...


The World Trade Center was an important tourist destination before the September 11, 2001 attacks, which devastated the city and its tourist industry. The city was nearly devoid of tourists for months, and it took two years for the numbers to fully rebound with fewer international, but more domestic visitors. Now the World Trade Center site has itself become an important place for visitors to see. The twin towers, photographed from the west The World Trade Center in New York City was a complex of seven buildings designed by American architect Minoru Yamasaki and leased by Larry Silverstein from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey around a central plaza, near the south end... The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of suicide attacks against civilians of the United States conducted on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. ... The site before it was cleared. ...


Many tourists only think of New York in terms of Manhattan, but there are four other boroughs which, if they can't compete in skyscrapers, still offer other kinds of attractions. Brooklyn's old Coney Island is still a center of seaside recreation, with its beach, boardwalk, and amusement parks. Many enjoy the spectacular views available from the deck of the Staten Island Ferry. The Bronx Zoo is world-famous, and the Bronx Bombers don't play in Manhattan. Flushing, Queens is home to the legacy of the 1964 New York World's Fair (including the Unisphere), the US Open in tennis and Shea Stadium. Image of Coney Island (middle left of picture) taken by NASA. The peninsula at right is Rockaway, Queens. ... 90 mile beach Australia A beach or strand is a geological formation consisting of loose rock particles such as sand, shingle, cobble, or even shell along the shoreline of a body of water. ... Photograph of the boardwalk in Atlantic City, NJ, USA, taken August 2003. ... Six Flags New England, an amusement park in Springfield, Massachusetts. ... Lower Mahattan skyline from the deck of the Ferry, 2003 The Staten Island Ferry is a passenger ferry operated by the New York City Department of Transportation between Whitehall Street in Lower Manhattan near Battery Park (South Ferry) and St. ... The Bronx Zoo is a world-famous zoo in The Bronx, New York. ... The New York Yankees are a Major League baseball team based in The Bronx, New York City. ... Flushing is a section of the borough of Queens in New York City, New York. ... View of the New York Worlds Fair 1964/1965 as seen from the observation towers of the New York State pavilion. ... The Unisphere, June 2005 Unisphere is a 12-story high, spherical stainless steel representation of the Earth. ... The U.S. Open is the fourth and final event of the Grand Slam in tennis. ... William A. Shea Stadium is a baseball stadium in Flushing, New York where the New York Mets play. ...

The is a list of parks in New York City maintained by the citys Department of Parks and Recreation. ... The following is a list of gardens in New York City which are open to the public (listed aphabetically): Bartow-Pell Mansion British Memorial Garden Brooklyn Botanic Garden Central Park Conservatory Garden The Cloisters Enid A. Haupt Glass Garden Fort Tryon Park Garden Frick Museum Courtyard Gardens Liz Christy Garden... The Plaza Hotel is a famous New York City hotel. ...

Cultural institutions

New York is a city of great museums with the Metropolitan Museum of Art's assemblage of historic art, the Museum of Modern Art and Guggenheim Museum's 20th century collection, and the American Museum of Natural History and its Hayden Planetarium focusing on the sciences. There are also many smaller specialty museums, from El Museo del Barrio with a focus on Latin American cultures to the Cooper-Hewitt National Museum of Design. A number of the city's museums are located along the Museum Mile section of Fifth Avenue. Crowds daily gather on the steps in front of the neoclassical façade The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as The Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums, located on the eastern edge of Central Park in Manhattan, New York, United... General Electric GE90-115B fanblade, on display at MoMA. The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is an art museum located in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. ... The Guggenheim Museum refers to any of several museums worldwide created and run by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. ... The American Museum of Natural History is a landmark of Manhattans Upper West Side in New York, at 79th Street and Central Park West. ... Hayden Planetarium is a public planetarium located on Central Park West, New York City, next to the famous American Museum of Natural History. ... Founded in 1969, El Museo del Barrio is located along Museum Mile in New York City ( USA), and is the only museum dedicated to the celebration of New Yorks Latin American and Caribbean cultures. ... The Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum is the only museum in the United States dedicated to contemporary design and design history. ... Museum Mile is the name for a section of Fifth Avenue, an avenue in Manhattan in the City of New York, running from 82nd to 105th streets on the Upper East Side in a neighborhood known as Carnegie Hill. ... Street sign at Fifth Avenue and East 57th street Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in New York City. ...


In addition to these museums, the city is also home to a vast array of spaces for opera, symphony, and dance performances. The largest of these is Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, which is actually a complex of buildings housing 12 separate companies, including the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Opera, the New York City Ballet, and Jazz at Lincoln Center. Other notable performance halls include Carnegie Hall, Radio City Music Hall, and the Brooklyn Academy of Music. The foyer of Charles Garniers Opéra, Paris, opened 1875 Opera refers to an European art form consisting of a dramatic stage performance set to music. ... A symphony is an extended piece of music usually for orchestra and comprising several movements. ... A contemporary dancer rehearsing in a dance studio Dance (from Old French dance, further history unknown) generally refers to human movement either used as a form of expression (see also body language) or presented in a social, spiritual or performance setting. ... Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 15 acre (61,000 m²) complex of buildings in New York City which serves as home for 12 arts companies. ... The New York Philharmonic is an American orchestra based in New York City. ... A full house at the old Metropolitan Opera House, seen from the rear of the stage, at the Metropolitan Opera House for a concert by pianist Josef Hofmann, November 28, 1937. ... The New York City Opera (NYCO) is New York Citys second opera company (after the Metropolitan Opera). ... The New York City Ballet is a ballet company founded in 1948 by choreographer George Balanchine and Lincoln Kirstein. ... Jazz at Lincoln Center is a new addition to the Lincoln Center performing arts complex, located at 60th Street and Broadway in New York City, slightly south of the main Lincoln Center campus and directly adjacent to Columbus Circle. ... Carnegie Hall Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Manhattan, New York City. ... Radio City Music Hall in 1996 Radio City Music Hall is an entertainment venue located in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Brooklyn Academy of Music ( pronounced BAM! in Emerilese) is located in Brooklyn, a borough of New York City, at 30 Lafayette Avenue near the Flatbush Avenue Station of the Long Island Rail Road and the Williamsburgh Savings Bank, the tallest building in Brooklyn. ...

The Metropolitan Museum of Art African Burial Ground American Folk Art Museum American Museum of the Moving Image American Museum of Natural History Hayden Planetarium (the Rose Center for Earth and Space) Bartow-Pell Mansion Brooklyn Academy of Music Brooklyn Botanic Gardens Brooklyn Museum Carnegie Hall Center for Architecture Cooper...

Media and entertainment

Main article: Media of New York City

Because of its sheer size and cultural influence, New York City has been the subject of many different, and often contradictory, portrayals in mass media. From the sophisticated and worldly metropolis seen in many Woody Allen films, to the chaotic urban jungle depicted in such movies as Martin Scorsese's Taxi Driver, New York has served as the unwitting backdrop for virtually every conceivable viewpoint on big city life. New York’s portrayal on television is similarly varied, with a disproportionate number of crime dramas taking place in the city despite the fact that it is one of the safest cities in which to live in the United States. New York has also been the setting for countless works of literature, many of them produced by the city’s famously large population of writers (including Jonathan Franzen, Don Delillo, Jonathan Safran Foer, Thomas Pynchon, Susan Sontag, and many others). Because of its sheer size and cultural influence, New York City has been the subject of many different, and often contradictory, portrayals in mass media. ... Woody Allen. ... Martin Scorsese Martin Scorsese (pronounced as Scor-SEH-see) (born November 17, 1942 in Queens, New York, USA) is an American film director. ... Taxi Driver is a 1976 American motion picture drama directed by Martin Scorsese. ... Jonathan Franzen (born August 17, 1959) is a USA novelist and essayist. ... Don DeLillo (born November 20, 1936) is an American author best known for his novels, which paint detailed portraits of American life in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. ... Jonathan Safran Foer (born 1977) is a writer who lives in the Park Slope neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, with his wife, novelist Nicole Krauss, and their dog, George. ... Thomas Pynchon pictured in his high school yearbook. ... Susan Sontag Susan Sontag (January 28, 1933 – December 28, 2004) was a well-known American essayist, novelist, left-leaning intellectual and controversial activist. ...


New York City boasts over forty daily newspapers in several different languages, including such national heavyweights as The Wall Street Journal (daily circulation of 2.1 million) and The New York Times (1.6 million), and America's oldest continuously-published newspaper, The New York Post, founded in 1801 by Alexander Hamilton. The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with a worldwide average daily circulation of more than 2. ... The New York Times is a newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The first edition of The New York Post of July 6, 2004 incorrectly declared that U.S. presidential candidate John Kerry would choose U.S. Representative Dick Gephardt to be his vice-presidential running mate that day (in reality, Kerry chose John Edwards). ... A portrait of Alexander Hamilton by John Trumbull, 1792. ...


New York City is also the home of the four major U.S. television networks, ABC, CBS the Fox Network, and NBC, as well as news organization CNN, and while the local film industry is dwarfed by that of Hollywood, its billions of dollars in revenue make it the second largest in the nation. A television network is a distribution network for television content whereby a central operation provides programming for many television stations. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is a television and radio network in the United States. ... CBS (Columbia Broadcasting System) is a major television network and radio broadcaster in the United States. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company, usually referred to as just Fox (the company itself prefers the capitalized version FOX), is a television network in the United States. ... The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Cable News Network (CNN) is a cable television network that was founded in 1980 by Ted Turner & Reese Schonfeld [1] [2] (although the latter currently is not recognized in CNNs official history). ... ...


With its connection to media and communications and its mix of cultures and immigrants, New York City has had a long history of association with American music. The city has served as an important center for many different genres of music ranging from Big Band Era and jazz, from Punk Rock to Goth and Hip-hop (the latter of which is generally acknowledged as having originated in the Bronx around 1973). A big band, also known as a jazz orchestra, is a large musical ensemble that plays jazz music, especially swing. ... Jazz master Louis Armstrong was one of the best loved and best known of all jazz musicians. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Gothic girl, medieval style, with spikes and piercings Goths with bondage-inspired attire This article is about the contemporary goth/gothic subculture. ... Hip hop is a cultural movement that began among urban African Americans and Latinos in New York City in the early 1970s, and has since spread around the world. ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of United States. ...


The East Village and Lower East Side continue to shine as the city's premier destination for music (rock, blues, jazz, dance), art (mixed media) and indie theater (experimental, off-broadway.) From CBGB's to LaMama Theater to the Amato Opera House, this area is famous for having a "venue on every block." Avenue A from Tompkins Square Park The East Village is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan, New York City. ... Categories: Manhattan neighborhoods | Stub ... CBGB, also CBGBs or CBs is a club in the Manhattan Bowery district of New York City, New York. ...

The lights of Times Square
The lights of Times Square

Times Square at night, New York City Personal snapshot by Montréalais. ... Times Square at night, New York City Personal snapshot by Montréalais. ... Times Square Times Square is also the name of a station on the Detroit People Mover, a shopping mall in Hong Kong, and a 1980 movie. ...

See also

This is a very incomplete list of fiction books set in New York City. ... This is a list of New York City newspapers and magazines. ... ABC Studios (in Times Square) Times Square is home to many of the citys TV studios, as well as the heart of New Yorks theater district. ... This page provides a partial list of television shows set in New York City. ... The following is a partial list of movies set in New York City: // 1920s For the Love of Mike (1927) The Cameraman (1928) 1930s Central Park (1932) Lawyer Man (1932) 42nd Street (1933) Hallelujah, Im a Bum (1933) Hold Your Man (1933) The House on 56th Street (1933) King...

Theater

Main article: Broadway theatre

New York City boasts a highly active and influential theater district, which is centered around Times Square in Manhattan. It serves both as the center of the American theater industry, and as a major attraction for visitors from around the world. The dozens of theaters in this district are responsible for tens of thousands of jobs, and help contribute billions of dollars every year to the city's economy. Along with those of London’s West End theater district, Broadway theaters are considered to be of the highest quality in the world. Despite the name, many "Broadway" theaters do not lie on Broadway the street, and the distinction with Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway (which tend more toward experimental theater) is simply a reference to the seating capacity of the theater. Broadway theatre is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle — indeed... West End is the name of some places in the world, including: The West End of London, England West End Theatre, is where many of Londons major theatres are located and premier cinema screenings take place. ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City, and is the oldest north-south main thoroughfare in the city, dating to the first New Amsterdam settlement. ... Off-Broadway plays or musicals are performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway, but larger than Off-Off-Broadway, productions. ... Off-Off-Broadway refers to plays or musicals performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway or still professional Off-Broadway productions. ... Experimental theatre is a general term for various movements in Western theatre that began in the 20th century as a reaction against the then-dominant conventions governing the writing and production of drama, and against naturalism in particular. ...


Professional sports

"The House that Ruth Built": Yankee Stadium in the Bronx
"The House that Ruth Built": Yankee Stadium in the Bronx

Although in much of the rest of the country American football has become the most popular professional sport, in New York City baseball arguably still stirs the most passion and interest. A "Subway Series" between city teams is a time of great excitement, and any World Series championship by either the New York Yankees or the New York Mets is considered to be worthy of the highest celebration, including a ticker-tape parade for the victorious team. For most American baseball fans, the most intense rivalry is between the Yankees and the Boston Red Sox, but in the city the rivalry between the Yankees and the Mets is just as fierce. Outsiders are frequently unaware that few baseball fans in New York are fans of both teams at once. Yankee Stadium, Bronx, NY, 2000, by Rick Dikeman File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Yankee Stadium, Bronx, NY, 2000, by Rick Dikeman File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... George Herman Ruth, (February 6, 1895 – August 16, 1948), better known as Babe Ruth and also commonly known by the nicknames The Bambino and The Sultan of Swat, was an American baseball player and United States national icon. ... Yankee Stadium is the home stadium of the New York Yankees, a major league baseball team. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Baseball is popular in the Americas and East Asia. ... The Subway Series is a series of Major League Baseball games played between teams based in New York City. ... In baseball, the World Series is the championship series of Major League Baseball in the United States and Canada, played in October after the end of the regular season between the pennant winner of the American League and the pennant winner of the National League. ... The New York Yankees are a Major League baseball team based in The Bronx, New York City. ... // Franchise history In 1957 the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants abandoned New York for California, leaving the largest city in the United States without a National League franchise. ... Ticker-tape parade in New York City in honor of the Apollo 11 astronauts, August 1969 A ticker-tape parade is a parade event, held in a downtown urban setting, allowing the jettison of large amounts of shredded paper products from nearby office buildings onto the parade route, creating a... The Boston Red Sox are a Major League Baseball team located in Boston, Massachusetts. ...


The New York metropolitan area is the only one in the United States with more than one team in each of the four major sports, with nine such franchises. At Madison Square Garden, 'the world's most famous arena,' New Yorkers can see the New York Knicks play NBA basketball, the New York Rangers play hockey, and the New York Liberty of the WNBA. New York's NFL teams, the New York Giants and New York Jets, play at Giants Stadium in New Jersey's Meadowlands. At the Continental Airlines Arena also in the meadowlands the New Jersey Nets play NBA basketball and the New Jersey Devils play NHL hockey. The New York Islanders are the third NHL team in the Metro area; they play their home games in Nassau Coliseum in Long Island. Nassau Coliseum is also the home of the New York Dragons of the Arena Football League. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... In the United States, the four prominent major sports leagues are Major League Baseball (MLB), the National Football League (NFL), the National Basketball Association (NBA), and the National Hockey League (NHL). ... Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG has been the name of four arenas in New York City, United States. ... This article is about a professional basketball team. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... The New York Rangers (NYR) are a National Hockey League (NHL) team based in New York City, New York. ... The modernized NHL shield logo, debuting in 2005. ... The New York Liberty is a Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) team based in New York City. ... WNBA may also refer to WNBA-AM, a radio station in Illinois. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Conference NFC Division East Year Founded 1925 Home Field Giants Stadium City East Rutherford, New Jersey Team Colors Blue, Red, and White Head Coach Tom Coughlin League Championships (6) NFL Champions: 1927, 1934, 1938, 1956 Super Bowl: 1986 (XXI), 1990 (XXV) Conference Championships (9) NFL Eastern: 1956, 1958, 1959, 1961... Conference AFC Division East Year Founded 1960 Home Field Giants Stadium City East Rutherford, New Jersey Team Colors Green and White Head Coach Herman Edwards League Championships (1) AFL Champions & Super Bowl: 1968 (III) Conference Championships (0) Division Championships (4) AFL East: 1968, 1969 AFC East: 1998, 2002 The New... Giants Stadium Giants Stadium is the home stadium for the New York Giants and New York Jets NFL football teams, and the MetroStars of Major League Soccer. ... Continental Airlines Arena is a multi-purpose indoor arena in the Meadowlands Sports Complex in East Rutherford, New Jersey. ... The New Jersey Nets are a National Basketball Association team based in East Rutherford, New Jersey. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... The New Jersey Devils (NJD) are a National Hockey League team based in the Continental Airlines Arena of the Meadowlands Sports Complex in East Rutherford, New Jersey. ... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... The New York Islanders (Isles for short) are a National Hockey League (NHL) team based in Uniondale, New York. ... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... Nassau Coliseum, officially known as Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum (though colloquially referred to simply as The Coliseum), is a multi-purpose indoor arena in Uniondale, New York, half an hour from New York City. ... Image of Long Island taken by NASA. Long Island is an island off the North American coast. ... Nassau Coliseum, officially known as Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum (though colloquially referred to simply as The Coliseum), is a multi-purpose indoor arena in Uniondale, New York, half an hour from New York City. ... The New York Dragons are an Arena Football League team. ... Current Arena Football League logo The Arena Football League (AFL) was founded in 1987 as an American football indoor league. ...


New York City is also home to two minor league baseball teams that play in the short-season Class A New York - Penn League. The Brooklyn Cyclones are a New York Mets affiliate, and the Staten Island Yankees are affiliated with the New York Yankees. A Class A California League game in San Jose, California (1994) Minor baseball leagues are North American professional baseball leagues that compete at a level below that of Major League Baseball. ... The New York - Penn League is a minor league baseball league which operates in the northeastern United States. ... The Brooklyn Cyclones are a minor league baseball team, affiliated with the New York Mets. ... The Staten Island Yankees are a minor league baseball team, located in Staten Island, New York. ...


New York has also buried more sports history than most American cities ever experience: Ebbets Field, home of the Brooklyn Dodgers from 1913 until 1957, was torn down in 1960, and the Polo Grounds in northern Harlem, just across the river from the Bronx's Yankee Stadium, was the home of the New York Giants of Major League Baseball from 1911 to 1957 (and the first home of the New York Mets) before being demolished in 1964. Also, many outsiders are unaware that the current Madison Square Garden is actually the fourth separate building to use that name; the first two were near Madison Square, hence the name, and the third was at 50th Street and Eighth Avenue. Ebbets Field was a Major League Baseball park located at in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn, New York. ... For the 1930s NFL team, see Brooklyn Dodgers (football). ... Link title1913 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... 1957 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Polo Grounds was the name given to four different stadiums in New York City used by Major League Baseballs New York Giants from 1883 until 1957, New York Metropolitans from 1883 until 1885, the New York Yankees from 1912 until 1922, and by the New York Mets in... Harlem is a neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City, long known as a major African American cultural and business center. ... Yankee Stadium is the home stadium of the New York Yankees, a major league baseball team. ... The San Francisco Giants are a Major League Baseball team based in San Francisco, California. ... MLB logo Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in the world. ... 1911 was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... 1957 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Madison Square, 1908. ...


Current sports issues include Bruce Ratner's proposal to move the New Jersey Nets to a new Brooklyn Nets Arena, and a proposal to build a West Side Stadium in Manhattan for the New York Jets in 2008. Both of these construction proposals have stirred considerable opposition, and may have had an impact on the City's bid to host the 2012 Summer Olympics (which went to London in the end). The West Side Stadium plan has been abandonded. After searching for other possible sites to locate a stadium, such as Flushing Meadows in Queens, the Jets finally signed an agreement with the Giants to build a new stadium to host both teams in the Meadowlands. The New Jersey Nets are a National Basketball Association team based in East Rutherford, New Jersey. ... The Brooklyn Nets Arena is a proposed $3. ... An artists rendition of how the West Side Stadium would have looked The West Side Stadium (also known as the New York Sports and Convention Center) was a proposed football stadium to be built on a platform over the rail yards on the West Side of Manhattan in New... Conference AFC Division East Year Founded 1960 Home Field Giants Stadium City East Rutherford, New Jersey Team Colors Green and White Head Coach Herman Edwards League Championships (1) AFL Champions & Super Bowl: 1968 (III) Conference Championships (0) Division Championships (4) AFL East: 1968, 1969 AFC East: 1998, 2002 The New... Leap year starting on Tuesday // Predicted events January-June January 15 - NASAs MESSENGER spacecraft makes the first of three flybys of Mercury. ... The 2012 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXX Olympiad, will be held in London, United Kingdom from 27 July to 12 August 2012. ... The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ...

The professional teams using New York in their names are: New York Mets, Major League Baseball, Shea Stadium (1964-) New York Jets, National Football League, Giants Stadium at the Meadowlands Sports Complex in East Rutherford, New Jersey New York Giants, National Football League, Giants Stadium at the Meadowlands Sports Complex...

Transportation

Main article: Transportation in New York City

Unlike most of America's car-oriented urban areas, public transportation is the common mode of travel for the majority of New York City residents. As of 2001, 50% of New York City households and only 20% of Manhattan households had access to a vehicle, as compared to more than 90% nationwide. [3] The exterior of Grand Central Terminal, New York, NY, 1996, by Rick Dikeman File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The exterior of Grand Central Terminal, New York, NY, 1996, by Rick Dikeman File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For the film of this name, see 42nd Street (film). ... The clock in the Main Concourse © 2004 Metropolitan Transportation Authority Grand Central Terminal (often still called Grand Central Station, although technically that is the name of the nearby post office and New York City Subway station on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line) is a train station at 15 Vanderbilt Avenue... The 42nd Street entrance to Grand Central Terminal. ... A taxi serving as a bus Public transport comprises all transport systems in which the passengers do not travel in their own vehicles. ...


The city is served by an extensive network of parkways and expressways, including four primary Interstate Highways enter the New York/New Jersey metropolitan area: I-78, I-80, I-87 and I-95. Interstate 287 serves as a partial beltway around the city, and there are numerous three-digit Interstates of I-78 and I-95. A typical rural stretch of Interstate highway, with two lanes in each direction separated by a large grassy median, and with cross-traffic limited to overpasses and underpasses. ... Interstate 78 is an interstate highway in the eastern United States. ... Location of Interstate 80 Interstate 80 is the second-longest interstate highway in the United States. ... Interstate 87 is a 346 mile (558 km) intrastate interstate highway located entirely within the state of New York. ... Interstate 95 or (I-95) is an interstate highway that runs 1907 miles (3070 kilometers) north-south along the east coast of the United States. ... Interstate 287 is a major highway in New Jersey and New York. ... A beltway (American English), ring road or orbital motorway (British English) is a circumferential highway found around many cities. ...


Mass transit

Main article: Mass transit in New York City

New York City boasts the most extensive network of public transportation in the United States. The world famous New York City Subway is operated by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA). It is the most extensive subway system in the world when measured by mileage of track (656 miles of mainline track), and the fifth largest when measured by annual ridership (1.4 billion passenger trips in 2004). The subway system connects all boroughs except Staten Island, which is served by the Staten Island Railway via the free Staten Island Ferry (which connects to the 1 subway line). The city is also served by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey's PATH subway system, which connects the borough of Manhattan to New Jersey. In addition to these, city residents rely on hundreds of bus lines, both publicly and privately operated (many to be taken over by the MTA sometime in 2005), which serve nearly all areas of the five boroughs. Because of the extensive mass transit system, many New Yorkers do not possess cars or even driver's licenses. New York City boasts the most extensive network of public transportation in the United States. ... The New York City Subway is a large rapid transit system in New York City, New York, United States. ... The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) is a public benefit corporation of the State of New York chartered by the New York State Legislature in 1965. ... This article describes subways as mass transit lines. ... 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Staten Island Railway (SIR) or Staten Island Rapid Transit (SIRT) is a rapid transit line operating in the Borough of Staten Island, New York City, USA. It began, like the BMT lines to Coney Island, as a typical railway, but it now uses subway cars (R44). ... Lower Mahattan skyline from the deck of the Ferry, 2003 The Staten Island Ferry is a passenger ferry operated by the New York City Department of Transportation between Whitehall Street in Lower Manhattan near Battery Park (South Ferry) and St. ... The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey is a bi-state agency (operated pursuant to an interstate compact) that runs most of the regional transportation infrastructure including the bridges, tunnels, airports and seaports within the New York-New Jersey Port District. ... PATH (Port Authority Trans-Hudson) is a rapid transit system linking Manhattan, New York with New Jersey, and providing service to Jersey City, Hoboken, Harrison, and Newark. ... State nickname: The Garden State Other U.S. States Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Governor Richard Codey (D)Acting Senators Jon Corzine (D) Frank Lautenberg (D) Official languages None defined Area 22,608 km² (47th)  - Land 19,231 km²  - Water 3,378 km² (14. ...

A typical subway entrance in the financial district.
A typical subway entrance in the financial district.

Responsibility for providing public transportation falls to a variety of government agencies and private corporations. Amtrak provides long-distance rail service. Short-distance rail, primarily for commuters from the suburbs, is operated by New Jersey Transit, the MTA (serving Long Island, Connecticut and regions in New York north of the city as the Long Island Rail Road and Metro-North Railroad), and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which also operates regional bus terminals. Download high resolution version (852x1136, 177 KB)Broad Street Station entrance opposite of the New York Stock Exchange at the corner of Wall Street. ... Download high resolution version (852x1136, 177 KB)Broad Street Station entrance opposite of the New York Stock Exchange at the corner of Wall Street. ... Woolworth Building, looking south along Broadway The Lower Manhattan skyline as viewed from Hoboken, New Jersey. ... Amtrak is the trademark name of the intercity passenger train system created on May 1, 1971 in the United States. ... New Jersey Transit Arrow III at West Windsor, NJ Hudson-Bergen Light Rail vehicle at 2nd Street station New Jersey Transit (NJ Transit) is a statewide public transportation system serving the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) is a public benefit corporation of the State of New York chartered by the New York State Legislature in 1965. ... The Long Island Rail Road or LIRR is a railroad that serves the length of Long Island, New York. ... Marble Hill station The Metro-North Railroad (officially the Metro-North Commuter Railroad Company, and usually abbreviated as Metro-North) is a suburban commuter railroad service between New York City to its northern suburbs in New York State and Connecticut. ... The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey is a bi-state agency (operated pursuant to an interstate compact) that runs most of the regional transportation infrastructure including the bridges, tunnels, airports and seaports within the New York-New Jersey Port District. ...


Airports

The Port Authority also owns and operates the four major airports in the New York City area, John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) in Jamaica, Newark Liberty International in Newark, New Jersey, La Guardia Airport in Flushing, and Teterboro Airport in Teterboro, New Jersey. JFK tends to handle international traffic, whereas La Guardia tends to handle shorter domestic flights, and Newark handles both international and domestic; Teterboro is New York's primary general aviation airport, handling heavy business jet traffic together with cargo and medevac flights and some light plane traffic. The first airport in the city was Floyd Bennett Field, now closed as an airport and today part of Gateway National Recreation Area. The Port Authority also operates the AirTrain service, a train which connects the JFK and Newark airports to local subway and heavy rail systems. An overview of the airport. ... Newark Liberty International Airport (IATA Airport Code EWR; ICAO Airport Code KEWR) is an international airport within the city limits of both Newark and Elizabeth, New Jersey, United States. ... Newark, nicknamed The Brick City, is the largest city in New Jersey and the county seat of urban Essex County. ... FAA diagram of LaGuardia Airport Fiorello La Guardia Airport is located in Flushing, a neighborhood within the New York City borough of Queens, New York near the Flushing Bay. ... Flushing is a section of the borough of Queens in New York City, New York. ... Teterboro Airport (IATA airport code TEB) is a public airport in Teterboro operated by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. ... Map highlighting Teterboros location within Bergen County. ... General aviation (GA) encompasses all aviation other than scheduled airline flights and military aviation. ... Airbus A310 MRT MedEvac of the German Airforce. ... Floyd Bennett Field, New York Citys first municipal airport, is located in Brooklyn on Barren Island, near Gerritsen Beach. ... Gateway National Recreation Area is a 26,607 acre (105 km²) recreation area owned by the United States government in the New York City metropolitan area. ... AirTrain is the name given to the rail transportation systems connecting airports with cities in several places: AirTrain (Brisbane) - Brisbane, Australia AirTrain (JFK) - New York City AirTrain (Newark) - Newark, New Jersey AirTrain (SFO) - San Francisco This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise...


Taxis

Taxicabs are operated by private companies and licensed by the New York City Taxi & Limousine Commission. There are two officially recognized car services in the city. "Medallion taxis," the familiar yellow cabs, are legally permitted to pick up passengers hailing them on the street. The T&LC also regulates and licenses "car services," which are legally permitted to pick up only those customers who have called the car service's dispatcher and requested a car, although most of these pick up hailing passengers as well. A taxicab (sometimes called taxi, cab, or hack) is a vehicle for hire which conveys passengers between locations of their choice. ... Created in 1971, the New York City Taxi & Limousine Commission, serves as the regulatory agency for New York Citys medallion (yellow) taxicabs, for-hire vehicles (community-based liveries and black cars), commuter vans, paratransit vehicles (ambulettes) and certain luxury limousines. ... A man emerges from car service outside the Staten Island Mall Car service is a term used in New York City and surrounding areas to refer to a type of vehicle-for-hire transportation. ...


Ferries

Many private ferries are run by NY Waterway, which provides several lines across the Hudson River, New York Water Taxi, with lines connecting Brooklyn and Manhattan, and other operators. There is also the free Staten Island Ferry between Manhattan and Staten Island, operated by the New York City Department of Transportation. The Pride of Burgundy, a P&O Ferries car ferry on the Dover-Calais route A ferry is a boat or a ship carrying passengers, and sometimes their vehicles, on scheduled services. ... NY Waterway is a private firm that provides commuter ferry service and tourist excursions in New York Harbor, with service between several points in Manhattan and New Jersey, including Hoboken Terminal. ... View of the Hudson in the 1880s showing Jersey City The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, is a river running mainly through New York State but partly forming the boundary between the states of New York and New Jersey. ... A New York Water Taxi docks at Pier 11 near Wall Street. ... Lower Mahattan skyline from the deck of the Ferry, 2003 The Staten Island Ferry is a passenger ferry operated by the New York City Department of Transportation between Whitehall Street in Lower Manhattan near Battery Park (South Ferry) and St. ...


Education and scientific research

Colleges and universities

Brooklyn College is famous for its well tended campus.
Brooklyn College is famous for its well tended campus.

New York City is served by the publicly-run City University of New York (CUNY), the largest urban university in the United States, which has a number of campuses throughout the five boroughs. The city is also home to a number of other institutions of higher learning, some of national or even international reputation, including Columbia University, New York University, the Juilliard School, and The Cooper Union. Brooklyn College is famous for its well tended campus. ... Brooklyn College is famous for its well tended campus. ... Brooklyn College of The City University of New York Brooklyn College of The City University of New York is a senior college of the City University of New York. ... The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym usually pronounced kyoo-nee or coo-nee), located in New York City, is the largest urban university in the United States, with more than 198,000 enrolled in degree programs, about 20,000 enrolled in non-degree programs and more than 200... Columbia University is a private university in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. ... New York University (NYU) is a major research university in New York City. ... The Juilliard School is a performing arts conservatory in New York City, informally but definitively identified as simply Juilliard, and most famous for its musically-trained alumni. ... Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art is a privately funded college in Lower Manhattan of New York City. ...


New York City is also a major center of academic medicine. Manhattan contains the campuses of the world-class Rockefeller University, Weill Cornell Medical College, and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, as well as Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center and NYU Medical Center and their medical schools. In the Bronx, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University is a major academic center. Jonas Salk, developer of the vaccine for polio, was an intern at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Upper Manhattan. Brooklyn also hosts one of the country's leading urban medical centers: SUNY Downstate Medical Center, an academic medical center, the oldest hospital-based medical school in the United States. Professor Raymond Vahan Damadian, the inventor of the MRI, was part of the faculty from 1967 - 1977 and built the first MRI machine, the Indomnitable, there. Rockefeller University is a small private university focusing primarily on graduate education and research in the biomedical fields, located in the southeasternmost corner of the Upper East Side of Manhattan island in New York City, New York. ... The Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College is the medical school and biomedical research unit of Cornell University. ... The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York is a treatment and research institution founded in 1884 as the New York Cancer Hospital. ... New York-Presbyterian Hospital is a prominent university hospital in New York City, composed of two medical centers, Columbia University Medical Center and New York Weill Cornell Medical Center, each affiliated with an Ivy League University. ... New York University (NYU) is a major research university in New York City. ... The Albert Einstein College of Medicine is a medical school in Bronx, New York. ... Yeshiva University Yeshiva University is a private Jewish university in New York City whose first component was founded in 1886. ... Jonas E. Salk Jonas Salk (October 28, 1914 - June 23, 1995) is the discoverer/inventor of the eponymous Salk vaccine while a researcher in Pittsburgh(see polio vaccine). ... Poliomyelitis (polio), or infantile paralysis, is a viral paralytic disease. ... Mount Sinai Hospital (zip code 10029) is a hospital in New York City, New York, serving Manhattans Upper East Side and Harlem. ... SUNY Downstate Medical Center is Brooklyns only academic medical center. ... Professor Raymond Vahan Damadian (born March 16, 1936), is an American pioneer of magnetic resonance imaging. ... For other meanings see Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). ...


Public schools

The city-run New York City Department of Education covers the entire city limits and operates almost all of the city's public schools. One exception is Hunter College High School, which is run by Hunter College and charges no tuition. The New York City Department of Education is a department of the city of New York which runs almost all of the citys public schools. ... Hunter College High School Hunter College High School (Hunter High School) is one of the top high schools in New York City, rivaled by Stuyvesant High School, the Bronx High School of Science, and Brooklyn Technical High School. ... Hunter College of The City University of New York See also: Hunter College High School Hunter College of The City University of New York (known more commonly as simply Hunter College) is a senior college of the City University of New York (CUNY), located on Manhattans Upper East Side. ...


Dedication to the sciences starts early for many New Yorkers, who have the chance to attend such selective specialized high schools as the Bronx High School of Science (which boasts the largest number of graduates who are Nobel Laureates of any high school in the world), and its rivals, Manhattan's Stuyvesant High School and Brooklyn Technical High School. The Brooklyn High School of the Arts is the only high school in the United States with a curriculum in Historic Preservation. The Bronx High School of Science, commonly called Bronx Science, is a public high school in the Bedford Park section of the Bronx, New York City. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... Stuyvesant High School, often nicknamed Stuy by its staff and students, is one of New York Citys specialized math- and science-based public high schools. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Brooklyn High School of the Arts, (BHSA) is a New York City Public High School located in Boreum Hill in Brooklyn. ... Historic Preservation is the theory and practice of creatively maintaining the historic built environment and controlling the landscape component of which it is an integral part. ...


See also

This is a list of colleges and universities in New York City. ...

Skyline

New York City has by far the most famous skyline in the world; because of its high residential density, and the extremely high real estate values found in the city's central business districts, New York has amassed the largest collection of office and residential towers in the world. In fact, New York actually has three separately recognizable skylines: Midtown Manhattan, Downtown Manhattan (also known as Lower Manhattan), and Downtown Brooklyn. The largest of these skylines is in Midtown, which is the largest central business district in the U.S., and also home to such notable buildings as the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, and Rockefeller Center. The Downtown skyline comprises the third largest central business district in the U.S. (after Midtown and Chicago's Loop), and was once characterized by the presence of the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center. Today it is undergoing the rapid reconstruction of Lower Manhattan, and will include the Freedom Tower, which will rise to a height of 1,776 feet when completed in 2010. The Downtown skyline will also be getting notable additions soon from such architects as Santiago Calatrava and Frank Gehry. A skyline is best described as the overall or partial view or relief of a citys tall buildings and structures. ... View of Midtown from Empire State Building. ... The term Downtown Manhattan may have different meanings to different people, especially depending on what part of New York City they live in. ... Woolworth Building, looking south along Broadway The Lower Manhattan skyline as viewed from Hoboken, New Jersey. ... Skyline of Downtown Brooklyn seen from the East River Downtown Brooklyn is the third largest central business district in New York City (following Midtown Manhattan and Downtown Manhattan), and is located in the northwestern section of the borough of Brooklyn. ... Completed in 1930, the Chrysler Building is a distinctive symbol of New York City, standing 1,046 feet (319 m) high on the east side of Manhattan at the intersection of 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue. ... Lower Plaza at Rockefeller Center. ... Chicago (officially named the City of Chicago) is the third largest city in the United States (after New York City and Los Angeles), with an official population of 2,896,016, as of the 2000 census. ... The Loop is what locals call the downtown neighborhood of Chicago. ... The phrase Twin Towers has different connotations for readers in different parts of the globe. ... The twin towers, photographed from the west The World Trade Center in New York City was a complex of seven buildings designed by American architect Minoru Yamasaki and leased by Larry Silverstein from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey around a central plaza, near the south end... Woolworth Building, looking south along Broadway The Lower Manhattan skyline as viewed from Hoboken, New Jersey. ... For the tower in Miami, see Freedom Tower (Miami) The Freedom Tower is the name given to the piece of crap that is most likely going to be created in the space of the lost World Trade Center. ... Calatrava is known for his organically inspired designs, such as LUmbracle at his Ciutat de les Arts i les Ciències in Valencia. ... Gehrys most famous work, the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain Frank Owen Gehry, CC (born Ephraim Goldberg, February 28, 1929) is an architect known for his sculptural approach to building design. ...


New York City has a long history of tall buildings. It has been home to 10 buildings that have held the world's tallest fully inhabitable building title at some point in history, although half have since been demolished. The first building to bring the world's tallest title to New York was the New York World Building, in 1890. Later, New York City was home to the world's tallest building for 75 continuous years, starting with the Park Row Building in 1899 and ending with 1 World Trade Center upon completion of the Sears Tower in 1974. The oldest world's tallest building still standing in the city is the Park Row Building, built in 1899. The New York World Building is a skyscraper in New York City built in 1890. ... The Park Row Building is a skyscraper in New York City built in 1899. ... (Redirected from 1 World Trade Center) This article is about the World Trade Center complex in New York City; see this article for the many other buildings around the world that have also been called world trade centers. The twin towers, photographed from the west The World Trade Center in... A view of the Sears Tower from the Chicago River. ... The Park Row Building is a skyscraper in New York City built in 1899. ...


The Downtown Brooklyn skyline is the smallest of the three New York City skylines, and is centered around a major transportation hub in Northwestern Brooklyn. The borough of Queens has also been developing its own skyline in recent years with a Citigroup office building (which is currently the tallest building in NYC outside Manhattan), and the City Lights development of several residential towers along the East River waterfront. Skyline of Downtown Brooklyn seen from the East River Downtown Brooklyn is the third largest central business district in New York City (following Midtown Manhattan and Downtown Manhattan), and is located in the northwestern section of the borough of Brooklyn. ... A map highlighting Brooklyn and the rest of New York City. ... Queens Borough in New York City Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the United States, is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... New York City waterways: 1. ...



Panorama of skyline.
Enlarge
Panorama of skyline.


ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (7979x740, 1523 KB) Skyline panorama of New York City from Empire State Building - Note that this is an updated photo, i. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (7979x740, 1523 KB) Skyline panorama of New York City from Empire State Building - Note that this is an updated photo, i. ...

New York City has the mostskyscrapers in the world — 45 buildings taller than 200 meters — for comparison, Hong Kong has 39 and Chicago 17. ...

Sister cities

New York has ten sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International (SCI)]: This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the unrelated concept of physically neighbouring cities. ...

The modern skyline of Tokyo is highly decentralized. ... 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...   Beijing? (Chinese: 北京; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Pei-ching; Postal System Pinyin: Peking) is the capital of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... 1980 is a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Plaza de Cibeles (Cibeles square) and the Palacio de Comunicaciones (Communications Palace) Coat of arms. ... 1982 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Although technically in Giza, The Great Pyramids have become a symbol of Cairo internationally Cairo (Arabic: القاهرة; transliterated: al-Qāhirah) is the capital city of Egypt (and previously the United Arab Republic) and has a metropolitan area population of approximately 15. ... 1982 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Santo Domingo from space, May 1992 Plaza Colón Santo Domingo, population 2,061,200 (2003), is the capital of the Dominican Republic. ... 1983 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Democratici di Sinistra) Area  - City Proper  1290 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,546,807 almost 4,000,000 1... 1992 was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... Budapest (pronounced ) is the capital city of Hungary and the countrys principal political, industrial, commercial and transportation centre. ... 1992 was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... Jerusalem (31°46′ N 35°14′ E; Hebrew:   יְרוּשָׁלַיִם ?; Yerushalayim; Arabic:   القُدس? al-Quds; see also names of Jerusalem) is an ancient Middle Eastern city of key importance to the religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. ... 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... City motto: Unity in Development Province Gauteng Mayor Amos Masondo Area  - % water 1,644 km² 0. ... 2003(MMIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Trivia

  • New York City finally reached the 8 million population mark in the 2000 census; the population had crossed the 7 million mark in the 1940 census.
  • With over 8 million residents, New York City has a larger population than 39 US states. It has more than twice the population of Los Angeles, the second largest city in the country, and more than 27 times the population of Buffalo, the second largest city in the state of New York.
  • If each borough — Brooklyn, Queens, Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island — were to become an independent city, they would rank as the 3rd, 4th, 6th, 9th, and 42nd largest cities in the U.S., respectively.
  • Approximately two out of five New York State residents live in New York City.

Aerial view of downtown Buffalo, New York Buffalo, is an American city in western New York. ...

See also

New York City related topics
History New AmsterdamCommissioners' PlanNew York CampaignEllis IslandSeptember 11thWTC bombingWorld's FairDraft RiotsBlackout of 1977Crown Heights riotsTammany Hall
Geography ManhattanThe BronxBrooklynStaten IslandQueensNew York HarborHudson RiverEast RiverUpper New York BayNew York BayLower ManhattanMidtown ManhattanDowntown ManhattanLong Island SoundBronx KillThe Narrows
Buildings Empire State BuildingChrysler BuildingWorld Trade CenterGrand Central TerminalMadison Square Garden • Jets Stadium • Yankee StadiumContinental Airlines ArenaTimes SquareSouth Street SeaportStatue of LibertyUnited Nations HeadquartersSt. Patrick's CathedralRadio City Music HallFreedom TowerRockefeller CenterCathedral of St. John the DivineLever HouseCarnegie HallGracie MansionCity HallPlaza HotelMacy'sPenn StationCondé Nast BuildingCitigroup CenterMetLife BuildingWoolworth BuildingTrump TowerFlatiron BuildingGE BuildingOne Chase Manhattan Plaza
Transport New York City SubwayIRT • BMT • Staten Island FerryNew York City Taxi & Limousine CommissionAirTrainJFK AirportLa Guardia AirportNewark Liberty AirportPort AuthorityNew Jersey TransitMTAStaten Island RailwayLower Manhattan ExpresswayTriborough BridgeBrooklyn Battery TunnelThrogs Neck Bridge • Holland Tunnel • Brooklyn BridgeTeterboro Airport
Economy New York Stock ExchangeWall Street • Port Newark • NASDAQAmerican Stock ExchangeNew York Mercantile ExchangeNew York Board of TradeMadison Avenue
Education New York UniversityColumbia UniversityCUNYCooper UnionFITFordham UniversityJuilliardPace UniversityPratt InstituteSVAManhattan College
Civic MayorNYPDFDNYOEMCity CouncilCivil CourtCriminal Court • Family Court • Supreme CourtAppellate DivisionTransit AuthorityTransit PoliceHighway PatrolDepartment of Parks and Recreation
Culture Macy's Thanksgiving Day ParadeYankeesMetsMuseum MileThe CloistersWhitney MuseumMetropolitan Museum of ArtInternational Center of PhotographyPublic LibraryLincoln Center
Parks and grounds Central ParkBronx ZooConey Island • Flushing Meadows • Battery ParkProspect ParkRiverside ParkPelham Bay ParkGreenbeltBowling Green
Other The Big Apple

This article traces the history of New York City, part of present day New York State. ... Dutch Revival buildings from the early 20th century on Pearl Street in lower Manhattan recall the Dutch origins of the city. ... An 1807 version of the Commissioners Grid plan for Manhattan, a few years before it was adopted in 1811. ... The New York Campaign describes the actions and battles of the American Revolutionary War, by which the British forces gained control of New York City and its surroundings in the summer and fall of 1776. ... Immigration Museum on Ellis Island Ellis Island, located in New York Harbor at the mouth of the Hudson River, was at one time the main immigration port for immigrants entering the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ... The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of suicide attacks against civilians of the United States conducted on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. ... The aftermath of the bombing. ... There have been two Worlds fairs in New York City: 1939 New York Worlds Fair ( 1939- 1940) at Flushing Meadows in Queens gave us Futurama, the Trylon, and Perisphere. ... The New York Draft Riots (New York City, July 13 - July 17, 1863) began as protests against President Abraham Lincolns Enrollment Act of Conscription drafting men to fight in the ongoing United States Civil War. ... Time 1977 The New York City Blackout of 1977 was a blackout that affected New York City on July 13-14, 1977. ... The Crown Heights riots or Crown Heights pogrom happened on August 19 – August 22, 1991 in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn, New York. ... The Tammany Hall on 14th Street, New York City Tammany Hall was the name given to the Democratic Party political machine that dominated New York City politics from the mayoral victory of Fernando Wood in 1854 through the election of Fiorello LaGuardia in 1934. ... Manhattan Borough,highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States. ... A map highlighting Brooklyn and the rest of New York City. ... Staten Island lies to the South West of the rest of New York City. ... Queens Borough in New York City Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the United States, is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City. ... New York Harbor is a geographic term that refers collectively to the bays and tidal estuaries near the mouth of the Hudson and adjacent rivers in the vicinity of New York City. ... View of the Hudson in the 1880s showing Jersey City The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, is a river running mainly through New York State but partly forming the boundary between the states of New York and New Jersey. ... New York City waterways: 1. ... Upper New York Bay, sometimes called Upper New York Harbor or the Upper Bay, is the northern area of New York Harbor inside the Narrows. ... New York Bay is the collective term for the marine areas surrounding the entrance of the Hudson River into the Atlantic Ocean. ... Woolworth Building, looking south along Broadway The Lower Manhattan skyline as viewed from Hoboken, New Jersey. ... View of Midtown from Empire State Building. ... The term Downtown Manhattan may have different meanings to different people, especially depending on what part of New York City they live in. ... Long Island Sound near Guilford, Connecticut Long Island Sound is an estuary of the Atlantic Ocean and various rivers in the United States. ... Bronx Kill is a narrow strait in New York City delineating the southernmost extent of The Bronx and separating it from Randalls Island. ... New York Harbor, as seen in a TERRA satellite image. ... The Empire State Building Entrance lobby The Empire State Building, a 102-story contemporary Art Deco style building in New York City, was designed by Shreve, Lamb and Harmon Associates and built in 1931. ... Completed in 1930, the Chrysler Building is a distinctive symbol of New York City, standing 1,046 feet (319 m) high on the east side of Manhattan at the intersection of 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue. ... The twin towers, photographed from the west The World Trade Center in New York City was a complex of seven buildings designed by American architect Minoru Yamasaki and leased by Larry Silverstein from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey around a central plaza, near the south end... The clock in the Main Concourse © 2004 Metropolitan Transportation Authority Grand Central Terminal (often still called Grand Central Station, although technically that is the name of the nearby post office and New York City Subway station on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line) is a train station at 15 Vanderbilt Avenue... Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG has been the name of four arenas in New York City, United States. ... Yankee Stadium is the home stadium of the New York Yankees, a major league baseball team. ... Continental Airlines Arena is a multi-purpose indoor arena in the Meadowlands Sports Complex in East Rutherford, New Jersey. ... Times Square Times Square is also the name of a station on the Detroit People Mover, a shopping mall in Hong Kong, and a 1980 movie. ... A view of the South Street Seaport in New York with the Brooklyn, Manhattan, and Williamsburg bridges. ... Statue of Liberty The Statue of Liberty, in full Liberty Enlightening the World, is a statue, given to the U.S. by France in the late 19th century, that stands at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor as a welcome to all returning Americans, visitors, and... United Nations headquarters, view from East River United Nations headquarters in New York City The United Nations headquarters is a distinctive complex in New York City that has served as the United Nationss headquarters since its completion in 1952. ... St. ... Radio City Music Hall in 1996 Radio City Music Hall is an entertainment venue located in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... For the tower in Miami, see Freedom Tower (Miami) The Freedom Tower is the name given to the piece of crap that is most likely going to be created in the space of the lost World Trade Center. ... Lower Plaza at Rockefeller Center. ... The Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine in New York City is the seat of the bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of New York. ... Lever House, by Gordon Bunshaft of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill on Park Avenue in New York City, is the quintessential and seminal glass box International Style skyscraper. ... Carnegie Hall Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Manhattan, New York City. ... Gracie Mansion is the official residence of the mayor of New York City. ... New York City Hall is the center of New York Citys municipal government. ... The Plaza Hotel as seen in 2004 from The Pond in Central Park. ... Macys Department Store on Seventh Avenue in Manhattan Looking down on Macys. ... Exterior view circa 1911. ... Condé Nast Building, seen from Empire State Building The Condé Nast Building, officially Four Times Square, is a modern skyscraper in Times Square in Midtown Manhattan. ... Citigroup Center The Citigroup Center is one of the largest skyscrapers in New York City. ... MetLife Building MetLife Building as seen from the Empire State Building, 2005. ... The 60-story Woolworth Building is one of the oldest – and one of the most famous – skyscrapers in New York City. ... Trump Tower Trump Tower Trump Tower is a 68 story skyscraper in New York City. ... Flatiron Building (2004) —H.G. Wells, 1906 The Fuller Building or as it is better known, the Flatiron Building, was one of the tallest buildings in New York City upon its completion in 1902. ... the GE Building at Rockefeller Center the GE Building at night The GE Building is a slim gothic skyscraper and the focal point at the beautiful Rockefeller Center. ... One Chase Manhattan Plaza is a skyscraper located in the downtown Manhattan Financial District of New York City, United States. ... The New York City Subway is a large rapid transit system in New York City, New York, United States. ... The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was the operator of the original New York Subway line that opened in 1904 and additional rapid transit lines in the City of New York. ... A 1914 map showing what was at the time the proposed expansion for the BRT. The only major differences from what was built is that a new 60th Street Tunnel was used rather than the Queensboro Bridge, the Manhattan-side Brooklyn Bridge connection was never built, and several lines ended... Lower Mahattan skyline from the deck of the Ferry, 2003 The Staten Island Ferry is a passenger ferry operated by the New York City Department of Transportation between Whitehall Street in Lower Manhattan near Battery Park (South Ferry) and St. ... Created in 1971, the New York City Taxi & Limousine Commission, serves as the regulatory agency for New York Citys medallion (yellow) taxicabs, for-hire vehicles (community-based liveries and black cars), commuter vans, paratransit vehicles (ambulettes) and certain luxury limousines. ... AirTrain is the name given to the rail transportation systems connecting airports with cities in several places: AirTrain (Brisbane) - Brisbane, Australia AirTrain (JFK) - New York City AirTrain (Newark) - Newark, New Jersey AirTrain (SFO) - San Francisco This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise... John F. Kennedy International Airport (IATA Airport Code: JFK, ICAO Airport Code: KJFK) is the main international airport in New York City, and is one of the largest airports in the world. ... FAA diagram of LaGuardia Airport Fiorello La Guardia Airport is located in Flushing, a neighborhood within the New York City borough of Queens, New York near the Flushing Bay. ... Newark Liberty International Airport (IATA Airport Code EWR; ICAO Airport Code KEWR) is an international airport within the city limits of both Newark and Elizabeth, New Jersey, United States. ... The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey is a bi-state agency (operated pursuant to an interstate compact) that runs most of the regional transportation infrastructure including the bridges, tunnels, airports and seaports within the New York-New Jersey Port District. ... New Jersey Transit Arrow III at West Windsor, NJ Hudson-Bergen Light Rail vehicle at 2nd Street station New Jersey Transit (NJ Transit) is a statewide public transportation system serving the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Metropolitan Transportation Authority is the name of a governmental or quasi-governmental body in each of several areas: Metropolitan Transit Authority of Boston Massachusetts, now the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority — Boston, Massachusetts Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority — Los Angeles County, California Metropolitan Transportation Authority — New York metropolitan area See... Staten Island Railway (SIR) or Staten Island Rapid Transit (SIRT) is a rapid transit line operating in the Borough of Staten Island, New York City, USA. It began, like the BMT lines to Coney Island, as a typical railway, but it now uses subway cars (R44). ... The Lower Manhattan Expressway (also known as the Canal Street Expressway) was a controversial plan for an expressway through lower Manhattan conceptualized by master builder Robert Moses in the early 1960s. ... Aerial view of the Triborough Bridge (left) and the Hell Gate Bridge (right) The Triborough Bridge is a complex of three bridges connecting the New York City boroughs of the Bronx, Manhattan, and Queens, using what were two islands, Wards Island and Randalls Island as intermediate right-of... The Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel is a toll road in New York City which crosses under the East River at its mouth and connects the Boroughs of Brooklyn and Manhattan, passing under but providing no access to Governors Island. ... Aerial view of the Throgs Neck Bridge The Throgs Neck Bridge is a suspension bridge opened on January 11, 1961 that carries US Interstate 295 and connects the Throggs Neck section of the Bronx with the Bayside section of Queens. ... The Holland Tunnel, originally known as the Hudson River Vehicular Tunnel or the Canal Street Tunnel, is one of two highway tunnels under the Hudson River connecting the island of Manhattan with Jersey City, New Jersey on the mainland (the Lincoln Tunnel is the other one). ... View from the East River (2002) Plan of one tower for the Brooklyn Bridge, 1867. ... Teterboro Airport (IATA airport code TEB) is a public airport in Teterboro operated by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. ... New York Stock Exchange (June 2003) The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is the largest stock exchange in the world, although its trading volume was exceeded by that of NASDAQ (historic comparison graph {pdf}) during the 1990s. ... For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... Container port facilities at Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal, seen from Bayonne, New Jersey. ... NASDAQ MarketSite (Times Square, New York City) at night NASDAQ (originally an acronym for National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations) is a U.S. electronic stock exchange. ... The American Stock Exchange (AMEX) is a stock exchange operated by American Stock Exchange LLC, a subsidiary of the United States of America. ... The New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) is the worlds largest physical commodity futures exchange located in New York City. ... The New York Board of Trade (NYBOT) is a physical commodity futures exchange located in New York, New York. ... Madison Avenue is a north-south avenue in the borough of Manhattan in New York City which carries northbound one-way traffic. ... New York University (NYU) is a major research university in New York City. ... Columbia University is a private university in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. ... The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym usually pronounced kyoo-nee or coo-nee), located in New York City, is the largest urban university in the United States, with more than 198,000 enrolled in degree programs, about 20,000 enrolled in non-degree programs and more than 200... Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art is a privately funded college in Lower Manhattan of New York City. ... The Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) is a State University of New York community college of art and design in New York City. ... Fordham University is a private, co-educational university located in the Bronx in New York City (but with campuses also in Manhattan — at Lincoln Center — and Westchester). ... The Juilliard School is a performing arts conservatory in New York City, informally but definitively identified as simply Juilliard, and most famous for its musically-trained alumni. ... See also: Pace University High School Pace University is a private co-educational comprehensive university with campuses located in New York City and throughout Westchester County and the Hudson Valley in New York State. ... The Pratt Institute is a specialized, private college in New York City with campuses in Manhattan and Brooklyn. ... The School of Visual Arts (SVA) is an art school in New York City. ... Manhattan College is a Catholic college in the Lasallian tradition in New York City. ... For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. ... The New York City Police Department (NYPD), the largest police department in the United States, has primary responsibility for law enforcement and investigation within the five boroughs of New York City. ... The New York City Fire Department (FDNY) has the responsibility of protecting citizens and property in New York Citys five boroughs from fires and fire hazards, as well as first response to biological, chemical and radioactive hazards. ... Originally formed in 1996 as part of the Mayors Office under Rudy Giuliani, the New York City Office of Emergency Management (OEM) became an independent agency, headed by a Commissioner who reports to the Mayor, by a vote of City residents in 2001. ... The New York City Council is the lawmaking body of the City of New York. ... The New York City Civil Court is the civil branch of the New York City courts system. ... The New York City Criminal Court is the begining level trial court of criminal cases in the City of New York. ... New York County Supreme Court building at 60 Centre Street, from across Foley Square The Supreme Court of the State of New York is one of several New York State trial courts in which cases originate. ... Appellate Department is the informal term used to distinguish the four appellate jurisdictions in New York State. ... The New York City Transit Authority (also known as NYCTA, NYCT or simply the TA for Transit Authority) is a New York State Authority that operates buses and subway trains in New York City. ... Established in 1935, the New York City Transit Police Department was responsible for the protection of New York City Subway lines for 60 years. ... The NYPD Highway Patrol -- also known as the New York City Police Department Patrol Services Bureau or NYPD Highway District -- is a specialized unit under the auspices of the NYPDs Transportation Bureau primarily responsible for patrolling and maintaining traffic safety on limited-access highways within New York City. ... The New York City Department of Parks and Recreation is the branch of government of the City of New York responsible for maintaining the citys parks system, preserving and maintaining the ecological diversity of the citys natural areas, and furnishing recreational opportunities for citys residents. ... Chinatown in Manhattan, 1995 The people of New York City, New Yorkers, share a unique culture rooted in centuries of immigration and city life. ... The Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade, originally called the Macys Christmas Parade, is an annual parade sponsored by Macys Department Store. ... The New York Yankees are a Major League baseball team based in The Bronx, New York City. ... // Franchise history In 1957 the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants abandoned New York for California, leaving the largest city in the United States without a National League franchise. ... Museum Mile is the name for a section of Fifth Avenue, an avenue in Manhattan in the City of New York, running from 82nd to 105th streets on the Upper East Side in a neighborhood known as Carnegie Hill. ... The Cloisters as seen from the Hudson River The Cloisters is one of the museums of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. ... The Whitney Museum of American Art is an art gallery and museum in New York City founded in 1931 by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney. ... Crowds daily gather on the steps in front of the neoclassical façade The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as The Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums, located on the eastern edge of Central Park in Manhattan, New York, United... Founded in 1974, the International Center for Photography is located in Midtown Manhattan in New York City ( United States). ... New York Public Library, central block, built 1897–1911, Carrère and Hastings, architects (June 2003) The New York Public Library (NYPL), one of three public library systems serving New York City, is one of the leading libraries in the United States. ... Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 15 acre (61,000 m²) complex of buildings in New York City which serves as home for 12 arts companies. ... The is a list of parks in New York City maintained by the citys Department of Parks and Recreation. ... A wintry aerial view, looking south: ice on the frozen lakes, the Metropolitan Museum in the park at left, the East River and the Empire State Building in the distance Central Park (40°46′59″ N 73°58′20″ W) is a large urban public park (843 acres or 3. ... The Bronx Zoo is a world-famous zoo in The Bronx, New York. ... Image of Coney Island (middle left of picture) taken by NASA. The peninsula at right is Rockaway, Queens. ... Flushing Meadows Park is located in northern Queens, New York at the intersection of the Long Island Expressway and the Grand Central Parkway. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Prospect Park is A park in Brooklyn, New York A neighborhood in Minneapolis, Minnesota A neighborhood in Prospect Park, New Jersey This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Riverside Park is a scenic waterfront public park on the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City, consisting of a narrow four-mile strip of land between the Hudson River and the gently curving rise-and-fall of Riverside Drive. ... Pelham Bay Park, located in the northeast corner of the The Bronx, is the largest public park in New York City, more than three times the size of Manhattans Central Park. ... The Staten Island Greenbelt is a system of contiguous public parkland and natural areas in the central hills of Staten Island, New York. ... Bowling Green, shown in a composite photograph taken from the steps of the U.S. Custom House looking north along Broadway. ... The Big Apple - Manhattan viewed from the World Trade Center The Big Apple is a nickname or alternate toponym for New York City. ... // Culture and Education List of famous New Yorkers List of colleges and universities in New York City List of New York City newspapers and magazines List of New York City Television and Film studios List of television shows set in New York City List of movies set in New York...

Further reading

The Encyclopedia of New York City is a comprehensive reference work about New York City published in 1995 by the Yale University Press. ... Kenneth T. Jackson (b. ... Gotham: A History of New York City to 1898 is a nonfiction book written by Edwin G. Burrows and Mike Wallace. ... Mike Wallace is an American historian. ... New York is a book of travel and observation written by Anthony Burgess in 1976 for Time-Lifes The Great Cities series of books. ...

External links

  • NYC.gov Official website for the city.
  • New York Magazine Variety of info for tourists and locals.
  • New York Times Local events and information
  • New York on Tap Events, reviews, unusual things to do.
  • NYC Bloggers Thousands of New York blogs orgazined by subway stop.

Related Wiki Links

Commons
Wikimedia Commons has more media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ...

References

  • http://flagspot.net, http://fotw.vexillum.com/flags/us-nyc.html – Source of flag and seal images. Picture of flag is by Joe McMillan. Picture of seal is by Dov Gutterman.
  • http://www.50states.com/bio/newyork.htm – Famous New Yorkers
Flag of New York State of New York
Capital: Albany
Regions:

Adirondack Mountains | Capital District | Catskill Mountains | Central | Finger Lakes | The Holland Purchase | Hudson Valley | Long Island | Mohawk Valley | Shawangunks | Southern Tier | Upstate | Western State flag of New York. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York City Governor George Pataki (R) Senators Charles Schumer (D) Hillary Rodham Clinton (D) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Location in New York Founded  -Incorporated 1614 1686  County Albany County Mayor Gerald D. Jennings Area  - Total  - Water 56. ... Eagle Lake, Adirondack region The Adirondack mountain range are a group of mountains in north-eastern New York, USA, which extend into Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Hamilton, Herkimer, Lewis, and Warren counties. ... The Capital District (or Capital-Saratoga Area) is an unofficial term used to refer to a four-county area of eastern New York. ... Catskill Escarpment and Blackhead Range as seen from Overlook Mountain The Catskill Mountains, a natural area in New York State northwest of New York City and southwest of Albany, are not, despite their popular name, true geological mountains, but rather a mature dissected plateau, an uplifted region that was subsequently... Central New York is a term used to describe the central region of Upstate New York, roughly including the following counties and cities: The region has a population of about 1,112,646. ... New Yorks Finger Lakes The Finger Lakes are glacially formed lakes in upstate New York, mainly linear in shape, each lake oriented on a north-south axis. ... Map of the Holland Purchase The Holland Land Company was formed in 1796 by Wilheim Willink and a group of fellow Dutch bankers to purchase from Robert Morris a large tract of land in what is now western New York State, an area later known as the Holland Purchase. ... The Hudson Valley refers to the canyon of the Hudson River and its adjacent communities in New York State, generally from northern Westchester County northward to the city of Albany. ... Image of Long Island taken by NASA. Long Island is an island off the North American coast. ... The six-county Mohawk Valley Region of the USA includes the industrialized cities of Utica and Rome, along with other smaller commercial centers. ... Castle Point in the Shawangunks The Shawangunk Ridge (also known as the Shawangunk Mountains, or The Gunks) is a ridge of mountains in Ulster County, Sullivan County and Orange County in the state of New York, extending from the northernmost point of New Jersey to the Catskill Mountains. ... The Southern Tier is a geographical term that refers to the counties of upstate New York State west of the Catskill Mountains along the northern border of Pennsylvania, with the exception of the counties in the far west of the state near the city of Buffalo. ... Upstate New York is the region of New York State outside of the core of the New York metropolitan area. ... Western New York refers to the westernmost counties of New York State, roughly the area included in the Holland Purchase. ...

Major metros:

Albany | Binghamton | Buffalo | New York | Rochester | Syracuse | Utica Location in New York Founded  -Incorporated 1614 1686  County Albany County Mayor Gerald D. Jennings Area  - Total  - Water 56. ... Binghamton is a city in upstate New York in the United States. ... Aerial view of downtown Buffalo, New York Buffalo, is an American city in western New York. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... A portion of Rochesters skyline, looking north along the Genesee River from the Ford Street Bridge City nickname: The Flour City, The Flower City Location Location of Rochester in New York State Government Mayor Physical characteristics Area      Land      Water 96. ... Clinton Square in Downtown Syracuse Syracuse is an American city in Central New York. ... This article is about Utica in New York, USA. For other places with this name, see Utica. ...

Smaller cities:

Amsterdam | Auburn | Batavia | Canandaigua | Corning | Cortland | Dunkirk | Elmira | Geneva | Glen Cove | Glens Falls | Gloversville | Goshen | Hornell | Hudson | Ilion | Ithaca | Jamestown | Kingston | Lockport | Malone | Massena | Middletown | New Paltz | Newark | Ogdensburg | Olean | Oneida | Oneonta | Oswego | Plattsburgh | Port Jervis | Poughkeepsie | Riverhead | Rome | Saratoga Springs | Warwick | Watertown Amsterdam, New York is the name of two locations in Montgomery County, New York. ... Auburn is a city located in Cayuga County, New York, United States of America. ... Batavia is a city located in USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 16,256. ... There are two local governmental bodies known as Canandaigua and both are in Ontario County, New York. ... Corning, New York is the name of two places in Steuben County, New York, although it most frequently means the City of Corning. ... Cortland is a city in Cortland County, New York, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a population of 18,740. ... Power plant along Lake Erie in Dunkirk Dunkirk is a city located in Chautauqua County, New York. ... Elmira is a city located in Chemung County, New York, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 30,940. ... Geneva is a city located in Ontario County, New York, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 13,617. ... Glen Cove is a city located in Nassau County, New York. ... Glens Falls is a city located in Warren County, New York. ... Gloversville is a city located in Fulton County, New York. ... Goshen, New York is a village and a town in Orange County, New York in the USA. Town of Goshen Village of Goshen This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Hornell is a city located in Steuben County, New York, about 56 miles south of Rochester, New York. ... Hudson is a city located in Columbia County, New York. ... Ilion is a village located in Herkimer County, New York. ... It has been suggested that Ithaca Commons be merged into this article or section. ... Jamestown is a city located in Chautauqua County, New York in the USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 31,730. ... Kingston is a city located in Ulster County, New York, United States. ... Lockport, New York refers to both a city and a town in Niagara County, New York, near Niagara Falls and Buffalo. ... Malone, New York is the name of two locations in Franklin County, New York. ... There are two places named Massena in St. ... Middletown is the name of two separate cities located in the U.S. state of New York: Middletown, Delaware County, New York Middletown, Orange County, New York This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... New Paltz is both a village and town in the U.S. state of New York: New Paltz (town), New York New Paltz (village), New York This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Newark is a village located in Wayne County, New York. ... Ogdensburg is a city located in St. ... Olean is a city located in Cattaraugus County, New York. ... Oneida is a city located in Madison County, New York. ... The City of Oneonta is located within the Town of Oneonta in Otsego County, New York. ... Oswego is a city located in Oswego County, New York. ... Plattsburgh, New York refers to two locations in Clinton County, New York: City of Plattsburgh Town of Plattsburgh This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Port Jervis is a city located in Orange County in the U.S. state of New York. ... Poughkeepsie City of Poughkeepsie Town of Poughkeepsie Poughkeepsie, Arkansas This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Riverhead is a hamlet in the Town of Riverhead in Suffolk County, New York. ... Rome is a city located in Oneida County, New York. ... Saratoga Springs is a city located in Saratoga County, New York, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 26,186. ... Warwick is a village located in Orange County, New York. ... Watertown is a city located in Jefferson County, New York. ...

Counties:

Albany | Allegany | Bronx | Broome | Cattaraugus | Cayuga | Chautauqua | Chemung | Chenango | Clinton | Columbia | Cortland | Delaware | Dutchess | Erie | Essex | Franklin | Fulton | Genesee | Greene | Hamilton | Herkimer | Jefferson | Kings (Brooklyn) | Lewis | Livingston | Madison | Monroe | Montgomery | Nassau | New York (Manhattan) | Niagara | Oneida | Onondaga | Ontario | Orange | Orleans | Oswego | Otsego | Putnam | Queens | Rensselaer | Richmond (Staten Island) | Rockland | Saint Lawrence | Saratoga | Schenectady | Schoharie | Schuyler | Seneca | Steuben | Suffolk | Sullivan | Tioga | Tompkins | Ulster | Warren | Washington | Wayne | Westchester | Wyoming | Yates Albany County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York, generally located in the vicinity of Albany, New York, the capital of New York State. ... Allegany County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States. ... Broome County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Cattaraugus County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Location in the state of New York Formed 1799 Seat Auburn Area  - Total  - Water 2,237 km² (864 mi²) 441 km² (170 mi²) 19. ... Chautauqua County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Chemung County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Chenango County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Clinton County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Cortland County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Delaware County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Location in the state of New York Formed 1683 Seat Poughkeepsie Area  - Total  - Water 2,138 km² (825 mi²) 62 km² (24 mi²) 2. ... Erie County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Essex County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Franklin County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Fulton County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Genesee County, New York - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Greene County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Hamilton County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Herkimer County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Image:Map of New Hippie-ville York highlighting Jefferson County. ... A map highlighting Brooklyn and the rest of New York City. ... Lewis County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Livingston County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Madison County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Location in the state of New York Formed 1821 Seat Rochester Area  - Total  - Water 3,537 km² (1,366 mi²) 15 km² (6 mi²) 51. ... Montgomery County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Location in the state of New York Formed 1899 Seat Mineola Area  - Total  - Water 1,173 km² (453 mi²) 431 km² (166 mi²) 36. ... Manhattan Borough,highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... Location in the state of New York Formed 1808 Seat Lockport Area  - Total  - Water 2,952 km² (1,140 mi²) 1,598 km² (617 mi²) 54. ... Oneida County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Location in the state of New York Formed 1794 Seat Syracuse Area  - Total  - Water 2,087 km² (806 mi²) 66 km² (25 mi²) 3. ... Ontario County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Location in the state of New York Formed 1683 Seat Goshen Area  - Total  - Water 2,172 km² (839 mi²) 58 km² (22 mi²) 2. ... Orleans County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Oswego County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Otsego County is a county located in the state of New York, USA. The 2003 population estimate was 62,196, a 2. ... Putnam County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Queens Borough in New York City Queens, the most ethnically diverse county in the United States, is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City. ... Rensselaer County is a county in the state of New York. ... Staten Island lies to the South West of the rest of New York City. ... Rockland County is a county located in the state of New York. ... St. ... Saratoga County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Location in the state of New York Formed 1809 Seat Schenectady Area  - Total  - Water 543 km² (210 mi²) 9 km² (4 mi²) 1. ... Schoharie County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Schuyler County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Seneca County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Steuben County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Location in the state of New York Formed 1683 Seat Riverhead Area  - Total  - Water 6,146 km² (2,373 mi²) 3,784 km² (1,461 mi²) 61. ... Sullivan County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Tioga County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Tompkins County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Location in the state of New York Formed 1683 Seat Kingston Area  - Total  - Water 3,006 km² (1,161 mi²) 89 km² (34 mi²) 2. ... Warren County is a county in the state of New York. ... Washington County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Wayne County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Westchester County is a suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Wyoming County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Yates County is a county located in the state of New York. ...


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