FACTOID # 5: Minnesota and Connecticut are both in the top 5 in saving money and total tax burden per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > New Wave (science fiction)

New Wave science fiction was characterised by a high degree of experimentation, both in form and in content, and a highbrow and self-consciously "literary" or artistic sensibility previously comparatively alien to the science fiction aesthetic. The term "New Wave" is borrowed from film criticism's nouvelle vague: films characterised by the work of Jean-Luc Godard, François Truffaut, and others. It was later applied to 1970s punk rock in the UK and to new wave music. The New Wave writers saw themselves as part of the general literary tradition and often openly mocked the traditions of pulp science fiction, which they regarded as stodgy, irrelevant and unambitious. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Highbrow is a colloquial synonym for intellectual. ... The New Wave (French: Nouvelle vague) of French cinema was a cinematic movement of the 1960s. ... Jean-Luc Godard (photograph by David Horvitz) Jean-Luc Godard (born 3 December 1930 in Paris) is a Franco-Swiss filmmaker and one of the most influential members of the Nouvelle Vague, or French New Wave. Born in Paris to Franco-Swiss parents, he was educated in Nyon, later studying... François Truffaut. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

Predecessors

Ray Bradbury, Theodore Sturgeon, Fritz Leiber, Algis Budrys (especially for his novel Rogue Moon with its use of Freudianism), and Alfred Bester can be considered as important precursors of the movement. Ray Douglas Bradbury (born August 22, 1920) is an American fantasy, horror, science fiction, and mystery writer best known for The Martian Chronicles, a 1950 book which has been described both as a short story collection and a novel, and his 1953 dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451. ... Theodore Sturgeon (February 26, 1918 Staten Island, New York – May 8, 1985) was an American science fiction author. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Falling Torch (1959) Algis Budrys (born January 9, 1931) is an American science fiction author. ... Rogue Moon is a short science fiction novel by Algis Budrys, published in 1960. ... Sigmund Freud His famous couch Sigmund Freud (May 6, 1856 - September 23, 1939) was an Austrian neurologist and the founder of the psychoanalytic school of psychology, a movement that popularized the theory that unconscious motives control much behavior. ... Alfred Bester Alfred Bester (born December 18, 1913 in New York City, died September 30, 1987) was a science fiction author and the winner of the first Hugo Award in 1953 for his novel The Demolished Man. ...


In his introduction to a reprint of Leigh Brackett's Martian Quest, Michael Moorcock, the editor of New Worlds (and thus the New Wave's prime instigator), wrote "With Catherine Moore, Judith Merril and Cele Goldsmith, Leigh Brackett is one of the true godmothers of the New Wave. Anyone who thinks they're pinching one of my ideas is probably pinching one of hers." Leigh Brackett (December 7, 1915 - March 18, 1978), was a writer of fantasy and science fiction, mystery novels and - best known to the general public - Hollywood screenplays, most notably The Big Sleep (1945), Rio Bravo (1959), The Long Goodbye (1973) and The Empire Strikes Back (1980). ... Michael John Moorcock (born December 18, 1939) is a prolific British writer of both science fiction and science fantasy. ... New Worlds was a British Science Fiction Magazine which was first published professionally in 1946. ... Catherine Lucille Moore (January 24, 1911 – April 4, 1987) was an American science fiction and fantasy writer. ... Judith Merril (January 21, 1923, New York, New York - September 12, 1997, Canada) was an North American science fiction author and anthologist. ... Cele Goldsmith-Lalli (1933 – January 14, 2002) was an US-American editor. ...


Beat writer William S. Burroughs would prove very inspirational, so much so that Philip José Farmer in "The Jungle Rot Kid on the Nod" and Barrington J. Bayley's "The Four Colour Problem" (Bayley's most acclaimed work of fiction, which appeared in New Worlds) wrote pastiches of the elder writer's work and J. G. Ballard published an admiring essay in New Worlds. (Burroughs had earlier expressed admiration for Bayeley's short novel Star Virus.) Burroughs' use of experimentatation such as the cut-up technique and his appropriation of science fiction tropes in radical ways proved the extent to which prose fiction could prove revolutionary. In this, the more extreme New Wave writers sought to emulate his example. The Beat Generation was a group of American writers who came to prominence in the late 1950s and early 1960s. ... William Seward Burroughs II (pronounced ) (February 5, 1914 – August 2, 1997) was an American novelist, essayist, social critic, painter and spoken word performer. ... Philip José Farmer (born January 26, 1918) is an American author, principally known for his science fiction and fantasy novels and short stories. ... Barrington John Bayley was born in 1937 in Birmingham, United Kingdom. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... J.G. Ballard James Graham Ballard (born November 15, 1930 in Shanghai) is a British writer. ... The cut-up technique is a literary form or method in which a text is cut up at random and rearranged to create a new text. ...


History

Growing as a trickle more than a flood, New Wave began in 1964, when Michael Moorcock took over as editor for the British science fiction magazine New Worlds. While the American magazines Amazing Stories with Cele Goldsmith as editor and the respected The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction which had from the very start had a leaning towards unusually literary stories, Moorcock turned that into a concerted policy. No other science fiction magazine seek as consistently to distance itself from traditional science fiction as much as New Worlds. By the time it ceased regular publication it had more or less transcended the science fiction genre, styling itself as an experimental literary journal. 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Amazing Stories magazine, sometimes retitled Amazing Science Fiction, began in April 1926, becoming the first science fiction magazine and one of the pioneers of science fiction in the United States. ... F&SF April 1971, special Poul Anderson issue. ...


The content of New Wave rejected the core concerns of traditional science fiction ("outer space"), in favour of a focus on taboo breaking and a more people focused approach ("innerspace"). Central concerns (and of William S. Burroughs, before it) of the New Wave was entropy, the idea that the universe (and human societies) will irrevocably run down, as well as a fascination with mass media itself. In thermodynamics, entropy, symbolized by S, is a state function of a thermodynamic system defined by the differential quantity , where dQ is the amount of heat absorbed in a reversible process in which the system goes from the one state to another, and T is the absolute temperature. ... Mass media is a term used to denote, as a class, that section of the media specifically conceived and designed to reach a very large audience (typically at least as large as the whole population of a nation state). ...


The New Wave also had a political subtext. Brian Aldiss, Thomas Disch, Michael Moorcock and other key figures in the British New Wave came from various Marxist and socialist political traditions; their disdain for genre SF was partly a maneuver against American cultural hegemony and what the New Wavers considered "conservatism" in "Campbellian" sf with its faith in and obsession with, technoscience. In the U.S., the New Wave would be closely associated with opposition to the Vietnam War and leftwing political activism. Brian Aldiss at 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005. ... Thomas M. Disch Thomas M. Disch (February 2, 1940 – ) is an American science fiction author. ... Marxism is the political practice and social theory based on the works of Karl Marx, a 19th century philosopher, economist, journalist, and revolutionary, along with Friedrich Engels. ... Socialism is a social and economic system (or the political philosophy advocating such a system) in which the economic means of production are owned and controlled collectively by the people. ... Cultural hegemony is the concept that a diverse culture can be ruled or dominated by one group or class, that everyday practices and shared beliefs provide the foundation for complex systems of domination. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


The New Wave peaked around 1971. It must be noted that Ursula K. Le Guin, Harlan Ellison, and Michael Moorcock continued to be exceedingly popular in the science fiction community. 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... Ursula Kroeber Le Guin (born October 21, 1929) is an American author. ... Harlan Jay Ellison (born May 27, 1934) is a prolific American writer of short stories, novellas, essays, and criticism. ... Michael John Moorcock (born December 18, 1939) is a prolific British writer of both science fiction and science fantasy. ...


The New Wave movement started to explore many subjects, including sex in science fiction, in ways that were previously unthinkable. Harlan Ellison's anthology Dangerous Visions was an important milestone. With its publication in 1967, the New Wave broke--it smashed taboos relentlessly, holding no regard for any sort of boundaries. The styles of the authors varied, but one thing held common for everyone: they had something to say, and they said it. What was more, it also collected three Hugo Awards, one for Best Novelette, one forBest Novella and one special award. Modern science fiction frequently involves themes of sex, gender and sexuality. ... Dangerous Visions (ISBN 0-425-06176-0) was a path-breaking science fiction short story anthology edited by Harlan Ellison and published in 1967. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... Gonna Roll the Bones is a short story by Fritz Leiber, in which Joe Slattermill plays craps with Death. ... Riders of the Purple Wage was a science fiction novella by Philip José Farmer. ...


Anthologies were particularly important because most of the best work of the New Wave was produced in short-story length. This is partly because magazines buying primarily short fiction were to remain the most most important SF market until the post-Star Wars publishing boom around 1980, but there were artistic reasons as well. The stylistic daring and experimentalism the movement valued were more difficult to sustain at novel length, and all too many of the attempts became ambitious flops. The cover of the 2004 DVD widescreen release of the revamped original Star Wars Trilogy. ...


Among works frequently cited as particularly important to the New Wave are John Brunner's Stand on Zanzibar, Philip Jose Farmer's Riders of the Purple Wage, Thomas M. Disch's 334, Samuel R. Delany's Dhalgren, Langdon Jones's The Great Clock; Harlan Ellison's I have No Mouth And I Must Scream; J.G. Ballard's "The Voices of Time"; Brian Aldiss's The Dark Light Years; Fritz Leiber's One Station of the Way. The Dangerous Visions anthology (and its sequel, Again, Dangerous Visions) remain especially noteworthy. John Brunner John Kilian Houston Brunner (September 24, 1934 – August 26, 1995) was a prolific British author of science fiction novels and stories. ... Cover art. ... Riders of the Purple Wage was a science fiction novella by Philip José Farmer. ... For the novel by Thomas M. Disch see 334 (novel). ... Samuel Ray Chip Delany, Jr. ... Dhalgren is a science fiction novel by Samuel R. Delany. ... The Voices of Time is a dystopian science fiction short story by J. G. Ballard. ... Dangerous Visions was a path-breaking science fiction short story anthology edited by Harlan Ellison and published in 1967. ...


Several factors may have contributed to the "death" of New Wave science fiction. One factor was its assimilation into the larger science fiction mainstream. A second factor was the passing of the radicalism of the 1960s in art as well as life. The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ...


The New Wave's demise may have been hastened by conscious reaction against it in the SF mainstream. Lester del Rey, an influential editor (who had himself enough had a story in Ellison's first Dangerous Visions anthology), led a conscious effort to re-assert genre traditions in the 1970s and early 1980s. By a neo-Campbellian revival of hard science fiction after 1982 at the hands of David Brin, Gregory Benford, Greg Bear and others had emerged. On the other hand, cyberpunk, a movement popularized by Gardner Dozois and editor Ellen Datlow had made it clear that "the rebellion" had taken on a radical new form. Lester del Rey (Ramon Felipe Alvarez-del Rey) (June 2, 1915 - May 10, 1993) was an American science fiction author and editor. ... Hard science fiction, or hard SF, is a subgenre of science fiction characterized by an interest in scientific detail or accuracy, being the opposite of soft science fiction. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... David Brin Glen David Brin (born October 6, 1950) is a well-known American author of science fiction. ... Gregory Benford (born January 30, 1941) is a science fiction author and physicist who is on the faculty of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of California, Irvine. ... Gregory Dale Bear (born August 20, 1951) is a science fiction author. ... Berlins Sony Center in Potsdamer Platz reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ... Gardner Dozois (born July 23, 1947) is an American science fiction author and editor. ... Ellen Datlow (born 1949) is an American speculative fiction editor and anthologist. ...


After-effects

Some have seen the emergence of cyberpunk literature as a sequel of sorts to the aims of the New Wave movement. Cyberpunk incorporated several of New Wave's "ancestors", namely Burroughs and Alfred Bester and partially embraced New Wave proponents Harlan Ellison and Samuel R. Delany. Berlins Sony Center in Potsdamer Platz reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ...


A more important effect of the movement was to broaden the range of acceptable themes and styles in genre SF. While the New Wavers never achieved the thoroughgoing disruption of genre conventions they were aiming for, they helped make it possible for post-New-Wave SF writers to tackle previously tabooed subjects and to use techniques such stream-of-consciousness narration and unreliable narrators. Even the neo-Campbellian revivalists who had set themselves most directly against the New Wave's political and aesthetic program eventually benefitted from the new freedom. In literary criticism, stream of consciousness denotes a literary technique which seeks to describe an individuals point of view by giving the written equivalent of the characters thought processes. ... In literature and film, an unreliable narrator (a term coined by Wayne C. Booth in his 1961 book The Rhetoric of Fiction[1]) is a literary device in which the credibility of the narrator, either first-person or third-person, is seriously compromised. ...


The current New Weird movement and the genre of slipstream fiction occupies a space similar to that of the New Wave movement, in releationship to the mainstream of science fiction and fantasy. However, they have a far less adversial relationship to their "parent" genres. The New Weird is an avant-garde literary movement or literary genre presently in progress. ... Slipstream is a term for a style of fiction which pushes conventional genre boundaries and doesnt sit comfortably within the confines of either science fiction/fantasy, or mainstream literary fiction. ...


Significant New Wave authors

Brian Aldiss at 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005. ... J.G. Ballard James Graham Ballard (born November 15, 1930 in Shanghai) is a British writer. ... John Brunner John Kilian Houston Brunner (September 24, 1934 – August 26, 1995) was a prolific British author of science fiction novels and stories. ... Samuel Ray Chip Delany, Jr. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American science fiction writer. ... Thomas M. Disch Thomas Michael Disch (Born February 2, 1940) is an American science fiction author and poet. ... Harlan Jay Ellison (born May 27, 1934) is a prolific American writer of short stories, novellas, essays, and criticism. ... Philip José Farmer (born January 26, 1918) is an American author, principally known for his science fiction and fantasy novels and short stories. ... At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Harry Harrison (born Henry Maxwell Dempsey, March 12, 1925 in Stamford, Connecticut) is an American science fiction author who has lived in many parts of the world including Mexico, England, Denmark and Italy. ... Michael John Harrison (July 26, 1945, Warwickshire ), is a UK science fiction author, fantasy author and literary fiction author, who writes as M. John Harrison. // Biography and writing career Harrisons first story was published in 1966. ... Raphael Aloysius Lafferty (November 7, 1914 - March 18, 2002) was a noted science fiction and fantasy writer of Irish descent, famous for his original use of language, metaphor, and narrative structure[1], as well as for his etymological wit. ... Ursula Kroeber Le Guin (born October 21, 1929) is an American author. ... For the former head of the Grenadian security forces, see Keith Roberts (Grenada). ... Joanna Russ (born February 22, 1937), American writer and feminist, is the author of a number of works of Science Fiction (among other types of writing), including The Female Man, an aclaimed SF novel and pioneering meditation on how differing societies might produce very different versions of the same person... At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Robert Silverberg (January 15, 1935, Brooklyn, New York) is a prolific American author best known for writing science fiction, a multiple winner of both the Hugo and Nebula Awards. ... Norman Richard Spinrad (born September 15, 1940) is an American science fiction author. ... Roger Joseph Zelazny (May 13, 1937 – June 14, 1995) was an American writer of fantasy and science fiction short stories and novels. ...

See also

Feminist science fiction is a subgenre of science fiction written from a specifically feminist viewpoint and often relating to issues of particular concern to feminists, such as gender and queer studies family and social structures and controls on the individual the individuals relation and ability to control their body...

Reference

  • Colin Greenland, The Entropy Exhibition: Michael Moorcock and the British New Wave in Science Fiction. Routledge, 1983. ISBN 0-7100-9310-1

  Results from FactBites:
 
Topics (278 words)
New Wave science fiction was an attempt to move the genre in a more mature direction.
New Wave stories often extrapolate from the soft sciences such as psychology and sociology, rather than from the hard sciences popular during Golden Age science fiction.
Other common themes in New Wave science fiction represent a backlash against the utopic tendencies of Golden Age science fiction, including a lack of faith in man’s intelligence, a general distrust of science and technology, and a disbelief in the perfectibility of the human race.
Science Fiction : the New Wave and Its Aftermath (910 words)
The introduction of sex into science fiction opened the way for a number of strikingly original investigations of gender, relationships, and the construction of identity.
Delany is the first science fiction writer to enter the field as a novelist rather than a short story writer.
Levin is a mainstream author of science fiction and horror; many of his novels have been made into very successful popular films.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m