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Encyclopedia > New Rochelle, New York
New Rochelle, New York
Official seal of New Rochelle, New York
Seal
Nickname: Queen City of the Sound
New Rochelle, New York (New York)
New Rochelle, New York
Location within the state of New York
Coordinates: 40°55′43″N 73°47′3″W / 40.92861, -73.78417
Country United States
State New York
County Westchester
Government
 - Type Council-Manager
 - Mayor Noam Bramson
Area
 - Total 13.2 sq mi (34.3 km²)
 - Land 10.4 sq mi (26.8 km²)
 - Water 2.9 sq mi (7.5 km²)
Elevation 85 ft (26 m)
Population (2000)
 - Total 72,182
 - Density 6,973.5/sq mi (2,692.5/km²)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 10801-10805
Area code(s) 914
FIPS code 36-50617
GNIS feature ID 0958451
Website: http://www.newrochelleny.com

New Rochelle (French: Nouvelle-Rochelle /la nuvɛl ʁoʃɛl/ ) is a city in the south-east portion of the U.S. state of New York in Westchester County. It is 16 miles (26 km) from Grand Central Terminal in New York City and 2 miles (3.2 km) north of the NYC border (Pelham Bay Park in The Bronx). // A nickname is a name of an entity or thing that is not its proper name. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the state. ... List of New York counties Map of the counties of New York State (click for larger version) Albany County: formed in 1683 as one of the original 12 counties. ... Westchester County is a primarily suburban county located in the U.S. state of New York with about 950,000 residents. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Mr. ... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... 914 is the area code for Westchester County, New York. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... The definitions of the political subdivisions of the state of New York differ from those in certain other countries or even various other U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the state. ... Westchester County is a primarily suburban county located in the U.S. state of New York with about 950,000 residents. ... The main concourse Grand Central Terminal (GCT, often unofficially called Grand Central Station) is a terminal rail station at 15 Vanderbilt Avenue (42nd Street and Park Avenue) in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Pelham Bay Park, located in the northeast corner of the New York City borough of The Bronx, is at 2,764 acres (11 km²) the largest public park in New York City, more than three times the size of Manhattans Central Park. ... Bronx redirects here. ...


The town was settled by refugee Huguenots (French Protestants) in 1688 who were fleeing tyrannical Catholic pogroms in France. Many of the settlers were artisans and craftsmen from the city of La Rochelle France, thus influencing the choice of the name of "New Rochelle." In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France. ... The Russian word pogrom (погром) refers to a massive violent attack on people with simultaneous destruction of their environment (homes, businesses, religious centers). ... For other uses, see La Rochelle (disambiguation). ... Many places in the United States have names of French origin, a legacy of past French exploration and rule over much of the land and in honor of French help during the founding of the country (see also: New France and French in the United States): Bay Minette, Alabama (Kitty...


The era of suburban living began in the late 1800s when the New York & New Haven Railroad opened a line with a stop in New Rochelle. It was during this period that the city became famous as a summer resort. New Rochelle soon became one of the country's first 'bedroom communities', with most residents traveling daily to New York City for work, and back home to the suburbs to sleep. The 1960s television hit 'The Dick Van Dyke Show' popularized New Rochelle suburban life as an American ideal.


In 2000, the city had a population of 72,182, making it the second largest city in Westchester County and the seventh largest in the state of New York.[citation needed] In 2008, New Rochelle was recognized by the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) as one of the 100 Best Walking Cities in America, and the second best in New York State next only to New York City[1]. This article is about the state. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...

Contents

History

17th century

Statue of Jacob Leisler
Statue of Jacob Leisler

In 1689, the absolutist Catholic monarch of France Louis XIV unilaterally revoked the Edict of Nantes. This royal edict had protected the minority Protestant population from religious persecution within certain defined areas of France. Despite the fact that the Protestants were France's most industrious class, Louis XIV was determined to drive them out of France. Faced with the prospect of the resurgence of another war of religion, Protestant countries of Europe opened up their territories to the these French Protestants, or Huguenots. In the American territories, John Pell under warrant from the King William III of England, Scotland, and Ireland, provided land to Huguenot families. A particularly large group of Huguenot manufacturers, artisans, and craftsmen from La Rochelle settled the area and named their settlement Nouvelle-Rochelle, after their homeland La Rochelle, France. There is a monument in Hudson Park which contains the names of these Huguenot settlers. Some 33 families from La Rochelle established the community of New Rochelle[2]. Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Absolute monarchy is a monarchical form of government where the monarch has the power to rule his or her land or country and its citizens freely, with no laws or legally-organized direct opposition in force. ... Louis XIV King of France and Navarre By Hyacinthe Rigaud (1701) Louis XIV (Louis-Dieudonné) (September 5, 1638–September 1, 1715) reigned as King of France and King of Navarre from May 14, 1643 until his death. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Religious persecution is systematic mistreatment of an individual or group due to their religious affiliation. ... The French Wars of Religion were a series of conflicts fought between Catholics and Huguenots (Protestants) from the middle of the sixteenth century to the Edict of Nantes in 1598, including civil infighting as well as military operations. ... In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France. ... John Pell (March 1, 1610 - December 12, 1685), was an English mathematician. ... William III (14 November 1650 – 8 March 1702) was the Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28 June 1672, King of England and King of Ireland from 13 February 1689, and King of Scots (under the name William II) from... For other uses, see La Rochelle (disambiguation). ... Location within France La Rochelle is a town and commune of western France, and a seaport on the Atlantic Ocean (population 76,584 in 1999). ... New Rochelle is a city located in Westchester County in the US state of New York. ...


Thirty-one years earlier, the Siwanoy Indians sold their land to Thomas Pell. His land patent was confirmed by his nephew, John Pell, who became lord of Pelham Manor - a feudal domain with its own civil and criminal courts. It was from John Pell and his wife that Jacob Leisler, acting as an agent for a group of Huguenots in New York, purchased the land upon which they would settle. In 1689 Pell officially deeded 6,100 acres (25 km²)to Leisler for the establishment of a Huguenot community. In addition to the purchase money, Jacob Leisler and his heirs and assigns were to yield and pay unto John Pell and his heirs and assigns (Lords of the Pelham Manor) one 'Fat Calf' yearly as acknowledgement of their feudal obligation to the Manor[3]. The Siwanoy are a Native American tribe in the New York area. ... Thomas Pell (born ? - 1669) was a physician who was famous for buying the area known as Pelham, Westchester, New York, as well as land that now includes the eastern Bronx and southern Westchester County. ... A land patent is the right of ownership to a tract of land, usually granted by the federal or state government to an individual or private company. ... Jacob Leisler (? 1640 - May 16, 1691) was a German-born American colonist. ... Pelham Manor is a village in Westchester County, New York, USA. The population was 5,466 at the 2000 census. ...


Jacob Leisler is an important figure in the early histories of both New Rochelle and the nation. He arrived in America as a mercenary in the British army and later became one of the most prominent merchants in New York. He also served for a time as mayor of New York City. He was subsequently appointed acting-governor of the province, and it was during this time that he acted of behalf of the Huguenots. For other uses, see Mercenary (disambiguation). ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The Mayor of New York City is the chief executive of the government of New York City, as stipulated by the Charter of the City of New York. ... In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France. ...


While the French refugees made the first agreement for the land, many of the earlier settlers came from places other than La Rochelle. The choice of name for the city reflected the significant number of Huguenot families and distinctly French character of the community. French was spoken, and it was common practice for people in neighboring areas to send their children to New Rochelle to learn the language. John Jay, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court and Washington Irving were among the most notable individuals to have been educated in the private boarding school at Trinity Church. For other persons named John Jay, see John Jay (disambiguation). ... The Chief Justice in many countries is the name for the presiding member of a Supreme Court in Commonwealth- or other countries with an Anglosaxon type of justice, such as the Supreme Court of the United States, the Supreme Court of Canada, the Supreme Court of New Zealand, the Supreme... Washington Irving (April 3, 1783 – November 28, 1859) was an American author of the early 19th century. ... A boarding school is a usually fee-charging school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ...


18th century

Thomas Paine Memorial
Thomas Paine Memorial
Paine Historical Society
Paine cottage
Paine cottage

The French Huguenots, as Protestant Europeans, quickly assimilated into the English colony. Although, most continued to marry within other Huguenot families over the first two generations, the colonists use of English and their similarity in customs and race to the larger English population quickly promoted the assimilation of the Huguenots into overall society. By 1738 the last recorded entries in French were made on town records. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2288 × 1712 pixel, file size: 901 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this photograph of the monument to Thomas Paine on North Avenue in New Rochelle, New York, on March 30, 2007. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2288 × 1712 pixel, file size: 901 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this photograph of the monument to Thomas Paine on North Avenue in New Rochelle, New York, on March 30, 2007. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2288 × 1712 pixel, file size: 870 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this photograph of the Thomas Paine Cottage at 983 North Avenue in New Rochelle, New York, on March 30, 2007. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2288 × 1712 pixel, file size: 870 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this photograph of the Thomas Paine Cottage at 983 North Avenue in New Rochelle, New York, on March 30, 2007. ... In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France. ...


In 1775 General George Washington stopped in New Rochelle on his way to assume command of the Army of the United Colonies in Massachusetts, recounting: "The road for the greater part, indeed the whole way, but the land strong and well covered with grass and a crop of Indian corn intermixed with Pompions (which were yet ungathered) in the fields... The distance of this day's travel was 31 miles (50 km) in which we passed through Eastchester, New Rochelle, Mamaroneck, but as these places (although they have houses of worship in them) are not regularly laid out, they are scarcely to be distinguished from the immediate farms which are very close together and are separated as one inclosure from another is, by fences of stones which are indeed easily made as the country is immensely stony" [4]. George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... This article is about the maize plant. ...


In 1776 the British Army briefly occupied sections of New Rochelle and Larchmont. Following British victory in the Battle of White Plains, New Rochelle became part of a "Neutral Ground" for General Washington to regroup his troops[5]. Combatants United States Britain Commanders George Washington William Howe Strength 14,500 men 14,000 men Casualties 300 killed and wounded 313 killed and wounded Battle of White Plains Historic Site : George Washingtons HQ The Battle of White Plains was an inconclusive meeting on October 28, 1776 in the...


The first national census of 1790 shows New Rochelle with 692 residents, 136 of whom were African American [6]. An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


In 1784, after the Revolutionary War ended, patriot Thomas Paine was given a farm in New Rochelle for his service to the cause of independence. The farm, totaling about 300 acres (1.2 km²), had been confiscated from its owners by state of New York due to their Tory activities. Now located on a small street in New Rochelle, the Thomas Paine Cottage is a small museum where many Revolutionary War re-enactments occur. This article is about military actions only. ... For other persons of the same name, see Thomas Paine (disambiguation). ... Thomas Paine Cottage, in New Rochelle, New York was the home of Thomas Paine, American pamphleteer and Revolutionary War hero. ...


19th century

Through the 18th century, New Rochelle had remained a modest village that retained an abundance of agricultural land. During the 19th century, however, with the rapid growth of New York City by immigration principally from Ireland and Germany, more American families left New York City and moved into the area. Although the original Huguenot population was rapidly shrinking in relative size, through ownership of land, businesses, banks, and small manufactures, they retained a predominant hold on the political and social life of the town.


A tollhouse was constructed in 1802 across the Westchester County Turnpike (now known as Main Street). Four cents was charged for each horse and rider and ten cents was charged for each horse-drawn cart. The tollhouse remained in operation until the discontinuation of all tolls in 1867 [7].


The 1820 Census showed 150 African-Americans residing in New Rochelle, six of whom were slaves. Languages Predominantly American English Religions Predominantly Christianity and Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Wiktionary has related dictionary definitions, such as: slave Slave may refer to: Slavery, where people are owned by others, and live to serve their owners without pay Slave (BDSM), a form of sexual and consenual submission Slave clock, in technology, a clock or timer that synchrnonizes to a master clock...


The era of suburban living began around the year 1849 when the New York and New Haven Railroad opened a line with a stop in New Rochelle. It was during this period that New Rochelle became famous as a summer resort. The New York and New Haven Railroad was a railroad connecting New York City to New Haven, Connecticut along the shore of the Long Island Sound. ...


In 1855 the wealthy hotelier Simeon Leland completed his 60-room summer home, "Castleview". Notable guests of "Castleview" included the Prince of Wales and Charles Dickens[8]. This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ... Dickens redirects here. ...


In 1857 the Village of New Rochelle was established within the borders of the Town of New Rochelle.


In 1858 the wealthy industrialist Adrian Iselin purchased land on Davenport Neck. The Iselin family began the New Rochelle Water Company as well as the first savings bank in the city. C.Oliver Iselin, and the six other children of Adrian Iselin, engage in many philanthropic causes in New Rochelle, donating substantial financial gifts to The College of New Rochelle, New Rochelle Hospital and also the World War Memorial Committee. Maura Lawn and Ursula Hall at the College of New Rochelles main campus in New Rochelle. ... This memorial in England lists the names of soldiers who died in the First World War. ...


In 1861 a group of volunteers created the first fire service named ‘The Enterprise Hook/Ladder/Bucket Company #1’.


In 1879 John H. Starin, a former United States Congressman and descendant of the Huguenots, purchased five islands off of Davenport Neck, which would soon become Glen Island Park. One of the first theme parks open to the public, Glen Island boasted a natural history museum, an aviary, a railway, a bathing beach, a German beer garden and a Chinese pagoda. A chain ferry brought people to the island from a mainland dock. He used a fleet of steamboats to bring thousands of New Yorkers to the park, handling up to a million visitors a season by 1882. John Henry Starin (August 27, 1825 - March 21, 1909) was a U.S. Representative from New York, grandson of Thomas Sammons. ... Theme park redirects here. ... For other similarly-named museums see Museum of Natural History. ... A typical beer garden in Munich A beer garden is an open-air area where alcohol is legally served. ... The Chinese Pagoda is a landmark in Birmingham. ... Coin operated cable ferry at Espevær in Bømlo, Norway A cable ferry or chain ferry is a means of water transportation by which a ferry or other boat is guided and in many cases propelled across a river or other larger body of water by means of cables...


In 1889 a bill creating the New Rochelle City Charter was signed by Governor Theodore Roosevelt. It was through this bill that the Village and Town of New Rochelle were joined into one municipality. A city charter or town charter (generically, municipal charter) is a legal document establishing a municipality such as a city or town. ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ...


In 1892 Rose Hill Gardens, one of the largest botanical gardens in the country during the 1800s, cultivated the first orchid in the United States. Also in that year, the artist Frederic Remington moved to a New Rochelle, purchasing a three-acre estate on Webster Avenue. Inside the United States Botanic Garden Washington, D.C. Botanical gardens grow a wide variety of plants primarily categorized and documented for scientific purposes. ... Orchid re-directs here; for alternate uses see Orchid (disambiguation) Genera Over 800 See List of Orchidaceae genera. ... Frederic Remington (October 4, 1861 - December 26, 1909) was an American painter, illustrator, sculptor, and writer who specialized in depictions of the American West. ...


In 1896 Davids’ Island became the site of Fort Slocum, named for General Henry Warner Slocum, a Huguenot descendant and a Civil War officer. Fort Slocum became one of the largest recruiting stations in the country, with greatest use during World War I and World War II. Fort Slocum, New York was a US military base occupying Davids Island and Hart Island at the western end of Long Island Sound. ... Portrait of General Henry W. Slocum by Mathew Brady, ca. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


n 1899 Michael J. Dillon narrowly defeated Hugh A. Harmer to become New Rochelle's first mayor. The recently established city charter designated four wards, a board of alderman (two from each ward), and 10 elected from the city at large [9]. A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ...


20th & 21st centuries

Bicentennial commemorative half-dollar
Bicentennial commemorative half-dollar

As the effects of continuing immigration continued throughout the northeastern United States and New York in particular, the early French Huguenot character of the town and its ruling class dissolved. In the early part of the 20th century, the County's famous Glen Island Casino on Long Island Sound continued to draw such celebrities as Glenn Miller, the Dorsey Brothers and Ozzie Nelson. Map of the US northeast. ... The term ruling class refers to the social class of a given society that decides upon and sets that societys political policy. ... New York City waterways: 1. ... This article is about the jazz musician. ... The Dorsey Brothers consisted of the dynamic duo Big Band musicians Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey who found fame in the 1940s playing with great Big Band favorites Glenn Miller and Benny Goodman among others. ...


By 1900 New Rochelle had a population of 14,720.


In 1904 plans were completed for Rochelle Park, one of the first planned communities in the country. See New Town for places with that name. ...


Forty-five Minutes from Broadway, a musical comedy about New Rochelle, opened January 1, 1906. Forty-five Minutes from Broadway is the name of a musical play written and produced by George M. Cohan in 1905. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


In 1909, Edwin Thanhouser established Thanhouser Film Corporation. Thanhouser's Million Dollar Mystery was one of the first serial motion pictures. Edwin Thanhouser (November 11, 1865 - March 21, 1956) founded the Thanhouser Company in 1909 in New Rochelle, New York. ... Million Dollar Mystery is a movie released in 1987 as a promotional piece for Glad-Lock brand bags. ...


The artist Norman Rockwell moved to New Rochelle in 1915, sharing a studio with the cartoonist Clyde Forsythe, who worked for The Saturday Evening Post. He often drew his illustration subjects from members of the community. Norman Percevel Rockwell (February 3, 1894 – November 8, 1978) was a 20th century American painter. ...


In 1923, New Rochelle resident Anna Jones became the first African American woman to be admitted to the New York State Bar [10]. An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


In 1928, women's rights advocate Carrie Chapman Catt settled in New Rochelle. Catt, President of The National American Womans Suffrage Association, was influential in the fight for the 19th Amendment (Susan B. Anthony Amenment). Carrie Chapman Catt (January 9, 1859 – March 9, 1947) was a womans suffrage leader. ... The Nineteenth Amendment may refer to the: Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution - guarantees women the right to vote. ...


In 1929 the city manager form of government was adopted. Under this arrangement, the city council is the legislative body that establishes city laws, ordinances and resolutions. The council appoints the city manager, who oversees and implements the directives of the council. The council-manager government is one of 2 main variations of representative municipal government (for contrast, also see Mayor-Council government). ... A city council is the most common style of legislative government in a city or town. ... A Legislature is a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to create, amend and ratify laws. ...


In 1930 New Rochelle recorded a population of 54,000, up from 36,213 only ten years earlier. During the 1930’s New Rochelle was the wealthiest city per capita in New York state and the third wealthiest in the country[11].


On June 18, 1938 the City celebrated its 250th anniversary with a massive parade of more than 5,000 marchers. Notable spectators included Governor Herbert H. Lehman, U.S. Postmaster General James A. Farley and a number of visiting dignitaries from La Rochelle, France. The U.S. Government authorized a limited edition of New Rochelle half dollar commemorative coins to mark the anniversary. is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Herbert Lehman Herbert Henry Lehman (March 28, 1878 – December 5, 1963) was a Democratic Party politician from the U.S. state of New York. ... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... In American history, James Farley led the Bonus army in 1932. ... United States Government redirects here. ... Commemorative coins are coins that were issued to commemorate some particular event or issue. ...


Two of the nation's first suburban branch department stores, Arnold Constable and Bloomingdales, opened in New Rochelle in the 1940s. The interior of a typical Macy*s department store. ... Bloomingdales is an upscale department store owned by Federated Department Stores, which is also the owner of Macys. ...


In 1941 New Rochelle based Terrytoons Studio introduced the famous Mighty Mouse cartoon character. Mighty Mouse, the signature character of the studio. ... This article is about the fictional character. ...


New Rochelle was the scene of the first court-ordered school desegregation case in "the north", when the Supreme Court in 1962 denied certiorari and so let stand a decision of the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit that the Lincoln School boundaries had been intentionally drawn to create segregated elementary school districts. Lincoln School was closed and demolished in 1965, with students of that district allowed to attend certain other city elementary schools. The school district is known for its diversity, and the high school honors civil rights leader Whitney Young in the name of its auditorium and civil rights martyr Michael Schwerner in the name of its library. Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Affirmative action in the United States Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity... For specific national Supreme Courts, see Category:National supreme courts. ... Certiorari (pronunciation: sÉ™r-sh(Ä“-)É™-ˈrer-Ä“, -ˈrär-Ä“, -ˈra-rÄ“) is a legal term in Roman, English and American law referring to a type of writ seeking judicial review. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts: District of Connecticut Northern, Southern, Eastern, and Western Districts of New York District of Vermont The Second Circuit hears argument at the Thurgood Marshall U... School districts are a form of special-purpose district in the United States (amongst some other places) which serves to operate the local public primary and secondary schools. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Whitney Young at the White House, 1964. ... Michael Schwerner Michael Schwerner (November 6, 1939 – June 21, 1964), called Mickey by friends and colleagues, was a CORE field worker killed in Philadelphia, Mississippi, by the Ku Klux Klan in response to the civil-rights work he coordinated, which included promoting registration to vote among Mississippi African Americans. ...


In May 1968, New Rochelle High School was destroyed by a fire set by a disturbed student. The fire was early in the morning and there were no fatalities. While the school was being rebuilt, students attended school in trailers. Sessions were divided into morning and evening shifts to accommodate all students. Fortunately, the facade of the school remained intact, allowing builders to construct a new building behind the beautiful, original exterior. New Rochelle High School is a public high school located in New Rochelle, New York. ...


In 1976 New Rochelle resident E.L. Doctorow wrote the novel Ragtime, which would later become a major Broadway musical[12]. Edgar Lawrence Doctorow (born January 6, 1931, New York, New York) is a writer who has written several critically aclaimed novels that blend history and social criticism. ... This article is about the 1975 novel. ...


In 1987 New Rochelle was awarded the U.S. Conference of Mayors City Livability Award[13]. The United States Conference of Mayors is a nonpartisan organization founded in 1932. ...

Downtown New Rochelle

By the end of the century, the City had begun a massive revitalization of its 'downtown'. In 1999, part of downtown New Rochelle near the Metro North train station was rebuilt with a $190 million entertainment complex, nicknamed New Roc City, which features a 19-screen movie theater, Westchester's first IMAX theater, an indoor ice-hockey arena, mini-golf, go karts, an arcade, a health club, restaurants, a hotel, loft-apartments and a mega supermarket. The complex was built on the former Macy's and Mall which had opened in 1968. The Metro-North Commuter Railroad Company, or MTA Metro-North Railroad, or, more commonly, Metro-North, is a suburban commuter rail service that is run and managed by an authority of New York State, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, or, more simply, the MTA. Metro-North runs service between New York... Passengers bustle around the typical grand edifice of Londons Broad Street station in 1865. ... New Roc City is an entertainment complex in New Rochelle, New York. ... A typical multiplex (AMC Promenade 16 in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, United States). ... IMAX theatre at the Melbourne Museum complex, Australia BFI London IMAX by night LHemisferic (Ciutat de les Arts i les Ciències) Valencia, Spain IMAX (short for Image Maximum) is a film format created by Canadas IMAX Corporation that has the capacity to display images of far greater... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Eternite Miniature golf course Minigolf is a miniature version of the sport of golf. ... For other uses, see Hotel (disambiguation). ... Packaged food aisles in a Fred Meyer store in Portland, Oregon A supermarket is a departmentalized self-service store offering a wide variety of food and household merchandise. ... This article is about the R. H. Macy & Co. ...


Additional revitalization has come by way of two new luxury residences. The construction of Avalon On The Sound East, a luxury apartment complex was unveiled by Avalon Bay Communities in 2007. Trump Plaza, a 39-story luxury residence is the tallest building in Westchester County at and the tallest between New York City and Albany. Properties along 'main street' which had been empty for years, such as the former Bloomingdales department store and Lillian Vernon headquarters, have been transformed into condominiums and rental apartments. Trump Plaza (New Rochelle) is a 42 story luxury residence and hotel with shopping centers. ... Westchester County is a suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Albany. ... Bloomingdales is an upscale department store owned by Federated Department Stores, which is also the owner of Macys. ... Lillian Vernon Corporation is an American catalog merchant and online retailer that sells household, childrens and fashion accessory products. ...


Residential profile



The image above is proposed for deletion. See images and media for deletion to help reach a consensus on what to do.

New Rochelle is commonly referred to as 'The Home Town' because of the significant amount of single-family, residential development that exists throughout most of its 10+ square miles. While the formerly industrial downtown section is more densely developed, with condominiums, high rises, offices, shopping centers, affordable housing complexes, a medical center, nursing homes, two college campuses and an inter modal transportation hub, the rest of the city consists of sprawling, residential neighborhoods. There are more than 11,500 single family units within the city, more than that of neighboring Larchmont, Mamaroneck and Scarsdale combined. The total number of separate households surpasses 26,000, more than that of neighboring Pelham, Pelham Manor, Eastchester, Scarsdale, Mamaroneck and Larchmont combined. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Central business district. ... For the traditional meaning of the word mall, see pedestrian street or promenade. ... Rest home for seniors in ÄŒeský Těšín, Czech Republic SNF redirects here. ... Pelham is the name of several towns in the United States of America and in Canada: Pelham, Alabama Pelham, Georgia Pelham, Massachusetts Pelham, New Hampshire Pelham, New York which indirectly gave its name to the novel The Taking of Pelham One Two Three through Pelham Bay, Bronx, New York Pelham... Pelham Manor is a village in Westchester County, New York, USA. The population was 5,466 at the 2000 census. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Scarsdale could be Scarsdale, New York in Westchester County Scarsdale, an ancient hundred of Derbyshire, England This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Mamaroneck, New York may refer to two places in New York: The Town of Mamaroneck, a town in Westchester County The Village of Mamaroneck, a village partially within the town This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... emblem, Village of Larchmont Larchmont is a village located in Westchester County, New York. ...


Housing variety. Some of the country's most expensive real estate can be found in New Rochelle. The north end of the city (10804) is ranked in Forbes Magazines list of the '500 most expensive zip-codes' in the country [14]. According to the list, the average household income was $199,061 and the average home price was over $752,000. Homes in Premium Point, a gated section of the city on Long Island Sound, are priced anywhere from $2 to $20 million. The three newest residential developments, 'Kensington Woods', 'The Greens at Cherry Lawn' and 'Riviera Shores', are all gated communities with single family homes priced from $2 million. With a population approaching 80,000 residents, New York State law dictates that the city provide an adequate amount of affordable housing units for the less fortunate. New Rochelle has historically met and surpassed state requirements, currently working to replace the existing Weyman Avenue Projects with more forward thinking, community centered townhouse-style housing units. By embracing the needs of the poor, New Rochelle sets a precedant for other suburban communities to follow. Neighboring towns including Mamaroneck, Larchmont and Scarsdale neglect to address such concerns, failing to meet the minimal affordable housing requirements set by the state. Popular consenus is that the presence of the poor precludes that of the middle-class and the wealthy. Considering the large number of working-class and affordable housing units found 'Downtown', the high property values prevalent throughout most of the city reflects the true economic diversity of New Rochelle. It is home to the financially disadvantaged and the very wealthy. One of 'the wealthiest people in the United States' according to Forbes Magazine is longtime New Rochelle resident and multi-billionaire Sidney Frank. Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ... New Rochelle is a city located in Westchester County in the US state of New York. ... For other uses, see Forbes (disambiguation). ... Household income may refer to one of the following articles: Median household income Household income in the United States This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... New York City waterways: 1. ... Entrance to a guard-gated community (Paradise Village Grand Marina Villas, Nuevo Vallarta, Mexico). ... A Northern European single-family home in Germany. ... This article is about the state. ... Affordable housing is a dwelling where the total housing costs are affordable to those living in that housing unit. ... The middle class (or middle classes) comprises a social group once defined by exception as an intermediate social class between the nobility and the peasantry. ... The term working class is used to denote a social class. ... Alternate meaning: For the Boston Brahmin family associated with John Forbes Kerry, see Forbes family. ... Sidney E. Frank (October 2, 1919 – January 10, 2006) was an American businessman who became a billionaire through his savvy promotion of Grey Goose vodka and Jägermeister. ...


Communities. Within the greater city borders are many established neighborhoods and subsections, several of which are larger in both size and population than neighborboring towns of Larchmont, Bronxville and Pelham Manor. The areas most noted include: Bayberry, Beechmont, Bloomingdale Estates, Bonniecrest, Cherry Lawn, Daisy Farms, Davenport Neck, Echo Manor, Forest Heights, Forest Knolls, French Ridge, Glen Island, Glenwood Lake, Heathcote, Kensington Woods, Lake Isle, Larchmont Woods, Lyncroft, Northfield, North Ridge, Paine Heights, Pinebrook , Premium Manor, Premium Point, Quaker Ridge, Residence Park, Rochelle Heights, Sans Souci, Scarsdale Downs, Shore Road, Sutton Manor, Vaneck Estates, Ward Acres, Wilmot Woods and Wykagyl. Whereas Bayberry and Wilmot Woods are public-communities, Premium Point, Kensington Woods and Cherry Lawn are gated neighborhoods accessible only by those immediate residents.


Education

Public education

The city is served by the City School District of New Rochelle, which operates a renown public high school, two junior high schools and ten elementary schools. On three separate occasions, the City's school system has claimed the prestigious Blue Ribbon Award from the U.S. Department of Education. In recent special education reports, both The Wall Street Journal and Newsweek named the New Rochelle school system as one of the top 20 in the country.[citation needed] New Rochelle High School is one of the most diverse high schools in the country; the student body represents over 60 different countries from around the world. The school offers over 240 courses in three program areas: College Preparatory, Business Education, and Vocational Education. A public high school is a secondary school that is financed by tax revenues and other government-collected revenues, and administered exclusively by, and at the discretion of, state and local officials. ... Blue Ribbon Award can mean: Blue Ribbon Awards, annual Japanese film awards. ... The United States Department of Education was created in 1979 (by PL 96-88) as a Cabinet-level department of the United States government, and began operating in 1980. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... New Rochelle High School is a public high school located in New Rochelle, New York. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ...


Private education

Primary and secondary schools

  • Iona Grammar - all-boys Catholic grammar school located on Stratton Road in the city's 'Northend'. The school is named for the Scottish island of Iona & founded by the Congregation of Christian Brothers in 1916.
  • Iona Prep - an all-boys National School of Excellence Catholic high school located on Wilmot Road in the city's 'Northend'. Current enrollment is approximately 750 students in grades 9 through 12.
  • The Thornton Donovan School - private preparatory school in Beechmont
  • The Ursuline School for girls in Grades 6-12, located in Wykagyl.
  • Salesian High School - founded in 1920 as a private Roman Catholic secondary school for young men in grades 9 through 12. Administered by the Salesian Society of St. John Bosco, a religious order of priests and brothers, Salesian High School is founded on Catholic philosophy and St. John Bosco's system of education, based on "reason, religion and kindness."
  • Blessed Sacrament-St. Gabriel High School, a coed Catholic High School

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Iona Preparatory School is an all-boys Catholic high school located in New Rochelle, NY in suburban Westchester County. ... Catholic schools are education ministries of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Thornton-Donovan School Emblem The Thornton-Donovan School was founded in 1901 as the New Rochelle School and Kindergarten in New Rochelle, New York. ... Salesian High School, located in New Rochelle, New York, was founded in 1920 as a private Roman Catholic secondary school for young men in grades 9 through 12. ... A Taoist monk playing an instrument. ... Blessed Sacrament-St. ...

Higher education

  • The College of New Rochelle - The first Catholic woman's college in New York State, founded by the sisters of the Ursuline Order. Its oldest school, The School of Arts & Sciences, is, as it was in 1904, a women's college. It offers courses in the liberal arts, pre-medicine, pre-law, communication arts and business. The three newer Schools (School of Nursing, School of New Resources and the Graduate School) are open to both men and women.
  • Iona College - Founded in 1940 by the Congregation of Christian Brothers, Iona College is a private, coeducational institution of learning in the tradition of American Catholic higher education. Iona, currently listed in the US News and World Report's annual "America's Best Colleges 2006" and The Princeton Review's Best Northeastern Colleges 2006 edition, offers undergraduate degrees in liberal arts, science, and business administration, as well as master of arts, master of science and master of business administration degrees and numerous post-graduate certificate programs.
  • Monroe College - The college offers two-year, four-year, and graduate programs (through the King Graduate School of Business). Monroe provides professional, career-oriented higher education to students from diverse backgrounds. It has a campus, with full dormitories in the downtown section of New Rochelle.

Maura Lawn and Ursula Hall at the College of New Rochelles main campus in New Rochelle. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... The Ursulines are a religious order founded at Brescia, Italy by St. ... Communication Arts is a magazine that highlights and features articles about graphic design, photography, and advertising. ... The main entrance to Iona College Iona College is located in New Rochelle, New York, 20 miles north of Manhattan in suburban Westchester County. ... The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... MBA redirects here. ... Monroe College is a private college with campuses in the Bronx and New Rochelle, New York. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Parks and recreation

Marina

Waterfront

While the shoreline within the City of New Rochelle measures 2.7 miles (4.3 km), but with its many irregularities and off-shore islands, the actual length of the waterfront is 9.3 miles (15.0 km). The unusual coastal features have over the years earned it the nickname, "the Queen City of the Sound."

  • Yacht, sailing and rowing clubs dot the coast on Long Island Sound and beach clubs line the shores of Davenport Neck. Beckwithe Point, The Greentree Country Club and The Surf Club are the largest of the private shore clubs, providing waterfront recreation to members during the summer season. The New York Athletic Club sits on Travers Island, located on the border of New Rochelle and Pelham Manor.
  • New Rochelle Yacht Club, Echo Bay Yacht Club and Imperial Yacht Club are several well known, private yacht clubs in the city.
  • New York Sailing School and New Rochelle Rowing Club each have histories dating back over 100 years.
  • The City operates a large marina with 300 slips and 150 mooring spaces.

A rowing club is a club for people interested in the sport of Rowing. ... A country club is a private club that offers a variety of recreational sports facilities to its members. ... The New York Athletic Club was founded in 1868 and is located in New York City. ... The Pelham Islands is a colloquial historical name for a group of islands in western Long Island Sound. ... A yacht club in Cienfuegos, Cuba Columbia yacht club in Chicago, Illinois A yacht club is a sports club specifically related to sailing and yachting. ...

Parks

Hudson Park
Hudson Park
Glen Island castle
Glen Island castle
Overlooking Davids' Island
Overlooking Davids' Island

The City has an impressive collection of parklands and nature preserves, with 102.5 acres (0.415 km²) of inland waters, 231.51 acres (0.9369 km²) of public park lands and 168 acres (0.68 km²) of park lets.

  • Glen Island — In 1879 John H. Starin, a former U.S. Congressman and New York transportation king, bought five islands which he named 'Glen Island ' and created perhaps the first theme park open to the public. His 12 steamboats transported millions of New York residents and others to the attractions which included a zoo, a natural history museum, a railway, a German beer garden (around the castle-like structure which still stands today), a bathing beach, and a Chinese pagoda. Today the park is a 105-acre (0.42 km²) island property connected to the mainland by a drawbridge built in the 1920s. One of the main features of the park is its pristine, crescent shaped beach offering access to Long Island Sound.
  • Five Islands Park is a series of islands connected by small footbridges and pathways, offers playground, sports, hiking and camping facilities for all residents to enjoy.
  • Hudson Park encompasses 13 acres (0.053 km²) along the city's harbor front and includes a beach for residents, the city boathouse, greenhouses, the shore station of the United States Coast Guard and several yacht and rowing clubs. The park is traditionally accepted as the original landing place of the Huguenot settlers. A granite boulder with bronze tablets commemorates the event.
  • Davids' Island, a 78 acre island of the coast of the city, is being transformed from a former American military base (Fort Slocum) into a park and environmental preserve. Beginning just after the Civil War, the island was a military base used to protect New York Harbors, during World War I it served as an army recruitment station and up until 1967, it maintained various ‘Cold War’ facilities. Today it is home to a variety of plants, birds, and animals. These include the endangered Kemp’s Ridley sea turtle, and rare birds such as osprey and least terns. Davids Island also supports valuable wetlands, rare rocky intertidal areas, and sandy beaches. The waters surrounding the Island are home to Winter Flounder, Atlantic Herring, and Atlantic Silversides.
  • Ward Acres, located in the North End, is a combination of untouched forest, wild lawns and meadows, acres of hiking, exercise trails and historic horse stables/cemeteries. It encompasses 62 acres, with the forests divided into four main sections (North Woods, Northwest Woods, Central Woods, Southeast Woods), each distinct in both general characteristics and species presence.
  • The Leatherstocking Trail is a 2-mile (3.2 km) long, inter-municipal hiking trail situated between New Rochelle and Mamaroneck, eventually linking into Saxon Woods County Park.
  • Sheldrake Lake which formerly served as a reservoir supplying the areas drinking water, is now a 60 acres (0.24 km²) park and nature conservancy promoting an increased understanding of the local ecology.
  • Twin Lakes Park, ccombined with the adjacent Nature Study Woods comprise 220 acres (0.89 km²) of woods, marsh, lakes, ponds and some fields along the Hutchinson River in New Rochelle’s Northend. There are many foot trails weaving through woods, marshlands, fields and around two large lakes (formerly reservoirs).

John Henry Starin (August 27, 1825 - March 21, 1909) was a U.S. Representative from New York, grandson of Thomas Sammons. ... This article is about the state. ... New York City waterways: 1. ... From the 16th to the 18th century the name Huguenot was applied to a member of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, historically known as the French Calvinists. ... Watertower on northern end of the island. ... A military base is a facility directly owned and operated by and/or for the military or one of its branches that shelters military equipment and personnel, and facilitates training and operations. ... {{Taxobox | color = pink | name = Kemps Ridley | status = CR | stat | image = kempsridley. ... For other uses, see Osprey (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Sterna albifrons Pallas, 1764 The Little Tern (Sterna albifrons) is a seabird of the tern family Sternidae. ...

Golf

  • Wykagyl Golf Club, located in the Wykagyl section of New Rochelle on North Avenue just south of Quaker Ridge Road. Golfweek magazine ranks Wykagyl as one of America's Top 100 Classic Courses.

Pelham Manor is a village located in Westchester County, New York, USA. As of the 2000 census, the village had a total population of 5,466. ... Westchester is the name of some places in the United States of America: Westchester, Los Angeles, California Westchester, Florida Westchester, Illinois Westchester County, New York There are also some places written West Chester: West Chester, Ohio West Chester, Pennsylvania This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other... New York, New York redirects here. ...

Landmarks, sites and attractions

  • Columbia Island is a small island (appx. 150 feet (46 m) square) situated between Davids' Island and Pea Island. Up until 1940 it was known as Little Pea Island. CBS purchased it and built a concrete foundation to support a transmitter building topped by a 410-foot (120 m) tall antenna tower for WCBS-AM. [15] [16] The transmitter remained in operation until the 1960s, when the station was moved to nearby High Island.
  • Execution Rocks Lighthouse is centered in the middle of Long Island Sound, just south of Davids' Island.The structure was built in 1849 and includes a 55-foot (17 m) tall tower and the ‘keeper's house’. It is rumored that the lighthouse's site got its name before the American Revolutionary War when British colonial authorities executed people by chaining them to the rocks at low tide and allowing the rising water to drown them. In reality, the name was chosen to reflect the historically dangerous shipping area created by the rocks exposure during low tides.

Columbia Island through telescope mounted in Pelham Bay Park. ... Watertower on northern end of the island. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... This article is about the construction material. ... WCBS-AM 880 is a Class A 50,000 watt radio station broadcasting from New York City featuring an all news and format. ... High Island is a small private island next to City Island. ... Execution Rocks Lighthouse is a large lighthouse in Long Island Sound, north of Sands Point. ... Watertower on northern end of the island. ...

Geography

New Rochelle is located at the southeastern point of continental New York State. It lies on the Long Island Sound, bordered on the west by Pelham, Pelham Manor and Eastchester, by Scarsdale to the north and east, Mamaroneck and Larchmont to the east. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 13.2 square miles (34.3 km²). The city has a rough triangle shape, approximately 10 miles (16 km) from north to south and 1.5 miles (2 km) from east to west at its widest point. New York City waterways: 1. ... Pelham is the name of several towns in the United States of America and in Canada: Pelham, Alabama Pelham, Georgia Pelham, Massachusetts Pelham, New Hampshire Pelham, New York which indirectly gave its name to the novel The Taking of Pelham One Two Three through Pelham Bay, Bronx, New York Pelham... Pelham Manor is a village in Westchester County, New York, USA. The population was 5,466 at the 2000 census. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Scarsdale could be Scarsdale, New York in Westchester County Scarsdale, an ancient hundred of Derbyshire, England This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Mamaroneck, New York may refer to two places in New York: The Town of Mamaroneck, a town in Westchester County The Village of Mamaroneck, a village partially within the town This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... emblem, Village of Larchmont Larchmont is a village located in Westchester County, New York. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...

Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Government and emergency services

New Rochelle City Hall
New Rochelle City Hall
Huguenot children's library
Huguenot children's library

Image File history File linksMetadata City_of_NR_800. ... Image File history File linksMetadata City_of_NR_800. ...

Government

Since 1932 New Rochelle has operated under a Council-Manager form of government. The City Manager is the Chief Administrative officer of the city selected to carry out the directives of the Council. The Manager monitors the city's fiscal condition and enforces it's ordinances and laws. The City Manager is involved in the discussion of all matters coming before Council yet has no final vote. The City Council is the legislative body consisting of the Mayor and six council members. The Mayor serves as the presiding officer of the Council. Since 1993 the City has had six council districts, with one council member elected from and by each district. The Council functions to set policy, approve the annual budget, appoint the City Manager and City Clerk, and enact local laws, resolutions & ordinances [17]. The council-manager government is one of two main variations of representative municipal government in the United States. ... Ordinance can mean: A law made by a non-sovereign body such as a city council or a colony. ... This article is about law in society. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... For the rental car company, see Budget Rent a Car. ... This article is about law in society. ...


Fire

New Rochelle's Fire Department actively pursues code enforcement and fire prevention. By keeping buildings up to code, controlling illegal occupancies, monitoring the safety of living-areas and issuing licenses and permits, the department works to control the potential for dangerous situations. With five state-of-the-art facilities stationed throughout the city, the department is capable of handling fires, rescues, extrications, medical emergencies, hazardous material incidents and natural disasters. The NRFD is known as the premiere fire department in the area because of its wide range of services and is frequently called on by nearby communities to assist in handling emergency situations. Whereas the city's emergency services are municipally funded, neighboring towns of Larchmont, Scarsdale, Mamaroneck, Eastchester, Bronxville and Pelham all depend on volunteer fire and emergency medical resources to serve their residents. Firefighter with an axe A firefighter, sometimes still called a fireman though women have increasingly joined firefighting units, is a person who is trained and equipped to put out fires, rescue people and in some areas provide emergency medical services. ... Emergency services are public services that deal with emergencies and other aspects of Public Safety. ...


Police

For almost two centuries the community relied on the traditional 'constable-magistrate' system for law enforcement. The population growth of the late 1800s greatly diminished the effectiveness of this system and by 1885 the Town of New Rochelle established its first professional police department to administer their law enforcement services. The Department has grown immensely over the past century, with over 186 officers currently sworn to the force. In 1993 the Department was certified as an accredited agency by the New York State Law Enforcement Accreditation Council. Focusing on the benefits of community oriented policing, the department recently introduced its 'Police and Community Together' (PACT) program [18]. For the band, see The Police. ... This article is about the state. ... In 1967, state-of-the-art policing was exemplified by a fast response to radio calls in this Black-and-White and a crowd drawn by the siren and flashing lights. ...


Medical

Sound Shore Medical Center of Westchester is a not-for-profit health care organization located in located in New Rochelle that treats over 85,000 patients annually and operates the only New York State Area Trauma Center in southern Westchester County. A non-profit organization (abbreviated NPO, or non-profit or not-for-profit) is an organization whose primary objective is to support an issue or matter of private interest or public concern for non-commercial purposes, without concern for monetary profit. ... This article is about the state. ... A trauma center is a hospital equipped to perform as a casualty receiving station for the emergency medical services by providing the best possible medical care for traumatic injuries 24 hours a day, 365 days per year. ... Westchester County is a primarily suburban county located in the U.S. state of New York with about 950,000 residents. ...


Crime statistics

New Rochelle is the safest city of its size in New York State and the fourth safest city of its size in the United States [19]. The majority of crimes committed within New Rochelle are non-violent property crimes, including burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. Property crime, on a scale of 1 (low crime) to 10, is 4 compared to the US average of 3. Violent crime (murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault) is 3, equal to the US average. [20] This article is about the state. ... Motor vehicle theft is a crime of theft. ... A violent crime or crime of violence is a crime in which the offender uses or threatens violent force upon the victim. ...


Demographics

See also: New Rochelle (Zip-Code Areas).


As measured by the census[21] of 2000, New Rochelle (City) had a population of 72,182 people, 24,275 occupied households, and 17,546 families residing in the city. The population density was 6,973.5 people per square mile (2,692.7/km²). There were 26,995 housing units at an average density of 2,608.0/sq mi (1,007.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 68% White, 19% African American, 0.20% Native American, 4% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 6% from other races, and 3% from two or more races. 20% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. In the city the population was spread out with 24.0% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 29.5% from 25 to 44, 22.2% from 45 to 64, and 15.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 90.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.9 males. There were 26,189 households out of which 32.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.5% were married couples living together, 12.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.0% were non-families. 28.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.29. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... Matrimony redirects here. ...


19,312 residents of New Rochelle were enrolled in school, with 2,743 in pre-school or kindergarten, 8,105 in elementary school, 3,704 in high school and 5,030 in college or graduate school. Out of 42,872 individuals over the age of 25, 20% (9,766) had no high school diploma, 23% (11,325) were high school graduates, 14% (6,710) achieved some level of college education, 5% (2,347) received their Associate's Degree, 19% (9,120) received their Bachelor's Degree and 20% (9,604) received a Graduate Degree. Child picking up book. ... A high school diploma is a diploma awarded for the completion of high school. ...


The working population was 35,262 individuals, 95.7% of whom were employed. The occupational breakdown had 42% working in 'management', 25% working in 'sales', 17% in 'services', 8% in 'construction', and 7% in 'production and transport'. The average daily commute was 30 minutes, with 60% driving to work, 12% carpooling, 18% traveling via public-transportation and 7% using other means.


According to the 2000 measurements, the median income for a household in the city was $86,206 and the median income for a family was $127,897.[2] The per capita income for the city was $31,956. About 9.8% of the population was below the poverty line. The median household income is commonly used to provide data about geographic areas and divides households into two equal segments with the first half of households earning less than the median household income and the other half earning more. ...


Transportation

Road

Major highways include Interstate 95 and the Hutchinson River Parkway. Interstate 95 serves as the main route through New Rochelle with four exits directly serving the city. The Hutchinson River Parkway, which is designated for passenger vehicles only, runs through much of the city. Substantial congestion on the Parkway occurs in both directions during the morning and evening rush-hour. Interstate 95, the major Interstate Highway along the East Coast of the United States, runs 23. ... The Hutchinson River Parkway, colloquially called The Hutch by many Westchester and Bronx residents, is a parkway that runs through Westchester County, New York and the Bronx in New York City. ... For other uses, see Rush hour (disambiguation). ...


The Boston Post Road, also known as Main Street in downtown New Rochelle, is used as a major artery during the morning and evening commute. Most traffic via the Post Road is short distance or fairly local, yet vehicles have utilized Route 1 during times of heavy congestion on I-95 as a re-route.


Railroad

The city has a commuter railroad station served by Metro North as well as Amtrak.[3] The New Rochelle Metro-North Railroad station serves the residents of New Rochelle, New York via the New Haven Line. ... Metro-North (officially MTA Metro-North Railroad) is a suburban commuter railroad running service from New York City to the northern suburbs in New York State and Connecticut. ... Vermonter at the Brattleboro, Vermont, station, 18 March 2004. ...


The New York, Westchester and Boston Railroad

Quaker Ridge station - Sratton Road

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By 1848, the New York & New Haven opened their line along Long Island Sound. After the end of the Civil War, proposals for new railroads reached new levels. As New York City continued to expand, many proposals were made to link The Bronx with Westchester County, hoping to capitalize on increasing real estate values. Banking that the city would continue to grow northward, the New York, Westchester and Boston Railway Company developed new lines of service to serve the large populations moving to the suburbs. Two main lines were built as part of the NYW&B; the Port Chester line and the White Plains line. The Port Chester Line ran along the same route as the New York Railroads New Haven line which remains in service today. The White Plains Line ran north through much of New Rochelle's rural, undeveloped Northend. Even by 1912, much of 'Upper Rochelle' remained sparsely populated. The Wykagyl and Quaker Ridge stations fronted dirt roads and were not served by public transportation. Ironically, most of the real-estate development that did occur at the time was attracting wealthier residents who owned their own automobiles, frequently chauffeur-driven, and used them instead of public-transportation for local trips. While the populations of some communities served by the NYWB did grow between 1912 and 1937, the growth was not large enough and did not occur fast enough to provide sufficient business for the railroad and service was discontinued on December 31, 1937. The only signs of the railway that are left can be found in a few remaining station houses, most notably the Quaker Ridge station, currently a private residence and the former Wykagyl station, now part of a shopping center. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Westchester County is a suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... The New York, Westchester and Boston Railway Company (NYW&BRwy), known to its riders as the Westchester and the Boston-Westchester, operated as an electric commuter railroad in the Bronx and Westchester County, New York from 1912 to 1937. ... White Plains is the name of some places in the United States of America: White Plains, Georgia White Plains, Kentucky White Plains, Maryland White Plains, New York White Plains, North Carolina White Plains, New York was the site of the American Revolutionary War Battle of White Plains. ... Mass transit redirects here. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Industry

New Rochelle has been home to a variety of industries over the years, including: Thanhouser Film Studios, Terrytoons Studios, P.J. Tierney Diner Manufacturing (now DeRaffele Manufacturing Company), Flynn Burner Company, New York Seven Up (Joyce Beverages, Inc), RawlPlug, Inc., the Longines Symphonette Society, Conran's USA. Manufacturing and warehousing has declined since the 1990s as industrial land near both exits from Interstate 95 have been converted to "big box" retailer use. New Rochelle remains a center of business, home to the corporate headquarters of Sidney Frank Importing, Blimpies, and East River Savings Bank. This article is about a soft drink. ...


Sister city

New Rochelle’s ‘sister city’ is La Rochelle, France, a city and commune of western France with a (population 78,000 in 2004). Location within France La Rochelle is a town and commune of western France, and a seaport on the Atlantic Ocean (population 76,584 in 1999). ...


New Rochelle in film, music, television and fiction

  • In the early 20th century New Rochelle was home to some of the first movie studios in the country. Edwin Thanhouser established Thanhouser Film Corporation on the corner of Warren and Grove Street. Thanhouser's "Million Dollar Mystery" was one of the first serial motion pictures. After a devastating fire in 1913, the studio moved to Main Street near Echo Avenue.
  • Terrytoons animation studio was located in New Rochelle from 1928 to 1968. Its most popular characters include Mighty Mouse, Gandy Goose, Dinky Duck, Deputy Dawg, Luno and Heckle and Jeckle.
  • The song "Happy To Keep His Dinner Warm" from the Broadway show How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying is about Rosemary's desire to become a trophy wife and live in a mansion in New Rochelle.
  • George M. Cohan's song "Forty-five Minutes from Broadway" is about New Rochelle in the late 1890s. Factoring in a walk from Broadway to Grand Central, and a 30-minute Metro-North ride, the city is still about 45 minutes away. Cohen had a summer house that was on The College of New Rochelle campus, until it was dismantled to make way for the new Wellness Center.
  • Musicals Give My Regards To Broadway and Guys and Dolls both reference New Rochelle.
  • Ragtime, a novel written by New Rochelle resident E. L. Doctorow and set in New Rochelle, was released in 1976 and later became a successful Broadway show, and a major motion picture of the same name.
  • The early 1960s TV hit The Dick Van Dyke Show starring Dick Van Dyke and Mary Tyler Moore was set in New Rochelle.
  • Don McLean's song "American Pie" has a line that says "Drove my chevy to the levee, But the levee was dry." One interpretation of the song suggests McLean is referring to a bar named "The Levee" that once existed on south North Ave. in New Rochelle.[22]
  • The film Catch Me If You Can is loosely based on the story Frank Abagnale, who grew up in New Rochelle, where parts of the film take place.
  • The famous Mean Joe Green Coca-Cola commercial was shot in New Rochelle in 1979.
  • Scenes in Goodfellas were filmed on Alfred Lane, off Quaker Ridge Road in the Pinebrook Heights neighborhood. The house of the parents of Henry Hill's eventual wife, Karen, is on Alfred Lane. Henry goes across the street and pistol whips the neighbor after the neighbor sexually attacked Karen.
  • The Oscar-nominated Burt Reynolds film Starting Over includes a school carnival scene filmed at what is now known as the Hudson Montessori School on Quaker Ridge Road.
  • Scenes in the movie Michael Clayton, released in 2007 and starring George Clooney, were filmed in New Rochelle.
  • The character James 'Spike' Thompson (Dexter Fletcher) in the ITV series Press Gang comes from New Rochelle, but lives in Norbridge, England.
  • Scenes of the movie Burn After Reading, starring Brad Pitt and George Clooney, were filmed in Sutton Manor.
  • The music video for the song "Dance, Dance" by the band Fall Out Boy takes place in the gymnasium of Salesian High School in New Rochelle.

Mighty Mouse, the signature character of the studio. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... Deputy Dawg was originally a Terrytoons cartoon character featured on the animated television series of the same name from 1959 through 1972. ... Silent Alarm is the debut album by British rock band Bloc Party, first released on February 14, 2005, and charted at #3 in the Official UK Charts. ... Heckle and Jeckle in Taming the Cat Heckle and Jeckle was a theatrical cartoon series created by Paul Terry, and released by his own studio, Terrytoons. ... How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying is a 1961 musical, initially running for 1,417 performances. ... A trophy wife is commonly used to describe the second or third wife of (usually) older man; and who is considered a status symbol. ... George Michael Cohan (July 3, 1878 – November 5, 1942) was a United States entertainer, playwright, composer, lyricist, actor, singer, dancer, director, and producer of Irish descent. ... Forty-five Minutes from Broadway is the name of a musical play written and produced by George M. Cohan in 1905. ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City. ... Grand Central may refer to: Grand Central Terminal - a train station in Manhattan, New York, USA Grand Central Station - a train station in Chicago; also the name of the predecessor to Grand Central Terminal (following Grand Central Depot) in Manhattan, New York. ... Give My Regards to Broadway is a song written by George M. Cohan for his musical play Little Johnny Jones (initiated 1904 in a Broadway theater). ... Guys and Dolls is a musical, with the music and lyrics written by Frank Loesser and book by Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows, based on The Idyll Of Miss Sarah Brown, a short story by Damon Runyon. ... This article is about the 1975 novel. ... E.L. Doctorow, photograph by Jill Krementz, from back cover of Doctorows 1975 novel Ragtime Edgar Lawrence Doctorow (born January 6, 1931, New York, New York) is the author of several critically acclaimed novels that blend history and social criticism. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of... Ragtime is a 1981 motion picture based on the historical novel Ragtime by E. L. Doctorow. ... The Dick Van Dyke Show is an American television situation comedy which initially aired on CBS from October 3, 1961 to June 1, 1966, created by Carl Reiner and starring Dick Van Dyke and Mary Tyler Moore. ... Richard Wayne “Dick” Van Dyke (born December 13, 1925) is an Emmy Award-winning American actor, presenter and entertainer, with a career spanning 5 decades. ... This article is about the actress. ... For other people with similar names see Don MacLean. ... For other uses, see American Pie (disambiguation). ... Catch Me If You Can is a 2002 motion picture set in the 1960s. ... Frank William Abagnale, Jr. ... The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ... Goodfellas (also spelled GoodFellas) is an Academy Award winning 1990 crime drama film directed by Martin Scorsese, based on the book Wiseguy by Nicholas Pileggi, the true story of mob informer Henry Hill. ... Burton Leon Reynolds, Jr. ... Starting Over is a 1979 film which tells the story of a recently divorced man (Burt Reynolds) who is torn between his new girlfriend (Jill Clayburgh) and his ex-wife (Candice Bergen). ... Michael Clayton is a 2007 American dramatic legal thriller film written and directed by Tony Gilroy and produced by Sydney Pollack. ... George Timothy Clooney (born May 6, 1961) is an Academy Award- and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor, director, producer, and screenwriter, who gained fame as one of the lead doctors in the long-running television drama, ER (1994–99), as Anthony Edwardss characters best friend and partner... Dexter Fletcher on the set of GamesMaster, of which he hosted only one series. ... Press Gang was a British childrens television comedy-drama, which ran for forty-three episodes in five series from 1989 to 1993. ... William Bradley Brad Pitt (born December 18, 1963) is an Academy award-nominated American actor, film producer, and social activist. ... Dance, Dance is the second single from Fall Out Boys album From Under the Cork Tree. ... Fall Out Boy (commonly abbreviated as FOB) is an American band from Wilmette, Illinois (a suburb of Chicago) that formed in 2001. ...

Notable residents

[44] Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Johnny Angel is a 1945 film starring George Raft. ... Hugh Jesse Arnelle (born December 30, 1933 in New Rochelle, New York) is a retired American basketball player. ... Derek Bermel (b. ... Jerry Bilik (b. ... Gloria Borger is a journalist, columnist, and commentator. ... There are several prominent people named John Boyd Sir John Boyd, British ambassador and master of Churchill College, Cambridge Col. ... Teresa Brewer (born as Theresa Breuer, May 7, 1931, Toledo, Ohio – died October 17, 2007, New Rochelle, New York) was an American pop and jazz singer who was one of the most popular female singers of the 1950s. ... For other uses, see Joseph Campbell (disambiguation). ... Craig Carton is an American radio personality and shock jock who has worked on a variety of radio stations and talk formats. ... Vernon and Irene Castle were a husband-and-wife team of ballroom dancers of the early 20th century. ... Carrie Chapman Catt (January 9, 1859 – March 9, 1947) was a womans suffrage leader. ... Kenneth Irvine Chenault (born 2 June 1951) is a former president (1997-2001) and current Chief Executive Officer (2001-present) of American Express. ... Harold and Maude, 1971 Bud Cort (born Walter Edward Cox on March 29, 1948) is an American film and stage actor, writer, and director. ... Vinnie Costa (born September 4, 196?) is an American actor and reality TV participant. ... Reality television is a genre of television programming in which the fortunes of real life people (as opposed to fictional characters played by actors) are followed. ... Faith Daniels (March 9, 1957, Wheeling, West Virginia) became nationally known for her role in anchoring some of Americas most popular news and talk show programs. ... Ossie Davis in The Green Pastures, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1951 Ossie Davis (December 18, 1917 – February 4, 2005) was an African American film actor, director and social activist. ... Drew Saunders Days III Drew Saunders Days III, U.S. lawyer, He served as United States Solicitor General from 1993 to 1996. ... The United States Solicitor General is the individual appointed to argue for the Government of the United States in front of the Supreme Court of the United States, when the government is party to a case. ... The Sterling Law Building Sculptural ornamentation on the Sterling Law Building Yale Law School, or YLS, is the law school of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Ruby Dee (born October 27, 1924) is an African American actress, poet, playwright, screenwriter, journalist, and activist. ... Robert Osbourne Bob Denver (January 9, 1935 – September 2, 2005) was an American comedic actor best known for his role as Gilligan on the television series Gilligans Island. ... Matthew Raymond Matt Dillon (born February 18, 1964) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Edgar Lawrence Doctorow (born January 6, 1931, New York, New York) is a writer who has written several critically aclaimed novels that blend history and social criticism. ... Christopher Edley, Jr. ... Sather Tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... Boalt Hall The UC Berkeley School of Law, commonly referred to as Boalt Hall, is one of 14 schools and colleges at the University of California, Berkeley. ... John Falter in his studio, 1978 John Philip Falter (Plattsmouth, NE, 1910 - Philadelphia, PA, 1982), more commonly known as John Falter, was a renowned Nebraska artist who was perhaps most famous for his many Saturday Evening Post covers. ... A cover of the Saturday Evening Post from 1903, illustrated by George Gibbs. ... Jane Erin Emmet de Glehn (1873-1961) was a notable American figure and portrait painter. ... Lydia Field Emmet, Self Portrait. 1912. ... Laurence John Fishburne III[1] (born July 30, 1961) is an American Academy Award-nominated, Emmy- and Tony Award-winning actor of screen and stage, as well as playwright, director, and producer. ... Gina Torres (born April 25, 1969) is an American television and movie actress. ... Noah Fleiss (b. ... Eddie Foy Jr. ... Francis Frankie Frisch (September 9, 1898 - March 12, 1973), nicknamed the Fordham Flash, was an American Major League Baseball player of the early 20th century and a Baseball Hall of Fame inductee. ... Sidney E. Frank (October 2, 1919 – January 10, 2006) was an American businessman who became a billionaire through his savvy promotion of Grey Goose vodka and Jägermeister. ... For other persons named Robert Fulton, see Robert Fulton (disambiguation). ... Henry Louis Lou Gehrig (June 19, 1903 â€“ June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig[2], was an American baseball player in the 1920s and 1930s, who set several Major League records and was popularly called the The Iron Horse[2] for his durability. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Leslie Howard Gelb (born March 4, 1937) is a former correspondent for The New York Times and is currently President Emeritus of the Council on Foreign Relations. ... The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is an influential and independent, nonpartisan foreign policy membership organization founded in 1921 and based at 58 East 68th Street (corner Park Avenue) in New York City, with an additional office in Washington, D.C. Through its membership, meetings, and studies, it has been...

  • Steven F. Goldstone . CEO of RJR Nabisco

[45]

[52] Irv Gotti (born Irving Lorenzo) (born June 26, 1970 in Hollis, Queens, New York, U.S.A) is a prominent hip hop and R&B record producer and is the head of The Inc. ... James Gregory (December 23, 1911 – September 16, 2002) was an American character actor noted for playing brash roles such as McCarthy-like Senator Joseph Iselin in The Manchurian Candidate (1962), the audacious General Ursus in Beneath the Planet of the Apes, and loudmouthed Inspector Luger in Barney Miller (TV-Series... Nick Gregory has been the meterologist for WNYW-FOX 5 News for nearly two decades. ... Butch Harmon is Tiger Woods swing coach ... Personal Information Birth December 30, 1975 ) Cypress, California Height 6 ft 0 in (1. ... Claude Harmon, Sr. ... Peter Lind Hayes (June 25, 1915 – April 21, 1998) was an American vaudeville entertainer, songwriter, and film and television actor. ... Anthony Heald is an American actor best known for portraying Hannibal Lecters smarmy psychiatrist, Frederick Chilton, in The Silence of the Lambs and Red Dragon, and as deputy principal Scott Guber in Boston Public. ... For other people named William Randolph Hearst, see William Randolph Hearst (disambiguation) William Randolph Hearst I (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate. ... Henry J. Heimlich (b. ... The Heimlich maneuver The Heimlich maneuver, also known as abdominal thrusts, is a first aid procedure for clearing an obstructed airway. ... Don Hewitt, broadcaster, born 14 December 1922. ...

Devon Hughes (born August 1, 1972) is an American professional wrestler, best known for his appearances with Extreme Championship Wrestling and World Wrestling Entertainment as D-Von Dudley. ... Lord Jamar (born Lorenzo Dechalus, September 17, 1968 in New Rochelle, New York) is a rapper and actor. ... Art James (October 15, 1929 - March 27, 2004) was best known as the announcer on the classic game show Concentration. ... Louis Woodard Lou Jones (born January 15, 1932 - died 3 February 2006) is a former American athlete, winner of gold medal in 4x400 m relay at the 1956 Summer Olympics. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Elia Kazan, (Greek: Ηλίας Καζάν, IPA: ), (September 7, 1909 – September 28, 2003) was a Greek-American film and theatre director, film and theatrical producer, screenwriter, novelist and cofounder of the influential Actors Studio in New York in 1947. ... Michael M. Kaiser, is the President of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts (which is also known as the Kennedy Center) in Washington, DC. Kaiser received his B.A. in Economics from Bradeis University and his M.B.A. from the MIT Sloan School of Management. ... The Kennedy Center as seen from the Potomac River. ... Jerome Kohlberg, Jr. ... Private equity is a broad term that refers to any type of equity investment in an asset in which the equity is not freely tradable on a public stock market. ... Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co (commonly referred to as KKR) is a New York City based private equity firm that focuses primarily on late stage leveraged buyouts. ... James Douglas Muir Jay Leno (April 28, 1950) is an Emmy Award-winning American stand-up comedian and television host, who succeeded Johnny Carson as host of The Tonight Show in 1992. ... Investigative Journalist, winner of the 2003 Pultizer Prize for his reporting on the abuse of mentally ill adults in state-regulated homes. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Joseph Christian Leyendecker (23 March 1874-25 July 1951) was a popularAmerican illustrator. ... A cover of the Saturday Evening Post from 1903, illustrated by George Gibbs. ... Andrea McArdle is an American singer and actress. ... For other uses, see Annie (disambiguation). ... For other people with similar names see Don MacLean. ... American Pie is an eight-and-a-half minute long classic rock song by singer-songwriter Don McLean, about the day the music died. Recorded in 1971 and released that year on the album of the same name, it was a number-one U.S. hit in 1972. ... Branford Marsalis. ... Willie Howard Mays, Jr. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Alan Menken (born July 22, 1949) is an American Broadway and Academy Award winning film score composer. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Robert Merrill (June 4, 1917 – October 23, 2004) was an American opera baritone. ... Bob Mintzer (Jan 27, 1953 - ), originally from New Rochelle, New York, is a jazz saxophonist, composer, arranger and big band leader based in New York City. ... Andrea Mitchell Andrea Mitchell (born October 30, 1946) is an American journalist, television commentator, and writer. ... Rob Morrow Rob Morrow (born September 21, 1962 in New Rochelle, New York) is an American actor currently starring in the television program Numb3rs. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Iona Preparatory School is an all-boys Catholic high school located in New Rochelle, NY in suburban Westchester County. ... Glynnis OConnor (born November 19, 1956 in New York City) is an American actress, perhaps best known for her work in the mid 1970s, including her lead actress role in the TV version of Our Town and the film Ode to Billy Joe, both of which co-starred Robby... George Oppen on board Galley Board, Long Island Sound, 1935; a picture featured on Selected Poems (2003) George Oppen (April 24, 1908 - July 7, 1984) was an American poet, best known as one of the members of the Objectivist group of poets. ... Barrie M. Osborne is a movie producer, executive producer, production manager and director. ... Cynthia Ozick (born April 17, 1928, New York City), is an American writer, the daughter of William Ozick and Celia Regelson. ... This article is about the department store chain. ... For other persons of the same name, see Thomas Paine (disambiguation). ... Jan Peerce (June 3, 1904 – December 15, 1984) was an American tenor. ... Maxwell Dixon, better known as Grand Puba, is a rapper from New York. ... Alex Raymond (October 2, 1909- September 6, 1956) was an American comic strip artist, best known for his work on Flash Gordon. ... For other uses, see Flash Gordon (disambiguation). ... Iona Preparatory School is an all-boys Catholic high school located in New Rochelle, NY in suburban Westchester County. ... Carl Reiner (born March 20, 1922) is an American actor, film director, producer, writer and comedian. ... Robert Rob Reiner (born March 6, 1945) is an American actor, director, producer, writer, childrens advocate and political activist. ... Frederic Remington (October 4, 1861 - December 26, 1909) was an American painter, illustrator, sculptor, and writer who specialized in depictions of the American West. ... Charles Haskell Revson (October 11, 1906 – August, 1975) was a pioneering cosmetics industry executive who created and managed Revlon Cosmetics through five decades. ... Revlon (NYSE: REV) is an American cosmetics company. ... Raymell Ray Rice (born January 22, 1987) from New Rochelle, New York is an American college football junior running back who plays for Rutgers University. ... City Baltimore, Maryland Team colors Purple, Black, and Gold Head Coach Brian Billick Owner Steve Bisciotti General manager Ozzie Newsome Mascot The Ravens: Edgar, Allan, & Poe League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1996–present) American Football Conference (1996-present) AFC Central (1996-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team history Baltimore... Mariano Rivera (born November 29, 1969, in Panama City, Panama) is a professional baseball player. ... Norman Percevel Rockwell (February 3, 1894 – November 8, 1978) was a 20th century American painter. ... Richard Roundtree Richard Roundtree (born July 9, 1942 in New Rochelle, New York) is an African American actor and hero famous for portraying John Shaft in the film Shaft (1971) and in its two sequels: Shafts Big Score in 1972, and Shaft in Africa in 1973. ... Louis Richard Rukeyser (born January 30, 1933) is a U.S. business columnist, economic commentator, and newscaster. ... Lawrence M. Small was the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. ... Robert Emmet Sherwood (4 April 1896–14 November 1955) American playwright, editor, and screenwriter. ... Lawrence M. Small was the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. ... Bob Smith (born November 27, 1917 in Buffalo, New York; died July 30, 1998 in Hendersonville, North Carolina), was the host of the childrens show Howdy Doody. ... Howdy Doody was a childrens television program (with a decidedly frontier/western theme, although other themes also colored the show) that aired on NBC in the United States from 1947 until 1960. ... CL Smooth (born Corey Penn, October 8, 1968 in New Rochelle, New York) is an American rapper from Mount Vernon, New York and the vocal half of the influential hip-hop duo Pete Rock & CL Smooth. ... Arnold Stang (born September 28, 1925 in Chelsea, Massachusetts) is a comic actor who plays a small and bespectacled, yet brash and knowing big-city type. ... Frances Sternhagen (born January 13, 1930) is an American actress. ... Cristina Teuscher (born March 12, 1978 in New Rochelle, New York) is a former freestyle and medley swimmer from the United States, who was a member of the Womens Relay Team that won the gold medal in the 4x200m Freestyle a the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Jean Toomer (December 26, 1894–March 30, 1967) was a poet, novelist and an important figure of the Harlem Renaissance. ... Joseph Paul Torre (born July 18, 1940 in Brooklyn, New York) is a former Major League Baseball player and the current manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers. ... Gina Torres (born April 25, 1969) is an American television and movie actress. ... Joan Tower (born September 6, 1938 in New Rochelle, New York) is a contemporary American composer. ... Rachel Vail, born July 25, 1966 is an American author of childrens and young adult books. ... Charles Malcolm Wilson (February 26, 1914 – March 13, 2000) was the Governor of New York from December 18, 1973 to January 1, 1975. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... Brand Nubian is a hip hop group from New Rochelle, New York, consisting of three MCs; Grand Puba (born Maxwell Dixon, March 4, 1966), Sadat X (formerly Derek X, born Derek Murphy) and Lord Jamar (born Lorenzo Dechalus, on September 17, 1968, and two DJs, DJ Alamo and DJ Sincere. ... Whitney Young at the White House, 1964. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.prevention.com/bestcities
  2. ^ Historical Landmarks of New Rochelle, Morgan Seacord 1938 pg.6
  3. ^ New York - A Guide to The Empire State, Work Projects Administration of New York pg.245
  4. ^ http://www.newrochelleny.com/182.asp
  5. ^ http://www.newrochelleny.com/182.asp
  6. ^ http://www.newrochelleny.com/183.asp
  7. ^ http://www.newrochelleny.com/19.asp
  8. ^ http://www.newrochelleny.com/193.asp
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  10. ^ http://www.newrochelleny.com/202.asp
  11. ^ http://www.newrochelleny.com/203.asp
  12. ^ http://www.newrochelleny.com/205.asp
  13. ^ http://www.newrochelleny.com/206.asp
  14. ^ http://www.forbes.com/lists/2006/7/ZIP10804.html
  15. ^ "CBS on an Island", Time, 1940-09-02. Retrieved on 2007-03-13. 
  16. ^ Kennedy Jr., T.R. "Radio 'Island' Comes to Life" (PDF, fee required), The New York Times, 1941-10-12, p. X12. Retrieved on 2007-03-13.  (Reprint)
  17. ^ http://www.newrochelleny.com
  18. ^ http://www.nrpd.org
  19. ^ http://noambramson.org/news/000879.html
  20. ^ Sperling's Best Places| New Rochelle, New York Crime Data [1]
  21. ^ American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  22. ^ Miss American Pie website
  23. ^ Encyclopedia of African-American Culture and History, Jack Salzman, David L. Smith, Cornel West, p. 196.
  24. ^ http://nrhs.nred.org/downloads/9D43E87C1E07432BA53F751F92B2E611/DistinguishedAlum.doc
  25. ^ The Heritage Encyclopedia of Band Music: Composers and Their Music, William H. Rehrig, Paul E. Bierley, p. 75.
  26. ^ http://nrhs.nred.org/downloads/9D43E87C1E07432BA53F751F92B2E611/DistinguishedAlum.doc
  27. ^ The Celebrity Black Book: Over 55,000 Accurate Celebrity Addresses, Jordan McAuley, p. 86.
  28. ^ Current Biography Yearbook, H.W. Wilson Company, p. 58.
  29. ^ Women Vaudeville Stars: Eighty Biographical Profiles, by Armond Fields, p. 210.
  30. ^ Eleanor Flexner, Century of Struggle, 1959; Harvard University Press, 1996, pp. 264-285, 300-317.
  31. ^ A CEO and a gentleman by Greg Farrell, USA TODAY, April 24, 2005
  32. ^ The Film Encyclopedia, Ephraim Katz, p. 293.
  33. ^ Reference Library of Black America, by Harry A. Ploski & James De Bois Williams, p. 1137
  34. ^ http://nrhs.nred.org/downloads/9D43E87C1E07432BA53F751F92B2E611/DistinguishedAlum.doc
  35. ^ "Ruby Dee To Be Named To Women's Hall Of Fame", Westchester.com, March 2007. Retrieved on 2008-01-23. 
  36. ^ Bob Denver, 70; Brought Goofy Comedy to Role as TV's Gilligan, The Washington Post, September 7, 2005
  37. ^ Current Biography, by H.W. Wilson Company, p. 91.
  38. ^ Contemporary Jewish-American Novelists: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook, Joel Shatzky, Michael Taub, p. 54.
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  42. ^ The Film Encyclopedia, Ephraim Katz, p. 479.
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  46. ^ http://www.scarletknights.com/football/roster/roster-detail.asp?ID=3473
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The Works Progress Administration (later Works Projects Administration, abbreviated WPA), was created on May 6, 1935 with the signing of Executive Order 7034. ... TIME redirects here. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

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