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Encyclopedia > New York City
The City of New York
New York City at night
Official flag of The City of New York
Flag
Official seal of The City of New York
Seal
Nickname: The Big Apple, Gotham, The City that Never Sleeps
Location in the state of New York
Coordinates: 40°43′N 74°00′W / 40.717, -74
Country United States
State New York
Boroughs The Bronx
Brooklyn
Manhattan
Queens
Staten Island
Settled 1624
Government
 - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (I)[1]
Area
 - City  468.9 sq mi (1,214.4 km²)
 - Land  303.3 sq mi (785.6 km²)
 - Water  165.6 sq mi (428.8 km²)
 - Urban  3,352.6 sq mi (8,683.2 km²)
 - Metro  6,720 sq mi (17,405 km²)
Elevation  33 ft (10 m)
Population (2006)[2]
 - City 8,214,426 (13th)
 - Density 27,083/sq mi (10,456/km²)
 - Urban 18,498,000
 - Metro 18,818,536
 - Demonym New Yorker
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Website: www.nyc.gov

New York; or New York City (officially The City of New York) is an alpha world city in the state of New York. It is the most populous city in the United States, the center of the New York metropolitan area, and ranks among the largest urban areas in the world. For more than a century, it has been one of the world's leading business, financial and cultural centers and its influence in politics, education, entertainment, sports, media, fashion and the arts all contribute to its status as one of the major global cities. As the home of the United Nations, the city is a hub for international diplomacy. Residents of the city are known as New Yorkers. New York, New York may mean New York City New York, New York (film), a 1977 film directed by Martin Scorsese. ... NYC may mean: IATA code for the New York City-area airports: John F. Kennedy International Airport LaGuardia Airport Newark Liberty International Airport New York City, common abbreviation New York Central Railroad, Association of American Railroads (AAR) reporting mark NYC is one of the songs from the musical Annie NYD... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_York_City. ... The official Flag of the City of New York is designed to bear the same colors (orange, white, and blue) as the flag of the United Netherlands used in 1625, the year of the first permanent European settlement on the island of Manhattan. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The seal of the City of New York, adopted in an earlier form in 1686, bears the legend SIGILUM CIVITATIS NOVI EBORACUM which means simply The Seal of the City of New York: Eboracum was the Roman name for York, the titular seat of James II as Duke of York. ... // A nickname is a name of a person or thing other than its proper name. ... The Big Apple is a nickname or alternate toponym for New York City used by New Yorkers. ... Image File history File links Map_of_New_York_Highlighting_New_York_City. ... This article is about the state. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the state. ... The Five Boroughs redirects here. ... For other uses, see The Bronx (disambiguation). ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Queens (disambiguation) and Queen. ... This article is about the borough in New York City. ... This article is about the settlement in present-day New York City. ... For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, philanthropist, and the founder of Bloomberg L.P., currently serving as the Mayor of New York City. ... Not to be confused with Independent Party or Independence Party. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 1,000 km² and 10,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... This is a list of the most populous cities of the world defined according to the concept of city proper. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... “Eastern Daylight Time” redirects here. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... “Eastern Daylight Time” redirects here. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... “World city” redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the state. ... Ten most populous cities in the United States Los Angeles San Jose San Diego Phoenix Chicago New York City Houston San Antonio Dallas Philadelphia The following is a list of the most populous incorporated places in the United States. ... The New York metropolitan area is the most populous in the United States and the fourth most populous in the world (after Tokyo, Seoul, and Mexico City). ... Metropolitan areas with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 This is a list of the 100 largest urban agglomerations in the world according to the United Nations World Urbanization Prospects report (2005 revision). ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... A stilt-walker entertaining shoppers at a shopping centre in Swindon, England Entertainment is an event, performance, or activity designed to give pleasure or relaxation to an audience (although, for example, in the case of a computer game the audience may be only one person). ... For other uses, see Fashion (disambiguation). ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ...


New York City comprises five boroughs, each of which is coterminous with a county: The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens and Staten Island. With over 8.2 million residents within an area of 322 square miles (830 km²), New York City is the second most densely populated city in the United States, behind its satellite city, Union City, New Jersey.[3] [4] The Five Boroughs redirects here. ... For other uses, see The Bronx (disambiguation). ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Queens (disambiguation) and Queen. ... This article is about the borough in New York City. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with satellite city. ... Spectators viewing the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks from across the Hudson River, in the terrace courtyard of the Union City Boxing Club. ...


The city has many neighborhoods and landmarks known around the world. The Statue of Liberty greeted millions of immigrants as they came to America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, at Ellis Island. Wall Street, in Lower Manhattan, has been a dominant global financial center since World War II and is home to the New York Stock Exchange. The city has been home to several of the tallest buildings in the world, including the Empire State Building and the former twin towers of the World Trade Center, which were destroyed in the September 11, 2001 attacks. For other monuments to freedom, see Monument of Liberty. ... 2000 Census Population Ancestry Map Immigration to the United States of America is the movement of non-residents to the United States, and has been a major source of population growth and cultural change throughout much of the American history even though the foreign born have never been more than... Ellis Island, at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor, was at one time the main entry facility for immigrants entering the United States from January 1, 1892 until November 12, 1954. ... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... Woolworth Building, looking south along Broadway Lower Manhattan, from the Brooklyn Bridge, 2005 Rigid airship the USS Akron over Lower Manhattan Lower Manhattan is the southernmost part of the island of Manhattan, the main island and center of business and government of the City of New York. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... For other uses, see Skyscraper (disambiguation). ... The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in New York City, New York on the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. ... For other uses, see World Trade Center (disambiguation). ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


The city is the birthplace of many American cultural movements, including the Harlem Renaissance in literature and visual art, abstract expressionism (also known as the New York School) in painting, and hip hop[5], punk[6] and Tin Pan Alley in music. In 2005, nearly 170 languages were spoken in the city and 36 percent of its population was born outside the United States.[7][8] New York is often called the "Big Apple," since it's the largest "bite of the apple" that performers as well as professionals in the United States seek to claim ("bite of the apple" is colloquial American English for "opportunity"). New York is also known as "The City that Never Sleeps," not least because its subway system operates around the clock and because many neighborhoods are busy at all hours. This nickname was popularized by Liza Minnelli's song "New York, New York", famously covered by Frank Sinatra. The Harlem Renaissance (also known as the Black Literary Renaissance and New Negro Renaissance) refers to the blooming of African American cultural and intellectual life during the 1920s and 1930s. ... Jackson Pollock, No. ... The New York School (synonymous with abstract expressionist painting) was an informal group of American poets, painters, dancers, and musicians active in the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s in New York City. ... Hip hop is a subculture, which is said to have begun with the work of DJ Kool Herc, Grandmaster Flash & the Furious Five, and Afrika Bambaattaa. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Tin Pan Alley is the name given to the collection of New York City-centered music publishers and songwriters who dominated the popular music of the United States in the late 19th century and early 20th century. ... Liza Minnelli (born March 12, 1946 in Los Angeles, California) is an American actress and singer. ... Theme from New York, New York (or just New York, New York) is the theme song from the 1977 Martin Scorsese film New York, New York. ... “Sinatra” redirects here. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of New York City
Lower Manhattan in 1660, when it was part of New Amsterdam. North is to the right.
Lower Manhattan in 1660, when it was part of New Amsterdam. North is to the right.
Mulberry Street, on the Lower East Side, circa 1900.
Midtown Manhattan, New York City, from Rockefeller Center, 1932.
Midtown Manhattan, New York City, from Rockefeller Center, 1932.
The iconic view of New York City showing many of its major landmarks, including the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, Empire State Building, and World Trade Center, July 2001.
The iconic view of New York City showing many of its major landmarks, including the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, Empire State Building, and World Trade Center, July 2001.

The region was inhabited by about 5,000 Lenape Native Americans at the time of its European discovery in 1524[citation needed] by Giovanni da Verrazzano, an Italian explorer in the service of the French crown, who called it "Nouvelle Angoulême" (New Angoulême).[9] European settlement began with the founding of a Dutch fur trading settlement, later called "Nieuw Amsterdam" (New Amsterdam), on the southern tip of Manhattan in 1614. Dutch colonial Director-General Peter Minuit purchased the island of Manhattan from the Lenape in 1626 (legend, now disproved, says that Manhattan was purchased for $24 worth of glass beads).[10] In 1664, the English conquered the city and renamed it "New York" after the English Duke of York and Albany.[11] At the end of the Second Anglo-Dutch War the Dutch gained control of Run (a much more valuable asset at the time) in exchange for the English controlling New Amsterdam (New York) in North America. By 1700, the Lenape population was diminished to 200.[12] This article traces the history of New York City, New York. ... Image File history File links Castelloplan. ... Image File history File links Castelloplan. ... This article is about the settlement in present-day New York City. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 591 pixelsFull resolution (2800 × 2067 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 591 pixelsFull resolution (2800 × 2067 pixel, file size: 1. ... L.E.S. redirects here. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (2451 × 1635 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (2451 × 1635 pixel, file size: 1. ... Midtown Manhattan viewed from the World Trade Center. ... Lower Plaza at Rockefeller Center. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 530 pixelsFull resolution (1545 × 1024 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 530 pixelsFull resolution (1545 × 1024 pixel, file size: 1. ... For other monuments to freedom, see Monument of Liberty. ... Ellis Island, at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor, was at one time the main entry facility for immigrants entering the United States from January 1, 1892 until November 12, 1954. ... The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in New York City, New York on the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. ... For other uses, see World Trade Center (disambiguation). ... For the language, see Lenape language. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Giovanni da Verrazzano (c. ... New Angoulême (French: Nouvelle-Angoulême) was the name given to New York City in 1524 by Italian explorer Giovanni da Verrazzano after Francis I of France, King of France and Count of Angoulême. ... An Alberta fur trader in the 1890s. ... This article is about the settlement in present-day New York City. ... Peter Minuit Peter Minuit == Life and work == Minuits Walloon family, originally from the city of Tournai, was one of many Protestant families that fled persecution from the Roman Catholic government of the Spanish Netherlands (present-day Belgium), and found refuge in the Dutch Republic and Protestant parts of the... James II (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701)[1] became King of England, King of Scots,[2] and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685. ... The Second Anglo-Dutch War was fought between England and the United Provinces from 4 March 1665 until 31 July 1667. ... Run is one of the smallest islands of the Banda Islands which are a part of Indonesia. ...


New York City grew in importance as a trading port while under British rule. In 1754, Columbia University was founded under charter by King George II as King's College in Lower Manhattan.[13] The city emerged as the theater for a series of major battles known as the New York Campaign during the American Revolutionary War. The Continental Congress met in New York City and in 1789 the first President of the United States, George Washington, was inaugurated at Federal Hall on Wall Street.[14] New York City was the capital of the United States until 1790. The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... Alma Mater Columbia University in the City of New York is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... George II (George Augustus; 10 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... Combatants United States Great Britain Commanders George Washington, Charles Lee Sir William Howe, Lord Cornwallis Strength 19,000 regulars and militia 25,000 soldiers, 10,000 seamen The New York and New Jersey campaign was a series of engagements in the American Revolutionary War between forces led by General Sir... This article is about military actions only. ... The Continental Congress was the first national government of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Federal Hall, once located at 26 Wall Street in New York City, was the first capitol of the United States. ...


In the 19th century, the city was transformed by immigration and development. A visionary development proposal, the Commissioners' Plan of 1811, expanded the city street grid to encompass all of Manhattan, and the 1819 opening of the Erie Canal connected the Atlantic port to the vast agricultural markets of the North American interior.[15] By 1835, New York City had surpassed Philadelphia as the largest city in the United States. Local politics fell under the domination of Tammany Hall, a political machine supported by Irish immigrants.[16] Public-minded members of the old merchant aristocracy lobbied for the establishment of Central Park, which became the first landscaped park in an American city in 1857. A significant free-black population also existed in Manhattan, as well as in Brooklyn. Slaves had been held in New York through 1827, but during the 1830s New York became the center of interracial abolitionist activism in the North. An 1807 version of the Commissioners Grid plan for Manhattan, a few years before it was adopted in 1811. ... The Erie Canal (currently part of the New York State Canal System) is a canal in New York State, United States, that runs from the Hudson River to Lake Erie, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... Tammany Hall was the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in controlling New York City politics from the 1790s to the 1960s. ... In this 1899 cartoon from Puck, all of New York City politics revolves around boss Richard Croker A political machine is an unofficial system of a political organization based on patronage, the spoils system, behind-the-scenes control, and longstanding political ties within the structure of a representative democracy. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ...


Anger at military conscription during the American Civil War (1861–1865) led to the Draft Riots of 1863, one of the worst incidents of civil unrest in American history.[17] In 1898, the modern City of New York was formed with the consolidation of Brooklyn (until then an independent city), Manhattan and municipalities in the other boroughs.[18] The opening of the New York City Subway in 1904 helped bind the new city together. Throughout the first half of the 20th century, the city became a world center for industry, commerce, and communication. However, this development did not come without a price. In 1904, the steamship General Slocum caught fire in the East River, killing 1,021 people on board. In 1911, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, the city's worst industrial disaster, took the lives of 146 garment workers and spurred the growth of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union and major improvements in factory safety standards.[19] Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The New York Draft Riots (July 13 to July 16, 1863; known at the time as Draft Week[1]) were a series of violent disturbances in New York City that were the culmination of discontent with new laws passed by Congress to draft men to fight in the ongoing American... Times Square–42nd Street station entrance The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system owned by the City of New York and leased to the New York City Transit Authority , an affiliate of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and also known as MTA New York City Transit. ... Wreckage of the General Slocum The General Slocum was a steamship launched in 1891. ... The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City on March 25, 1911, was the largest industrial disaster in the history of the city of New York, causing the death of 146 garment workers who either died in the fire or jumped to their deaths. ... The International Ladies Garment Workers Union was once one of the largest labor unions in the United States, one of the first U.S. unions to have a primarily female membership, and a key player in the labor history of the 1920s and 1930s. ...


In the 1920s, New York City was a major destination for African Americans during the Great Migration from the American South. By 1916, New York City was home to the largest urban African diaspora in North America. The Harlem Renaissance flourished during the era of Prohibition, coincident with a larger economic boom that saw the skyline develop with the construction of competing skyscrapers. New York City became the most populous city in the world in 1948, overtaking London, which had reigned for over a century. The difficult years of the Great Depression saw the election of reformer Fiorello LaGuardia as mayor and the fall of Tammany Hall after eighty years of political dominance.[20] An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The states in blue had the ten largest net gains of African-Americans during the Great Migration, while the states in red had the ten largest net losses[1]. The Great Migration was the movement of over 1 million[1] African Americans out of the rural Southern United States from... The Harlem Renaissance (also known as the Black Literary Renaissance and New Negro Renaissance) refers to the blooming of African American cultural and intellectual life during the 1920s and 1930s. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Skyscraper (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... LaGuardia redirects here. ... Tammany Hall was the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in controlling New York City politics from the 1790s to the 1960s. ...


Returning World War II veterans and immigrants from Europe created a postwar economic boom and the development of huge housing tracts in eastern Queens. New York emerged from the war unscathed and the leading city of the world, with Wall Street leading America's ascendance as the world's dominant economic power, the United Nations headquarters (built in 1952) emphasizing New York's political influence, and the rise of abstract expressionism in the city precipitating New York's displacement of Paris as the center of the art world.[21] In the 1960s, New York suffered from economic problems, rising crime rates and racial tension, which reached a peak in the 1970s. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Immigration is the movement of people from one place to another. ... Jackson Pollock, No. ...


In the 1980s, a resurgence in the financial industry improved the city's fiscal health. By the 1990s, racial tensions had calmed, crime rates dropped dramatically, and waves of new immigrants arrived from Asia and Latin America. Important new sectors, such as Silicon Alley, emerged in the city's economy and New York's population reached an all-time high in the 2000 census. Silicon Alley is a nickname for an area with a large concentration of Internet and new media companies in Manhattan, New York City. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


The city was one of the sites of the September 11, 2001 attacks, when nearly 3,000 people died in the destruction of the World Trade Center. The Freedom Tower will be built on the site and is scheduled for completion in 2012.[22] A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... For other uses, see World Trade Center (disambiguation). ... For the building in Miami, Florida of the same name, see Freedom Tower (Miami). ...


Geography

Satellite image showing most of the five boroughs, portions of eastern New Jersey, and the main waterways around New York harbor.

New York City is located in the Northeastern United States, in southeastern New York State, approximately halfway between Washington, D.C. and Boston.[23] The location at the mouth of the Hudson River, which feeds into a naturally sheltered harbor and then into the Atlantic Ocean, has helped the city grow in significance as a trading city. Much of New York is built on the three islands of Manhattan, Staten Island, and Long Island, making land scarce and encouraging a high population density. Satellite image showing most of the five boroughs, portions of eastern New Jersey, and the main waterways around New York harbor. ... New York Harbor waterways (numbered): 1. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1964x2607, 3389 KB) Summary This false-color satellite image shows Greater New York City. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1964x2607, 3389 KB) Summary This false-color satellite image shows Greater New York City. ... Regional definitions vary The Northeastern United States is a region of the United States. ... This article is about the state. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... “Boston” redirects here. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and...

Across the Hudson River from Hoboken Terminal in New Jersey is Lower Manhattan.
Across the Hudson River from Hoboken Terminal in New Jersey is Lower Manhattan.

The Hudson River flows through the Hudson Valley into New York Bay. Between New York City and Troy, New York, the river is an estuary.[24] The Hudson separates the city from New Jersey. The East River, actually a tidal strait, flows from Long Island Sound and separates the Bronx and Manhattan from Long Island. The Harlem River, another tidal strait between the East and Hudson Rivers, separates Manhattan from the Bronx. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3264 × 2176 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3264 × 2176 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... Categories: Rail stubs | Transportation in New Jersey ... “NJ” redirects here. ... Woolworth Building, looking south along Broadway Lower Manhattan, from the Brooklyn Bridge, 2005 Rigid airship the USS Akron over Lower Manhattan Lower Manhattan is the southernmost part of the island of Manhattan, the main island and center of business and government of the City of New York. ... For the magazine, see Hudson Valley (magazine). ... New York Bay is the collective term for the marine areas surrounding the entrance of the Hudson River into the Atlantic Ocean. ... Looking west down Broadway at downtown Troy. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Rio de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... “NJ” redirects here. ... New York City waterways: 1. ... New York City waterways: 1. ... The Harlem River, shown in red, between the Bronx and Manhattan in New York City The Harlem River is a tidal strait in New York City, USA that flows 8 miles (13 km) between the East River and the Hudson River, separating the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx. ...


The city's land has been altered considerably by human intervention, with substantial land reclamation along the waterfronts since Dutch colonial times. Reclamation is most notable in Lower Manhattan, with developments such as Battery Park City in the 1970s and 1980s.[25] Some of the natural variations in topography have been evened out, particularly in Manhattan.[26] Land reclamation is either of two distinct practices. ... Woolworth Building, looking south along Broadway Lower Manhattan, from the Brooklyn Bridge, 2005 Rigid airship the USS Akron over Lower Manhattan Lower Manhattan is the southernmost part of the island of Manhattan, the main island and center of business and government of the City of New York. ... The promenade of Battery Park City. ...


The city's land area is 322 sq mi (831.4 km²).[27] The highest point in the city is Todt Hill on Staten Island, which at 409.8 ft (124.9 m) above sea level is the highest point on the Eastern Seaboard south of Maine.[28] The summit of the ridge is largely covered in woodlands as part of the Staten Island Greenbelt.[29] Todt Hill (elevation 410 ft) is a small mountain ridge on Staten Island, New York. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... The Staten Island Greenbelt is a system of contiguous public parkland and natural areas in the central hills of Staten Island, New York. ...


Climate

Although located at about the same latitude as the much warmer European cities of Naples and Madrid, New York has a humid continental climate (Köppen climate classification) resulting from prevailing wind patterns that bring cool air from the interior of the North American continent.[30] New York City has cold winters but the city's coastal position keeps temperatures slightly warmer than inland regions, helping to moderate the amount of snow which averages 25 to 35 inches (63.5 to 88.9 cm) each year.[30] New York City has a frost-free period lasting an average of 199 days between seasonal freezes.[30] Spring and Autumn in New York City are erratic, and can range from cold and snowy to hot and humid, although they can also be cold or cool and rainy. Summer in New York City is warm and humid, with temperatures of 90 °F (32 °C) or higher recorded on average 18 to 25 days each summer.[30] Though not usually associated with hurricanes, New York City is susceptible to them, notably the 1821 Norfolk and Long Island Hurricane which flooded southern Manhattan, and 1938 Hurricane, which affected New York and killed more than 700 people, most of them in New England. The city's long-term climate patterns have been affected by the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation, a 70-year long warming and cooling cycle in the Atlantic that influences the frequency and severity of hurricanes and coastal storms in the region.[31] Scientists believe, however, that global warming will change this pattern.[32] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2576 × 1932 pixel, file size: 960 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this picture in Central Park in January of 2007. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2576 × 1932 pixel, file size: 960 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this picture in Central Park in January of 2007. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... For other uses, see Naples (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... The humid continental climate is a climate found over large areas of land masses in the temperate regions of the mid-latitudes where there is a zone of conflict between polar and tropical air masses. ... The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ... Cyclone Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004 Hurricane and Typhoon redirect here. ... ... Lowest pressure 938 mbar (hPa; 27. ... Upper: AMO index: the ten-year running mean of detrended Atlantic sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA, °C) north of the equator. ... Global warming refers to the increase in the average temperature of the Earths near-surface air and oceans in recent decades and its projected continuation. ...

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high temperature, °F
(°C)
38
(3)
40
(4)
50
(10)
61
(15)
72
(22)
80
(27)
85
(30)
84
(29)
76
(24)
65
(18)
54
(12)
42
(6)
62
(17)
Average low temperature, °F
(°C)
25
(-4)
27
(-3)
35
(2)
44
(7)
54
(12)
63
(17)
68
(20)
67
(19)
60
(16)
50
(10)
41
(5)
31
(-1)
47
(8)
Rainfall, inches
(mm)
3.4
(86)
3.3
(84)
3.9
(99)
4.0
(102)
4.4
(112)
3.7
(95)
4.4
(112)
4.1
(104)
3.9
(99)
3.6
(91)
4.5
(127)
3.9
(99)
46.7
(1,124)
Source: Weatherbase.com

Environment

From Central Park South
From Central Park South
A boardwalk on Staten Island, with the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge in background.

Environmental concerns in the city involve managing the city's extraordinary population density. Mass transit use is the highest in the nation and gasoline consumption in the city is at the rate the national average was in the 1920s.[33] New York City's dense population and low automobile dependence help make New York among the most energy efficient in the United States.[34] The city's greenhouse gas emission levels are relatively low when measured per capita, at 7.1 metric tons per person, below San Francisco, at 11.2 metric tons, and the national average, at 24.5.[35] New Yorkers are collectively responsible for one percent of the nation's total greenhouse gas emissions,[35] though comprise 2.7% of the nation's population. The average New Yorker consumes less than half the electricity used by a resident of San Francisco and nearly one-quarter the electricity consumed by a resident of Dallas.[36] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x490, 804 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Central Park Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x490, 804 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Central Park Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... Central Park is nearly twice as big as the worlds second-smallest country, Monaco. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the borough in New York City. ... Verrazano Bridge redirects here; for the bridge to Assateague Island, see Verrazano Bridge (Maryland). ... San Francisco redirects here. ... Top: Increasing atmospheric CO2 levels as measured in the atmosphere and ice cores. ... “Dallas” redirects here. ...


In recent years the city has focused on reducing its environmental impact. Large amounts of concentrated pollution in New York City lead to high incidence of asthma and other respiratory conditions among the city's residents.[37] The city government is required to purchase only the most energy-efficient equipment for use in city offices and public housing.[38] New York has the largest clean air diesel-hybrid and compressed natural gas bus fleet in the country, and some of the first hybrid taxis.[39] The city is also a leader in the construction of energy-efficient green office buildings, including the Hearst Tower among others.[40] For other types of Hybrid Transportation, see Hybrid (disambiguation)#Transportation. ... Typical North America vehicles carry this diamond shape symbol, meaning it is running on compressed natural gas fuel. ... This article is about green building construction. ... Hearst Tower, in September 2006 Interior of the Lobby taken from Cafe 57 Hearst Tower in New York City, New York is located at 300 West 57th Street on Eighth Avenue, near Columbus Circle. ...


New York City is supplied with drinking water by the protected Catskill Mountains watershed.[41] As a result of the watershed's integrity and undisturbed natural water filtration process, New York is one of only five major cities in the United States with drinking water pure enough not to require purification by water treatment plants.[42] A new environmental friendly building called One Bryant Park will be built to clean up the air in New York City. The Catskill Mountains (also known as simply the Catskills), a natural area in New York State northwest of New York City and southwest of Albany, are not, despite their popular name, true geological mountains, but rather a mature dissected plateau, an uplifted region that was subsequently eroded into sharp relief. ... A drainage basin is the area within the drainage basin divide (blue outline), and drains the surface runoff and river discharge (green lines) of a contiguous area. ... A water treatment plant in northern Portugal. ... Future Bank of America Tower at One Bryant Park The Bank of America Tower in New York City is a $1 billion skyscraper project currently undergoing construction, on the west side of Sixth Avenue, between 42nd and 43rd Street, opposite Bryant Park. ...


Cityscape

Manhattan has one of the world's most recognizable skylines. (Shown: midtown area from around 65th St., on left, to about 23rd St., on right, from the west.)
360 degree panorama from the top of the Empire State Building.
360 degree panorama from the top of the Empire State Building.

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 165 pixelsFull resolution (5858 × 1210 pixel, file size: 5. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 165 pixelsFull resolution (5858 × 1210 pixel, file size: 5. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (7979x740, 1523 KB) Skyline panorama of New York City from Empire State Building - Note that this is an updated photo, i. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (7979x740, 1523 KB) Skyline panorama of New York City from Empire State Building - Note that this is an updated photo, i. ... The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in New York City, New York on the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. ...

Architecture

The Skyscraper is the architectural style most associated with New York City.
The Lower Manhattan skyline as envisioned in 2011 with the rebuilt World Trade Center.

The building form most closely associated with New York City is the skyscraper that saw New York buildings shift from the low-scale European tradition to the vertical rise of business districts. Surrounded mostly by water, the city's residential density and high real estate values in commercial districts saw the city amass the largest collection of individual, free-standing office and residential towers in the world.[43] Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (859 × 570 pixel, file size: 433 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Time Warner Center with Trump Tower. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (859 × 570 pixel, file size: 433 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Time Warner Center with Trump Tower. ... For other uses, see Skyscraper (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 351 pixelsFull resolution (3282 × 1440 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 351 pixelsFull resolution (3282 × 1440 pixel, file size: 1. ... For other uses, see World Trade Center (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Skyscraper (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ...


New York has architecturally significant buildings in a wide range of styles. These include the Woolworth Building (1913), an early gothic revival skyscraper built with massively scaled gothic detailing able to be read from street level several hundred feet below. The 1916 Zoning Resolution required setback in new buildings, and restricted towers to a percentage of the lot size, to allow sunlight to reach the streets below.[44] The Art Deco design of the Chrysler Building (1930), with its tapered top and steel spire, reflected the zoning requirements. The building is considered by many historians and architects to be New York's finest building, with its distinctive ornamentation such as replicas at the corners of the 61st floor of the 1928 Chrysler eagle hood ornaments and V-shaped lighting inserts capped by a steel spire at the tower's crown.[45] A highly influential example of the international style in the United States is the Seagram Building (1957), distinctive for its facade using visible bronze-toned I-beams to evoke the building's structure. The Condé Nast Building (2000) is an important example of green design in American skyscrapers.[40] The Woolworth Building, at sixty stories, is one of the oldest — and one of the most famous — skyscrapers in New York City. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin San Sebastian Church in Manila, Philippines made entirely of steel. ... Midtown Manhattan in 1932, showing the results of the Zoning Resolution The New York City 1916 Zoning Resolution was a measure adopted primarily to stop massive buildings such as the Equitable Building (Manhattan) from preventing light and air from reaching the streets below. ... Setbacks on the Pyramid of Djoser. ... Asheville City Hall. ... The Chrysler Building is an Art Deco skyscraper in New York City, located on the east side of Manhattan at the intersection of 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue. ... The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1927) The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1930) The International style was a major architectural trend of the 1920s and 1930s. ... The Seagram Building is a skyscraper in New York City, located at 375 Park Avenue, between 52nd Street and 53rd Street in Midtown Manhattan. ... Condé Nast Building, seen from Empire State Building The Condé Nast Building, officially Four Times Square, is a modern skyscraper in Times Square in Midtown Manhattan. ... It has been suggested that Green design be merged into this article or section. ...


The character of New York's large residential districts is often defined by the elegant brownstone rowhouses, townhouses, and shabby tenements that were built during a period of rapid expansion from 1870 to 1930.[46] Stone and brick became the city's building materials of choice after the construction of wood-frame houses was limited in the aftermath of the Great Fire of 1835.[47] Unlike Paris, which for centuries was built from its own limestone bedrock, New York has always drawn its building stone from a far-flung network of quarries and its stone buildings have a variety of textures and hues.[48] A distinctive feature of many of the city's buildings is the presence of wooden roof-mounted water towers. In the 1800s, the city required their installation on buildings higher than six stories to prevent the need for excessively high water pressures at lower elevations, which could burst municipal water pipes.[49] Garden apartments became popular during the 1920s in outlying areas, including Jackson Heights in Queens, which became more accessible with expansion of the subway.[50] This article is about the building material and the dwelling. ... A street of British Victorian/Edwardian terraced homes. ... Leinster House, 18th century Dublin townhouse of the Duke of Leinster. ... A red brick apartment block in central London, England, on the north bank of the Thames An apartment building, block of flats or tenement is a multi-unit dwelling made up of several (generally four or more) apartments (US) or flats (UK). ... This article is about the 1835 fire. ... The mushroom-shaped concrete water tower of Roihuvuori in Helsinki, Finland was built in the 1970s. ... Ebenezer Howards 3 magnets diagram which addressed the question Where will the people go?, the choices being Town, Country or Town-Country The garden city movement is an approach to urban planning that was founded in 1898 by Ebenezer Howard in England. ... A typical residential street in Jackson Heights. ...


Boroughs

New York City is comprised of five boroughs, an unusual form of government used to administer the five constituent counties that make up the city.[51] Throughout the boroughs there are hundreds of distinct neighborhoods, many with a definable history and character to call their own. If the boroughs were each independent cities, four of the boroughs (Brooklyn, Queens, Manhattan, and the Bronx) would be among the ten most populous cities in the United States. The Five Boroughs redirects here. ... The Neighborhoods of New York City are located within the five boroughs. ... The Five Boroughs redirects here. ...

The five boroughs: Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, The Bronx, Staten Island
The five boroughs: Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, The Bronx, Staten Island
Union Square in Manhattan.
Union Square in Manhattan.
  • The Bronx (pop. 1,364,566)[52] is New York City's northernmost borough. The site of Yankee Stadium, home of the New York Yankees, and home to the largest cooperatively owned housing complex in the United States, Co-op City.[53] Except for a small piece of Manhattan known as Marble Hill, the Bronx is the only section of the city that is part of the United States mainland. It is home to the Bronx Zoo, the largest metropolitan zoo in the United States, which spans 265 acres (107.2 hectares) and is home to over 6,000 animals.[54] The Bronx is the birthplace of rap and hip hop culture.[55]
  • Brooklyn (pop. 2,511,408)[52] is the city's most populous borough and was an independent city until 1898. Brooklyn is known for its cultural, social and ethnic diversity, an independent art scene, distinct neighborhoods and a unique architectural heritage. It is also the only borough outside of Manhattan with a distinct downtown area. The borough features a long beachfront and Coney Island, established in the 1870s as one of the earliest amusement grounds in the country.[56]
  • Manhattan (pop. 1,593,200)[52] is the most densely populated borough and home to most of the city's skyscrapers, as well as Central Park. The borough is the financial center of the city and contains the headquarters of many major corporations, the United Nations, as well as a number of important universities, and many cultural attractions, including numerous museums, the Broadway theatre district, Greenwich Village, and Madison Square Garden. Manhattan is loosely divided into Lower, Midtown, and Uptown regions. Uptown Manhattan is divided by Central Park into the Upper East Side and the Upper West Side, and above the park is Harlem.
  • Queens (pop. 2,256,576)[52] is geographically the largest borough and the most ethnically diverse county in the United States[57], and may overtake Brooklyn as the city's most populous borough due to its growth. Historically a collection of small towns and villages founded by the Dutch, today the borough is largely residential and middle class. It is the only large county in the United States where the median income among blacks, approximately $52,000 a year, is higher than that of whites.[58] Queens is the site of Shea Stadium, the home of the New York Mets, and annually hosts the U.S. Open tennis tournament. It is also the home to New York City's two major airports, LaGuardia Airport and John F. Kennedy International Airport.
  • Staten Island (pop. 475,014)[52] is the most suburban in character of the five boroughs. It is connected to Brooklyn by the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge and to Manhattan via the free Staten Island Ferry. Until 2001, the borough was home to the Fresh Kills Landfill, formerly the largest landfill in the world, which is now being reconstructed as a large urban park.[59] Staten Island has almost half of New York City's protected land, one third of the borough is parkland or under protected wetland status, comprising 13,000 acres+ and growing.[citation needed]

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2652x2582, 6650 KB) A map showing the five boroughs of New York City, as well as airports. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2652x2582, 6650 KB) A map showing the five boroughs of New York City, as well as airports. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 777 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (3173 × 2448 pixel, file size: 7. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 777 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (3173 × 2448 pixel, file size: 7. ... Union Square Park (also known as Union Square) is an important and historic intersection in New York City, located where Broadway and the Bowery came together in the early 19th century. ... For other uses, see The Bronx (disambiguation). ... This is about the stadium the New York Yankees currently play in. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... A housing co-operative is a legal entity, usually a corporation, that owns real estate, one or more residential buildings. ... Co-Op City as viewed from the east over the Hutchinson River. ... Marble Hill is the northernmost section of the borough of Manhattan in New York, New York. ... The Bronx Zoo is a world-famous zoo located within the Bronx Park, in the Bronx borough of New York City. ... Rap redirects here. ... Hip hop is a subculture, which is said to have begun with the work of DJ Kool Herc, Grandmaster Flash & the Furious Five, and Afrika Bambaattaa. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... These are the neighborhoods of Brooklyn, one of five boroughs of New York City. ... For other uses, see Coney Island (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Skyscraper (disambiguation). ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City, United States. ... Woolworth Building, looking south along Broadway Lower Manhattan, from the Brooklyn Bridge, 2005 Rigid airship the USS Akron over Lower Manhattan Lower Manhattan is the southernmost part of the island of Manhattan, the main island and center of business and government of the City of New York. ... Midtown Manhattan viewed from the World Trade Center. ... Upper Manhattan is an area in New York City consisting of the thin, northern neck of the island of Manhattan. ... The Upper East Side at Sunset The Upper East Side is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, USA, between Central Park and the East River. ... The Upper West Side is a neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City that lies between Central Park and the Hudson River above West 59th Street. ... For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Queens (disambiguation) and Queen. ... William A. Shea Municipal Stadium, usually shortened to Shea Stadium, is an American baseball stadium in Flushing, New York. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... For other uses, see U.S. Open. ... LaGuardia Airport (IATA: LGA, ICAO: KLGA, FAA LID: LGA) is an airport serving New York City, New York, United States, located on the waterfront of Flushing Bay, and borders the neighborhoods of Astoria, Jackson Heights and East Elmhurst in the borough of Queens. ... , For the regional airport in Wisconsin, see John F. Kennedy Memorial Airport. ... This article is about the borough in New York City. ... Verrazano Bridge redirects here; for the bridge to Assateague Island, see Verrazano Bridge (Maryland). ... Staten Island Ferry, with the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge in the background The Staten Island Ferry is a passenger ferry operated by the New York City Department of Transportation between Whitehall Street at the southernmost tip of Manhattan near Battery Park (South Ferry) and St. ... The Fresh Kills Landfill on the New York City borough of Staten Island, was formerly the largest landfill in the world, at 2200 acres (890 hectares),[1] and was New York Citys principal landfill in the second half of the 20th century. ...

Culture

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is one of the largest museums in the world.
The Metropolitan Museum of Art is one of the largest museums in the world.

"Culture just seems to be in the air, like part of the weather," the writer Tom Wolfe has said of New York City.[60] Numerous major American cultural movements began in the city, such as the Harlem Renaissance, which established the African-American literary canon in the United States. The city was the epicenter of jazz in the 1940s, abstract expressionism in the 1950s, and the birthplace of hip hop in the 1970s. The city's punk and hardcore scenes were influential in the 1970s and 1980s, and the city has long had a flourishing scene for Jewish American literature. Prominent indie rock bands coming out of New York in recent years include The Strokes, Interpol, The Bravery, Scissor Sisters, and They Might Be Giants. The city is also important in the American film industry. Manhatta (1920), the nation's first avant-garde film, was filmed in the city.[61] Today, New York City is the second largest center for the film industry in the United States. The city has more than 2,000 arts and cultural organizations and more than 500 art galleries of all sizes.[62] The city government funds the arts with a larger annual budget than the National Endowment for the Arts.[62] Wealthy industrialists in the 19th century built a network of major cultural institutions, such as the famed Carnegie Hall and Metropolitan Museum of Art, that would become internationally established. The advent of electric lighting led to elaborate theatre productions, and in the 1880s New York City theaters on Broadway and along 42nd Street began showcasing a new stage form that came to be known as the Broadway musical. Graffiti and street art emerged in New York as part of the Zoo York subculture in the 1970s. ... Carnegie Hall, a major music venue in New York The music of New York City is a diverse and important field in the world of music; no American city has as central a place in music history as New York City. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 595 pixelsFull resolution (1539 × 1144 pixel, file size: 320 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Metropolitan Museum of Art at New York. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 595 pixelsFull resolution (1539 × 1144 pixel, file size: 320 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Metropolitan Museum of Art at New York. ... Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as the Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the early 20th century American novelist, see Thomas Wolfe. ... The Harlem Renaissance (also known as the Black Literary Renaissance and New Negro Renaissance) refers to the blooming of African American cultural and intellectual life during the 1920s and 1930s. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Jackson Pollock, No. ... Hip hop is a subculture, which is said to have begun with the work of DJ Kool Herc, Grandmaster Flash & the Furious Five, and Afrika Bambaattaa. ... Punks at a music festival The punk subculture is a subculture that is based around punk rock music. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Jewish American literature holds an essential place in the literary history of the United States. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). ... For the international organisation, see Interpol. ... The Bravery is an American rock band from New York City that consists of Sam Endicott, John Conway, Anthony Burulcich, Michael Zakarin, and Mike Hindert. ... The Scissor Sisters are an American alternative band who formed in 2001. ... This article is about the musical group. ... Manhatta is a 1922 short documentary film which revels in the haze rising from city smoke stacks. ... A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... The National Endowment for the Arts is a United States federally funded program that offers support and funding for projects that exhibit artistic excellence. ... Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ... Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as the Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City. ... The Black Crook (1866) is considered the first musical comedy Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ...


Strongly influenced by the city's immigrants, productions such as those of Harrigan and Hart, George M. Cohan and others used song in narratives that often reflected themes of hope and ambition. Today these productions are a mainstay of the New York theatre scene. The city's 39 largest theatres (with more than 500 seats) are collectively known as "Broadway", after the major thoroughfare that crosses the Times Square theatre district.[63] Edward Harrigan (October 26, 1845 - 1911), American actor, was born in New York of Irish parents. ... George Michael Cohan (July 3, 1878 – November 5, 1942) was a United States entertainer, playwright, composer, lyricist, actor, singer, dancer, director, and producer of Irish descent. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City. ... For other uses, see Times Square (disambiguation). ...


The Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, which includes Jazz at Lincoln Center, the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Opera, the New York Philharmonic, the New York City Ballet, the Vivian Beaumont Theatre, The Juilliard School and Alice Tully Hall, is the largest performing arts center in the United States. Central Park SummerStage presents performances of free plays and music in Central Park and 1,200 free concerts, dance, and theater events across all five boroughs in the summer months.[64] Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a 15 acre (61,000 m²) complex of buildings in New York City which serves as home for 12 arts companies. ... Jazz at Lincoln Center is a new addition to the Lincoln Center performing arts complex, located at 60th Street and Broadway in New York City, slightly south of the main Lincoln Center campus and directly adjacent to Columbus Circle. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, the lead section of this article may need to be expanded. ... The New York State Theater at Lincoln Center, seen from Lincoln Center Plaza New York State Theater The New York State Theater at Lincoln Center, interior, as seen from the stage The New York City Opera (NYCO) is based in Philip Johnsons New York State Theater at Lincoln Center. ... The New York Philharmonic is the oldest active symphony orchestra in the United States, organized during 1842. ... Logo of the New York City Ballet The New York City Ballet is a ballet company founded in 1948 by choreographer George Balanchine and Lincoln Kirstein originally known as the American Ballet. ... The Vivian Beaumont Theater is a Broadway theatre at the Lincoln Center. ... The Juilliard School is a performing arts conservatory in New York City, informally but definitively identified as simply Juilliard, and most famous for its musically-trained alumni. ... The Alice Tully Hall is a concert hall that is part of the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York City. ... Central Park SummerStage is an outdoor concert venue in Central Park (New York City), presenting free music, dance, spoken word, and film events produced by City Parks Foundation, throughout the summer months. ...


Tourism

About 40 million foreign and American tourists visit New York City each year.[65] Major destinations include the Empire State Building, Ellis Island, Broadway theatre productions, museums such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and other tourist attractions including Central Park, Washington Square Park, Rockefeller Center, Times Square, the Bronx Zoo, New York Botanical Garden, luxury shopping along Fifth and Madison Avenues, and events such as the Halloween Parade in Greenwich Village, the Tribeca Film Festival, and free performances in Central Park at Summerstage. The Statue of Liberty is a major tourist attraction and one of the most recognizable icons of the United States.[66] Many of the city's ethnic enclaves, such as Jackson Heights, Flushing, and Brighton Beach are major shopping destinations for first and second generation Americans up and down the East Coast. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 206 pixelsFull resolution (2976 × 768 pixel, file size: 365 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Times Square in the city that never sleeps. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 206 pixelsFull resolution (2976 × 768 pixel, file size: 365 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Times Square in the city that never sleeps. ... For other uses, see Times Square (disambiguation). ... I Love New York logo, by Milton Glaser. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... The Unisphere, June 2005 Unisphere is a 12-story high, spherical stainless steel representation of the Earth. ... Flushing Meadows Park, also sometimes referred to as Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, is located in northern Queens, New York City, USA at the intersection of the Long Island Expressway and the Grand Central Parkway. ... For other uses, see Queens (disambiguation) and Queen. ... The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in New York City, New York on the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. ... Ellis Island, at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor, was at one time the main entry facility for immigrants entering the United States from January 1, 1892 until November 12, 1954. ... Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as the Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... Washington Square Park ( ) is one of the best-known of New York Citys 1,700 public parks. ... Lower Plaza at Rockefeller Center. ... For other uses, see Times Square (disambiguation). ... The Bronx Zoo is a world-famous zoo located within the Bronx Park, in the Bronx borough of New York City. ... One of the premiere botanical gardens in the United States, the New York Botanical Garden [located at East 200th Street & Kazimiroff Boulevard] spans some 240 acres (1 km²) in the borough of The Bronx, in New York City. ... Street sign at corner of Fifth Avenue and East 57th Street Fifth Avenue, early morning photograph, looking south from Thirty-eighth Street Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in the center of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. ... Madison Avenue, looking north from 40th Street Madison Avenue is a north-south avenue in the borough of Manhattan in New York City that carries northbound one-way traffic. ... // Volunteers costumed as a deck of playing cards shuffle up Sixth Avenue in New Yorks Village Halloween Parade, directed by artist and producer Jeanne Fleming. ... The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... Robert De Niro and Jane Rosenthal 2005 The TriBeCa Film Festival was founded in 2002 by Jane Rosenthal and Robert De Niro in a response to the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center and the consequent loss of vitality in the TriBeCa neighborhood in Manhattan. ... For other monuments to freedom, see Monument of Liberty. ... A typical residential street in Jackson Heights. ... Several landmarks from two New York Worlds Fairs still stand in Flushing Meadows, including the US Steel Unisphere Flushing is an urban neighborhood in the northern part of the borough of Queens in New York City, New York. ... 1873 map of the Villages of Unionville and Guntherville, part of the Town of Gravesend, the area of present-day Brighton Beach A Russian-language bookstore under the elevated train tracks in Brighton Beach Newly built luxury condos on Brighton Beach Where apartments and private homes meet A school in...

New York City has over 28,000 acres (113 km²) of parkland and 14 miles (22 km) of public beaches.[67] Manhattan's Central Park, designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux, is the most visited city park in the United States.[68] Prospect Park in Brooklyn, also designed by Olmsted and Vaux, has a 90 acre (36 hectare) meadow.[69] Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Queens, the city's third largest, was the setting for the 1939 World's Fair and 1964 World's Fair. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 800 pixel, file size: 79 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) United Nations Headquarters I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 800 pixel, file size: 79 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) United Nations Headquarters I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... United Nations Headquarters in New York City, viewed from the East River. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... {{Infobox Person | name = | image = FLOlmstead. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Prospect Park is a 585[1] acre (2. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... Flushing Meadows Park, also sometimes referred to as Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, is located in northern Queens, New York City, USA at the intersection of the Long Island Expressway and the Grand Central Parkway. ... Trylon, Perisphere and Helicline photo by Sam Gottscho The 1939-40 New York Worlds Fair, located on the current site of Flushing Meadows-Corona Park (also the location of the 1964-1965 New York Worlds Fair), was one of the largest worlds fairs of all time. ... View of the New York Worlds Fair 1964/1965 as seen from the observation towers of the New York State pavilion. ...


New York's food culture, influenced by the city's immigrants and large number of dining patrons, is diverse. Jewish and Italian immigrants made the city famous for bagels, cheesecake and New York-style pizza. Some 4,000 mobile food vendors licensed by the city, many immigrant-owned, have made Middle Eastern foods such as falafels and kebabs standbys of contemporary New York street food, although hot dogs and pretzels are still the main street fare.[70] The city is also home to many of the finest haute cuisine restaurants in the United States.[71] A Jewish American (also commonly American Jew) is an American (a citizen of the United States) of Jewish descent who maintains a connection to the Jewish community, either through actively practicing Judaism or through cultural and historical affiliation. ... For other uses, see Bagel (disambiguation). ... For the meaning of pin-up photo, see Pin-up girl. ... Lombardis Pizza at 32 Spring Street in Little Italy, Manhattan A slice of New York-style plain pizza New York-style pizza is a common style of pizza, originating from New York City. ... Immigration is the movement of people from one place to another. ... This article is about the Middle Eastern food. ... Left to right: Chenjeh Kabab, Kabab Koobideh, Jujeh Kabab in an Afghan restaurant. ... Haute cuisine (literally high cooking in French) or grande cuisine refers to the cooking of the grand restaurants and hotels of the western world. ...


Media

New York's use of mass transit gives the city a large newspaper readership base.[72]

New York is a global center for the television, advertising, music, newspaper and book publishing industries and is also the largest media market in North America (followed by Los Angeles, Chicago, and Toronto).[73] Some of the city's media conglomerates include Time Warner, the News Corporation, the Hearst Corporation, and Viacom. Seven of the world's top eight global advertising agency networks are headquartered in New York.[74] Three of the "Big Four" record labels are also based in the city, as well as in Los Angeles. One-third of all American independent films are produced in New York.[75] More than 200 newspapers and 350 consumer magazines have an office in the city[75] and book-publishing industry employs about 25,000 people.[76] The media of New York City is internationally influential, with some of the most important newspapers, largest publishing houses, most prolific television studios, and biggest record companies in the world. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (804x536, 124 KB) Summary F Train, Manhattan-bound, 9:25am. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (804x536, 124 KB) Summary F Train, Manhattan-bound, 9:25am. ... The transportation system of New York City is an unparalleled cooperation of unique, complex, and grandiose systems of infrastructure. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Time Warner Inc. ... 1211 Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue), where News Corporation is based News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: , LSE: NCRA) is an Australian media conglomerate company and one of the worlds largest. ... The Hearst Corporation is a large privately-held media conglomerate based in New York City. ... Viacom (NYSE: VIA) (NYSE: VIAb) is an American media conglomerate with various worldwide interests in cable and satellite television networks (MTV Networks and BET), and movie production and distribution (the Paramount Pictures and DreamWorks movie studios). ... An advertising agency or ad agency is a service business dedicated to creating, planning and handling advertising (and sometimes other forms of promotion) for its clients. ... The music industry refers to the business industry connected with the creation and sale of music. ... An independent film, or indie film, is usually a low-budget film that is produced by a small movie studio. ...


Two of the three national daily newspapers in the United States are New York papers, The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times. Major tabloid newspapers in the city include The New York Daily News and The New York Post, founded in 1801 by Alexander Hamilton. The city also has a major ethnic press, with 270 newspapers and magazines published in more than 40 languages.[77] El Diario La Prensa is New York's largest Spanish-language daily and the oldest in the nation.[78] The New York Amsterdam News, published in Harlem, is a prominent African-American newspaper. The Village Voice is the largest alternative newspaper. The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757–July 12, 1804) was an Army officer, lawyer, Founding Father, American politician, leading statesman, financier and political theorist. ... El Diario la Prensa is the largest Spanish-language daily newspaper in New York City and the oldest in the United States. ... The New York Amsterdam News is a weekly newspaper geared for the African-American community of New York City. ... This article is about a New York newspaper. ... An alternative weekly, alternately referred to as an alternative newsweekly or alternative newspaper, is a form of alternative media newspaper found in many centres in the United States and Canada. ...


The television industry developed in New York and is a significant employer in the city's economy. The four major American broadcast networks, ABC, CBS, FOX and NBC, are all headquartered in New York. Many cable channels are based in the city as well, including MTV, Fox News, HBO and Comedy Central. In 2005, there were more than 100 television shows taped in New York City.[79] The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company, usually referred to as just Fox (the company itself prefers the capitalized version FOX), is a television network in the United States. ... This article is about the television network. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... “Fox News” redirects here. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... Comedy Central is an American cable television and satellite television channel in the United States. ...


New York is also a major center for non-commercial media. The oldest public-access television channel in the United States is the Manhattan Neighborhood Network, founded in 1971.[80] WNET is the city's major public television station and a primary provider of national PBS programming. WNYC, a public radio station owned by the city until 1997, has the largest public radio audience in the United States.[81] The City of New York operates a public broadcast service, nyctv, that produces several original Emmy Award-winning shows covering music and culture in city neighborhoods, as well as city government. Look up public access television in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Manhattan Neighborhood Network (MNN) is a non-profit organization that broadcasts programming on four public access stations in Manhattan, New York. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “PBS” redirects here. ... WNYC (93. ... nyctv is the publicly-owned broadcast service of New York City run by the NYC Media Group. ...


Accent

Main article: New York dialect

The New York City area has a distinctive regional speech pattern called the New York dialect, alternatively known as Brooklynese or New Yorkese. It is often considered to be one of the most recognizable accents within American English.[82] The classic version of this dialect is centered on middle and working class people of European American descent, and the influx of non-European immigrants in recent decades has led to changes in this distinctive dialect.[83] The New York dialect of the English language is spoken by most European Americans who were raised in New York City and much of its metropolitan area including the lower Hudson Valley, western Long Island, and in northeastern New Jersey. ... The New York dialect of the English language is spoken by most European Americans who were raised in New York City and much of its metropolitan area including the lower Hudson Valley, western Long Island, and in northeastern New Jersey. ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... European American is a term for an American of European descent, who are usually referred as White or Caucasian. ...


One of the more notable features of this dialect is its "r-lessness". The traditional New York–area accent is non-rhotic, so that the sound [ɹ] does not appear at the end of a syllable or immediately before a consonant; hence the pronunciation of the city as "New Yawk".[83] There is no [ɹ] in words like park [pɔːk] (with vowel raised due to the low-back chain shift), butter [bʌɾə], or here [hiə]. In another feature called the low back chain shift, the [ɔ] vowel sound of words like talk, law, cross, and coffee and the often homophonous [ɔr] in core and more are tensed and usually raised more than in General American. English pronunciation is divided into two main accent groups, the rhotic and non-rhotic, depending on when the phoneme (the letter r) is pronounced. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ...


In the most old-fashioned and extreme versions of the New York dialect, the vowel sounds of words like girl and of words like oil both become a diphthong [ɜɪ]. This is often misperceived by speakers of other accents as a "reversal" of the "er" and "oy" sounds, so that girl is pronounced "goil" and oil is pronounced "erl"; this leads to the caricature of New Yorkers saying things like "Joizey" (Jersey), "Toidy-Toid Street' (33rd St.) and "terlet" (toilet).[83] The character Archie Bunker from the 1970s show All in the Family was a good example of a speaker who had this feature. This particular speech pattern is no longer very prevalent.[83] Information Gender Male Age 50 (in 1974) Date of birth 1924 Date of death Unknown (still alive as of 1983) Occupation Blue Collar (19??-1978) Bar Owner (1979-????) Family Michael Stivic (son-in-law) Joey Stivic (grandson) Alfred Bunker (brother) Barbara Lee Billie Bunker (niece) Katherine Bunker (sister-in-law... For other uses, see All in the Family (disambiguation). ...


Sports

Yankee Stadium,"The House that Ruth Built", and the home of the New York Yankees, is located in the Bronx. It is soon to be replaced by the New Yankee Stadium, which is scheduled to be completed in 2009.

New York City has teams in the four major North American professional sports leagues, each of which also has its headquarters in the city. View of a night game at Yankee Stadium between the New York Yankees and the Minnesota Twins. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... This is about the stadium the New York Yankees currently play in. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... New Yankee Stadium is the working title for a new stadium for the New York Yankees, currently under construction. ...


Baseball is the city's most closely followed sport. There have been fourteen World Series championship series between New York City teams, in matchups called Subway Series. New York is one of only five metro areas (Chicago, Washington-Baltimore, Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area being the others) to have two baseball teams. The city's two current Major League Baseball teams are the New York Yankees and the New York Mets, who enjoy a rivalry arguably as fierce as that between the Yankees and the Boston Red Sox. The Yankees have enjoyed 26 world titles, while the Mets have taken the Series twice. The city also was once home to the New York Giants (now the San Francisco Giants) and the Brooklyn Dodgers (now the Los Angeles Dodgers). Both teams moved to California in 1958. There are also two minor league baseball teams in the city, the Staten Island Yankees and Brooklyn Cyclones. This article is about the sport. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... The program for the 1936 Subway Series. The Subway Series is a series of Major League Baseball games played between teams based in New York City. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885-1957) New York Gothams (1883-1885) Ballpark AT&T Park (2006–present) a. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–1885) Other nicknames Jints, Gigantes, G-Men Ballpark AT... The Brooklyn Dodgers were a Major League Baseball team that played from 1890-1957. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1913) Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... The Staten Island Yankees are a minor league baseball team, located in Staten Island, New York. ... Class-Level A Minor League affiliations New York - Penn League McNamara Division Major League affiliations New York Mets Name St. ...


The city is represented in the National Football League by the New York Jets and New York Giants (officially the New York Football Giants), although both teams play their home games in Giants Stadium in nearby New Jersey. NFL redirects here. ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White, Jersey Jets Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... Giants Stadium, frequently referred to as The Meadowlands, is the home stadium for the New York Giants and New York Jets football teams of the NFL, and the Red Bull New York soccer team of MLS. It is located in East Rutherford, New Jersey in the Meadowlands Sports Complex, which... “NJ” redirects here. ...


The New York Rangers represent the city in the National Hockey League. The New York Rangers are a professional ice hockey team based in New York, New York, U.S.A. They are members of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). ... “NHL” redirects here. ...


In soccer, New York is represented by the Major League Soccer side, Red Bull New York. The "Red Bulls" also play their home games at the Giants Stadium in New Jersey. A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... Major League Soccer (MLS) is a professional soccer league with teams in the United States and Canada. ... Year founded 1995 (as NY/NJ MetroStars) League Major League Soccer Nickname Red Bulls, Metro, RBNY Stadium Giants Stadium East Rutherford, NJ Coach Bruce Arena (2006—) Owner Red Bull First Game Los Angeles Galaxy 2–1 NY/NJ MetroStars (Rose Bowl; April 13, 1996) Largest Win Red Bull New York... Giants Stadium, frequently referred to as The Meadowlands, is the home stadium for the New York Giants and New York Jets football teams of the NFL, and the Red Bull New York soccer team of MLS. It is located in East Rutherford, New Jersey in the Meadowlands Sports Complex, which...

The New York City Marathon is the largest marathon in the world.

The city's National Basketball Association team is the New York Knicks and the city's Women's National Basketball Association team is the New York Liberty. The first national college-level basketball championship, the National Invitation Tournament, was held in New York in 1938 and remains in the city.[84] Rucker Park in Harlem is a celebrated court where many professional athletes play in the summer league. Image File history File linksMetadata 2005_New_York_City_Marathon. ... Image File history File linksMetadata 2005_New_York_City_Marathon. ... The New York City Marathon is an annual marathon foot-race run over a 42,195 m (26. ... NBA redirects here. ... “Knicks” redirects here. ... The Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) is an organization governing a professional basketball league for women in the United States. ... The New York Liberty is a Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) team based in New York City. ... The National Invitation Tournament (NIT) is a mens college basketball tournament operated by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... Rucker Park is a basketball court in the New York City borough of Manhattan, located at 155th Street and Frederick Douglass Boulevard, in the Harlem neighborhood. ... For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ...


As a global city, New York supports many events outside these sports. Queens is host of the U.S. Tennis Open, one of the four Grand Slam tournaments. The New York City Marathon is the world's largest, and the 2004-2006 runnings hold the top three places in the marathons with the largest number of finishers, including 37,866 finishers in 2006.[85] The Millrose Games is an annual track and field meet whose featured event is the Wanamaker Mile. Boxing is also a very prominent part of the city's sporting scene, with events like the Amateur Boxing Golden Gloves being held at Madison Square Garden each year. For other uses, see U.S. Open. ... In tennis, a singles player or doubles team that wins all four Grand Slam titles in the same year is said to have achieved the Grand Slam or a Calendar Year Grand Slam. ... The New York City Marathon is an annual marathon foot-race run over a 42,195 m (26. ... The Millrose Games is an annual indoor athletics meet (track and field) held in New York Citys Madison Square Garden since 1914. ... The Wanamaker Mile is an event held annually at the Millrose Games in New York Citys Madison Square Gardens. ...


Many sports are associated with New York's immigrant communities. Stickball, a street version of baseball, was popularized by youths in working class Italian, German, and Irish neighborhoods in the 1930s. In recent years several amateur cricket leagues have emerged with the arrival of immigrants from South Asia and the Caribbean.[86] Stickball is a street game related to baseball, usually formed as a pick-up game, in large cities in the Northeastern United States (especially New York City). ... Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ...


Economy

Main article: Economy of New York

New York City is a global hub of international business and commerce and is one of three "command centers" for the world economy (along with London and Tokyo).[87] The city is a major center for finance, insurance, real estate, media and the arts in the United States. The New York metropolitan area had an estimated gross metropolitan product of $952.6 billion in 2005, the largest regional economy in the United States.[88] The city's economy accounts for the majority of the economic activity in the states of New York and New Jersey.[88] Many major corporations are headquartered in New York City, including 44 Fortune 500 companies.[89] New York is also unique among American cities for its large number of foreign corporations. One out of ten private sector jobs in the city is with a foreign company.[90] The New York State Quarter released in 2001. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 794 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 773 pixel, file size: 451 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) George Washington Statue overlooking Wall Street. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 794 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 773 pixel, file size: 451 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) George Washington Statue overlooking Wall Street. ... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 681 pixel, file size: 405 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) World Financial Center in the Financial District, Manhattan I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 681 pixel, file size: 405 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) World Financial Center in the Financial District, Manhattan I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... A view of the World Trade Center, World Financial Center, and Battery Park City from the Hudson River on August 26, 2000. ... A view up Broad Street in the Financial District in Manhattan Federal Hall The Financial District of New York City is a neighborhood on the southernmost section of the borough of Manhattan which comprises the offices and headquarters of many of the citys major financial institutions, including the New... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A metropolitan areas gross domestic product, or GMP, is one of several measures of the size of its economy. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ...


New York City is home to some of the nation's—and world's—most valuable real estate. 450 Park Avenue was sold on July 2, 2007 for $510 million, about $1,589 per square foot ($17,104/m²), breaking the barely month-old record for an American office building of $1,476 per square foot ($15,887/m²) set in the June 2007 sale of 660 Madison Avenue.[91] Park Avenue in the Upper East Side (2004) Park Avenue, looking north toward the Metlife building from the Union Square Area Park Avenue (formerly Fourth Avenue) is a wide boulevard that carries traffic north and south in Manhattan in New York City. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


The New York Stock Exchange, located on Wall Street, and the NASDAQ are the world's first and second largest stock exchanges, respectively, when measured by average daily trading volume and overall market capitalization.[92] Financial services account for more than 35 percent of the city's employment income.[93] Real estate is a major force in the city's economy, as the total value of all New York City property was $802.4 billion in 2006.[94] The Time Warner Center is the property with the highest-listed market value in the city, at $1.1 billion in 2006.[94] The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... NASDAQ in Times Square, New York City. ... Time Warner Center and Columbus Monument. ...


The city's television and film industry is the second largest in the country after Hollywood.[95] Creative industries such as new media, advertising, fashion, design and architecture account for a growing share of employment, with New York City possessing a strong competitive advantage in these industries.[96] High-tech industries like bioscience, software development, game design, and Internet services are also growing, bolstered by the city's position at the terminus of several transatlantic fiber optic trunk lines.[97] Other important sectors include medical research and technology, non-profit institutions, and universities. Hollywood redirects here. ... A transatlantic telephone cable is a submarine communications cable that carries telephone traffic under the Atlantic Ocean. ...


Manufacturing accounts for a large but declining share of employment. Garments, chemicals, metal products, processed foods, and furniture are some of the principal products.[98] The food-processing industry is the most stable major manufacturing sector in the city.[99] Food making is a $5 billion industry that employs more than 19,000 residents, many of them immigrants who speak little English. Chocolate is New York City's leading specialty-food export, with $234 million worth of exports each year.[99]


Demographics

New York City Compared
2000 Census NY City NY State U.S.
Total population 8,213,839[52] 18,976,457 281,421,906
Population, percent change, 1990 to 2000 +9.4% +5.5% +13.1%
Population density 26,403/sq mi 402/sq mi 80/sq mi
Median household income (1999) $38,293 $43,393 $41,994
Bachelor's degree or higher 27% 27% 29%
Foreign born 36% 20% 11%
White 45% 68% 75%
White (non-Hispanic) 37% 62% 67%
Black 28% 16% 12%
Hispanic (any ethnicity) 27% 15% 11%
Asian 10% 6% 4%

New York is the most populous city in the United States, with an estimated 2005 population of 8,213,839 (up from 7.3 million in 1990).[52] This amounts to about 40% of New York State's population and a similar percentage of the metropolitan regional population. Over the last decade the city's population has been increasing and demographers estimate New York's population will reach between 9.2 and 9.5 million by 2030.[100] Population growth (blue) and population loss (red) from 1990 to 2000. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


New York's two key demographic features are its population density and cultural diversity. The city's population density of 26,403 people per square mile (10,194/km²), makes it the densest of any American municipality with a population above 100,000.[101] Manhattan's population density is 66,940 people per square mile (25,846/km²), highest of any county in the United States.[102][103] There is a general consensus among mainstream anthropologists that humans first emerged in Africa about two million years ago. ...


New York City is exceptionally diverse. Throughout its history the city has been a major point of entry for immigrants; the term "melting pot" was first coined to describe densely populated immigrant neighborhoods on the Lower East Side. 36% of the city's population is foreign-born.[8] Among American cities, this proportion is higher only in Los Angeles and Miami.[103] While the immigrant communities in those cities are dominated by a few nationalities, in New York no single country or region of origin dominates. The ten largest countries of origin for modern immigration are the Dominican Republic, China, Jamaica, Guyana, Pakistan, Ecuador, Haiti, Trinidad and Tobago, Colombia, and Russia.[104] About 170 languages are spoken in the city.[7] Immigration is the movement of people from one place to another. ... Alternate meaning: crucible (science) The melting pot is a metaphor for the way in which heterogenous societies develop, in which the ingredients in the pot (iron, tin; people of different backgrounds and religions, etc. ... L.E.S. redirects here. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Miami redirects here. ...

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1790 33,131
1850 696,490
1900 3,437,202
1920 5,620,048
1950 7,891,957
1960 7,781,984 -1.4%
1970 7,894,862 1.5%
1980 7,071,639 -10.4%
1990 7,322,564 3.5%
2000 8,008,288 9.4%
Est. 2005 8,143,197 [105] 1.7%
Population 1790 - 1990[106]

The New York metropolitan area is home to the largest Jewish community outside Israel; Tel Aviv proper (non-metro/within municipal limits) has a smaller population than the Jewish population of New York City proper, making New York the largest Jewish community in the world. About 12% of New Yorkers are Jewish or of Jewish descent and roots.[107] It is also home to nearly a quarter of the nation's Indian Americans,[108] and the largest African American community of any city in the country. The United States Census of 1790 was the first Census conducted in the United States. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twetieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,542,199, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... American Jews, or Jewish Americans, are American citizens who were born Jews or who have converted to Judaism. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


The five largest ethnic groups as of the 2005 census estimates are: Puerto Ricans, Italians, West Indians, Dominicans and Chinese.[109] The Puerto Rican population of New York City is the largest outside of Puerto Rico.[110] Italians emigrated to the city in large numbers in the early twentieth century. The Irish, the sixth largest ethnic group, also have a notable presence; one in 50 New Yorkers of European origin carry a distinctive genetic signature on their Y chromosomes inherited from Niall of the Nine Hostages, an Irish high king of the fifth century A.D.[111] “West Indian” redirects here. ... It can be said that the Puerto Ricans have both immigrated and migrated to New York. ... // St. ... Niall of the Nine Hostages (Irish: Niall Noigíallach) was a High King of Ireland who was active in the early-to-mid 5th century, dying - according to the latest estimates - around 450-455. ...


New York City has a high degree of income disparity. In 2005 the median household income in the wealthiest census tract was $188,697, while in the poorest it was $9,320.[112] The disparity is driven by wage growth in high income brackets, while wages have stagnated for middle and lower income brackets. In 2006 the average weekly wage in Manhattan was $1,453, the highest and fastest growing among the largest counties in the United States.[113] The borough is also experiencing a baby boom that is unique among American cities. Since 2000, the number of children under age 5 living in Manhattan grew by more than 32%.[114]


Home ownership in New York City is about 33%, much lower than the national average of 69%.[115] Rental vacancy is usually between 3% and 4.5%, definitely below the 5% threshold defined to be a housing emergency and used to justify the continuation of rent control and rent stabilization. About 33% of rental units are rent-stabilized. Finding housing, particularly affordable housing, in New York City can be more than challenging. [116] Rent control in New York refers to rent control and rent stabilization programs in New York State, USA. Each city may choose whether to participate or not, and as of 2007, 51 municipalities participated in the program, including Albany, Buffalo and most famously, New York City. ...


Government

The Manhattan Municipal Building, home to many city agencies, is one of the largest government office buildings in the world.
The Manhattan Municipal Building, home to many city agencies, is one of the largest government office buildings in the world.

Since its consolidation in 1898, New York City has been a metropolitan municipality with a "strong" mayor-council form of government. The government of New York is more centralized than that of most other U.S. cities. In New York City, the central government is responsible for public education, correctional institutions, libraries, public safety, recreational facilities, sanitation, water supply and welfare services. The mayor and councillors are elected to four-year terms. The New York City Council is a unicameral body consisting of 51 Council members whose districts are defined by geographic population boundaries.[117] The mayor and councilors are limited to two four-year terms. New York City has been a metropolitan municipality with a strong mayor-council form of government since its consolidation in 1898. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 634 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 634 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Municipal Building from down Chambers Street. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Consolidated city-county. ... Mayor-Council government is one of two variations of government most commonly used in modern representative municipal governments in the United States. ... For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. ... A councillor is a member of a council (such as a city council), particularly in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and other parts of the Commonwealth. ... New York City Hall The New York City Council is the lawmaking body of the City of New York. ... For unicameral alphabets, see the article letter case. Unicameralism is the practice of having only one legislative or parliamentary chamber. ...


The mayor is Michael Bloomberg, a former Democrat and current independent elected as a Republican in 2001 and re-elected in 2005 with 59% of the vote.[118] He is known for taking control of the city's education system from the state, rezoning and economic development, sound fiscal management, and aggressive public health policy. In his second term he has made school reform, poverty reduction, and strict gun control central priorities of his administration.[119] Together with Boston mayor Thomas Menino, in 2006 he founded the Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition, an organization with the goal of "making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets."[120] The Democratic Party holds the majority of public offices. 66% of registered voters in the city are Democrats.[121] New York City has not been won by a Republican in a statewide or presidential election since 1924. Party platforms center on affordable housing, education and economic development, and labor politics are of importance in the city. Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, philanthropist, and the founder of Bloomberg L.P., currently serving as the Mayor of New York City. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... “Boston” redirects here. ... Thomas Michael Menino (born December 27, 1942) is the current mayor of Boston, Massachusetts, United States and the citys first Italian-American mayor. ... The Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition is a coalition of mayors from 225 different United States cities, with a stated goal of making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets. ... Gun politics is a set of legal issues surrounding the ownership, use, and control of firearms as well as safety issues related to firearms both through their direct use and through criminal use. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... A party platform, also known as an manifesto is a list of the principles which a political party supports in order to appeal to the general public for the purpose of having said partys candidates voted into office. ...


New York is the most important source of political fundraising in the United States, as four of the top five zip codes in the nation for political contributions are in Manhattan. The top zip code, 10021 on the Upper East Side, generated the most money for the 2004 presidential campaigns of both George W. Bush and John Kerry.[122] The city has a strong imbalance of payments with the national and state governments. It receives 83 cents in services for every $1 it sends to the federal government in taxes (or annually sends $11.4 billion more than it receives back). The city also sends an additional $11 billion more each year to the state of New York than it receives back.[123] Mr. ... The Upper East Side at Sunset The Upper East Side is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, USA, between Central Park and the East River. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Taxation in the United States is a complex system which may involve payment to at least four different levels of government. ...


Located near City Hall are the courthouse for the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York and United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, and the Jacob K. Javits Federal Building. Manhattan also hosts the NY Appellate Division, First Department. Brooklyn hosts the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York, and NY Appellate Division, Second Department. As with any county, each Borough has a branch of the New York Supreme Court and other New York State courts. As the host of the United Nations, New York City is home to the world's largest international consular corps, comprising 122 consulates, consulates general and honorary consulate offices.[124] The United States District Court for the Southern District of New York (S.D.N.Y.) is the federal district court whose jurisdiction comprises the following counties: New York (Manhattan), Bronx, Westchester, Putnam, Rockland, Orange, Dutchess, and Sullivan. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts: District of Connecticut Northern, Southern, Eastern, and Western Districts of New York District of Vermont The Second Circuit hears argument at the Thurgood Marshall U... Jacob K. Javits Federal Office Building at 26 Federal Plaza is a 40+ story structure which houses many government agencies. ... The Appellate Division of the New York Supreme Court is the intermediate appellate court in the U.S. state of New York. ... The United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York is the Federal district court whose jurisdiction is comprised of the entirety of Long Island and Staten Island. ... The Appellate Division of the New York Supreme Court is the intermediate appellate court in the U.S. state of New York. ... The Supreme Court of the State of New York is the basic New York State trial court of general jurisidiction. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... For the uses of Consul as Chief Magistrate of a (city) state, see Consul. ...


Crime

NYPD vehicle stationed in Times Square.
NYPD vehicle stationed in Times Square.

Out of 216 U.S. cities with populations of more than 100,000 in 2002, the city ranked 197th in overall crime (with about the same crime rate as Provo, Utah).[125] Violent crime in New York city has decreased 75% in the last twelve years and the murder rate in 2005 was at its lowest level since 1963.[126] Crime rates spiked in the 1980s and early 1990s as the crack epidemic hit the city. During the 1990s the New York City Police Department (NYPD) adopted CompStat, broken windows policing and other strategies in a major effort to reduce crime. The city's dramatic drop in crime has been attributed by criminologists to these policing tactics, the end of the crack epidemic and demographic changes.[127] Crime in New York City is the lowest among the 25 largest cities in the United States. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1704x2272, 1744 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Times Square Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1704x2272, 1744 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Times Square Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... The New York City Police Department (NYPD) was created in 1845 and currently is the largest municipal police force in the world with primary responsibilities in law enforcement and investigation within the five boroughs of New York City. ... For other uses, see Times Square (disambiguation). ... Provo is a city in Utah and the county seat of Utah County, located about 35 miles south of Salt Lake City along the Wasatch Front. ... Crack Cocaine The crack epidemic refers to a six year period between 1984 and 1990 in the United States during which there was a huge surge in the use of crack cocaine in major cities, and crack-houses all over the USA. Fallout from the crack epidemic included a huge... The New York City Police Department (NYPD) was created in 1845 and currently is the largest municipal police force in the world with primary responsibilities in law enforcement and investigation within the five boroughs of New York City. ... CompStat - or COMPSTAT - (short for COMPuter STATistics or COMParative STATistics) is the name given to the New York City Police Departments accountability process. ... Broken windows in the Pruitt-Igoe housing development Fixing Broken Windows: Restoring Order and Reducing Crime in Our Communities by George L. Kelling and Catherine Coles is a criminology book published in 1996, about petty crime and strategies to contain or eliminate it from urban neighbourhoods. ...


Organized crime has long been associated with New York City, beginning with the Forty Thieves and the Roach Guards in the Five Points in the 1820s. The 20th century saw a rise in the Mafia dominated by the Five Families. Gangs including the Black Spades also grew in the late 20th century.[128] Numerous major riots have occurred in New York City since the mid 19th century, including the Draft Riots in 1863, multiple riots at Tompkins Square Park, and in Harlem.[129] The serial killings by the "Son of Sam", which began on July 29, 1976, terrorized the city for the next year.[130] Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ... The 40 Thieves — likely named after Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves — was the first organized street gang in the New Yorks history. ... The Roach Guards were an Irish street gang in the New Yorks Five Points during the early 19th Century. ... Five Points (or The Five Points) was a notorious slum centered on the intersection of Worth St. ... This article is about the criminal society. ... The Five Families are the major crime families of the Italian-American Mafia based in New York City which have dominated traditional organized crime in New York. ... For other uses, see Gang (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The New York Draft Riots (July 13 to July 16, 1863; known at the time as Draft Week[1]) were a series of violent disturbances in New York City that were the culmination of discontent with new laws passed by Congress to draft men to fight in the ongoing American... Tompkins Square Park is a 10. ... For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ... “Son of Sam” redirects here. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Education

Fordham University's Keating Hall in the Bronx.
Fordham University's Keating Hall in the Bronx.

The city's public school system, managed by the New York City Department of Education, is the largest in the United States. About 1.1 million students are taught in more than 1,200 separate primary and secondary schools.[131] There are approximately 900 additional privately run secular and religious schools in the city, including some of the most prestigious private schools in the United States.[132] Education in New York City is provided by a vast number of public and private institutions. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1222x876, 321 KB) Summary Keating Hall, Rose Hill, Fordham University Photograph by Chriscobar Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Fordham University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1222x876, 321 KB) Summary Keating Hall, Rose Hill, Fordham University Photograph by Chriscobar Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Fordham University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[2] in the United States, with three residential campuses located in and around New York City. ... For other uses, see Bronx (disambiguation). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1824 × 1368 pixel, file size: 1,014 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Columbia University Metadata This file... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1824 × 1368 pixel, file size: 1,014 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Columbia University Metadata This file... Alma Mater Columbia University in the City of New York is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The Official Seal of the City of New York The New York City Department of Education is the branch of municipal government in New York City that manages the citys public school system. ...


Though it is not often thought of as a "College Town", there are about 594,000 university students in New York City, the highest number of any city in the United States.[133] In 2005, three out of five Manhattan residents were college graduates and one out of four had advanced degrees, forming one of the highest concentrations of highly educated people in any American city.[134] Public postsecondary education is provided by the City University of New York, the nation's third-largest public university system, and the Fashion Institute of Technology, part of the State University of New York. New York City is also home to such notable private universities as Barnard College, Columbia University, Cooper Union, Fordham University, New York University, Pace University, The New School, St. John's University, and Yeshiva University. The city has dozens of other smaller private colleges and universities, including many religious and special-purpose institutions, such as The Juilliard School and The School of Visual Arts. In North America, a college town or university town is a community (often literally a town, but possibly a small or medium sized city, or in some cases a neighborhood or a district of a city) which is dominated by its university population. ... The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym: IPA pronunciation: ), is the public university system of New York City. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Not to be confused with University of the State of New York. ... Barnard College, founded in 1889, is one of the four undergraduate divisions of Columbia University. ... Alma Mater Columbia University in the City of New York is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art is a privately funded college in Lower Manhattan of New York City. ... Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[2] in the United States, with three residential campuses located in and around New York City. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... Pace University is a private, co-educational and comprehensive multi-campus university in the New York metropolitan area with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York. ... The New School is an institution of higher learning in New York City, located around Greenwich Village in Lower Manhattan. ... Saint Johns University can refer to: College of Saint Benedict/Saint Johns University in St. ... Yeshiva University is a private Jewish university in New York City whose first component was founded in 1886. ... The Juilliard School is a performing arts conservatory in New York City, informally but definitively identified as simply Juilliard, and most famous for its musically-trained alumni. ... The School of Visual Arts Main Building, circa 1992. ...


Much of the scientific research in the city is done in medicine and the life sciences. New York City has the most post-graduate life sciences degrees awarded annually in the United States, 40,000 licensed physicians, and 127 Nobel laureates with roots in local institutions.[135] The city receives the second-highest amount of annual funding from the National Institutes of Health among all U.S. cities.[136] Major biomedical research institutions include Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Rockefeller University, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine and Weill Cornell Medical College. National Institutes of Health Building 50 at NIH Clinical Center - Building 10 The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and is the primary agency of the United States government responsible for biomedical research. ... The original New York Cancer Hospital[1], first built between 1884 and 1886, now converted to luxury condominiums, at 455 Central Park West and 106th St. ... Founders Hall Rockefeller University is a private university focusing primarily on graduate and postgraduate education research in the biomedical fields, located between 63rd and 68th Streets along York Avenue, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan island in New York City, New York. ... The State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn, better known as SUNY Downstate Medical Center, is an academic medical center and is the only one of its kind in the Borough of Brooklyn in New York City. ... Albert Einstein College of Medicine logo For the engineering company, see AECOM The Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM) is a graduate school of Yeshiva University. ... This page is about a medical school in New York. ... The Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, formerly named the Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University and abbreviated to Weill Cornell, is the medical school and biomedical research unit of Cornell University. ...


The New York Public Library, which has the largest collection of any public library system in the country, serves Manhattan, The Bronx, and Staten Island.[137] Queens is served by the Queens Borough Public Library, which is the nation's second largest public library system, and Brooklyn Public Library serves Brooklyn.[137] The New York Public Library has several research libraries, including the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Queens Borough Public Library, or QBPL is the public library for the Borough of Queens and one of three library systems serving New York City. ... The Main Branch, Brooklyn Public Library, Grand Army Plaza, 2003 The Brooklyn Public Library (BPL), is the public library system of the borough of Brooklyn in New York City. ... The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture is part of the New York Public Library. ...


New York City also features some of the most elite and exclusive private schools in the country, many of which are located on the Upper East Side or in Riverdale, Bronx. These schools include The Dalton School, Horace Mann School, Riverdale Country School, Ethical Culture Fieldston School, Brearley School, The Spence School, Nightingale-Bamford School, The Trinity School, and The Collegiate School. Renowned public secondary schools include Stuyvesant High School, The Bronx High School of Science, High School of American Studies at Lehman College, Brooklyn Technical High School, Townsend Harris High School, and LaGuardia High School. The Upper East Side at Sunset The Upper East Side is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, USA, between Central Park and the East River. ... Riverdale Riverdale (population approximately 45,000, according to the 2000 U.S. Census) is a middle- and upper-class residential neighborhood in the northwest Bronx, New York City. ... The Dalton School, originally called the Childrens University School,[1] is a private university-preparatory school in New York City and a member of the Ivy Preparatory School League. ... The Horace Mann School is an independent college preparatory school in New York City. ... The Lower Campus of Riverdale Country School Riverdale Country School is a co-educational college preparatory day school in New York City. ... The Ethical Culture Fieldston School, known as Fieldston, is a private independent school in New York City and a member of the Ivy Preparatory School League. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Spence School, founded in 1892 by Clara B. Spence, is a day school for girls in grades kindergarten through grade 12, offering a liberal arts program for college preparation. ... The Nightingale Bamford School is an all-girls school founded in 1920 by Miss Nightingale and Miss Bamford. ... Trinity School labore et virtute (labor and virtue) Trinity School is a private, co-educational day school for grades K-12 located in New York City, USA, and a member of the Ivy Preparatory School League. ... Collegiate School is a private school for boys in New York City and lays claim to being the oldest school in the United States. ... Stuyvesant High School, commonly referred to as Stuy, is a New York City public high school that specializes in mathematics and science. ... The Bronx High School of Science, commonly called Bronx Science, Bronx Sci, or just Science, is a specialized New York City public high school located in the Bedford Park section of the Bronx, with no tuition charges and admission by exam (reportedly taken by more than 20,000 students). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Brooklyn Technical High School, commonly called Brooklyn Tech or just Tech, and also administratively sometimes as High School 430, is a New York City public high school that specializes in engineering, math and science. ... Townsend Harris High School is a public magnet high school for the humanities in the borough of Queens in New York City. ... Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts is located near the Juilliard School in the Lincoln Center district of Manhattan, on Amsterdam Avenue between 65th Street and 64th Street. ...


Transportation

New York is home to the two busiest rail stations in the United States, including Grand Central Terminal seen here.

Public transit is overwhelmingly the dominant form of travel for New Yorkers.[138] About one in every three users of mass transit in the United States and two-thirds of the nation's rail riders live in New York and its suburbs.[139][140] This is in contrast to the rest of the country, where about 90% of commuters drive automobiles to their workplace.[138] New York is the only city in the United States where more than half of all households do not own a car (in Manhattan, more than 75% of residents do not own a car; nationally, the percentage is 8%).[138] The transportation system of New York City is an unparalleled cooperation of unique, complex, and grandiose systems of infrastructure. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2305x1287, 1501 KB)Temporary file for FPC Original photography & stitching by User:Diliff, horizontal correction by User:Janke Licensing Original license at Commons, Grand Central Station Main Concourse Jan 2006. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2305x1287, 1501 KB)Temporary file for FPC Original photography & stitching by User:Diliff, horizontal correction by User:Janke Licensing Original license at Commons, Grand Central Station Main Concourse Jan 2006. ... The main concourse Grand Central Terminal (GCT, often unofficially called Grand Central Station) is a terminal rail station at 15 Vanderbilt Avenue (42nd Street and Park Avenue) in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. ... Download high resolution version (1290x966, 313 KB)New York City Subway entrance near Times Square File links The following pages link to this file: New York City Subway Times Square-42nd Street (New York City Subway station) User:Uris Categories: User-created public domain images | NowCommons ... Download high resolution version (1290x966, 313 KB)New York City Subway entrance near Times Square File links The following pages link to this file: New York City Subway Times Square-42nd Street (New York City Subway station) User:Uris Categories: User-created public domain images | NowCommons ... Times Square–42nd Street station entrance The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system owned by the City of New York and leased to the New York City Transit Authority , an affiliate of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and also known as MTA New York City Transit. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 554 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 554 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... , For the regional airport in Wisconsin, see John F. Kennedy Memorial Airport. ... The following is a list of United States cities of 100,000+ inhabitants with the 50 highest percentages of households without automobiles, according to data from the 2000 Census. ...


The New York City Subway is the largest rapid transit system in the world when measured by track with 660 miles (1,062 km ) of mainline track, and by number of stations in operation, with 468. It is also the fourth-largest when measured by annual ridership (1.4 billion passenger trips in 2005).[139] New York's subway is also remarkable because nearly all of the system remains open 24 hours per day (though in some cases with significant differences in routings from the daytime network), in contrast to the overnight shutdown common to systems in most cities, including London, Paris, Washington, D.C., and Tokyo. The transportation system in New York City is extensive and complex. It includes the longest suspension bridge in North America,[141] the world's first mechanically ventilated vehicular tunnel,[142] more than 12,000 yellow cabs[143] and an aerial tramway that transports commuters between Roosevelt Island and Manhattan. Times Square–42nd Street station entrance The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system owned by the City of New York and leased to the New York City Transit Authority , an affiliate of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and also known as MTA New York City Transit. ... “Mass Transit” redirects here. ... This is a list of the longest underground/surface/elevated subways, metros and rapid transit modules of the world. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Verrazano Bridge redirects here; for the bridge to Assateague Island, see Verrazano Bridge (Maryland). ... Clifford Milburn Holland, 1919 Traveling through the Holland Tunnel, from Manhattan to New Jersey. ... The Roosevelt Island Tramway is an aerial tramway in New York City. ... Main Street on Roosevelt Island Roosevelt Island, formerly known as Welfare Island, and before that Blackwells Island, is a narrow island in the East River of New York City. ...


New York City's public bus fleet and commuter rail network are the largest in North America.[139] The rail network, which connects the suburbs in the tri-state region to the city, has more than 250 stations and 20 rail lines.[139][144][145] The commuter rail system converges at the two busiest rail stations in the United States, Grand Central Terminal and Pennsylvania Station.[146] The MTA Bus Company (MTA Bus for short), a subsidiary of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, is a public benefit corporation created to operate those bus routes formerly operated by private companies in the New York City area. ... The Tri-State Area The Tri-State Region is commonly used in the area surrounding New York City to unambiguously refer to the greater metropolitan area. ... The main concourse Grand Central Terminal (GCT, often unofficially called Grand Central Station) is a terminal rail station at 15 Vanderbilt Avenue (42nd Street and Park Avenue) in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. ... Pennsylvania Station (commonly known as Penn Station) is the major intercity rail station and a major commuter rail hub in New York City. ...


New York City is the top international air passenger gateway to the United States.[147] The area is served by three major airports, John F. Kennedy International, Newark Liberty International and LaGuardia, with plans for a fourth airport, Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, NY, to be taken over and enlarged by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (which administers the other three airports), as a "reliever" airport to help cope with increasing passenger volume. 100 million travelers used the three airports in 2005 and the city's airspace is the busiest in the nation.[148] Outbound international travel from JFK and Newark accounted for about a quarter of all U.S. travelers who went overseas in 2004.[149] , For the regional airport in Wisconsin, see John F. Kennedy Memorial Airport. ... For the massive interchange outside of Newark Liberty International Airport, see Newark Airport Interchange. ... LaGuardia Airport (IATA: LGA, ICAO: KLGA, FAA LID: LGA) is an airport serving New York City, New York, United States, located on the waterfront of Flushing Bay, and borders the neighborhoods of Astoria, Jackson Heights and East Elmhurst in the borough of Queens. ... Stewart International Airport (IATA: SWF, ICAO: KSWF) is located near Newburgh, New York, in the southern Hudson Valley, 55 miles (88. ... Tolls collected at the Holland Tunnel and other crossings help fund the Port Authority. ...


New York's high rate of public transit use, 120,000 daily cyclists[150] and many pedestrian commuters makes it the most energy-efficient major city in the United States.[33] It is well positioned to endure an oil crisis with an extended gasoline price shock in the range of US$3 to US$8 per gallon.[151] Walk and bicycle modes of travel account for 21% of all modes for trips in the city; nationally the rate for metro regions is about 8%.[152] The following is a list of United States cities of 100,000+ inhabitants with the 50 highest rates of public transit commuting, according to data from the 2000 Census. ... The following is a list of United States cities of 100,000+ inhabitants with the 50 highest rates of pedestrian commuting, according to data from the 2000 Census. ...

The Brooklyn Bridge, and Manhattan Bridge in background.

To complement New York's vast mass transit network, the city also has an extensive web of expressways and parkways, that link New York City to its suburbs in northern New Jersey, Westchester County, Long Island, and southwest Connecticut. Because these highways serve millions of suburban residents who commute into New York, it is quite common for motorists to be stranded for hours in traffic jams that are a daily occurrence, particularly during rush hour. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 576 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 1080 pixel, file size: 364 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Brooklyn Bridge I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 576 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 1080 pixel, file size: 364 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Brooklyn Bridge I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... For other uses, see Brooklyn Bridge (disambiguation). ... The Manhattan Bridge is a suspension bridge that crosses the East River in New York City, connecting Lower Manhattan (at Canal Street) with Brooklyn (at Flatbush Avenue Extension). ... Interstate 80 (Eastshore Freeway) in Berkeley, California: a typical American freeway (MUTCD definition) A freeway, also known as a highway, superhighway, autoroute, autobahn, autostrada, dual carriageway, expressway, Autosnelweg or motorway, depending on the country of discussion, is a type of road designed for safer high-speed operation of motor vehicles... Harden Parkway in Salinas, CA. For other uses, see Parkway (disambiguation). ... “NJ” redirects here. ... Westchester County is a suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... In quantum Mechanics, we define: [A,B]=AB-BA If [A,B]=0, then we say A, B is commute. ... Traffic jams are common in heavily populated areas. ... For other uses, see Rush hour (disambiguation). ...


Sister cities

New York City has ten sister cities,[153] nine of which are through the city's membership in Sister Cities International (SCI).[154] The year each relationship was formed is shown in parentheses below. Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ... Sister Cities International is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting and fostering town twinning, especially between a city in the United States and a city in another country. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... “Peking” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Egypt. ... Nickname: Egypt: Site of Cairo (top center) Coordinates: , Government  - Governor Dr. Abdul Azim Wazir Area  - City 214 km²  (82. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Dominican_Republic. ... It has been suggested that Greater Santo Domingo Area be merged into this article or section. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Africa. ... This article is about the city in South Africa. ...

Notes

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is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1979 - 1993 Republican Edward Regan 1993 - 2003 Democrat Carl McCall 2003 - present Democrat Alan Hevesi Category: ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Department of City Planning is a governmental agency of New York City responsible for setting the framework of citys physical and socioeconomic planning. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Department of City Planning is a governmental agency of New York City responsible for setting the framework of citys physical and socioeconomic planning. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Hell and High Water: Global Warming — the Solution and the Politics — and What We Should Do is a book by author, scientist, and former U.S. Department of Energy official Joseph J. Romm, published December 26, 2006 by HarperCollins. ... Kerry Emanuel is an American Professor of Meteorology currently working at MIT in Boston. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PlaNYC is a design for the sustainability of New York City, Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s outline for his vision for the city over the next twenty-five years. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 11 is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Brookings Institution is one of the oldest and best known think tanks in the United States. ... The Department of City Planning is a governmental agency of New York City responsible for setting the framework of citys physical and socioeconomic planning. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Department of City Planning is a governmental agency of New York City responsible for setting the framework of citys physical and socioeconomic planning. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Advertising Age is a magazine, chronicling trends in advertisement. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Manhattan Neighborhood Network (MNN) is a non-profit organization that broadcasts programming on four public access stations in Manhattan, New York. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Association of International Marathons and Distance Races (AIMS) was established in May 1982 by a group of prominent marathon race directors concerned to: foster and promote Marathon running throughout the world; work with the International Amateur Athletic Federation (IAAF) on all matters relating to international Marathons; and exchange information... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Saskia Sassen Saskia Sassen (born January 5th in 1949 at The Hague, in The Netherlands) is an American sociologist and economist noted for her analyses of globalization and international human migration. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Heroes stamp using the Thomas E. Franklin photo The Record (also called The Bergen Record, although this has never been the newspapers name) is the second largest daily newspaper in the US state of New Jersey. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Department of City Planning is a governmental agency of New York City responsible for setting the framework of citys physical and socioeconomic planning. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Department of City Planning is a governmental agency of New York City responsible for setting the framework of citys physical and socioeconomic planning. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Department of City Planning is a governmental agency of New York City responsible for setting the framework of citys physical and socioeconomic planning. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Department of City Planning is a governmental agency of New York City responsible for setting the framework of citys physical and socioeconomic planning. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Department of City Planning is a governmental agency of New York City responsible for setting the framework of citys physical and socioeconomic planning. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Lankevich, George L. (1998). American Metropolis: A History of New York City. NYU Press. ISBN 0814751865. 

Further reading

Edwin G. Burrows is a professor of history at Brooklyn College, and is the Pulitzer Prize winning author of Gotham: A History of New York City to 1898. ... Mike Wallace is an American historian. ... Gotham: A History of New York City to 1898 is a nonfiction book written by Edwin G. Burrows and Mike Wallace. ... Anthony Burgess (February 25, 1917 – November 22, 1993) was a British novelist, critic and composer. ... New York is a work of travel and observation by Anthony Burgess. ... Poster advertising a Federal Writers Project publication. ... Kenneth T. Jackson (b. ... The Encyclopedia of New York City is a comprehensive reference work about New York City published in 1995 by the Yale University Press. ... Elwyn Brooks White (July 11, 1899, Mount Vernon, New York – October 1, 1985, North Brooklin, Maine) was a leading American essayist, author, humorist, poet and literary stylist. ... Colson Whitehead (full name Arch Colson Chipp Whitehead) is a New York-based novelist, born in 1969. ... At the Frankfurt Book Fair in October 2004, Google introduced its Google Print service, now known as Google Book Search. ...

External links

New York City Portal
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
New York City
Look up New York City in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
  • NYC.gov - official website of the city
  • NYCvisit.com - Official tourism website of New York City
  • New York City travel guide from Wikitravel
  • New York City webcams via Google maps
  • New York City at the Open Directory Project
  • Maps and aerial photos for 40°43′N 74°00′W / 40.71, -74.00Coordinates: 40°43′N 74°00′W / 40.71, -74.00
    • Maps from MapQuest, Multimap and Yahoo! Maps
    • Satellite images and maps from Google Maps and Live Search
    • Other mapping from GlobalGuide and WikiMapia
    • NYCityMap - Interactive Map of New York City - includes subway stations and entrances

Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... The First Continental Congress was a body of representatives appointed by the legislatures of twelve North American colonies of the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1774. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence depicts the five-man drafting committee presenting the first draft of the Declaration of Independence to the Second Continental Congress. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... Baltimore redirects here. ... Nickname: Location of Lancaster County in Pennsylvania Location of Lancaster in Lancaster County Country United States State Pennsylvania County Lancaster Founded 1730 Incorporated March 10, 1818 Government  - Mayor Rick Gray (D) Area  - City  7. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country United States State Pennsylvania County York Incorporated  - Borough September 24, 1787  - City January 11, 1887 Government  - Mayor John Brenner Area  - City  5. ... The Congress of the Confederation or the United States in Congress Assembled was a body of representatives appointed by the legislatures of the United States from March 1, 1781 to March 4, 1789. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... Nassau Street, Princetons main street. ... “Annapolis” redirects here. ... Nickname: Location of Trenton inside of Mercer County Coordinates: , Country State County Mercer Incorporated November 13, 1792 Government  - Mayor Douglas H. Palmer Area  - City  8. ... This article describes the government of the United States. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


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