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Encyclopedia > New Year's Day
New Year's Day
Observed by Almost all users of the Gregorian calendar and others
Type International
Significance The first day of the Gregorian year
Date January 1
Observances Making New Year's resolutions, parades, additional sporting events, fireworks
Related to New Year's Eve, the previous day

New Year's Day is the first day of the year. On the modern Gregorian calendar, it is celebrated on January 1, as it was also in ancient Rome (though other dates were also used in Rome). In all countries using the Gregorian calendar, except for Israel, it is a public holiday, often celebrated with fireworks at the stroke of midnight as the new year starts. January 1 on the Julian calendar corresponds to January 14 on the Gregorian calendar, and it is on that date that followers of some of the Eastern Orthodox churches celebrate the New Year. is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... New Years Day may refer to: New Years Day, January 1, the first day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the calendar of religious holidays and periods, see liturgical year. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... A New Years Resolution is a commitment that an individual makes to a project or a habit, often a lifestyle change that is generally interpreted as advantageous. ... For other articles with similar names, see New Year (disambiguation). ... A year (from Old English gēr) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... For the calendar of religious holidays and periods, see liturgical year. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The word holiday has related but different meanings in English-speaking countries, with the exception of the United States where usage differs greatly. ... For other uses, see Fireworks (disambiguation). ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Julian calendar was a reform of the Roman calendar which was introduced by Julius Caesar in 46 BC and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ...

Contents

Modern practices

January 1 marks the end of a period of remembrance of a particular passing year, especially on radio, television, and in newspapers, which usually starts right after Christmas Day. Publications often have year-end articles that review the changes during the previous year. Common topics include politics, natural disasters, music and the arts, and the listing of significant individuals who died during the past year. Often there are also articles on planned or expected changes in the coming year, such as the description of new laws that often take effect on January 1. is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Joseph and Mary with baby Jesus, at the first Christmas Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a holiday in the Christian calendar, usually observed on December 25, which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... Mount Pinatubo eruption, 1991 A natural disaster is according to or provided by nature. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... This article is about Arts as a group of disciplines. ... An obituary is a notice of the death of a person, usually published in a newspaper and usually including a short biography. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


This day is traditionally a religious feast, but since the 1900s has become an occasion for celebration the night of December 31, called New Year's Eve. There are often fireworks at midnight. Depending on the country, individuals may be allowed to burn fireworks, even if it is forbidden the rest of the year. A religious festival is a time of special importance marked by adherents to that religion. ... This article is about the decade starting in 1900 and ending in 1909. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other articles with similar names, see New Year (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fireworks (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fireworks (disambiguation). ...


It is also a memorable occasion to make New Year's resolutions, which they hope to fulfill in the coming year; the most popular ones in the western world include to stop tobacco smoking or drinking alcohol, or to lose weight or get physically fit.[1] A New Years Resolution is a commitment that an individual makes to a project or a habit, often a lifestyle change that is generally interpreted as advantageous. ... The cigarette is the most common method of smoking tobacco. ... Alcoholic beverages An alcoholic beverage is a drink containing ethanol, commonly known as alcohol, although in chemistry the definition of alcohol includes many other compounds. ... Weight loss, in the context of medicine or health or physical fitness, is a reduction of the total body weight, due to a mean loss of fluid, body fat or adipose tissue and/or lean mass, namely bone mineral deposits, muscle, tendon and other connective tissue. ... The term Exercise can refer to: Physical exercise such as running or strength training Exercise (options), the financial term for enacting and terminating a contract Category: ...


Many groups organize Polar Bear Dips on this day.


History

See also: Old Style and New Style dates, Julian year (calendar), and Lunisolar calendar

Originally observed on March 15 in the old Roman Calendar, New Year's Day first came to be fixed in January 1, 153 BC, when the two Roman consuls, after whom - in the Roman calendar - years were named and numbered, began to be chosen on that date, for military reasons. However, dates in March, coinciding with the first day of spring, or commemorating the Annunciation of Jesus, along with a variety of Christian feast dates were used throughout the Middle Ages, though calendars often continued to display the months in columns running from January to December in the Roman fashion. Old Style redirects here. ... A Julian year is on average 365. ... A lunisolar calendar is a calendar whose date indicates both the moon phase and the time of the solar year. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Roman calendar changed its form several times in the time between the foundation of Rome and the fall of the Roman Empire. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC - 150s BC - 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC Years: 158 BC 157 BC 156 BC 155 BC 154 BC - 153 BC - 152 BC 151 BC... This article is about the Roman rank. ... For other uses, see Annunciation (disambiguation). ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... For other uses, see January (disambiguation). ... Look up December in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Among the 7th-century druidic pagans of Flanders and the Netherlands it was the custom to exchange gifts at the New Year, a pagan custom deplored by Saint Eligius (died 659 or 660), who warned the Flemings and Dutchmen, "[Do not] make vetulas, [little figures of the Old Woman], little deer or iotticos or set tables [for the house-elf, compare Puck] at night or exchange New Year gifts or supply superfluous drinks [another Yule custom]." The quote is from the vita of Eligius written by his companion Ouen. The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... In the Celtic religion, the modern words Druidry or Druidism denote the practices of the ancient druids, the priestly class in ancient Celtic societies through much of Western Europe north of the Alps and in the British Isles. ... For other uses, see Flanders (disambiguation). ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain... Signature of St. ... Events Ealdormen in Mercia proclaim Wulfhere king, and throw off Northumbrian rule. ... Events Childeric II proclaimed king of Austrasia. ... It has been suggested that Puck (Shakespeare) be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Yule (disambiguation) and Jul (disambiguation). ...


Most countries in Western Europe officially adopted January 1 as New Year's Day somewhat before they adopted the Gregorian calendar. This is sometimes called Circumcision Style, because this was the date of the Feast of the Circumcision, being the eighth day counting from December 25.[citation needed] is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the calendar of religious holidays and periods, see liturgical year. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Other celebrations on January 1

Some churches celebrate the Feast of the Circumcision of Christ on January 1, based on the belief that Jesus was born on December 25, and that, according to Jewish tradition, his circumcision would have taken place on the eighth day of his life (which would be January 1). The Catholic church has also given the name Feast of the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God to their holy day on January 1. is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God also known as the Solemnity of the Holy Mother of God is a Christian feast celebrated on January 1 on the Roman Catholic liturgical calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Specific, high-profile or common celebrations

New Year's Day

  • Aries in the Hindu month of Chithrai (mid April) and observed for more than 5100 years in Kali Yuga. The Hindus of Nepal begin their new year Nava Varsha in the third week of March, and the people of Kashmir start the Kashmiri Lunar year - Navreh - in the second week of March. The southern Indian states of Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh begin their new year - Ugadi - in late March or early April. The Maharashtrians celebrate their new year Gudi Padwa, during the same time
  • In England and Scotland an extra round of football fixtures is played (unless New Year's Day falls on a Friday or Sunday).
  • In Pasadena, California, United States, the Tournament of Roses is held, with revelers viewing the parade from the streets and watching on television, followed by the Rose Bowl football game.
  • The aforementioned Rose Bowl football game is one of several postseason bowl games played in college football in the United States (though in recent years it, due to its involvement in the BCS, has not always fallen on New Year's Day; changes in the BCS mean that the Rose Bowl will return as a perennial New Year's Day fixture).
  • Vienna New Year Concert, in Austria.
  • Polar Bear Clubs: in many northern hemisphere cities near bodies of water, they will have a tradition of people plunging into the cold water on New Year's Day. The Coney Island Polar Bears Club in New York is the oldest cold-water swimming club in the United States. They have had groups of people enter the chilly surf since 1903.
  • In Philadelphia, the Mummers Parade is held on Broad Street.
  • Hindu New Year, which falls at the time and date Sun enters Mesha.
  • Hindus celebrate the new year by paying respects to their parents and other elders and seek their blessings. They also exchange tokens of Good Wishes (Kai Vishesham).
  • The New Year's Day Parade is held in London. Performers include acts from each of the city's 32 boroughs, as well as entertainment from around the world.

For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... There is also the Roses Tournament in England Perhaps one of the United States of Americas most important annual festivities, The Tournament of Roses Parade is the 114-year-old traditional parade generally held on New Years Day in Pasadena, California. ... United States Marines on parade. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article covers college football played in the United States. ... BCS Logo 2006-Present with logo of Television Rightsholder Fox Broadcasting Company The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) is a selection system designed to pair the top two teams in college football against each other in the BCS National Championship Game, with the winner crowned the BCS national champion. ... The New Year Concert (in German: Das Neujahrskonzert der Wiener Philharmoniker) of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra is a concert that takes place each year in the morning of January 1 in Vienna, Austria. ... For other uses, see Coney Island (disambiguation). ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... A group of comic mummers in the 2005 parade The Mummers Parade is held each New Years Day in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... The New Years Day Parade is parade of 10,000 performers through the streets of the West End of London which takes place annually on 1 January. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...

New Year's Eve

Main article: New Year's Eve
Sydney leads the world in one of the first major New Year celebrations each year.
Sydney leads the world in one of the first major New Year celebrations each year.
Taipei 101 New Year's fireworks, 2008, Taipei, Taiwan.
Taipei 101 New Year's fireworks, 2008, Taipei, Taiwan.
  • In Brazil, two major cities, Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, celebrate the New Year. Most famous is the celebration in Rio de Janeiro which occurs in Copacabana beach, drawing 1.5 to 2.5 million people.
  • In Australia, celebrations are held around the nation, especially in Sydney, where one of the world's largest fireworks displays draws 1 to 1.5 million people to the harbour. Australia is one of the first countries in the world to celebrate the new year.
  • In New York City, the world famous 1,070-pound, 6-foot-diameter Waterford crystal ball located high above Times Square is lowered starting at 11:59:00 p.m., or the last minute of the year, and reaches the bottom of its tower at the stroke of midnight. It is sometimes referred to as "the big apple" like the city itself; the custom derives from the time signal that used to be given at noon in harbors.
  • Other ball drops occur in Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro and Sydney Harbour.
  • In The Netherlands, Denmark and other European countries, the New Year is greeted with massive private fireworks. This day is also the occasion to make bonfires of discarded Christmas trees in some countries.
  • In Russia the New Year is greeted by fireworks and drinking champagne. The New Year is considered a family celebration, with lavish dinner tables and gifts. The president of Russia normally counts down the final seconds of the "old year", as it is called in Russia. A giant clock tower chimes in the new year, and it is customary to make a wish with each chime.
  • In South Korea, the most popular way of celebrating New Year's Day is to travel to Jung dong jin, the place on the peninsula where the sun can first be seen each day.
  • Junkanoo parade, in Nassau, Bahamas.
  • Some mayors in North America hold New Year levees.
  • In Scotland, there are many special customs associated with the New Year. For more information, see Hogmanay, the Scots name for the New Year celebration.
  • Japanese New Year in Japan.
  • The Peach Drop in Underground Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia, United States.
  • In Davos, Switzerland, the final match of the Spengler Cup Ice Hockey Tournament is usually held on this day by tradition.
  • In the Philippines, people light fireworks, loud firecrackers, booming sound system, bamboo canons as well as make a lot of noise to ward off evil spirits. Coins are also jumbled in tin cans to make noise with the belief that this will bring more money to the revelers.
  • One of the few Western nations that uses the Gregorian calendar for business but does not formally celebrate a Dec 31/Jan 1 New Years holiday is Israel, this mainly due to objections by religious parties on the holiday's Christian religious origins. However, many secular Israelis do partake in some sort of informal celebration, especially if they have European or North American origins.
  • It is also very popular to kiss loved ones on New Years Eve to celebrate love and happiness.

For other articles with similar names, see New Year (disambiguation). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Sydney_New_Year's_Eve_2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Sydney_New_Year's_Eve_2. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Taipei 101 (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: TáibÄ›i YÄ«língyÄ«; Wade-Giles: Tai-pei I-ling-i) is a 101-floor landmark skyscraper located in Taipei, the capital of Taiwan. ... For other uses, see Fireworks (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city. ... This article is about the Brazilian city. ... This article is about the city. ... This article is about the Brazilian city. ... , Famous Portuguese pavement wave pattern at Copacabana beach. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The world-famous Waterford Crystal Ball is lowered in Times Square, New York City, on New Years Eve Waterford Crystal is a trademark brand of crystal glassware produced in Waterford, Ireland, by the company Waterford Wedgwood plc. ... For other uses, see Times Square (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Midnight (disambiguation) Midnight, literally the middle of the night, is a time arbitrarily designated to determine the end of a day and the beginning of the next in some, mainly Western, cultures. ... Noon is the time exactly halfway through the day, written 12:00 in the 24-hour clock and 12:00 noon in the 12-hour clock. ... , Famous Portuguese pavement wave pattern at Copacabana beach. ... This article is about the Brazilian city. ... For other uses, see Port Jackson (disambiguation). ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fireworks (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Christmas tree (disambiguation). ... Junkanoo is a street parade with music, which occurs in many towns across the Bahamas every Boxing Day (December 26) and New Years Day. ... United States Marines on parade. ... For other uses of Nassau, see Nassau (disambiguation). ... The levée was a ceremony commonly held in European high society, constituting a morning assembly or reception given by kings and important nobles. ... This article is about the country. ... Hogmanay (pronounced — with the main stress on the last syllable - hog-muh-NAY) is the Scots word for the last day of the year and is synonymous with the celebration of the New Year (Gregorian calendar) in the Scottish manner. ... This article is about the Anglic language of Scotland. ... The kadomatsu is a traditional decoration for the new year holiday. ... The Peach Drop is the name for the downtown Atlanta New Years Eve celebration. ... Underground Atlanta entrance Underground Atlanta is a shopping and entertainment complex in the Five Points neighborhood of downtown Atlanta, Georgia, near the intersection of the MARTA rail lines. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... Davos viewed from air Davos is a town in eastern Switzerland, in the canton of Graubünden, on the Landwasser River. ... Spengler Cup is an annual ice hockey tournament held in Davos, Switzerland. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... A tournament is a competition involving a relatively large number of competitors, all participating in a single sport or game. ... For the calendar of religious holidays and periods, see liturgical year. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... The European peoples are the various nations and ethnic groups of Europe. ... North American redirects here. ...

Images associated with New Year's Day

In the United States, a common image used is that of an incarnation of Father Time (or the "Old Year") wearing a sash across his chest with the previous year printed on it passing on his duties to the Baby New Year (or the "New Year"), an infant wearing a sash with the new year printed on it. This article is about the personification of time. ... A typical depiction of the Baby New Year for 2006. ...


New Year's babies

People born on New Year's Day are commonly called New Year babies. Many hospitals give out prizes to the first baby born in that hospital in the new year. These prizes are often donated by local businesses. Prizes may include various baby related items such as baby formula, baby blankets, gift certificates to stores which specialize in baby related merchandise, and diapers. An infant being fed by bottle. ... For other uses, see Blanket (disambiguation). ... Scrip is any substitute for currency, which is not legal tender. ... Baby cloth diaper filled with extra cloth. ...


See also

Holidays Portal
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
New year celebrations
Wikinews has related news:
World celebrates new year for gregorian calendar

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... For other uses, see New Year (disambiguation). ... For other articles with similar names, see New Year (disambiguation). ... Persepolis all nations stair case. ... Enkutatash is the first day of the New Year in Ethiopia. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Nativity of the Lord redirects here. ...

References

  1. ^ Popular New Year's Resolutions on USA.gov

External links

  • Holiday Origins as celebrated in the United States
  • Ringing in 1977 in Times Square @ You Tube
  • Keeping New Year's Resolutions

  Results from FactBites:
 
New Years Day (983 words)
The Romans continued to observe the new year in late March, but their calendar was continually tampered with by various emperors so that the calendar soon became out of synchronization with the sun.
New Years is still observed as the Feast of Christ's Circumcision by some denominations.
The use of an image of a baby with a New Years banner as a symbolic representation of the new year was brought to early America by the Germans.
New Years (453 words)
Although the new year has been celebrated since prehistoric times, it was celebrated on the vernal equinox rather than what we now consider the first of the year.
Years later, Julius Caesar wanted to change the date to a more logical date but that year, January 1, 45 BC was the date of a new moon.
New Year Resolutions is simply another way to wish away the past in exchange for hopes of the future.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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