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Encyclopedia > New South Wales Police
New South Wales Police Force
New South Wales Police logo
Culpam Poena Premit Comes
("Punishment Follows Guilt Swiftly")
Established: 1862
Headed by: Commissioner Ken Moroney
Ministry: Police
Headquarters: 1 Charles Street,
Parramatta, NSW 2150
Stations: 500+
Employees: 18,500
Major units:
  • Counter Terrorist and Disaster Victim Identification Unit
  • Crime Stoppers Unit
  • Missing Persons Unit
  • Mounted Police Unit
  • Negotiation Unit
  • Police Rescue & Bomb Disposal Unit
  • State Protection Support Unit
  • Tactical Operations Unit
http://www.police.nsw.gov.au

The New South Wales Police Force (NSW Police Force; previously New South Wales Police Service & New South Wales Police) is the primary law enforcement agency in the State of New South Wales, Australia. It is an agency of the Government of New South Wales within the New South Wales Ministry for Police. Divided into eighty Local Area Commands (LAC),[1] the NSW Police Force consists of over five hundred local police stations and covers an area of 801,600 square kilometres whilst serving the state's population of seven million people.[2] Image File history File links Nswpolicebadge. ... Crime Stoppers is a community policing initiative that commenced operation in the Australian state of Victoria in 1987, it has been operating Australia wide since 1998. ... SPG subdued shoulder patch State Protection Group (SPG) is the special operations division of the Australian New South Wales Police. ... SPG subdued shoulder patch State Protection Group (SPG) is the special operations division of the Australian New South Wales Police. ... SPG subdued shoulder patch State Protection Group (SPG) is the special operations division of the Australian New South Wales Police. ... SPG subdued shoulder patch State Protection Group (SPG) is the special operations division of the Australian New South Wales Police. ... For the band, see The Police. ... Capital Sydney Government Const. ... The form of the Government of New South Wales is prescribed in its Constitution, which dates from 1856, although it has been amended many times since then. ... The New South Wales Ministry for Police is a ministry of the Government of New South Wales. ...


Under the Police Regulation Act (1862), the organisation of the NSW Police Force was formally established in 1862 with the unification of all existing independent police units within New South Wales. The authority and responsibility of the entire police force was given to the Inspector General of Police.[3] Presently, the Commissioner of Police controls the police force. 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


The current Commissioner of Police is Ken Moroney APM and the Cabinet Minister of the State Government responsible for the policing portfolio is John Watkins. As of 2006, the NSW Police Force consists of approximately 14,454 officers.[1] However, due to the growing number of violent attacks in the state in 2006, the president of the New South Wales Police Association, Bob Pritchard, commented on January 7, 2007, that the state is "very short of police and that there is a need to increase the number of police officers throughout the state significantly".[4] Ken Moroney AO APM is and has been the Commissioner of the New South Wales Police in Australia since 2002. ... John Arthur Watkins (born December 7, 1955) is an Australian Labor Party member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly, presently holding the seat of Ryde. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New South Wales Police Association was formed in 1922 and is the industrial association representing over 99 percent of the sworn police officers in the State of New South Wales, Australia. ... January 7 is the seventh day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

Mission and authority

The motto of the NSW Police is Culpam Poena Premit Comes. When translated from Latin to English, it means "Punishment Follows Guilt Swiftly". The insignia of the NSW Police Force also depicts this sentiment. Its coat of arms features the state badge of New South Wales, a soaring eagle carrying a scroll with the word Nemesis, a wreath and the Crown of the Queen of Australia.[5] A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... Elizabeth II, Queen of Australia, in 1952 and 2002 The title Queen of Australia has existed since 1973, when the Parliament of Australia passed the Royal Style and Titles Act (1973). ...


The overall mission of the NSW Police Force is to protect the community and property of the state of New South Wales. Services provided by the NSW Police include:[2]

  • Preventing, detecting and investigating crime;
  • Monitoring and promoting road safety;
  • Maintaining social order; and
  • Performing and coordinating emergency and rescue operations.

Further policing duties performed are traffic control, intelligence analysis and anti-terrorist negotiation.


Like all other States of Australia, municipalities and shires in NSW have no or very limited law enforcement responsibilities. The Australian Federal Police is relatively unobtrusive and is not very visible in the day to day lives of New South Welsh residents. Therefore, state police forces—the NSW Police Force included—are much more powerful and ubiquitous than equivalent state or provincial police forces in other federal nations such as the United States or Canada, where the total law enforcement task is more evenly shared among three or four tiers of government. The NSW Police Force are arguably the highest profile police jurisdiction in the country. The Australian Federal Police (AFP) is the federal or Commonwealth police force of Australia. ...


Authoritative powers of the NSW Police Force are controlled and described by the law as set out by the State Government. When exercising their powers, the police officers must adhere to the legislation imposed on the police body, the NSW Police Force policies, procedures and other documents such as the Aboriginal Policy Statement and Strategic Plan, the Youth Policy Statement and the Disability Action Plan.[6]


History

The NSW Police Force has existed in various forms since the foundation of the colony of New South Wales at Sydney in 1788. In order to protect the infant town against thieves and petty criminals after dark, Governor Arthur Phillip authorised the formation of a nightwatch in August 1789, consisting of eight of the best-behaved convicts.[7] After his appointment as the new governor of New South Wales, Governor Lachlan Macquarie restructured the police force in January 1811, setting up a basic system of ranks and control. Police units were under the rule of the district magistrates. The Sydney Opera House on Sydney Harbour Sydney (pronounced ) is the most populous city in Australia with a metropolitan area population of over 4. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Admiral Arthur Phillip (1786 portrait by Francis Wheatley, National Portrait Gallery, London) Admiral Arthur Phillip, RN (11 October 1738 – 31 August 1814) was a British naval officer and colonial administrator. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Major General Lachlan Macquarie, Governor of New South Wales Major-General Lachlan Macquarie CB (31 January 1762 – 1 July 1824), British military officer and colonial administrator, served as Governor of New South Wales from 1810 to 1821 and had a leading role in the social, economic and architectural development of...


Responding to the various forms of crime, a number of independent specialised units were set up. The earliest of these units formed was the Mounted Police. Established in 1825, the Mounted Police was amongst the most important police units created to keep the settlers safe and to guard road transportation. Other specialist groups formed during this time were the Water Police (formed in 1832), the Border Police (formed in 1839) and the Native Police (formed in 1848).[7]


As the colony expanded, a more sophisticated form of crime management was called for, which involved unifying all the police units into a single cohesive police force with the centralisation of authority. After a failed attempt made by Act No. 38 of 1850, a unified control of the police finally eventuated in 1862 when the Police Regulation Act (1862) was passed, establishing the New South Wales Police Force. An Inspector General of Police was appointed to assume the authority and responsibility of the entire police force, the first of whom being John McLerie. The Police Regulation (Amendment) Act, passed in 1935, changed the official title of Inspector General of Police to Commissioner of Police with its role clearly defined. In addition, the position of Deputy Commissioner was also created.[8]


By 1872, seventy police stations existed throughout the colony in various sub-districts with a total of 803 police officers. In 1915, the first female police officers were appointed. The number of members of the Police Force increased to 5717 in 1961. The Police Force celebrated its centenary the following year, which now maintains 507 police stations in New South Wales.[9]


In 1990, the Police Service Act was introduced to replace the Police Regulation Act. The New South Wales Police Force was consequently renamed to the New South Wales Police Service, which reflected "community-based policing at the time" of the Greiner Government[10] and the public's responsilibity in crime control, aided by the police.[11] In accordance with the Police Service Amendment (NSW Police) Bill in 2002, the New South Wales Police Service was then renamed again to simply New South Wales Police.[12] The then Minister for Police, Michael Costa, explains:[13] Nicholas Franciscus Hugo Greiner (born April 27, 1947) was the parliamentary leader of the Liberal Party in New South Wales, Australia and also Premier from 1988 to 1992. ...

"NSW Police" is the name on which everybody signed off and it is the name with which we were to come to the Parliament... I do not believe we need the word "service" in the name of the police force. I do not accept the argument that we need the word "service" in a community-based policing approach.

In 2006, the Police Amendment (Miscellaneous) Bill resulted in a name change for the third time, renaming the New South Wales Police to New South Wales Police Force.[14]


The NSW Police Force has grown to be the largest in Australia and the highest paid.[2]


Organisation

NSW Police Ford Falcon General Duties patrol sedan in current national police markings. The building in the background photograph is the residential towers of the New South Wales Police College at Goulburn in Southern New South Wales.
NSW Police Ford Falcon General Duties patrol sedan in current national police markings. The building in the background photograph is the residential towers of the New South Wales Police College at Goulburn in Southern New South Wales.

The headquarters of the NSW Police Force is located at 1 Charles Street, Parramatta 2150. The NSW Police Force maintains over 500 local police stations coordinated by their respective Local Area Commands. Image File history File linksMetadata Nswpolice1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Nswpolice1. ...


The NSW Police College, whose primary function is to educate and train police officers from the newly recruited to the senior executive level, is located at McDermott Drive, Goulburn 2580. The Associate Degree of Policing Practice is awarded to a graduate of the college by its university provider, Charles Sturt University.[15] Charles Sturt University (CSU) is an Australian multi-campus university in rural New South Wales. ...


Divisions

The New South Wales Police Force consists of three major divisions: Corporate Services, Field Operations and Specialist Operations.[16]


The Corporate Services of the NSW Police is headed by the Executive Director (Corporate Services), who is charged with the management of recruitment and education, firearms, records and information process services, Security Industry Registry (SIR), investment and commercial services, safety, business and technology services, human resources, education services, finance and legal services which includes Police Prosecutors.


The Field Operations of the NSW Police, headed by the Deputy Commissioner (Field Operations), is responsible for managing and overseeing the North West Metropolitan region, South West Metropolitan region, Central Metropolitan region, Southern Metropolitan region, Northern Metropolitan region, Western Metropolitan region, State Crime Command, Traffic Services, APEC Police Security Command and Special Projects. APEC may refer to: Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Action Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour Advanced Placement European Civilization Atlantic Provinces Economic Council This article consisting of a 4-letter acronym or initialism is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ...


The Specialist Operations of the NSW Police, headed by the Deputy Commissioner (Specialist Operations), is responsible for a range of specialist groups of the police force. These groups include Operations Communications & Information Group, Forensics Services Group, Special Services Group, Counter Terriorism and Public Order Management, Public Affairs Branch and Professional Standards Command. The Specialist Operations is a division within the New South Wales Police (NSW Police) that is responsible for a range of specialist groups of the police force. ...


Rank structure

The NSW Police Force is run in a para-military structure. Promotion to the Rank of Sergeant is based upon a "merit based" promotion system, although it has been open to widespread criticism amongst serving members, as experience, qualifications and mastery of practice is not taken into account [citation needed]. The following ranks are listed from lowest to highest as set out in 2002:[17]

If a NSW Police Officer elects to undertake Criminal Investigation duties, after a period of exams and assignments, and given experience in a criminal investigation office that officer is given the designation of Detective. As it is a designation and not a rank, the Designation comes prior to the Rank, i.e., Detective Constable, or Detective Senior Constable etc. Returning to General Duties (uniform) is common for Detectives, and many Detectives do seek promotion in the General Duties arena. However, they do not have the designation of "Detective" after leaving criminal investigation. A constable is a person holding a particular office, most commonly in law enforcement. ... Sergeant is a rank used in some form by most militaries, police forces, and other uniformed organisations around the world. ... Inspector is a rank in many police forces. ... Superintendent (Supt. ... Commissioner is a designation that may be used for a variety of official positions, especially referring to a high-ranking public (administrative or police) official, or an analogous official in the private sector (e. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Leading Senior Constable (LSC) is a position listed in the Rank structure but it is not a Rank per sae. It is only open for Senior Constables to apply for and is not a permanent position. If a member transfers to another duty type or station, the officer is then relieved of the position of LSC. It primarily is a position for Field Training Officers who oversees the training and development of inexperienced Probationary Constables or Constables. Look up position in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


As members can be promoted to the Rank of Sergeant at seven years, many less experienced members look towards the career practitioner for advice. As far as career or master practitioners are concerned, the Rank of Incremental Senior Constable (commonly known as a "barred up Senior Constable", due to a bar above two chevrons on the members rank slide) cannot be overlooked in terms of experience, longevity and mastery of practice is concerned. It is not uncommon to see Incremental Senior Constables with over 35 years service in operational or "front line" policing activities.


Uniform and equipment

Working and ceremonial dress

Current New South Wales Police uniform insignia
Current New South Wales Police uniform insignia

New South Wales Police has two uniforms for general duties police officers, one operational and one ceremonial. Image File history File links Untitleda. ... Image File history File links Untitleda. ...


The Operational Police Uniform consists of navy blue cargo pants with map pockets, ballooned at the bottom, light blue marle short or long sleeve shirt, navy blue baseball cap with blue and white Sillitoe Tartan(fluorescent yellow caps were worn by the (now defunct) seconded Central Business District Street Policing Unit - a High Visibility unit in the City of Sydney and general purpose boots. During winter the leather duty jacket is worn mostly in the Sydney Metro area, whilst in the rural or provincial areas of the state, a navy blue Polartec jacket is worn.


The Ceremonial Uniform consists of G.P. Boots, Straight Leg Navy Blue Trousers, Tie, Blue Marle Shirt and Leather Duty Jacket. NSW Police College Staff, NSW Police Protocol and NSW Police Assistant Protocol Officers generally wear a Navy Blue Ceremonial Tunic during official occasions such as Attestation Parades (passing out parades), medal ceremonies and funerals etc. Assistant Protocol Officers are issued with a light blue/navy blue lanyard to be worn over the right shoulder and tucked into the right pocket during ceremonial occasions.


Specialist groups and special events

New South Wales Police are also entitled to wear Mess dress with Mess kit for black tie or formal dinners/dances. The dark navy blue trousers and mess jacket with cobalt blue cuffs, eppalettes (with ranks) and lapels clearly identify them as being members of the New South Wales Police.


Specialist units such as the Public Order and Riot Squad, Airwing, Marine Area Command and the State Protection Group Tactical Operations Unit all have different uniform needs and are outfitted accordingly. Detectives wear plain clothes. Public Order and Riot Squad (PORS) One of the Public Order and Riot Squad rapid response vans. ... SPG subdued shoulder patch State Protection Group (SPG) is the special operations division of the Australian New South Wales Police. ...


During ANZAC day marches and United Nations Day marches in Sydney, New South Wales Police can be seen alongside their Australian Federal Police counterparts wearing the distinctive United Nations blue beret and full sized medals, if they have served with the Australian Federal Police in United Nations sanctioned peacekeeping operations.


Equipment

Members of the NSW Police are issued with a Self Loading Pistol, namely the Glock 22 SLP. The weapon's calibre is .40 S&W with a magazine capacity of 15 rounds. Members are also issued with a spare magazine for their pistol, Saflock (mark IV & V) handcuffs, O.C. (capsicum spray), ASP expandable baton, Motorola XTS 3000 III UHF radio, and first aid kit. Members also carry a Police Issue Long Baton in crowd control environments. Each police officer is issued an identification metal badge with a Warrant Card. Glock is an Austrian defense contractor (named after the founder Gaston Glock) founded in 1963 in Deutsch-Wagram, near Vienna, Austria. ...


Notable incidents and arrests

After the formation of the NSW Police Force in 1862, the majority of crimes the police were faced with were conducted by bushrangers, particularly during the Victorian gold rush years. Constable Byrne, almost single-handed, fought off the Ben Hall gang when they attacked a gold escort at Major's Creek on March 13, 1865. Constable O'Grady was taken ill with cholera when, on April 9, 1866, he left his sick bed to confront the Clarke gang, who were renowned as being the "bloodiest bushrangers" of the Colony of New South Wales and that of Australia. Constable Walker was one of the earliest Australian-born mounted troopers to gain fame. He brought Captain Thunderbolt's enduring "bushranging" career to an end by shooting him near Uralla in New England, New South Wales. The Victorian gold rush was a period in the history of Victoria in Australia between approximately 1851 and the early 1860s. ... Ben Hall (1837-1865) was a noted Australian bushranger of the 19th century. ... March 13 is the 72nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (73rd in leap years). ... April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (100th in leap years). ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Frederick Ward Frederick Wordsworth Ward (aka Captain Thunderbolt) (1836–25 May 1870) was an Australian bushranger renowned for escaping from Cockatoo Island with the help of his partner Mary Ann Bugg, and for committing over 200 crimes over six and a half years across the northern section of the state... The New England region of Australia, here showing Mt Duval Approximate location of New England within New South Wales; red a narrow definition, yellow a broader definition New England is the name given to a region in the north of the state of New South Wales, Australia. ...


Constable Ernest Charles Day (later the Inspector General of Police) showed courage under fire when he shot and captured Bushranger Hobson. Hobson was later hanged. Day later investigated a string of murders involving a hawker Tommy Moore by tracing his activities to South Australia and solved one of Australia's earliest cases of serial killers. Emblems: Hairy Nosed Wombat (faunal); Leafy Seadragon (marine); Piping Shrike (bird: unofficial); Sturts Desert Pea (floral); Opal (gemstone) Motto: United for the Common Wealth Slogan or Nickname: Festival State Other Australian states and territories Capital Adelaide Government Const. ...


(Cited: Melrose, A (1911)The trooper police of Australia. London)


A member of the satire comedy group The Chaser, Chas Licciardello was arrested by the NSW police while selling fake Canterbury Bulldogs merchandise to fans before a game against the St. George Dragons. Items included plastic knives and knuckledusters, fakes flares and Rohypnol (the date rape drug) as well as balaclavas in bulldogs colours. This was in response to fan violence during Bulldogs games. Chas was arrested on charges of offensive conduct when some fans grew a bit violent towards him. As of now he has been declared free from all charges. (Note: This incident also caused a Bulldogs player wearing his t-shirt on his head like a balaclava walk in the background during an interview in the change rooms.)


Criticism

Wood Royal Commission

This concentration of policing power in the NSW Police is thought to have led to the multi-generational and endemic levels of corruption, graft and vice that were revealed to the public in the 1990s at the Wood Royal Commission, a State-sponsored judicial inquiry into police corruption led by Justice James Wood of the New South Wales Supreme Court. This Royal Commission, which lasted approximately two years, uncovered crimes and institutionalised corruption throughout the NSW Police Service (as it was then known) by a small number of officers, most notably detectives. This unexpected discovery by the Royal Commission led to a widening of its terms of reference to include the investigation of paedophilia and sex crimes outside the Police Service and implicated members of the legal fraternity. However, critics of the Royal Commission argue that it should have had a wider terms of reference, namely the NSW Parliament and NSW Criminal Justice System but considering the political ramifications that would have resulted, this did not occur. The Royal Commission into the New South Wales Police Service (Wood Royal Commission) was held in the State of New South Wales, Australia between 1994 and 1997. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... In states that are Commonwealth Realms a Royal Commission is a major government public inquiry into an issue. ...


The biggest impact of the Wood Royal Commission was the uprooting of many corrupt detectives in the force (which, despite the almost daily revelations of depravity and criminality, consisted of only a small minority of the total Police Service) and the establishment of the Police Integrity Commission - an independent, permanent tribunal with some judicial powers that now stands as a permanent watchdog over police corruption, but is not part of the NSW Police (unlike the old Internal Affairs Bureau).


Honours and awards

Recognition for the bravery and sacrifice of members of the NSW Police is expressed through honours and awards. The New South Wales Police is the only Australian Police jurisdiction to have one of its members awarded the Imperial Honour, namely the George Cross and the Australian Honour the Cross of Valour. Sergeant 3rd Class Eric George BAILEY GC was awarded the George Cross posthumously on the 12 January, 1945.


New South Wales Police also has the distinction in having one of its members being awarded the highest civilian bravery award, namely the Cross of Valour. In its history, only five people have been awarded that award, with a New South Wales Police Officer being the first Australian Police Officer to receive it. On the May 3, 1996, the then Detective Senior Constable Sparkes rescued a boy trapped in a flooded underground storm water drain following record rainfalls at Coffs Harbour. May 3 is the 123rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (124th in leap years). ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ...


Members of the New South Wales Police have been awarded the four levels of Australian Bravery Decorations, namely Cross of Valour, Star of Courage, Bravery Medal and the Commendation for Brave Conduct.


Australian honours and awards

New South Wales Police are eligible for the following National Honours and Awards:

  • Australian Bravery Decorations, namely the Cross of Valour (CV), Star of Courage (SC), Bravery Medal (BM) and the Commendation for Brave Conduct.
  • Australian Police Medal (APM) (This Medal is awarded for distinguished service);
  • Police Overseas Service Medal (This Medal was established in 1991 to recognise service with international peacekeeping organisations by officers of Australian police forces. The Governor-General makes awards of the Medal on the recommendation of the Chief Officer of an Australian police force.);
  • National Medal (The National Medal is awarded for diligent long service to the community in hazardous circumstances, including in times of emergency and national disaster, in direct protection of life and property);
  • Campaign Medals such as United Nations Medal For Service.

Australian Honours and Awards are worn as left sided decorations.


Internal New South Wales Police honours and awards

New South Wales Police also have a number of inservice Honours and Awards, awarded by the Commissioner of Police. Commissioner Peter Ryan QPM implemented the New South Wales Police Commissioner's Olympic Commendation and the New South Wales Olympic Citation. This award is significant as the New South Wales Police is the only police force in the world to be permitted the Olympic Rings to be attached. It has been widely reported and accepted that the Sydney 2000 Olympics was the "Safest Games in modern Olympic history". Peter Ryan was a driver from Canada. ...


Commissioner Ken Moroney AO APM implemented the Commissioners Community Service Commendation and Community Service Citation in 2002.


NSW Police Honours and Awards are regarded by members of the NSW Police to be highly prized due to the fact that they are only awarded to members in small numbers. The only award that was given out in large numbers was the Commissioner's Olympic Citation due to the massive contribution by all members of the force.


Commendations and medals

  • New South Wales Police Valour Award (VA);
  • New South Wales Police Commissioners Commendation (Courage);
  • New South Wales Police Commissioners Commendation (Service);
  • New South Wales Police Commissioners Olympic Commendation;
  • New South Wales Police Commissioners Community Service Commendation;
  • New South Wales Police Medal for Diligent and Ethical Service.

The above in-service decorations are worn 5 mm below the officers' name plate and are right sided decorations.


Citations

The following in-service decorations are worn 5mm above the officers' name plate and are right sided decorations.

  • New South Wales Police Unit Citation - metal device, with silver laurel leaf surround, with light blue enamel centre (maximum 3 further awards are indicated by silver stars;
  • New South Wales Police Commissioner's Olympic Citation - metal device, with silver laurel leaf surround, with navy blue enamel centre and silver Olympic rings in centre;
  • New South Wales Police Commissioner's Community Service Citation (maximum 1 further award indicated by one silver star) - metal device, with silver laurel leaf surround, with white enamel centre.

Peacekeeping

In peacekeeping operations, New South Wales Police Officers are seconded to the Australian Federal Police and take an Oath or Affirmation of the AFP. They are then appointed to the Rank of Senior Sergeant, Station Sergeant, Superintendent or Commander. Following their service, UN Peacekeeping Veterans are awarded the United Nations Medal for their particular Mission. In addition, under the Australian System of Honours and Awards, police officers serving with peacekeeping organisations are awarded the Police Overseas Service Medal with the relevant clasp for the prescribed area of service. It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... The Australian Federal Police (AFP) is the federal or Commonwealth police force of Australia. ... U.N. Medal (Standard Design) The term United Nations Medal refers to one of several international decorations which are issued by the United Nations (U.N.) to the various militaries of the world for participation in joint international military operations such as peacekeeping, humanitarian efforts, and disaster relief. ...


Since UNICYP commenced, a large number of the NSW Police has served in Cyprus alongside other Australian police jurisdictions. From 2002 to 2005, 45 NSW Police Officers were involved in UNTAET and UNMISET seconded to the Australian Federal Police for their Tour of Duty in East Timor with the United Nations. The United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) was established in 1964 to prevent a recurrence of fighting between the Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots. ... The United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor (UNTAET) provided an interim civil administration and a peacekeeping mission in the territory of East Timor. ...


In addition, two NSW Police Officers have been commended for courage for Peacekeeping in East Timor, one by the Australian Government (Station Sergeant David McCann OAM - UNMISET) and one by the NSW Police Commissioner (Senior Sergeant Mark Aubrey Gilpin - UNTAET). Station Sergeant McCann was awarded the Commendation for Brave Conduct for his part in the rescue of 110 vulnerable persons from a village in East Timor after it suffered major flooding. Senior Sergeant Gilpin was awarded the NSW Police Commendation (courage) for his part in protecting a member of the community who was being subjected to mob justice. He placed his body in front of the mob, who were armed with machettes and other weapons and managed to extract the victim to safety.


Out of the ten Australian peacekeepers who have died on peacekeeping missions, two were from New South Wales Police whilst serving with UNICYP. Sergeant Ian Ward and Inspector Patrick Hackett died in separate incidents in UNFCYP.


See also

This is a list of New South Wales Police officers killed in the line of duty. ... It should be noted that the term Inspector General was used until 1930. ... Tactical Response Group (New South Wales Police, Australia) The Tactical Response Group (TRG) was a tactical police unit of the Australian New South Wales Policesimilar to SWAT. The acronym TRG has been used by several different Australian States police departments at various times and is still used by the Western... The Special Weapons and Operations Squad (SWOS) was a tactical police unit similar to SWAT. The acronym SWOS was used by several different Australian States police departments at various times. ... SWOS was a Police Unit similar to SWAT known as the Special Weapons Operational Squad. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Company Profile of the New South Wales Police. Graduate Careers Australia.
  2. ^ a b c Profile of the NSW Police. New South Wales Police.
  3. ^ Archives in Brief 20 - Police service records. State Records NSW. Retrieved on January 7, 2007.
  4. ^ "NSW Police Association to push for officer numbers boost". ABC News. January 7, 2007. Retrieved on January 7, 2007.
  5. ^ Hunter, I, The Meaning of the Police Insignia. Retrieved on January 6, 2007.
  6. ^ Code of Practice for CRIME. New South Wales Police.
  7. ^ a b Police. State records NSW. Retrieved on January 15, 2007.
  8. ^ New South Wales Police Force. State Records NSW. Retrieved on January 15, 2007.
  9. ^ The NSW Police Force Chronology of the First Hundred Years. The Thin Blue Line. Retrieved on January 15, 2007.
  10. ^ Legislative Assembly Hansard, Wednesday, 25 October 2006, Corrected Copy. Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved on January 15, 2007.
  11. ^ Van Krieken, R, "Crime, government and civilization: Rethinking Elias in Criminology". Retrieved on January 15, 2007.
  12. ^ Police Service Amendment (NSW Police) Bill 2002 explanatory notes. Australasian Legal Information Institute. Retrieved on January 15, 2007.
  13. ^ Police Service Amendment (NSW Police) Bill Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved on January 15, 2007.
  14. ^ Police Amendment (Miscellaneous) Bill 2006 explanatory notes. Australasian Legal Information Institute. Retrieved on January 15, 2007.
  15. ^ Goulburn - School of Policing Studies. Charles Sturt University.
  16. ^ Official NSW Police website organizational structure chart.
  17. ^ Ranks and insignia. The Thin Blue Line.

ABC News is the name the of Australian Broadcasting Corporations news service. ... Charles Sturt University (CSU) is an Australian multi-campus university in rural New South Wales. ...

External links

  • NSW Police website
  • Rank insignia of the NSW Police
  • www.policensw.com — Unofficial site with much information about the NSW Police
  • National Police Memorial website
  • Union for NSW Police
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Law enforcement in Australia
Federal: Australian Competition and Consumer Commission | Australian Crime Commission | Australian Customs Service | Australian Federal Police | Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service | Australian Securities and Investments Commission
State/Territory: Australian Capital Territory Police| New South Wales Police | Northern Territory Police | Queensland Police | South Australia Police| Tasmania Police | Victoria Police | Western Australia Police

  Results from FactBites:
 
New South Wales - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (945 words)
New South Wales (abbreviated as NSW) is Australia's most populous state, located in the south-east of the country, north of Victoria and south of Queensland.
New South Wales is known the world over for the picturesque harbour of its capital, Sydney, Australia's oldest and largest city and a centre of international finance.
Queen Elizabeth II is the Sovereign, represented by the Governor of New South Wales.
New South Wales Police - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2812 words)
The NSW Police in its current form was established in 1862 with the passing of the Police Regulation Act and drew upon members of the Royal Irish Constablary.
The NSW Police has existed in various forms since the foundation of the colony of New South Wales at Sydney in 1788, when Governor Captain Arthur Phillip authorised the formation of a nightwatch to protect the infant town against thieves and petty criminals after dark.
New South Wales Police Officers have served with distinction in Cyprus UNFCYP and East Timor UNTAET and UNMISET.
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