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Encyclopedia > New York
State of New York
Flag of New York
Flag of New York Seal
Nickname(s): The Empire State
Motto(s): Excelsior[1]
Official language(s) None
Demonym New Yorker
Capital Albany
Largest city New York City
Largest metro area New York metropolitan area
Area  Ranked 27th in the US
 - Total 54,556 sq mi
(141,299 km²)
 - Width 285 miles (455 km)
 - Length 330 miles (530 km)
 - % water 13.3
 - Latitude 40° 30′ N to 45° 1′ N
 - Longitude 71° 51′ W to 79° 46′ W
Population  Ranked 3rd in the US
 - Total 18,976,457
 - Density 401.92/sq mi 
155.18/km² (6th in the US)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Mount Marcy[2]
5,344 ft  (1,629 m)
 - Mean 1,000 ft  (305 m)
 - Lowest point Atlantic Ocean[2]
0 ft  (0 m)
Admission to Union  July 26, 1788 (11th)
Governor David Paterson (D)
Lieutenant Governor Joseph Bruno (R) (acting)
U.S. Senators Charles Schumer (D)
Hillary Rodham Clinton (D)
Congressional Delegation List
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Abbreviations NY US-NY
Website www.ny.gov
New York state insignia
Motto Excelsior (Ever upward)
Slogan I Love New York
Bird Eastern bluebird
Animal Beaver
Fish Brook trout; salt water - Striped bass
Insect Pink Ladybug [3]
Flower Rose
Tree Sugar maple
Song "I Love New York"
Quarter New York quarter
2001
Reptile Snapping turtle
Beverage Milk
Colors Blue & Gold
Fossil Sea scorpion
Gemstone Garnet

New York (pronounced /n(j)uːˈjɔɹk//) is a state in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern regions of the United States, and is the country's third most populous state. It is bordered by Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, and shares a water border with Rhode Island as well as an international border with the Canadian provinces of Quebec and Ontario. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... // New York may mean: New York, a U.S. state (population 19,227,088) New York, a city in the above state (population 8,008,278) New York County, generally referred to as Manhattan, a county fully contained in the above city (population 1,537,195) New York metropolitan area... NY can be an abbreviation for New York, see New York (disambiguation) ny can be a letter in the Hungarian alphabet This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_York. ... State seal of New York. ... The flag of the State of New York depicts two supporters: Left: Liberty, with the Revolutionary imagery of a Phrygian cap raised on a pole. ... The New York State seal is the same as the flag, but in a seal. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Look up Excelsior in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_NY.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): New York ... The United States does not have an official language, but English is spoken by about 82% of the population as a native language. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... For other uses, see Albany. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... New York–Northern New Jersey–Long Island is the most populous metropolitan area in the United States and is also one of the most populous in the world . ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... “km” redirects here. ... Map of states populations (2007) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2007, according to the 2007 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... Mount Marcy, at 5,344 ft, is the highest mountain in the Adirondack Mountain Range and the highest point in New York State. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Governor of New York. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... This is a complete and current List of United States Lieutenant Governors. ... Joseph L. Bruno (born April 8, 1929) is an American businessman and politician, the Temporary President of the New York State Senate and its Republican-party majority leader. ... GOP redirects here. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Charles Ellis Chuck Schumer (born November 23, 1950) is a Jewish American politician. ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... These are tables of congressional delegations from New York to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... UTC redirects here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... These are lists of U.S. state insignia as designated by tradition or the respective state legislatures List of U.S. state amphibians List of U.S. state beverages List of U.S. state birds List of U.S. state butterflies List of U.S. state colors List of U... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... I Love New York logo, by Milton Glaser. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name Sialia sialis (Linnaeus,, 1758) The Eastern Bluebird, Sialia sialis, is a medium-sized thrush found in open woodlands, farmlands and orchards. ... A state mammal is the official or representative animal of a U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Beaver (disambiguation). ... This is a list of official U.S. state fish: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... This article is about the species of fish. ... Binomial name Morone saxatilis (Walbaum, 1792) The striped bass Morone saxatilis is a member of the temperate bass family native to North America but widely introduced elsewhere. ... It has been suggested that List of U.S. state butterflies be merged into this article or section. ... Subfamilies Chilocorinae Coccidulinae Coccinellinae Epilachninae Scymininae Sticholotidinae etc. ... This is a list of U.S. state flowers: List of U.S. state trees Lists of U.S. state insignia ^ State Flower of Alabama. ... For other uses, see Rose (disambiguation). ... This List of U.S. state trees includes official trees of the following states and U.S. possessions: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia National Grove of State Trees External link USDA list of state trees and flowers Categories: | | ... Binomial name Acer saccharum Marshall The Sugar Maple Acer saccharum is a prominent tree in the hardwood forests of eastern North America. ... Forty-nine states of the United States (all except New Jersey) have one or more state songs, selected by the state legislature as a symbol of the state. ... I Love New York logo, by Milton Glaser. ... Obverse of redesigned quarter The 50 State Quarters program is the release of a series of commemorative coins by the United States Mint. ... Download high resolution version (1106x1105, 229 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This is a list of official U.S. state reptiles: Lists of U.S. state insignia ^ Official Alabama Reptile. ... Genera See text Snapping turtles (or snappers) are large, New World freshwater turtles of the family Chelydridae. ... This is a list of official state beverages:[1] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... A glass of cows milk. ... This is a list of U.S. state colors:[1] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... This article is about the colour. ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ... Though every state in the United States has a State Bird and a State Flower, not every state in the United States has a State Fossil. ... Orders many, all extinct The eurypterids were the largest known arthropods that ever lived. ... // Not every state has an official state mineral, rock, stone or gemstone. ... Garnet is a group of minerals that have been used since the Bronze Age as gemstones and abrasives. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... It has been suggested that Middle Atlantic States be merged into this article or section. ... Map of the US northeast. ... Map of states populations (2007) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2007, according to the 2007 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ...


New York City, which is both the largest city in the state and in the United States, is known for its history as a gateway for immigration to the United States and its status as a financial, cultural, transportation, and manufacturing center. It was named after the 17th century Duke of York, James Stuart, future James II and VII of England and Scotland. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Ellis Island, at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor, was at one time the main entry facility for immigrants entering the United States from January 1, 1892 until November 12, 1954. ... HRH The Prince Andrew, the current Duke of York For the nursery rhyme see The Grand Old Duke of York. ... James II and VII (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701)[2] was King of England, King of Scots,[1] and King of Ireland from 6 February 1685 to 11 December 1688. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ...


New York was inhabited by the Algonquin, Iroquois, and Lenape Native American groups at the time Dutch and French nationals moved into the region in the early 17th century. First claimed by Henry Hudson in 1609, the region came to have Dutch forts in Fort Orange, near the site of the present-day capital of Albany in 1614 and was colonized by the Dutch in 1624, at both Albany and Manhattan; it later fell to British annexation in 1664. About one third of all of the battles of the Revolutionary War took place in New York. New York became an independent state on July 9, 1776 and enacted its constitution in 1777. The state ratified the United States Constitution on July 26, 1788 to become the 11th state. According to the US Department of Commerce, it is also the state of choice for foreign visitors, leading both Florida and California in tourism. This article is about the Native American tribe. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... For the language, see Lenape language. ... Native Americans (also Indians, Aboriginal Peoples, American Indians, First Nations, Alaskan Natives, Amerindians, or Indigenous Peoples of America) are the indigenous inhabitants of The Americas prior to the European colonization, and their modern descendants. ... The Dutch (Ethnonym: Nederlanders meaning Lowlanders) are the dominant ethnic group[1] of the Netherlands[2]. They are usually seen as a Germanic people. ... No portrait of Hudson is known to be in existence. ... Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ... Fort Orange (Dutch: Fort Oranje or Fort Oranije) was the first permanent Dutch settlement in New Netherland. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... New York State Capitol Building, completed in 1899 at a cost of $25 million was the most expensive government building of its time. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... This article is about military actions only. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...

Contents

Geography

Main article: Geography of New York

New York covers 54,556 square miles (141,299 km²) and ranks as 27th largest state by size.[4] The Great Appalachian Valley dominates eastern New York, while Lake Champlain is the chief northern feature of the valley, which also includes the Hudson River flowing southward to the Atlantic Ocean. The rugged Adirondack Mountains, with vast tracts of wilderness, lie west of the valley. Most of the southern part of the state is on the Allegheny plateau, which rises from the southeast to the Catskill Mountains. The western section of the state is drained by the Allegheny River and rivers of the Susquehanna and Delaware systems. The Delaware River Basin Compact, signed in 1961 by New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and the federal government, regulates the utilization of water of the Delaware system. The highest elevation in New York is Mount Marcy in the Adirondacks.[2] The Great Appalachian Valley dominates eastern New York, while Lake Champlain is the chief northern feature of the valley, which also includes the Hudson River flowing southward to the Atlantic Ocean. ... The Great Valley, also called the Great Appalachian Valley or Great Valley Region, is one of the major landform features of eastern North America. ... Landsat photo Lake Champlain (French: lac Champlain) is a large lake in North America, mostly within the borders of the United States (states of Vermont and New York) but partially situated across the US-Canada border in the province of Quebec. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... Stream on the hike to the top of Ampersand Mountain The Adirondack mountain range is located in the northeastern part of New York that runs through Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Fulton, Hamilton, Herkimer, Lewis, St. ... The Catskill Mountains (also known as simply the Catskills), a natural area in New York State northwest of New York City and southwest of Albany are a mature dissected plateau, an uplifted region that was subsequently eroded into sharp relief. ... Allegheny River watershed Much of the area through which the Allegheny River flows consists of hilly woodlands. ... The Susquehanna River (originally Sasquesahanough per the 1612 John Smith map) is a river located in the northeastern United States. ... For the Delaware River in Kansas, see Delaware River (Kansas). ... Mount Marcy, at 5,344 ft, is the highest mountain in the Adirondack Mountain Range and the highest point in New York State. ...


New York's borders touch (clockwise from the west) two Great Lakes (Erie and Ontario, which are connected by the Niagara River); the provinces of Ontario and Quebec in Canada; Lake Champlain; three New England states (Vermont, Massachusetts, and Connecticut); the Atlantic Ocean, and two Mid-Atlantic states (New Jersey and Pennsylvania). In addition, Rhode Island shares a water border with New York. Lake Erie (pronounced ) is the tenth largest lake on Earth[2] and, of the five Great Lakes of North America, is the fourth largest by surface area, the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume. ... Lake Ontario, bounded on the north by the Canadian province of Ontario and on the south by Ontarios Niagara Peninsula and by New York State, USA, is one of the five Great Lakes of North America. ... Satellite image of the Niagara River. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Landsat photo Lake Champlain (French: lac Champlain) is a large lake in North America, mostly within the borders of the United States (states of Vermont and New York) but partially situated across the US-Canada border in the province of Quebec. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... The Mid-Atlantic region of the United States of America, located in the northeastern section of the country, includes the following states and district: Delaware Maryland New Jersey New York Pennsylvania Washington, D.C. West Virginia Virginia These areas provided the young United States with heavy industry and served as... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Contrasting with New York City's urban atmosphere, the vast majority of the state is dominated by farms, forests, rivers, mountains, and lakes. New York's Adirondack Park is the largest state park in the United States. It is larger than the Yellowstone, Yosemite, Grand Canyon, Glacier and Olympic National Parks combined. New York established the first state park in the United States at Niagra Falls in 1885. Niagara Falls, on the Niagara River as it flows from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario, is a popular attraction. The Hudson River begins with Lake Tear of the Clouds and flows south through the eastern part of the state without draining Lakes George or Champlain. Lake George empties at its north end into Lake Champlain, whose northern end extends into Canada, where it drains into the Richelieu and then the St. Lawrence Rivers. Four of New York City's five boroughs are on the three islands at the mouth of the Hudson River: Manhattan Island, Staten Island, and Brooklyn and Queens on Long Island. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Adirondack Park, is a large state park in northeast New York. ... For other uses, see Niagara Falls (disambiguation). ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... Lake Tear of the Clouds (44. ... Lake George, nicknamed the Queen of American Lakes, is a long narrow lake at the southeast base of the Adirondack Mountains, northern New York, USA. The lake extends about 32. ... Landsat photo Lake Champlain (French: lac Champlain) is a large lake in North America, mostly within the borders of the United States (states of Vermont and New York) but partially situated across the US-Canada border in the province of Quebec. ... The Richelieu River in Quebec, Canada flows about 130 km north to drain Lake Champlain into the St. ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... The Five Boroughs of New York City The Five Boroughs is a colloquialism often used by residents of New York City to unambiguously refer to the city itself, as opposed to any particular borough or to the greater metropolitan area. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Staten Island (disambiguation) Staten Island, shown in an enhanced satellite image Staten Island is one of the five boroughs of New York City, located on an island of the same name on the west side of the Narrows at the entrance of New York Harbor. ... This article is about the New York City borough, or Kings County, New York. ... For other uses, see Queens (disambiguation) and Queen. ... This article is about Long Island in New York State. ...


"Upstate" and "Downstate" are common terms used to distinguish New York State counties north of suburban Westchester and Rockland counties, on the one hand, from the New York City metropolitan area on th other. Upstate New York typically includes the Catskill and Adirondack Mountains, the Shawangunk Ridge, the Finger Lakes and the Great Lakes in the west; and Lake Champlain, Lake George, and Oneida Lake in the northeast; and rivers such as the Delaware, Genesee, Mohawk, and Susquehanna. Central New York is the region centered around Syracuse and Utica, regions west of Syracuse are "Western New York" (i.e. Rochester and Buffalo), Binghamton, Elmira and west along the Pennsylvania line is the "Southern Tier," and "The North Country" is the region between the Adirondacks and the Canadian border, from the Watertown area to Plattsburgh. Residents of neighboring states and provinces may use the term "New York State" to refer to Upstate New York, to distinguish the region from New York City. The areas highlighted in YELLOW and GREEN are those which are considered to be a bona fide part of Upstate New York from the perspective of New York City. ... Westchester County is a primarily suburban county located in the U.S. state of New York with about 950,000 residents. ... The Tappan Zee Bridge, in a view looking toward Rockland. ... The Catskill Mountains (also known as simply the Catskills), a natural area in New York State northwest of New York City and southwest of Albany are a mature dissected plateau, an uplifted region that was subsequently eroded into sharp relief. ... Stream on the hike to the top of Ampersand Mountain The Adirondack mountain range is located in the northeastern part of New York that runs through Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Fulton, Hamilton, Herkimer, Lewis, St. ... Shawangunk Ridge from south of New Paltz, N.Y. The Shawangunk Ridge (also known as the Shawangunk Mountains, or The Gunks; pronounced by some locals as SHONG-gum, (/ˈʃɑŋgʌm/)) is a ridge of mountains in Ulster County, Sullivan County and Orange County in the state of New York, extending... The Finger Lakes, a major tourist destination in the west-central section of Upstate New York, are actually eleven in number, but only seven of the largest are commonly identified as such. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... Landsat photo Lake Champlain (French: lac Champlain) is a large lake in North America, mostly within the borders of the United States (states of Vermont and New York) but partially situated across the US-Canada border in the province of Quebec. ... Lake George, nicknamed the Queen of American Lakes, is a long narrow lake at the southeast base of the Adirondack Mountains, northern New York, USA. The lake extends about 32. ... Oneida Lake is a large lake in central New York, northeast of Syracuse. ... For the Delaware River in Kansas, see Delaware River (Kansas). ... Upper Genesee near Belmont, New York, a series of pools and riffles The Middle Falls of the Genesee in Letchworth State Park The Genesee Rivers name is derived from the Iroquois meaning good valley or pleasant valley. ... The Mohawk River is a major waterway in north-central New York, United States. ... The Susquehanna River (originally Sasquesahanough per the 1612 John Smith map) is a river located in the northeastern United States. ...


New York has a humid continental climate.[5] Weather in New York is heavily influenced by two continental air masses: a warm, humid one from the southwest and a cold, dry one from the northwest. A cool, humid airflow from the North Atlantic also has an effect on weather in the state, albeit to a lesser extent than the continental ones.[5] Many continental frontal boundaries move across New York, and storm systems moving north along the coast often affect the southern areas of the state.[5] The humid continental climate is found over large areas of land masses in the temperate regions of the mid latitudes where there is a zone of conflict between polar and tropical air masses. ...


The winters are long and cold in the Plateau Divisions of the state. In the majority of winter seasons, a temperature of −13 °F (−25 °C) or lower can be expected in the northern highlands (Northern Plateau) and 5 °F (−15 °C) or colder in the southwestern and east-central highlands (Southern Plateau). The Adirondack region records from 35 to 45 days with below zero temperatures in normal to severe winters.[citation needed] Much of Upstate New York, particularly Western and Central New York, are typically affected by lake-effect snows. This usually results in high yearly snowfall totals in these regions. Winters are also long and cold in both Western and Central New York, though not as cold as the Adirondack region. The New York City metro area in comparison to the rest of the state is milder in the winter. Thanks in part to geography (its proximity to the Atlantic and being shielded to the north and west by hillier terrain), the New York metro area usually sees far less snow than the rest of the state. Lake-effect snow rarely affects the New York metro area, except for its extreme northwestern suburbs. Winters also tend to be noticeably shorter here than the rest of the state.[citation needed]


The summer climate is cool in the Adirondacks, Catskills, and higher elevations of the Southern Plateau. The New York City area and lower portions of the Hudson Valley have rather warm summers by comparison, with some periods of high, uncomfortable humidity. The remainder of New York State enjoys pleasantly warm summers, marred by only occasional, brief intervals of sultry conditions. Summer daytime temperatures usually range from the upper 70s to mid 80s °F (25 to 30 °C) over much of the State, producing an atmospheric environment favorable to many athletic, recreational, and other outdoor activities.


New York ranks 46th among the 50 states in the amount of greenhouse gases generated per person. This efficiency is primarily due to the state's relatively higher rate of mass transit use.[6] Top: Increasing atmospheric levels as measured in the atmosphere and ice cores. ...

Monthly Normal High and Low Temperatures For Various New York Cities
City Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Albany 31/13 34/16 44/25 57/36 70/46 78/55 82/60 80/58 71/50 60/39 48/31 36/20
Binghamton 28/15 31/17 41/25 53/35 66/46 73/54 78/59 76/57 68/50 57/40 44/31 33/21
Buffalo 31/18 33/19 42/26 54/36 66/48 75/57 80/62 78/60 70/53 59/43 47/34 36/24
Long Beach 39/23 40/24 48/31 58/40 69/49 77/60 83/66 82/64 75/57 64/45 54/36 44/28
New York 38/26 41/28 50/35 61/44 71/54 79/63 84/69 82/68 75/60 64/50 53/41 43/32
Rochester 31/17 33/17 43/25 55/35 68/46 77/55 81/60 79/59 71/51 60/41 47/33 36/23
Syracuse 31/14 34/16 43/24 56/35 68/46 77/55 82/60 80/59 71/51 60/40 47/32 36/21
Temperatures listed using the Fahrenheit scale
Source: [3]

For other uses, see Albany. ... This article is about the City of Binghamton, New York. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State Coordinates: , Country State County Erie Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... Nickname: Location of the City of Long Beach in Nassau County, between the Atlantic Ocean and the Town of Hempstead. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the city of Rochester in Monroe County. ... Nickname: Location of Syracuse within the state of New York Coordinates: , City Government  - Mayor Matthew Driscoll (D) Area  - City 66. ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ...

State parks

See also: List of New York state parks
Long Pond in the Saint Regis Canoe Area of the Adirondack Park.
Long Pond in the Saint Regis Canoe Area of the Adirondack Park.

New York has many state parks and two major forest preserves. Adirondack Park, roughly the size of the state of Vermont and the largest state park in the United States, was established in 1892 and given state constitutional protection in 1894. The thinking that led to the creation of the Park first appeared in George Perkins Marsh's Man and Nature, published in 1864. Marsh argued that deforestation could lead to desertification; referring to the clearing of once-lush lands surrounding the Mediterranean, he asserted "the operation of causes set in action by man has brought the face of the earth to a desolation almost as complete as that of the moon." This is a list of state parks in the U.S. state of New York. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 479 KB) Summary Long Pond, in the Saint Regis Canoe Area. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 479 KB) Summary Long Pond, in the Saint Regis Canoe Area. ... The Saint Regis Canoe Area is a 19,000 acre area of the Adirondack State Park in in southern Franklin County, New York about 18 miles northeast of Tupper Lake and southwest of Paul Smiths. ... The Adirondack Park, is a large state park in northeast New York. ... The Adirondack Park, is a large state park in northeast New York. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... George Perkins Marsh (March 15, 1801 – July 23, 1882), an American diplomat and philologist, is considered by some to be Americas first environmentalist. ... Man and Nature is a book written by George Perkins Marsh in 1864. ...


The Catskill Park was protected in legislation passed in 1885,[7] which declared that its land was to be conserved and never put up for sale or lease. Consisting of 700,000 acres (2,800 km²) of land,[7] the park is a habitat for bobcats, minks and fishers. There are some 400 black bears living in the region. The state operates numerous campgrounds and there are over 300 miles (480 km) of multi-use trails in the Park. The Catskill State Park, also called Catskill Park, is in the Catskill Mountains in New York in the United States. ...


The Montauk Point State Park boasts the famous Montauk Lighthouse, commissioned by President George Washington, which is a major tourist attraction and is located in the township of East Hampton, Suffolk County. Hither Hills park offers camping and is a popular destination with surfcasting sport fishermen. Montauk Point State Park is located at the eastern tip of Long Island, New York in Suffolk County. ... The Montauk Lighthouse Montauk Point State Park is located at the eastern tip of Long Island, New York in Suffolk County. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Hook Windmill in East Hampton (village), New York, which is the symbol for East Hampton. ... Suffolk County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Hither Hills State Park is a state park located at the eastern tip of Long Island in Suffolk County, New York in the USA. See also List of New York state parks ...


History

Main article: History of New York
The Woolworth Building, in New York City, was one of the world's first skyscrapers (1913).

During the 17th century, Dutch trading posts established for the purchase of pelts from the Iroquois and other tribes expanded into the colony of New Netherlands. The first of these trading posts were Fort Nassau (1614, near present day Albany); Fort Orange (1624, on the Hudson River just south of nowadays city of Albany (to replace the already mentioned Fort Nassau), developing into settlement Beverwijck (1647), and into nowadays Albany); Fort Amsterdam (1625, to develop into the town New Amsterdam which is present-day New York City); and Esopus, (1653, now Kingston). The British captured the colony during the Second Anglo-Dutch War and governed it as the Province of New York. Agitation for independence during the 1770s brought the American Revolution, which for New York was also a civil war. New York, the Empire State has been at the center of American politics, finance, industry, transportation and culture since it was created by the Dutch in the 17th century. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2864x3658, 1406 KB) Summary TITLE: [View of Woolworth Building and surrounding buildings, New York City] CALL NUMBER: U.S. GEOG FILE - New York--New York City--Bldgs--Woolworth [item] [P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-127214 (b&w film copy neg. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2864x3658, 1406 KB) Summary TITLE: [View of Woolworth Building and surrounding buildings, New York City] CALL NUMBER: U.S. GEOG FILE - New York--New York City--Bldgs--Woolworth [item] [P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-127214 (b&w film copy neg. ... The Woolworth Building, at sixty stories, is one of the oldest — and one of the most famous — skyscrapers in New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... New Netherland (Dutch Nieuw-Nederland, Latin: Nova Belgica) was the territory claimed by the Netherlands on the eastern coast of North America in the 17th century. ... Fort Nassau (North) was a Dutch fort constructed on an island in the Hudson River near present day Albany in 1614. ... The name Albany is an ancient and literary name for Scotland, north of the Firth of Forth (east) and Firth of Clyde (west). ... Fort Orange (Dutch: Fort Oranje or Fort Oranije) was the first permanent Dutch settlement in New Netherland. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... The name Fort Nassau was used by the Dutch in the 17th century for several fortifications, mostly trading stations, named for the House of Orange-Nassau. ... Fort Amsterdam was the name of the Dutch fort that was constructed on the southern tip of Manhattan in 1625. ... This article is about the settlement in present-day New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Kingston is a city in Ulster County, New York, United States. ... The Second Anglo-Dutch War was fought between England and the United Provinces from 4 March 1665 until 31 July 1667. ... A map of the Province of New York. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen...


New York endorsed the Declaration of Independence on July 9, 1776.[8] The New York state constitution was framed by a convention which assembled at White Plains, New York on July 10, 1776, and after repeated adjournments and changes of location, terminated its labors at Kingston, New York on Sunday evening, April 20, 1777, when the new constitution was adopted with but one dissenting vote. It was not submitted to the people for ratification. It was drafted by John Jay. On 30 July 1777, George Clinton was inaugurated as the first Governor of New York at Kingston. The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... hi:Alternative meaning: Constitutional convention (political custom) this is random:Alternative meaning: Constitutional convention (political custom) A constitutional convention is a gathering of delegates for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution. ... For other places with the same name, see White Plains (disambiguation). ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... Kingston is a city in Ulster County, New York, United States. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The first Constitution of New York was ratified April 20, 1777. ... For other persons named John Jay, see John Jay (disambiguation). ... George Clinton (July 26, 1739 – April 20, 1812) was an American soldier and politician. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ...


The Capture of Fort Ticonderoga provided the cannon and gunpowder necessary to force a British withdrawal from the Siege of Boston in 1775. The first major battle of the American Revolutionary War after independence was declared - and the largest battle of the entire war - was fought in New York at the Battle of Long Island (a.k.a Battle of Brooklyn) in 1776, and the first of two major British armies were captured by the Continental Army at the Battle of Saratoga in 1777, influencing France to ally with the revolutionaries. The withdrawal of General George Washington from Manhattan Island was followed by the British making New York City their military and political base of operations in North America for the duration of the conflict, and consequently the center of attention for Washington's intelligence network. The notorious British prison ships of Wallabout Bay saw more American combatants die of intentional neglect than were killed in combat in every battle of the war, combined. Four of the Iroquois nations fought on the side of the British. They were defeated in the Sullivan Expedition of 1779.[9] Suffering privations, many members moved to Canada. Most, absent or present, lost their land after the war. Some of the land purchases are the subject of modern-day claims by the individual tribes.[10] As per the Treaty of Paris. the last vestige of British authority in the former Thirteen Colonies - their troops in New York City - departed in 1783, which was long afterwards celebrated as Evacuation Day.[11] Combatants Vermont, Connecticut Great Britain Commanders Ethan Allen, Benedict Arnold William Delaplace Strength 83 48 Casualties None 48 captured The capture of Fort Ticonderoga was an event early in the American Revolutionary War. ... Combatants Continental Army Great Britain Commanders George Washington William Howe The Fortification of Dorchester Heights was a decisive action early in the American Revolutionary War, which led to the British evacuation of Boston, ending the ongoing siege of Boston. ... Combatants New England militia, Continental Army Great Britain Commanders Artemas Ward, George Washington Thomas Gage, William Howe Strength 17,000 The Siege of Boston (April 19, 1775 – March 17, 1776) was the opening phase of the American Revolutionary War, in which New England militiamen—and then the Continental Army—surrounded... This article is about military actions only. ... Combatants United States Kingdom of Great Britain Commanders George Washington, Israel Putnam William Howe, Charles Cornwallis, Henry Clinton Strength 11,000-13,000 unknown, nearly 20,000 (about 10,000 of which were militia ) 22,000 (including 9,000 Hessians) Casualties 1,719 total (312 dead, 1,407 wounded, captured... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... Combatants British 9th/Hill, 20th/Lynd, 21st/ Hamilton, 62nd/Ansthruter, Simon Fraser Brunswick Major Generals V. Riedesel, 1st Brigade (Brunswickers) Brig. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Like many wars, much of the American Revolutionary War was fought by means other then the armies of George Washington, Howe, John Burgoyne, and Cornwallis. ... A small body of water along the northwest shore of Brooklyn, New York. ... HMS Jersey was a British Royal Navy vessel most noted for serving as a prison ship in the American Revolutionary War. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... The Sullivan Expedition, also known as the Sullivan-Clinton Expedition, was a campaign led by Major General John Sullivan and General James Clinton against Loyalists (Tories) and the four nations of the Iroquois who had sided with the British in the American Revolutionary War. ... Painting by Benjamin West depicting (from left to right) John Jay, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Henry Laurens, and William Temple Franklin. ... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... Evacuation Day on November 25 marks the day in 1783 when the last vestige of British authority in the United States — its troops in New York — departed from Manhattan. ...

The creation of the Erie Canal led to rapid industrialization in New York.
The creation of the Erie Canal led to rapid industrialization in New York.

New York state was one of the original thirteen colonies that became the United States. It was the 11th state to ratify the United States Constitution, on July 26, 1788.[12] Image File history File links BaldwinsvilleLock24. ... Image File history File links BaldwinsvilleLock24. ... The Erie Canal (currently part of the New York State Canal System) is a canal in New York State, United States, that runs from the Hudson River to Lake Erie, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Betsy Ross purportedly sewed the first American flag with 13 stars and 13 stripes representing each of the 13 colonies. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Transportation in western New York was difficult before canals were built in the early part of the nineteenth century. The Hudson and Mohawk Rivers could be navigated only as far as Central New York. While the St. Lawrence River could be navigated to Lake Ontario, the way westward to the other Great Lakes was blocked by Niagara Falls, and so the only route to western New York was over land. Governor DeWitt Clinton strongly advocated building a canal to connect the Hudson River with Lake Erie, and thus all the Great Lakes. Work commenced in 1817, and the Erie Canal was finished in 1825.[13] The canal opened up vast areas of New York to commerce and settlement, and enabled port cities such as Buffalo to grow and prosper. The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... The Mohawk River is a major waterway in north-central New York, United States. ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Lake Ontario, bounded on the north by the Canadian province of Ontario and on the south by Ontarios Niagara Peninsula and by New York State, USA, is one of the five Great Lakes of North America. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... For other uses, see Niagara Falls (disambiguation). ... DeWitt Clinton. ... Lake Erie (pronounced ) is the tenth largest lake on Earth[2] and, of the five Great Lakes of North America, is the fourth largest by surface area, the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... The Erie Canal (currently part of the New York State Canal System) is a canal in New York State, United States, that runs from the Hudson River to Lake Erie, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State Coordinates: , Country State County Erie Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ...


The Statue of Liberty was dedicated in New York Harbor on October 28, 1886. Ellis Island opened as the primary immigration depot in the U.S. in 1892.

See also: New York State Constitutions

Wikisource has original text related to this article: New York Constitution The New York State Constitution establishes the structure of the government of the state of New York, and enumerates the basic rights of the citizens of New York. ...

Demographics

Historical population of New York
Historical population of New York

New York population distribution According to the U.S. Census Bureau, as of 2006, New York was the third largest state in population after California and Texas, with an estimated population of 19,306,183 [1], which is a decrease of -9,538 from the prior year and an increase... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 530 pixelsFull resolution (828 × 549 pixel, file size: 16 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 530 pixelsFull resolution (828 × 549 pixel, file size: 16 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Population

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1790 340,120
1800 589,051 73.2%
1810 959,049 62.8%
1820 1,372,851 43.1%
1830 1,918,608 39.8%
1840 2,428,921 26.6%
1850 3,097,394 27.5%
1860 3,880,735 25.3%
1870 4,382,759 12.9%
1880 5,082,871 16.0%
1890 5,997,853 18.0%
1900 7,268,894 21.2%
1910 9,113,614 25.4%
1920 10,385,227 14.0%
1930 12,588,066 21.2%
1940 13,479,142 7.1%
1950 14,830,192 10.0%
1960 16,782,304 13.2%
1970 18,236,967 8.7%
1980 17,558,072 -3.7%
1990 17,990,455 2.5%
2000 18,976,457 5.5%
Est. 2007 19,297,729 1.7%

As of 2006, New York was the third largest state in population after California and Texas, with an estimated population of 19,306,183.[14] This represents an increase of 329,362, or 1.7%, since the year 2000; it includes a natural increase since the last census of 601,779 people (1,576,125 births minus 974,346 deaths) and a decrease due to net migration of 422,481 people out of the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 820,388 people, and migration within the country produced a net loss of about 800,213. The United [[States Census of 1790 was the first Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1800 was the second Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1810 was the third Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1820 was the fourth Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


In spite of the open land in the state, New York's population is very urban, with 92% of residents living in an urban area.[15]


New York is a slow growing state with a large rate of migration to other states. In 2000 and 2005, more people moved from New York to Florida than from any one state to another.[16] New York state is a leading destination for international immigration, however. The center of population of New York is located in Orange County, in the town of Deerpark.[17] New York City and its eight suburban counties (excluding those in New Jersey, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania) have a combined population of 13,209,006 people, or 68.42% of the state's population.[18] Center of population is a subject of study in the field of demographics. ... For other uses, see Orange County (disambiguation). ... Deerpark is a town located in Orange County, New York. ...

New York population density map
New York population density map

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (792x660, 46 KB) Summary Population distribution of New York State, based on Census 2000. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (792x660, 46 KB) Summary Population distribution of New York State, based on Census 2000. ...

Racial and ancestral makeup

The major ancestry groups in New York state are African American (15.8%), Italian (14.4%), Irish (12.9%), and German (11.1%).[19] According to a 2004 estimate, 20.4% of the population is foreign-born. For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... An Italian American is an American of Italian descent and/or dual citizenship. ... Irish Americans (Irish: Gael-Mheiriceánach) are citizens of the United States who can claim ancestry originating in the west European island of Ireland. ... German Americans (German Deutschamerikaner) are citizens of the United States of ethnic German ancestry and currently form the largest ancestry group in the United States, accounting for 17% of the U.S. population. ...


New York is home to the largest Dominican and Jamaican American population in the United States. The New York City neighborhood of Harlem has historically been a major cultural capital for sub saharan African-Americans and Bedford Stuyvesant is the largest in the United States. Queens, also in New York City, is home to the state's largest Asian-American population, and is also the most diverse county in the United States. Jamaican Americans are Americans of Jamaican heritage or Jamaican-born people who live in the United States of America. ... For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ... Bedford Stuyvesant (aka Bed-Stuy) is a neighborhood in central Brooklyn, New York City. ... For other uses, see Queens (disambiguation) and Queen. ... An Asian American is generally defined as a person of Asian ancestry and American citizenship,[2][3][4] although may also be extended to include non-citizen resident Asians as well. ...


In the 2000 Census, Italian-Americans make up the largest ancestral group in Staten Island and Long Island, followed by Irish-Americans. Albany and southeast-central New York are heavily Irish-American and Italian-American. In Buffalo and western New York, German-Americans are the largest group; in the northern tip of the state, French-Canadians. An Italian-American is an American of Italian descent. ... Irish Americans are residents or citizens of the United States who claim Irish ancestry. ... German Americans are common in the US. Light blue indicates counties that are predominately German ancestry. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


6.5% of New York's population were under 5 years of age, 24.7% under 18, and 12.9% were 65 or older. Females made up 51.8% of the population.


New York State has a higher number of Italian-Americans than any other U.S. state.


According to the 2000 U.S. Census, 13.61% of the population aged 5 and over speak Spanish at home, while 2.04% speak Chinese (including Cantonese and Mandarin), 1.65% Italian, and 1.23% Russian [4]. The 22nd United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... This article is about all of the Cantonese (Yue) dialects. ... This article is on all of the Northern and Southwestern Chinese dialects. ...


Religion

Catholics comprise more than 40% of the population in New York.[20] Protestants are 30% of the population, Jews 5%, Muslims 3.5%, Buddhists 1%, and 13% claim no religious affiliation. Reformation redirects here. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Buddhism is a variety of teachings described as a religion[1] or way of life that attempts to identify the causes of human suffering and offer various ways that are claimed to end, or ease suffering. ...


Cities and towns

New York's population centers reflect early transportation routes, with railroad paralleling the Erie Canal (shown in blue)
New York's population centers reflect early transportation routes, with railroad paralleling the Erie Canal (shown in blue)
For lists of cities, towns, and counties in New York, see List of cities in New York, List of towns in New York, List of villages in New York, List of counties in New York, List of census-designated places in New York and Administrative divisions of New York.

The largest city in the state and the most populous city in the United States is New York City, which comprises five counties, the Bronx, New York (Manhattan), Queens, Kings (Brooklyn), and Richmond (Staten Island). New York City is home to more than two-fifths of the state's population. The ten largest cities are:[21] Image File history File links Water Level Routes of the New York Central Railroad, West Shore Railroad and Erie Canal on http://commons. ... Image File history File links Water Level Routes of the New York Central Railroad, West Shore Railroad and Erie Canal on http://commons. ... This List of the 62 cities in New York State, USA, is an alphabetic list that also gives the primary county in which each city is located. ... As of the 2000 census, there are 932 towns in the state of New York. ... List of villages in New York, arranged in alphabetical order. ... List of New York counties Map of the counties of New York State (click for larger version) Albany County: formed in 1683 as one of the original 12 counties. ... As of the 2000 census, there are 434 census-designated places (CDPs) in New York State. ... Administrative divisions of New York State differ from those in certain other countries and most U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...

  1. New York City (8,143,197)
  2. Buffalo (279,745)
  3. Rochester (211,091)
  4. Yonkers (196,425)
  5. Syracuse (141,683)
  6. Albany (93,523)
  7. New Rochelle (72,967)
  8. Mount Vernon (67,924)
  9. Schenectady (61,280)
  10. Utica (59,336)

The location of these population centers within the state stays remarkably true to the major transportation and trade routes in the early nineteenth century, primarily the Erie Canal and railroads paralleling it. Today, Interstate 90 acts as a modern counterpart to commercial water routes. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State Coordinates: , Country State County Erie Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... This article is about the city of Rochester in Monroe County. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nickname: Location of Syracuse within the state of New York Coordinates: , City Government  - Mayor Matthew Driscoll (D) Area  - City 66. ... For other uses, see Albany. ... New Rochelle City Hall New Roc City New Rochelle (French: Nouvelle-Rochelle) is a city in the southeast portion of the U.S. state of New York in Westchester County, 16 miles (26 km) from Grand Central Terminal in New York City and 2 miles north of the border with... For other places with the same name, see Mount Vernon (disambiguation). ... Schenectady (IPA ) is a city in Schenectady County, New York, United States, of which it is the county seat. ... Utica, New York is a city in the state of New York, and the county seat of Oneida County. ... The Erie Canal (currently part of the New York State Canal System) is a canal in New York State, United States, that runs from the Hudson River to Lake Erie, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ...


The smallest city is Sherrill, New York, located just west of the Town of Vernon in Oneida County. Albany is the state capital, and the Town of Hempstead is the civil township with the largest population. Sherrill is a city located in Oneida County, New York. ... Vernon is a town located in Oneida County, New York. ... Oneida County is the name of several counties in the United States: Oneida County, Idaho Oneida County, New York Oneida County, Wisconsin This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see Albany. ... The Town of Hempstead is one of the three towns (otherwise known as civil townships) in Nassau County, New York, United States. ...


The southern tip of New York State—New York City, its suburbs including Long Island, the southern portion of the Hudson Valley, and most of northern New Jersey—can be considered to form the central core of a "megalopolis", a super-city stretching from the northern suburbs of Boston to the southern suburbs of Washington D.C. in Virginia and therefore occasionally called "BosWash". The geography and environment of New York City is characterized by its coastal position at the meeting of the Hudson River and the Atlantic Ocean in a naturally sheltered harbor. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... A megalopolis is defined as an extensive metropolitan area or a long chain of continuous metropolitan areas. ... Boston redirects here. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The BosWash or Bosnywash or Boshington or Northeast Corridor or simply Northeast megalopolis is the name for a group of metropolitan areas in the northeastern United States, extending from Boston, Massachusetts, to Washington, D.C., including Providence, Rhode Island; Hartford and New Haven and Stamford, Connecticut; New York, New York...

Economy

Main article: Economy of New York
Manhattan in New York City is home to the greatest concentration of Fortune 500 companies in the world.
Manhattan in New York City is home to the greatest concentration of Fortune 500 companies in the world.
A dairy farm near Oxford, New York.
A dairy farm near Oxford, New York.

New York's gross state product in 2006 was $1.02 trillion, ranking third in size behind the larger states of California and Texas.[22] If New York were an independent nation, it would rank as the 16th largest economy in the world behind South Korea. Its 2005 per capita personal income was $40,072, an increase of 4.2% from 2004, placing it fifth in the nation behind Maryland, and eighth in the world behind Ireland. New York's agricultural outputs are dairy products, cattle and other livestock, vegetables, nursery stock, and apples. Its industrial outputs are printing and publishing, scientific instruments, electric equipment, machinery, chemical products, and tourism. The New York State Quarter released in 2001. ... Download high resolution version (1106x1105, 229 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1031x740, 688 KB)Midtown Manhattan looking North from the Empire State Building, 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1031x740, 688 KB)Midtown Manhattan looking North from the Empire State Building, 2005. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... Dairy farm, Oxford, NY Image copyleft: Image taken by me, released under GFDL Pollinator 05:50, Sep 19, 2004 (UTC) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Dairy farm, Oxford, NY Image copyleft: Image taken by me, released under GFDL Pollinator 05:50, Sep 19, 2004 (UTC) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Oxford, New York is the name of two locations in Chenango County, New York: Town of Oxford Village of Oxford This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A dairy farm near Oxford, New York in the United States. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... Sheep are commonly bred as livestock. ... For other uses, see Vegetable (disambiguation). ... A nursery is a place where plants are propagated, usually for sale as a business, though some gardeners and farmers keep private nurseries. ... For other uses, see Apple (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Publishing (disambiguation). ... A machine is any mechanical or electrical device that transmits or modifies energy to perform or assist in the performance of tasks. ... A chemical substance is any material substance used in or obtained by a process in chemistry: A chemical compound is a substance consisting of two or more chemical elements that are chemically combined in fixed proportions. ... Tourist redirects here. ...


A recent review by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities found 13 states, including several of the nation's largest, face budget shortfalls for FY2009. New York faces a deficit that could be as large as $4.3 billion.[23] This article is about budget deficits. ...


New York exports a wide variety of goods such as foodstuffs, commodities, minerals, manufactured goods, cut diamonds, and automobile parts. New York's five largest export markets in 2004 were Canada ($30.2 billion), United Kingdom ($3.3 billion), Japan ($2.6 billion), Israel ($2.4 billion), and Switzerland ($1.8 billion). New York's largest imports are oil, gold, aluminum, natural gas, electricity, rough diamonds, and lumber.


Canada is a very important economic partner for the state. 23% of the state's total worldwide exports went to Canada in 2004. Tourism from the north is also a large part of the economy. Canadians spent US$487 million in 2004 while visiting the state.


New York City is the leading center of banking, finance and communication in the United States and is the location of the New York Stock Exchange, the largest stock exchange in the world by dollar volume. Many of the world's largest corporations are based in the city. For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... The field of finance refers to the concepts of time, money and risk and how they are interelated. ... Popular press redirects here; note that the University of Wisconsin Press publishes under the imprint The Popular Press. Mass media is a term used to denote a section of the media specifically envisioned and designed to reach a very large audience such as the population of a nation state. ... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ...


The state also has a large manufacturing sector that includes printing and the production of garments, furs, railroad equipment and bus line vehicles. Many of these industries are concentrated in upstate regions. Albany and the Hudson Valley are major centers of nanotechnology and microchip manufacturing, while the Rochester area is important in photographic equipment and imaging. There is also a Rochester in Ulster County, New York; for that town see Rochester, Ulster County, New York. ...


New York is a major agricultural producer, ranking among the top five states for agricultural products such as dairy, apples, cherries, cabbage, potatoes, onions, maple syrup and many others. The state is the largest producer of cabbage in the U.S. The state has about a quarter of its land in farms and produced US$3.4 billion in agricultural products in 2001. The south shore of Lake Ontario provides the right mix of soils and microclimate for many apple, cherry, plum, pear and peach orchards. Apples are also grown in the Hudson Valley and near Lake Champlain. The south shore of Lake Erie and the southern Finger Lakes hillsides have many vineyards. New York is the nation's third-largest grape-producing state, behind California, and second largest wine producer by volume. In 2004, New York's wine and grape industry brought US$6 billion into the state economy. The state has 30,000 acres (120 km²) of vineyards, 212 wineries, and produced 200 million bottles of wine in 2004. A moderately sized saltwater commercial fishery is located along the Atlantic side of Long Island. The principal catches by value are clams, lobsters, squid, and flounder. These areas have been increasing as environmental protection has led to an increase in ocean wildlife. Loess field in Germany Surface-water-gley developed in glacial till, Northern Ireland For the American hard rock band, see SOiL. For the System of a Down song, see Soil (song). ... Microclimate on rock located in intertidal zone on rock at Sunrise-on Sea Tree ferns thrive in a protected dell at the Lost Gardens of Heligan, in Cornwall, England, latitude 50° 15N A microclimate is a local atmospheric zone where the climate differs from the surrounding area. ... Species See text. ... Species About 30 species; see text For other uses, see Pear (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (L.) Batsch Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... A community apple orchard originally planted for productive use during the 1920s, in Westcliff on Sea (Essex, England) An orchard is an intentional planting of trees or shrubs maintained for food production. ... The Finger Lakes, a major tourist destination in the west-central section of Upstate New York, are actually eleven in number, but only seven of the largest are commonly identified as such. ...


Transportation

The major cities and roadways of New York State.
The major cities and roadways of New York State.

New York has one of the most extensive and one of the oldest transportation infrastructures in the country. Engineering difficulties because of the terrain of the state and the unique issues of the city brought on by urban crowding have had to be overcome since the state was young. Population expansion of the state generally followed the path of the early waterways, first the Hudson River and then the Erie Canal. Today, railroad lines and the New York State Thruway follow the same general route. The New York State Department of Transportation is often criticized for how they maintain the roads of the state in certain areas and for the fact that the tolls collected along the roadway have long passed their original purpose. Until 2006, tolls were collected on the Thruway within The City of Buffalo. They were dropped late in 2006 during the campaign for Governor (both candidates called for their removal). Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links National-atlas-new-york. ... Image File history File links National-atlas-new-york. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... The Erie Canal (currently part of the New York State Canal System) is a canal in New York State, United States, that runs from the Hudson River to Lake Erie, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... The New York State Thruway (officially the Governor Thomas E. Dewey Thruway) is a limited-access toll highway in the U.S. state of New York. ... The New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) is reponsible for the development and operation of highways, railroads, mass transit systems, ports, waterways and aviation facilities in the U.S. state of New York. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State Coordinates: , Country State County Erie Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ...

The Bear Mountain Bridge crossing the Hudson River.
The Bear Mountain Bridge crossing the Hudson River.

In addition to New York City's famous mass transit subway, four suburban commuter railroad systems enter and leave the city, including the Long Island Rail Road, MTA Metro-North, the PATH system and five of NJTransit's rail services. Many of the other cities have urban and regional public transportation. Buffalo also has a Subway line, sometimes called a Lightrail System run by the NFTA, and Rochester had a subway system, although it is mostly destroyed. Only a small part exists under the old Erie Canal Aqueduct. Download high resolution version (1280x960, 142 KB)Bear Mountain Bridge from the top of Bear Mountain PD File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1280x960, 142 KB)Bear Mountain Bridge from the top of Bear Mountain PD File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Bear Mountain Bridge is a toll suspension bridge in New York State, carrying U.S. Highways 202 and 6, as well as the Appalachian Trail, across the Hudson River between Rockland and Orange Counties to the west and Westchester and Putnam Counties to the east. ... LIRR redirects here. ... Marble Hill station The Metro-North Railroad (officially the Metro-North Commuter Railroad Company, and usually abbreviated as Metro-North) is a suburban commuter railroad service between New York City to its northern suburbs in New York State and Connecticut. ... Hoboken- and Newark-bound platform at Exchange Place station in Jersey City. ... New Jersey Transit Arrow III at West Windsor, NJ Hudson-Bergen Light Rail vehicle at 2nd Street station New Jersey Transit (NJ Transit) is a statewide public transportation system serving the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State Coordinates: , Country State County Erie Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A tram of the Luas system in Dublin, Ireland A METRORail train approaching Preston Station in downtown Houston, Texas, USA. The Guadalajara urban L-train system (SITEUR), at first a trolleybus system, opened in 1980; the second line was opened in 1994, and a third line is in project. ... The Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority (NFTA) is the local provider of public transportation for Erie and Niagara counties in New York. ... This article is about the city of Rochester in Monroe County. ...


Portions of the transportation system are intermodal, allowing travelers to easily switch from one mode of transportation to another. One of the most notable examples is AirTrain JFK which allows rail passengers to travel directly to terminals at John F. Kennedy International Airport. Intermodal is a term that refers to more than one mode of transport. ... AirTrain JFK is a 13 km (8. ...

See also: Transportation in New York City

The transportation system of New York City is an unparalleled cooperation of unique, complex, and grandiose systems of infrastructure. ...

Politics and government

Under its present constitution (adopted in 1938), New York is governed by the same three branches that govern all fifty states of the United States: the executive branch, consisting of the Governor of New York and the other independently elected constitutional officers; the legislative branch, consisting of the bicameral New York State Legislature; and the judicial branch, consisting of the state's highest court, the New York Court of Appeals, and lower courts. The state has two U.S. senators, 29 members in the United States House of Representatives, and 31 electoral votes in national presidential elections (a drop from its 41 votes during the 1970s). Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 716 KB) New York State Capitol. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 716 KB) New York State Capitol. ... New York State Capitol The New York State Capitol is the state capitol building of the U.S. state of New York. ... In political science and constitutional law, the executive is the branch of government responsible for the day-to-day management of the state. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... Chamber of the Estates-General, the Dutch legislature. ... In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... The New York Legislature is the U.S. state of New Yorks legislative branch, seated at the states capital, Albany. ... The judiciary, also referred to as the judicature, consists of justices, judges and magistrates among other types of adjudicators. ... The Court of Appeals is New Yorks highest appellate court, created in 1847, replacing the Court for the Trial of Impeachments and the Correction of Errors. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Electoral votes by state/federal district, for the elections of 2004 and 2008 The United States Electoral College is a term used to describe the 538 President Electors who meet every 4 years to cast the electoral votes for President and Vice President of the United States; their votes represent...


New York's capital is Albany. The state's subordinate political units are its 62 counties. Other officially incorporated governmental units are towns, cities, and villages. New York has more than 4,200 local governments that take one of these forms. About 52% of all revenue raised by local governments in the state is raised solely by the government of New York City, which is the largest municipal government in the United States.[24] For other uses, see Albany. ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... Administrative divisions of New York State differ from those in certain other countries and most U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ... Administrative divisions of New York State differ from those in certain other countries and most U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ... Administrative divisions of New York State differ from those in certain other countries and most U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ... New York City has been a metropolitan municipality with a strong mayor-council form of government since its consolidation in 1898. ...


The state has a strong imbalance of payments with the federal government. New York State receives 82 cents in services for every $1 it sends in taxes to the federal government in Washington.[25] The state ranks near the bottom, in 42nd place, in federal spending per tax dollar.[26]


Many of New York's public services are carried out by public benefit corporations, frequently called authorities or development corporations. Well known public benefit corporations in New York include the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which oversees New York City's public transportation system, and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, a bi-state transportation infrastructure agency. A public benefit corporation is usually a government-owned corporation that performs a specific, narrow function for the public good. ... New York State public benefit corporations and authorities operate like quasi-private corporations, generally with boards appointed by elected officials. ... The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) is a public benefit corporation responsible for public transportation in the State of New York. ... Tolls collected at the Holland Tunnel and other crossings help fund the Port Authority. ...


New York's legal system is explicitly based on English common Law. Capital punishment was declared unconstitutional in 2004.[27] This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ... Capital punishment is the legal process which ends the life of a felon. ...


Politics

In the last few decades, New York State has generally supported candidates belonging to the Democratic Party in national elections. Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry won New York State by 18 percentage points in 2004, while Democrat Al Gore won the state by an even larger margin in 2000. New York City is a major Democratic stronghold with liberal politics. Many of the state's other urban areas, such as Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse are also Democratic. Rural upstate New York, however, is generally more conservative than the cities and tends to favor Republicans. Heavily populated Suburban areas such as Westchester County and Long Island have swung between the major parties over the past 25 years, but more often support Democrats. The Politics of New York State tend to be more left-leaning than in most of the rest of the United States, with in recent decades a solid majority of Democratic voters, concentrated in New York City and its suburbs, and in the cities of Buffalo, Rochester and Albany. ... Some pages with election results are The NYS Board of Elections and Polidata. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... For other uses, see Albany. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State Coordinates: , Country State County Erie Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... This article is about the city of Rochester in Monroe County. ... Nickname: Location of Syracuse within the state of New York Coordinates: , City Government  - Mayor Matthew Driscoll (D) Area  - City 66. ... GOP redirects here. ... Westchester County is a suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ...


New York City is the most important source of political fund-raising in the United States for both major parties. Four of the top five zip codes in the nation for political contributions are in Manhattan. The top zip code, 10021 on the Upper East Side, generated the most money for the 2000 presidential campaigns of both George W. Bush and Al Gore.[28] The Upper East Side at Sunset The Upper East Side is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, USA, between Central Park and the East River. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ...


Education

Main article: Education in New York
The Agriculture Quad of Cornell University.
The Agriculture Quad of Cornell University.
System Administration Building of the State University of New York.

The University of the State of New York oversees all public primary, middle-level, and secondary education in the state, while the New York City Department of Education manages the public school system in New York City. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1299x805, 557 KB) Summary Cornell University Ag Quad, taken from Bradfield Hall. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1299x805, 557 KB) Summary Cornell University Ag Quad, taken from Bradfield Hall. ... Cornell redirects here. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 334 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) SUNY System Administration Building taken from the 787 pedestrian bridge. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 334 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) SUNY System Administration Building taken from the 787 pedestrian bridge. ... Not to be confused with University of the State of New York. ... The University of the State of New York (USNY; acronym usually pronounced USE-nee) is the governmental umbrella organization of the US state of New York which is responsible for most institutions and much of the personnel that are in any way connected to formal educational functions (public and private... The Official Seal of the City of New York The New York City Department of Education is the branch of municipal government in New York City that manages the citys public school system. ...


At the college level, the statewide public university system is the State University of New York (SUNY). The City University of New York (CUNY) is the public university system of New York City. SUNY schools SUNY Geneseo and Binghamton University are consistently ranked in the top two best values in education in the nation, according to Kipliger's. Binghamton University was ranked as the, "Premier Public University in the Northeast," according to the Fisk Guide to Colleges. The SUNY system consists of 64 community colleges, technical colleges, undergraduate colleges and universities. The four university centers are University at Albany, Binghamton University, University at Buffalo and SUNY Stony Brook. Not to be confused with University of the State of New York. ... The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym pronounced ), is the public university system of New York City. ... The State University of New York (acronym SUNY; usually pronounced SOO-nee) is a system of public institutions of higher education in New York, United States. ... The State University of New York at Geneseo, also known as SUNY Geneseo or the State University of New York College at Geneseo is located in Geneseo, Livingston County, New York. ... Overlooking center of campus. ... Overlooking center of campus. ... The State University of New York (acronym SUNY; usually pronounced SOO-nee) is a system of public institutions of higher education in New York, United States. ... The University at Albany, (formerly known as Albany State University until the early 1990s) located in Albany, New York, in the USA, is one of four university centers of the State University of New York. ... Overlooking center of campus. ... It has been suggested that The Poetry Collection be merged into this article or section. ... Stony Brook University Stony Brook University (SBU) or the University at Stony Brook (USB), or the State University of New York at Stony Brook (SUNYSB), located in Stony Brook, New York, USA, is one of the premier public universities in the United States with more than 21,000 students enrolled. ...


In addition there are many notable private universities, including the oldest Catholic institution in the northeast, Fordham University. Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York is a private, liberal-arts college known for its small-class sizes and extremely high tuition. New York is home to both Columbia University and Cornell University, making it the only state to contain more than one Ivy League school. Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[3] in the United States, with three campuses located in and around New York City. ... Sarah Lawrence College is a private liberal arts college located in metropolitan New York City, about a thirty-minute train ride north of Manhattan. ... Bronxville is a village in Westchester County, New York, United States, located 15 miles north of midtown Manhattan. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Cornell redirects here. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ...


In total, New York State is home to 307 degree granting institutions making it the second in number behind California. Among the most notable and highest ranked institutions are: This article is about the U.S. state. ...

For other meanings of the word Bard, see Bard (disambiguation). ... Overlooking center of campus. ... Canisius College (pronounced IPA: ) is a private Catholic college in the Hamlin Park district of north-central Buffalo, New York. ... Clarkson University, formerly Clarkson College of Technology, is a private university located in rural Potsdam, New York. ... Colgate University is a highly selective, private liberal arts college located in the Village of Hamilton in Madison County, New York, USA. It was founded in 1819 as a Baptist seminary, but has since become non-denominational. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Cornell redirects here. ... Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[3] in the United States, with three campuses located in and around New York City. ... For other colleges with the same name, see Hamilton College (disambiguation). ... Iona College is located in New Rochelle, New York. ... Ithaca College is a private institution of higher education located on the South Hill of Ithaca, New York. ... The architectural and administrative centerpiece of the Manhattanville campus, Reid Hall (1864), is named after Whitelaw Reid owner of the New York Tribune. ... This article is about Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, or RPI, is a nonsectarian, coeducational private research university in Troy, New York, a city lying just outside the state capital of Albany. ... It has been suggested that The Poetry Collection be merged into this article or section. ... The University of Rochester (UR) is a private, coeducational and nonsectarian research university located in Rochester, New York. ... RIT redirects here. ... Sarah Lawrence College is a private liberal arts college located in metropolitan New York City, about a thirty-minute train ride north of Manhattan. ... Siena College is a nationally recognized independent Catholic Liberal Arts College situated on US 9 in the suburban community of Loudonville, New York, two miles (3. ... St. ... The State University of New York at Canton, located in the Town of Canton in St. ... The State University of New York at Geneseo, also known as SUNY Geneseo or the State University of New York College at Geneseo is located in Geneseo, Livingston County, New York. ... Main quad at SUNY at New Paltz, with Jacobson Faculty Tower and Old Main in the background The State University of New York at New Paltz is a public university in New Paltz, New York. ... The State University of New York at Potsdam, soemtimes known as SUNY Potsdam, originated in St. ... Purchase College, also known as SUNY Purchase or State University of New York College at Purchase, is a public liberal, visual, and performing arts college in Purchase, New York and is a part of the State University of New York system. ... Stony Brook University Stony Brook University (SBU) or the University at Stony Brook (USB), or the State University of New York at Stony Brook (SUNYSB), located in Stony Brook, New York, USA, is one of the premier public universities in the United States with more than 21,000 students enrolled. ... Crouse College, a 19th-century Romanesque building which houses the universitys visual arts and music programs Syracuse University (SU) is a private research university located in Syracuse, New York, United States the geographic center of the state, about 250 miles northwest of New York City. ... Maura Lawn and Ursula Hall at the College of New Rochelles main campus in New Rochelle. ... This article is about the Union College in New York. ... Vassar College is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college situated in the town of Poughkeepsie, New York, USA. Founded as a womens college in 1861, it was the first member of the Seven Sisters to become coeducational. ...

Sports

Main article: Sports in New York

New York hosted the 1980 Winter Olympics at Lake Placid, the Games known for the USA-USSR hockey game dubbed the "Miracle on Ice" in which a group of American college students and amateurs defeated the heavily-favored Soviet national ice hockey team 4-3 and went on to win the gold medal. Lake Placid also hosted the 1932 Winter Olympics. Along with St. Moritz, Switzerland and Innsbruck, Austria, it is one of the three places to have twice hosted the Winter Olympic Games. Category: ... The 1980 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIII Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1980 in Lake Placid, New York, United States of America. ... For other places with the same name, see Lake Placid (disambiguation). ... U.S. captain Mike Eruzione(left) celebrates with Bill Baker (center) moments after scoring the decisive goal against the Soviet Union. ... The 1932 Winter Olympics, officially known as the III Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1932 in Lake Placid, New York, United States. ... St. ... Innsbruck City Center Innsbruck and Nordkette from south Innsbruck (population 120,000) is a city in western Austria, and the capital of the Tyrol province. ...


New York is the home of one National Football League team, the Buffalo Bills; Although the New York Giants and New York Jets represent the New York metropolitan area, they play in Giants Stadium, which is located in East Rutherford, New Jersey. New York also has two Major League Baseball teams, the New York Yankees (based in The Bronx), and the New York Mets (based in Queens). Three National Hockey League franchises (the New York Rangers in Manhattan, the New York Islanders in Long Island and the Buffalo Sabres) are based in New York. A National Basketball Association team, the New York Knicks is based in Manhattan. NFL redirects here. ... For other uses, see Buffalo Bills (disambiguation). ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White, Jersey Jets Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... New York–Northern New Jersey–Long Island is the most populous metropolitan area in the United States and is also one of the most populous in the world . ... Giants Stadium, frequently referred to as The Meadowlands, is the home stadium for the New York Giants and New York Jets football teams of the NFL, and the Red Bull New York soccer team of MLS. It is located in East Rutherford, New Jersey in the Meadowlands Sports Complex, which... Map highlighting East Rutherfords location within Bergen County. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... For other uses, see The Bronx (disambiguation). ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42, Shea Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964-present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league titles World... For other uses, see Queens (disambiguation) and Queen. ... NHL redirects here. ... The New York Rangers are a professional ice hockey team based in New York, New York, U.S.A. They are members of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... The New York Islanders are a professional ice hockey team based in Uniondale, a hamlet located on Long Island in Town of Hempstead, Nassau County, New York, United States. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ... The Buffalo Sabres is the best professional ice hockey team around. ... NBA redirects here. ... Knicks redirects here. ...


Navy vessel namesakes

There have been at least six United States Navy ships named USS New York in honor of the state. The keel was laid for the USS New York (LPD 21) on September 10, 2004 and she will be the seventh US Navy ship to be named for the state. The New York's motto will be "Never Forget." USN redirects here. ... There have been at least five United States Navy ships that have borne the name New York, after the 11th state. ... USS New York (LPD-21), a San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock, is the sixth ship of the United States Navy to be named for the state of New York. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The USS New York is one of several ships in the San Antonio-class of amphibious transport dock ships (LPD stands for Landing Ship Transport, Dock). The ship will be used to transport and land Marines, their equipment and supplies, such as amphibious vehicles and helicopters. It is one of three similar ships that are being built and being given names that are associated with September 11. The others are the LPD 24 USS Arlington (named because of the location of The Pentagon) and the LPD 25 USS Somerset (named after the county in Pennsylvania where United Airlines Flight 93 crashed). The San Antonio class is the United States Navys primary class of amphibious transport dock (LPD). ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... The date that commonly refers to the attacks on United States citizens on September 11, 2001 (see the September 11, 2001 Attacks). ... USS Arlington (LPD-24), a San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock, is the third ship of the United States Navy to be named for Arlington, Virginia. ... This article is about the United States military building. ... USS Somerset (LPD-25), a San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock, is the fifth ship of the United States Navy of that name, in honor of Somerset County, Pennsylvania. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses of Flight 93 and United 93, see Flight 93. ...


Twenty-four tons of steel from the World Trade Center have been recycled for construction of the ship. Approximately seven tons were used to make the bow section of the ship's hull. The steel from the World Trade Center has been treated with reverence by the ship builders. Several workers have postponed their retirements for the honor of constructing the USS New York. For other uses, see World Trade Center (disambiguation). ...


According to Naval records, several other ships have carried the name the USS New York. This new ship was given the name the USS New York when former New York governor George Pataki wrote to Secretary of the Navy Gordon England and requested that the Navy use the name to honor the victims of September 11 and to give it to a surface ship that would be used to fight the War on Terror. This is an exception to the current use of state names for submarines only. For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... George Elmer Pataki (born June 24, 1945) is an American politician who was the 57th Governor of New York serving from January 1995 until January 1, 2007. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... Secretary Gordon R. England Gordon Richard England is an American businessman who (as of 2004) serves as the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... This article is about U.S. actions, and those of other states, after September 11, 2001. ... USS Los Angeles A submarine is a specialized watercraft that can operate underwater. ...


The first ship to carry the name USS New York was an armed gondola built by Revolutionary War General Benedict Arnold in 1776. She was burned to avoid capture later in the Revolutionary War. The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other persons named Benedict Arnold, see Benedict Arnold (disambiguation). ...


The second ship named USS New York was a 36-gun frigate built in New York and commissioned in 1800. She saw service in the Mediterranean in the war against the Barbary Pirates. She was burned by the British in 1814 while she was in the Washington Navy Yard. The second USS New York was a frigate in the United States Navy during the Quasi-War with France. ... For the bird, see Frigatebird. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Washington Navy Yard is the former shipyard and ordnance plant of the United States Navy in Washington, D.C.. The yard currently is a ceremonial and administrative center for the navy, home to the Chief of Naval Operations and is headquarters for the Naval Historical Center, the Marine Corps...


The third USS New York was one of nine built to discourage a future war with Britain after the war of 1812. The threat abated, so she was never launched. Union forces later burned the 74-gun ship of the line to avoid her capture at the start of the American Civil War. In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... Ships of the line were 1st, 2nd, or 3rd-rated ships in the rating system of the Royal Navy. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


Beginning in 1863, a screw sloop that was being built that would have carried the name USS New York, but it also never got launched, being sold in 1888. A screw sloop is a propeller-driven sloop-of-war. ...


The fifth USS New York (ACR 2) was a armored cruiser commissioned in 1893. She was used in the Spanish-American War and was the flagship of Rear Admiral William T. Sampson in the Battle of Santiago de Cuba (July 3, 1898), which destroyed the Spanish fleet. She was later renamed the USS Saratoga in 1911 and then renamed again as the USS Rochester in 1917. The fourth USS New York (ACR-2) was a United States Navy armored cruiser, later renamed to Saratoga and then Rochester (CA-2). ... Schematic section of a typical armoured cruiser with an armoured upper and middle deck and side belt (red), lateral protective coal bunkers (grey) and a double-bottom of watertight compartments. ... Belligerents United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Kingdom of Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Manuel Macías y Casado Ramón Blanco y Erenas Casualties and losses 385 KIA USA 5,000... This article is about the lead ship, store, or product of a group. ... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... Rear Admiral William Thomas Sampson William Thomas Sampson (9 February 1840 – 6 May 1902) was a United States Navy admiral known for his victory in the Battle of Santiago de Cuba during the Spanish-American War. ... Combatants United States Spain Commanders William T. Sampson, Winfield Scott Schley Pascual Cervera Strength 4 battleships 1 armoured cruiser 2 torpedo boats 4 armoured cruisers 2 torpedo boats Casualties 2 dead ~100 wounded 474 dead or wounded 6 ships lost The Battle of Santiago de Cuba, fought between Spain and... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Six United States Navy ships have borne the name Saratoga, after the important Battle of Saratoga in the American Revolutionary War. ... USS Rochester has been the name of many ships of the United States Navy. ...


The sixth was the battleship USS New York (BB 34), commissioned in 1914. She saw service in both World War I and World War II. She participated in atomic testing off the Bikini Islands surviving both an atmospheric explosion and an underwater detonation. She was used as a target ship in 1948 and was sunk off Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. For other uses, see Battleship (disambiguation). ... The fifth USS New York (BB-34) was a United States Navy battleship, the lead ship of her class of two (USS Texas (BB-35) being the other). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A 23 kiloton dropped nuclear weapon, known as Operation Crossroads (Event Able) A 21 kiloton underwater nuclear weapons effects test, known as Operation Crossroads (Event Baker), conducted at Bikini Atoll (1946). ... This article is about the harbor in Hawaii. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Finally, there was a Los Angeles-class nuclear attack submarine USS New York City (SSN 696) in service from 1979 until 1997 when she was decommissioned.[29][30] Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Los Angeles class submarines The Los Angeles class is a class of nuclear-powered fast attack submarines (SSN) that forms the backbone of the United States submarine fleet, and is the most numerous class of nuclear powered submarine in the world. ... USS New York City (SSN-696), a Los Angeles-class submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named specifically for New York City as distinct from the state. ...


See also

The United States Census Bureau has defined 6 Combined Statistical Areas (CSAs),[1] 12 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs),[2] and 15 Micropolitan Statistical Areas (μSAs)[3] in the State of New York. ... This is a list of sister states, regions, and cities in the U.S. state of New York. ...

References

  1. ^ New York State Motto. New York State Library (2001-01-29). Retrieved on 2007-11-16.
  2. ^ a b c Elevations and Distances in the United States. U.S Geological Survey (29 April 2005). Retrieved on November 6, 2006.
  3. ^ Pink spotted ladybug
  4. ^ Land and Water Area of States (2000). www.infoplease.com. Retrieved on 2008-04-11.
  5. ^ a b c Climate of New York. New York State Climate Office - Cornell University. Retrieved on April 10, 2008.
  6. ^ The New York Post. "A Breath of Fresh New York Air", 2007-06-03. Retrieved on 2007-06-06. 
  7. ^ a b Catskill Park History. www.catskillpark.org. Retrieved on April 11, 2008.
  8. ^ Declaration of Independence. www.history.com. Retrieved on April 10, 2008.
  9. ^ The Sullivan and Brodhead Expeditions. Pennsylvania Museum and Historical Commision. Retrieved on April 11, 2008.
  10. ^ Chen, David W. Battle Over Iroquois Land Claims Escalates [1] The New York Times. 16 May 2000. (accessed 11 April, 2008)
  11. ^ Happy Evacuation Day. New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. Retrieved on April 12, 2008.
  12. ^ New York's Ratification. The U.S. Constitution Online. Retrieved on April 10, 2008.
  13. ^ The Erie Canal: A Brief History. New York State Canals. Retrieved on April 10, 2008.
  14. ^ Estimates of Population Change for the United States and States, and for Puerto Rico and State Rankings: July 1, 2005 to July 1, 2006 (Excel Spreadsheet). Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  15. ^ New York Fact Sheet: NY agriculture income population food education employment farms top commodities exports counties financial indicators poverty organic farming farm income America USDA
  16. ^ Domestic Migration Flows for States from the 2005 ACS (Microsoft Word). Retrieved on 2007-10-19.
  17. ^ Population and Population Centers by State: 2000 (Text). Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  18. ^ DP-3. Profile of Selected Economic Characteristics: 2000, Geographic Area: New York (HTML). U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  19. ^ Awesome America: New York. Retrieved August 18, 2007.
  20. ^ Egon Mayer, Ph.D.; Barry A. Kosmin, Ph.D, Ariela Keysar, Ph.D. (2001). American Religious Identification Survey(Key Findings) (HTML) (English). The City University of New York. Retrieved on January 5, 2007.
  21. ^ New York: History, Geography, Population, and State Facts — Infoplease.com
  22. ^ The Bureau of Economic Analysis. "Gross Domestic Product (GDP) by State, 2005", 2006-8-26. Retrieved on 2007-02-08. 
  23. ^ 13 States Face Total Budget Shortfall of at Least $23 Billion in 2009; 11 Others Expect Budget Problems, 12/18/07, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
  24. ^ Office of the New York State Comptroller. "2006 Annual Report on Local Governments", 2006-11. Retrieved on 2006-11-14. 
  25. ^ New York City Finance Division. "A Fair Share State Budget: Does Albany Play Fair with NYC?", 2005-03-11. Retrieved on 2006-07-19. 
  26. ^ Federal Spending in Each State Per Dollar of Federal Taxes FY2005. Tax Foundation. Retrieved on April 12, 2008.
  27. ^ Powell, Michael. In N.Y., Lawmakers Vote Not to Reinstate Capital Punishment [2] The Washington Post. 13 April 2005. (accessed 11 April, 2008)
  28. ^ Opensecrets.org. "2006 Election Overview: Top Zip codes", 2005-05-16. Retrieved on 2006-07-19. 
  29. ^ TruthOrFiction.com. "A New Navy Ship, the USS New York, is Partly Built With Steel From the Ruins of the World Trade Center-Truth!", Unknown. Retrieved on 2007-10-19. 
  30. ^ globalsecurity.org. "LPD-21 New York", Unknown. 

This article is about the year. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Preceded by
Virginia
List of U.S. states by date of statehood
Ratified Constitution on July 26, 1788 (11th)
Succeeded by
North Carolina

Coordinates: 43°N 75°W / 43, -75 (New York) Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Nebraska (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Federal districts are subdivisions of a federal system of government. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... Motto Samoa, Muamua Le Atua(Samoan) Samoa, Let God Be First Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner, Amerika Samoa Capital Pago Pago; Fagatogo (seat of government) Official languages English, Samoan Government  -  Governor Togiola Tulafono United States unincorporated territory  -  Treaty of Berlin 1899   -  Deed of Cession of Tutuila 1900   -  Deed of Cession... Anthem: Gi Talo Gi Halom Tasi(Chamorro) Satil Matawal Pacifiko(Carolinian) Capital Saipan Official languages English, Chamorro, Carolinian Government Presidential representative democracy  -  Governor Benigno R. Fitial  -  Lt. ... For the board game, see Puerto Rico (board game). ... Motto United in Pride and Hope Anthem Virgin Islands March Capital (and largest city) Charlotte Amalie Official languages English Government  -  Head of State George W. Bush  -  Governor John de Jongh Organized, unincorporated territory  -  Revised Organic Act 22 July 1954  Area  -  Total 346. ... The flag of the United States is used for all of the United States Minor Outlying Islands The United States Minor Outlying Islands, a statistical designation defined by ISO 3166-1, consists of nine insular United States possessions: All of these islands are in the Pacific Ocean except Navassa Island... Bajo Nuevo Bank, also called the Petrel Islands, is located in the western United States and Jamaica. ... Baker Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°13′N 176°31′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Howland Island Howland Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°48′N 176°38′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Jarvis Island (formerly also known as Bunker Island[1]) is an uninhabited 4. ... Johnston Atoll is a 130 km² atoll in the North Pacific Ocean at 16°45′N 169°30′W, about one-third of the way from Hawaii to the Marshall Islands. ... The flag of the US is used for Kingman Reef Kingman Reef Kingman Reef—NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Kingman Reef is a one-square-kilometer tropical coral reef located in the North Pacific Ocean, roughly half way between Hawaiian Islands and American Samoa at 6°24... Orthographic projection centred over Midway. ... Navassa Island map from The World Factbook Navassa Island - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Navassa Island (La Navase in French, Lanavaz in Haitian Kreyòl) is a small, uninhabited island in the Caribbean Sea. ... Palmyra Atoll - Landsat Image N-03-05_2000 (1:50,000) Palmyra Atoll - Marplot Map (1:50,000) Orthographic projection over Palmyra Atoll Palmyra Atoll, is an incorporated atoll administered by the United States government. ... Serranilla Bank is a western Caribbean island located about 210 miles north-northeast of Nicaragua. ... USGS Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite image of Wake Island. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America and is... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...



  Results from FactBites:
 
The New York Times - Breaking News, World News & Multimedia (834 words)
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New York travel guide - Wikitravel (16001 words)
New York is easily one of the world's greatest cities, and is a major center for media, culture, food, fashion, art, research, finance and trade.
New York City is one of the global centers of international finance, politics, communications, music, fashion, and culture, and is among the world's most important and influential cities.
New York is the entertainment capital of the world, and no other city can match the number, range, and quality of its entertainment options.
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