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Encyclopedia > New Orleans, Louisiana
City of New Orleans
Ville de La Nouvelle-Orléans
Flag of City of New Orleans
Flag

Seal
Nickname: "The Crescent City," "The Big Easy," "The City That Care Forgot," "504," and "NOLA" (acronym for New Orleans, LA).
Location in the State of Louisiana and the United States
Coordinates: 29°57′53″N 90°4′14″W / 29.96472, -90.07056
Country Flag of the United StatesUnited States
State Louisiana
Parish Orleans
Founded 1718
Government
 - Mayor C. Ray Nagin (D)
Area
 - City 907 km² (350.2 sq mi)
 - Land 467.6 km² (180.6 sq mi)
 - Water 439.4 km² (169.7 sq mi)
Elevation -2 to 6 m (-6.5 to 20 ft)
Population (2006[1])
 - City 275,000
 - Density 973/km² (2,518/sq mi)
 - Metro 1,030,363
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 - Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Website: http://www.cityofno.com

New Orleans (pronounced /nʲuːˈɔɹliˌɛnz/, locally /ˌnuːˈɔːlɛnz/; French: La Nouvelle-Orléans [lanuvɛlɔʀleɑ̃] ) is a major United States port city and the largest city in Louisiana. It is the center of the New Orleans metropolitan area. Down is an American southern heavy metal supergroup formed in 1991. ... NOLA is Downs first album. ... New Orleans, Louisiana is a US city and a metropolitan area. ... The Big Easy (film) a film shot in New Orleans in 1987 The Big Easy a nickname given to the city of New Orleans, Louisiana The Big Over Easy novel Category: ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2317x584, 268 KB)New Orleans, Louisiana Skyline from Tulane University parking garage, [{february 24]], 2007. ... Image File history File links New_Orleans,_Louisiana_flag. ... // A nickname is a name of an entity or thing that is not its proper name. ... Image File history File links Map_of_Louisiana_and_USA_highlighting_Orleans_Parish. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Image File history File links Flag_of_Louisiana. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... List of Louisiana parishes The state of Louisiana is divided into parishes in the same way that the other states of the United States are divided into counties. ... Image File history File links New_Orleans,_Louisiana_flag. ... New Orleans (French: Nouvelle-Orléans) is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... fuck you // Fuck you Fuck you fuck you Fuck you Fuck you Fuck you Fuck you Fuck you Fuck you Fuck you Fuck you btw Mister Nagin, don`t be angry. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Image File history File links La_Nouvelle-Orleans. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The New Orleans Metropolitan Area, consisting of the Greater New Orleans region and three addtional parishes which share the perimeter of Lake Ponchartrain, is the largest metropolitan area in the U.S. state of Louisiana, centered around the city of New Orleans. ...


New Orleans is located in southeastern Louisiana, straddling the Mississippi River. It is coextensive with Orleans Parish, meaning that the boundaries of the city and the parish are the same.[2] It is bounded by the parishes of St. Tammany (north), St. Bernard (east), Plaquemines (south), and Jefferson (south and west).[2][3][4] Lake Pontchartrain, part of which is included in the city limits, lies to the north, and Lake Borgne lies to the east.[4] For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ... St. ... St. ... Plaquemines Parish is a parish located in the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... Jefferson Parish is a parish in Louisiana that includes most of the suburbs of New Orleans. ... Lake Pontchartrains north shore at Fontainebleau State Park near Mandeville, Louisiana in 2004 Lake Pontchartrain (local English pronunciation ) (French: Lac Pontchartrain, pronounced ) is a brackish lake located in southeastern Louisiana. ... Lake Borgne is a lagoon in eastern Louisiana of the Gulf of Mexico. ...


The city is named after Philippe II, Duc d'Orléans, Regent of France, and is one of the oldest cities in the United States. It is well known for its multicultural heritage,[5] cuisine, architecture, music (particularly as the birthplace of jazz),[6][7] and its annual Mardi Gras and other celebrations and festivals. The city is often referred to as the "most unique" city in America.[8][9][10][11][12] Philippe II, Duke of Orléans, Philippe Charles (August 2, 1674 – December 23, 1723) called Duke of Chartres (1674–1701), and then Duke of Orléans (1701–1723) was Regent of France from 1715 to 1723. ... Multiculturalism or cultural pluralism is a policy, ideal, or reality that emphasizes the unique characteristics of different cultures in the world, especially as they relate to one another in immigrant receiving nations. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Revelers, Frenchmen Street, Faubourg Marigny. ...

Contents

History

The history of New Orleans, Louisiana traces its development from its founding by the French, through its period under Spanish control, then back to French rule before being sold to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase. ...

Beginnings through the 19th century

See also: New Orleans in the Civil War
Map of New Orleans from the 1888 Meyers Konversations-Lexikon
Map of New Orleans from the 1888 Meyers Konversations-Lexikon

La Nouvelle-Orléans (New Orleans) was founded August 25, 1718 by the French Mississippi Company, under the direction of Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville. It was named for Philippe II, Duke of Orléans, who was Regent of France at the time; his title came from the French city of Orléans. The French colony was ceded to the Spanish Empire in the Treaty of Paris (1763) and remained under Spanish control until 1801, when it reverted to French control. Most of the surviving architecture of the Vieux Carré (French Quarter) dates from this Spanish period. Napoleon sold the territory to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. The city grew rapidly with influxes of Americans, French, and Creole French. Major commodity crops of sugar and cotton were cultivated with slave labor on large plantations outside the city. Panoramic View of New Orleans-Federal Fleet at Anchor in the River, ca. ... 1888 German Map of New Orleans - From German Wikipedia File links The following pages link to this file: New Orleans, Louisiana History of New Orleans Categories: Meyers Konversations-Lexikon ... 1888 German Map of New Orleans - From German Wikipedia File links The following pages link to this file: New Orleans, Louisiana History of New Orleans Categories: Meyers Konversations-Lexikon ... Meyers Konversations-Lexikon was a German encyclopaedia. ... In the history of French trade, the French Mississippi Company was a chartered company first established in 1684. ... Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville (February 23, 1680–March 7, 1767) was a colonizer and governor of Louisiana. ... Philippe II, Duke of Orléans, Philippe Charles (August 2, 1674 – December 23, 1723) called Duke of Chartres (1674–1701), and then Duke of Orléans (1701–1723) was Regent of France from 1715 to 1723. ... Orléans (Latin, meaning golden) is a city and commune in north-central France, about 130 km (80 miles) southwest of Paris. ... The Spanish colonization of the Americas was Spains conquest, settlement, and rule over much of the western hemisphere from 1492-1898. ... The Treaty of Paris, often called the Peace of Paris, or the Treaty of 1763, was signed on February 10, 1763, by the kingdoms of Great Britain, France and Spain, with Portugal in agreement. ... French Quarter: upper Chartres street looking down towards Jackson Square and the spires of St. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... The Louisiana Purchase (French: Vente de la Louisiane) was the acquisition by the United States of America of 828,000 square miles (2,140,000 km²) of French territory (Louisiana) in 1803. ... This article is about an ethnic culture in Louisiana, USA. For uses of the term Creole in other countries and cultures, see Creole (disambiguation). ...


The Haitian Revolution of 1804 established the second republic in the Western Hemisphere and the first led by blacks. Haitian refugees both white and free people of color (affranchis) arrived in New Orleans, often bringing slaves with them. While Governor Claiborne and other officials wanted to keep out more free black men, French Creoles wanted to increase the French-speaking population. As more refugees were allowed in Louisiana, Haitian émigrés who had gone to Cuba also arrived. Nearly 90 percent of the new immigrants settled in New Orleans. The 1809 migration brought 2,731 whites; 3,102 free persons of African descent; and 3,226 enslaved refugees to the city, doubling its French-speaking population. Sixty-three percent of Crescent City inhabitants were now black, as Americans classified people.[13] Combatants Haiti France Commanders Toussaint Louverture, Jean-Jacques Dessalines Charles Leclerc, vicomte de Rochambeau, Napoleon Bonaparte Strength Regular army: <55,000, Volunteers: <100,000 Regular army: 60,000, 86 warships and frigates Casualties Military deaths: unknown, Civilian deaths: <100,000 Military deaths: 57,000 (37,000 combat; 20,000 yellow...


During the War of 1812, the British sent a force to conquer the city. The Americans decisively defeated the British troops, led by Sir Edward Pakenham, in the Battle of New Orleans on January 8, 1815. This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... Sir Edward Michael Pakenham (pro. ... For other uses of the name, see Battle of New Orleans (disambiguation). ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ...


As a principal port, New Orleans had the major role of any city during the antebellum era in the slave trade. Its port handled huge quantities of goods for export from the interior and import from other countries to be traded up the Mississippi River. The river was filled with steamboats, flatboats and sailing ships. At the same time, it had the most prosperous community of free persons of color in the South, who were often educated and middle-class property owners.[6][14] This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


The population of the city doubled in the 1830s, and by 1840 New Orleans had become the wealthiest and third-most populous city in the nation. It had the largest slave market. Two-thirds of the more than one million slaves brought to the Deep South arrived via the forced migration of the internal slave trade. The money generated by sales of slaves in the Upper South has been estimated at fifteen percent of the value of the staple crop economy. The slaves represented half a billion dollars in property, and an ancillary economy grew up around the trade in slaves - for transportation, housing and clothing, fees, etc., estimated at 13.5 percent of the price per person. All this amounted to tens of billions of dollars during the antebellum period, with New Orleans as a prime beneficiary.[15]


The Union captured New Orleans early in the American Civil War, sparing the city the destruction suffered by many other cities of the American South.[16] Animated map of secession, Civil War and re-admission:  States of the Union  Territories of the Union (including occupied territory)  States of the Confederacy  Territories claimed by Confederacy During the American Civil War, the Union was a name used to refer to the twenty-three states of the United States... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Historic Southern United States. ...


Twentieth century

A view across Uptown New Orleans, with the Central Business District in the background (1991).
A view across Uptown New Orleans, with the Central Business District in the background (1991).

In the early 20th century, New Orleans was a progressive major city whose most portentous development was a drainage plan devised by engineer and inventor A. Baldwin Wood. Until then, urban development was largely limited to higher ground along natural river levees and bayous; Wood's pump system allowed the city to expand into low-lying areas. Over the 20th century, rapid subsidence, both natural and human-induced, left these newly populated areas several feet below sea level.[17][18] Download high resolution version (874x494, 99 KB)New Orleans, the CBD from Uptown, larger version of photo by User:Infrogmation File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (874x494, 99 KB)New Orleans, the CBD from Uptown, larger version of photo by User:Infrogmation File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Albert Baldwin Wood (December 1, 1879 - May 10, 1956) was an inventor and engineer from New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Big Cypress Bayou in Jefferson, Texas off U.S. Route 59. ... A road destroyed by subsidence and shear. ...


New Orleans was vulnerable to flooding even before the age of negative elevation. In the late 20th century, however, scientists and New Orleans residents gradually became aware of the city's increased vulnerability. In 1965, Hurricane Betsy killed dozens of residents, even though the majority of the city remained dry. The rain-induced 1995 flood demonstrated the weakness of the pumping system; since that time, measures were taken to repair New Orleans's hurricane defenses and restore pumping capacity. Hurricane Betsy was a powerful hurricane of the 1965 Atlantic hurricane season which caused enormous damage in the Bahamas, Florida, and Louisiana. ... The May 8th 1995 New Orleans Flood struck the New Orleans metropolitan area, shutting down the city for two days. ...


Throughout the 20th Century, New Orleans experienced a significant drop in economic activity compared with newer southern cities such as Houston and Atlanta. While the port remained important, automation and containerization resulted in fewer local jobs for locals at the ports. Manufacturing in the city also diminished. New Orleans became increasingly dependent on tourism as an economic mainstay. Poor education and rising crime became increasingly problematic in the later decades of the century.


Hurricane Katrina

Main article: Hurricane Katrina
An aerial view from a United States Navy helicopter showing floodwaters around the entire downtown New Orleans area (2005).
An aerial view from a United States Navy helicopter showing floodwaters around the entire downtown New Orleans area (2005).

By the time Hurricane Katrina approached the city at the end of August 2005, most residents had evacuated. As the hurricane passed through the Gulf Coast region, the city's federal flood protection system failed, resulting in the worst civil engineering disaster in American history.[19] Floodwalls and levees constructed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers failed below design specifications and 80% of the city flooded. Tens of thousands of residents who had remained in the city were rescued or otherwise made their way to shelters of last resort at the Louisiana Superdome or the Morial Convention Center. Over 1,500 people died in Louisiana.[20] This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... States that border the Gulf of Mexico are shown in red The Gulf Coast region of the United States comprises the coasts of states which border the Gulf of Mexico. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The Petronas Twin Towers, designed by Thornton-Tomasetti and Ranhill Bersekutu Sdn Bhd engineers, and Cesar Pelli, were the worlds tallest buildings from 1998 to 2004. ... This article is about the type of dam. ... The United States Army is the largest, and by some standards oldest, established branch of the armed forces of the United States and is one of seven uniformed services. ... The United States Army Corps of Engineers, or USACE, is a federal agency made up of some 34,600 civilian and 650 military men and women. ... The Louisiana Superdome, often informally referred to simply as the Superdome, The Dome or even the New Orleans Superdome is a large, multi-purpose sports and exhibition facility located in the Central Business District of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The Ernest N. Morial Convention Center is a collection of buildings in New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


Hurricane Rita

Main article: Hurricane Rita

The city was declared off-limits to residents while efforts to clean up after Katrina began. The approach of Hurricane Rita in September 2005 caused repopulation efforts to be postponed,[21] and the Lower Ninth Ward was reflooded by Rita's storm surge. Lowest pressure 895 mbar (hPa)[1] Damages $10 billion (2005 USD)[1] Fatalities 7 direct, 113 indirect Areas affected Bahamas, Florida, Cuba, Yucatán Peninsula, Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas Part of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane Rita is the fourth-most intense Atlantic hurricane ever recorded and the most... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... Lowest pressure 895 mbar (hPa)[1] Damages $10 billion (2005 USD)[1] Fatalities 7 direct, 113 indirect Areas affected Bahamas, Florida, Cuba, Yucatán Peninsula, Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas Part of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane Rita is the fourth-most intense Atlantic hurricane ever recorded and the most... The two Lower Ninth Ward areas, including Holy Cross and the Lower Ninth Ward Neighborhood in relation to the rest of the city of New Orleans. ...

See also: Effect of Hurricane Katrina on New Orleans and Drainage in New Orleans

The effect of Hurricane Katrina on New Orleans, Louisiana was catastrophic and long-lasting. ... Drainage has been a major concern since the founding of New Orleans in the early 18th century, and an important factor in the citys history. ...

Post-disaster recovery

The Census Bureau in July 2006 estimated the population of New Orleans to be 223,000; a subsequent study estimated that 32,000 additional residents had moved to the city as of March 2007, bringing the estimated population to 255,000, approximately 56% of the pre-Katrina population level. Another estimate, based on data on utility usage from July 2007, estimated the population to be approximately 274,000, or 60% of the pre-Katrina population. These estimates are somewhat smaller than a third estimate, based on mail delivery records, from the Greater New Orleans Community Data Center in June 2007, which indicated that the city had regained approximately two-thirds of its pre-Katrina population.[22] The effect of Hurricane Katrina on New Orleans was catastrophic due to failure of the flood protection that experts agree worldwide should have protected the city. ...

The New Orleans cityscape as of 2007.
The New Orleans cityscape as of 2007.

Several major tourist events and other forms of revenue for the city have returned. Large conventions are being held again, such as those held by the American Library Association and American College of Cardiology.[23][24] College football events such as the Bayou Classic, New Orleans Bowl, and Sugar Bowl returned for the 2006-2007 season. The New Orleans Saints returned that season as well, following speculation of a move. The New Orleans Hornets returned to the city fully for the 2007-2008 season, having partially spent the 2006-2007 season in Oklahoma City. In March 2007 a local group of investors began conducting a study to see if the city could support a Major League Soccer team.[25] New Orleans successfully hosted the 2008 NBA All-Star Game, and Tulane University hosted the first and second rounds of the 2007 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament. The Superdome played host to the 2008 BCS National Championship Game in January 2008. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1268x360, 72 KB) Skyline de New Orleans a la nuit tombante, photo prise le 02/02/07 par lauteur, vue du pont reliant LUpper Ninth Ward a Gentilly. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1268x360, 72 KB) Skyline de New Orleans a la nuit tombante, photo prise le 02/02/07 par lauteur, vue du pont reliant LUpper Ninth Ward a Gentilly. ... ALA Logo The American Library Association (ALA) is a group based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally. ... Categories: Organization stubs | Medical associations ... The State Farm Bayou Classic is the annual college football game between the Grambling State University Tigers and the Southern University Jaguars, first held in 1974 at Tulane Stadium in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The New Orleans Bowl is a post-season college football bowl game certified by the NCAA that has been played annually at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana since 2001. ... The Sugar Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game played in the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... City New Orleans, Louisiana Team colors Gold and black Head Coach Sean Payton Owner Tom Benson and Rita Benson LeBlanc General manager Mickey Loomis Mascot Gumbo the dog League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1967–present) Eastern Conference (1967-1969) Capitol Division (1967; 1969) Century Division (1968) National Football Conference... The New Orleans Hornets are a professional basketball team based in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Nickname: Location in Oklahoma County and the state of Oklahoma. ... 2008 NBA All-Star Game Logo The 2008 NBA All-Star Game will be played on February 17, 2008 at the New Orleans Arena in New Orleans, Louisiana, home of the New Orleans Hornets. ... Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The 2007 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 65 NCAA schools playing in a single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... Date January 7, 2007 Stadium Louisiana Superdome Location New Orleans, Louisiana United States TV Coverage Network FOX The 2008 Allstate BCS National Championship Game will be played at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana, on Monday, January 7, 2008, and feature the #1 and #2 college football teams in...


Major events such as Mardi Gras and the Jazz and Heritage Festival were never displaced. For other uses, see Mardi Gras (disambiguation). ... Leroy Jones Quintet The New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, often known as Jazz Fest, is an annual celebration of the music and culture of New Orleans and Louisiana. ...


Geography

A true-color satellite image of New Orleans taken on NASA's Landsat 7
A true-color satellite image of New Orleans taken on NASA's Landsat 7

New Orleans is located at 29°57′53″N, 90°4′14″W (29.964722, −90.070556)[26] on the banks of the Mississippi River, approximately 105 miles (169 km) upriver from the Gulf of Mexico. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 350.2 square miles (907 km²), of which 180.56 square miles (467.6 km²), or 51.55%, is land.[27] Image File history File links from nasa. ... Image File history File links from nasa. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...


The city is located in the Mississippi River Delta on the east and west banks of the Mississippi River and south of Lake Pontchartrain. The area along the river is characterized by ridges and hollows. False-color image of the larger Mississippi Delta Closeup of the currently active delta front Mississippi Delta Lobes The Mississippi River Delta is the modern area of land (the river delta) built up by alluvium deposited by the Mississippi River as it slows down and enters the Gulf of Mexico. ... Lake Pontchartrains north shore at Fontainebleau State Park near Mandeville, Louisiana in 2004 Lake Pontchartrain (local English pronunciation ) (French: Lac Pontchartrain, pronounced ) is a brackish lake located in southeastern Louisiana. ...

Elevation of New Orleans
Elevation of New Orleans

New Orleans was originally settled on the natural levees or high ground along the Mississippi River. In fact, when the capital of French Louisiana was moved from Mobile, Alabama to New Orleans, the French colonial government cited New Orleans' inland location as one of the reasons for the move as it would be less vulnerable to hurricanes.[28] After the Flood Control Act of 1965, the US Army Corps built floodwalls and man-made levees around a much larger geographic footprint that included previous marshland and swamp. Whether or not this human interference has caused subsidence is a topic of debate. A study by the Geological Society of America reported Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x949, 351 KB)Elevation profile of New Orleans. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x949, 351 KB)Elevation profile of New Orleans. ... This article is about the type of dam. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country State County Mobile Founded 1702 Incorporated 1814 Government  - Mayor Sam Jones Area  - City 412. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... A road destroyed by subsidence and shear. ... The Geological Society of America (or GSA) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the advancement of the geosciences. ...

While erosion and wetland loss are huge problems along Louisiana's coast, the basement 30 to 50 feet (15 m) beneath much of the Mississippi Delta has been highly stable for the past 8,000 years with negligible subsidence rates.[29]

On the other hand, a report by the American Society of Civil Engineers claims that "New Orleans is subsiding (sinking)":[30]

Large portions of Orleans, St. Bernard, and Jefferson parishes are currently below sea level — and continue to sink. New Orleans is built on thousands of feet of soft sand, silt, and clay. Subsidence, or settling of the ground surface, occurs naturally due to the consolidation and oxidation of organic soils (called “marsh” in New Orleans) and local groundwater pumping. In the past, flooding and deposition of sediments from the Mississippi River counterbalanced the natural subsidence, leaving southeast Louisiana at or above sea level. However, due to major flood control structures being built upstream on the Mississippi River and levees being built around New Orleans, fresh layers of sediment are not replenishing the ground lost by subsidence.[30]
Vertical cross-section of New Orleans, showing maximum levee height of 23 feet (7 m).
Vertical cross-section of New Orleans, showing maximum levee height of 23 feet (7 m).

A recent study by Tulane and Xavier University notes that 51% of New Orleans is at or above sea level, with the more densely populated areas generally on higher ground. The average elevation of the city is currently between one and two feet (0.5 m) below sea level, with some portions of the city as high as 16 feet (5 m) and others as low as 10 feet (3 m) below sea level.[31] New Orleans (French: Nouvelle-Orléans) is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... St. ... Jefferson Parish is a parish in Louisiana that includes most of the suburbs of New Orleans. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian university headquartered in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Xavier University of Louisiana is a historically African-American Roman Catholic University located off Carrollton Avenue in Mid-City New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


In 2005, storm surge from Hurricane Katrina caused catastrophic failure of the federally designed and built levees, flooding 80% of the city.[32][33] A report by the American Society of Civil Engineers says that "had the levees and floodwalls not failed and had the pump stations operated, nearly two-thirds of the deaths would not have occurred".[30] There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


New Orleans has always had to consider the risk of hurricanes, but the risks are dramatically greater today due to coastal erosion from human interference.[28] Since the beginning of the 20th century it has been estimated that Louisiana has lost 2,000 square miles (5,000 km²) of coast (including many of its barrier islands) which once protected New Orleans against storm surge. Following Hurricane Katrina, the Army Corps of Engineers has instituted massive levee repair and hurricane protection measures to protect the city. United States Army Corps of Engineers logo The United States Army Corps of Engineers, or USACE, is made up of some 34,600 military men and women. ...


In 2006, Louisiana voters overwhelmingly adopted an amendment to the state's constitution to dedicate all revenues from off shore drilling to restore Louisiana's eroding coast line.[34] Congress has allocated $7 billion to bolster New Orleans' flood protection.[35]


National protected areas

Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve is a unit of the National Park Service in southeastern Louisiana. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...

Climate

Climate chart for New Orleans
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temperatures in °F
precipitation totals in inches
source: Weather.com[36]
Hurricanes of Category 3 or greater passing within 100 miles (160 km) of New Orleans
Hurricanes of Category 3 or greater passing within 100 miles (160 km) of New Orleans

The climate of New Orleans is humid subtropical, with short, generally mild winters and hot, humid summers. In January, morning lows average around 43 °F (6 °C), and daily highs around 62 °F (17 °C). In July, lows average 74 °F (23 °C), and highs average 91 °F (33 °C). The lowest recorded temperature was 7 °F (−14 °C) on February 13, 1899. The highest recorded temperature was 102 °F (39 °C) on August 22, 1980. The average precipitation is 64.2 inches (1,630 mm) annually; the summer months are the wettest, while October is the driest month.[37] Precipitation in winter usually accompanies the passing of a cold front. Hurricanes pose a severe threat to the area, and the city is particularly vulnerable because of its low elevation. According the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the city is the most vulnerable in the country when it comes to hurricanes.[38] Since 1965, portions of New Orleans have been flooded by four different storms: Hurricane Betsy, Hurricane Georges, Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita.[39][40] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about weather phenomena. ... FEMA redirects here. ... Hurricane Betsy was a powerful hurricane of the 1965 Atlantic hurricane season which caused enormous damage in the Bahamas, Florida, and Louisiana. ... Lowest pressure 937 mbar (hPa; 27. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... Lowest pressure 895 mbar (hPa)[1] Damages $10 billion (2005 USD)[1] Fatalities 7 direct, 113 indirect Areas affected Bahamas, Florida, Cuba, Yucatán Peninsula, Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas Part of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane Rita is the fourth-most intense Atlantic hurricane ever recorded and the most...


New Orleans experiences snowfall only on rare occasions. A small amount of snow fell during the 2004 Christmas Eve Snowstorm. On December 25, a combination of rain, sleet, and snow fell on the city, leaving some bridges icy. Before that, the last white Christmas was in 1954 and brought 4.5 inches (11 cm). The last significant snowfall in New Orleans fell on December 22, 1989, when most of the city received 1–2 inches (2–5 cm) of snow. For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ... The 2004 Christmas Eve Snowstorm was an extremely rare weather event that took place in Louisiana and Texas in the United States on December 24, 2004. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ...


Cityscape

The City of New Orleans & The Mississippi River
The City of New Orleans & The Mississippi River
Bourbon Street, New Orleans, in 2003, looking towards Canal Street.
Bourbon Street, New Orleans, in 2003, looking towards Canal Street.
See also: Wards of New Orleans and New Orleans neighborhoods
New Orleans, Chartres Street looking towards Canal Street, (2004).
New Orleans, Chartres Street looking towards Canal Street, (2004).

The Central Business District of New Orleans is located immediately north and west of the Mississippi River, and was historically called the "American Quarter" or "American Sector". Most streets in this area fan out from a central point in the city. Major streets of the area include Canal Street, Poydras Street, Tulane Avenue and Loyola Avenue. Canal Street functions as the street which divides the traditional "downtown" area from the "uptown" area. Bourbon Street, New Orleans, in 2003. ... Bourbon Street, New Orleans, in 2003. ... The city of New Orleans, Louisiana is divided into 17 Wards. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2288 × 1712 pixel, file size: 610 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) en: New Orleans, Chartres St - towards Canal Street, by Rafal Konieczny, 2004 pl: Nowy Orlean, ulica Chartres w kierunku Canal Street, Rafał Konieczny, 2004 File history... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2288 × 1712 pixel, file size: 610 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) en: New Orleans, Chartres St - towards Canal Street, by Rafal Konieczny, 2004 pl: Nowy Orlean, ulica Chartres w kierunku Canal Street, Rafał Konieczny, 2004 File history... The Central Business District is an area of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Canal Street is a major thoroughfare in the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


Every street crossing Canal Street between the Mississippi River and Rampart Street, which is the northern edge of the French Quarter, has a different name for the "uptown" and "downtown" portions. For example, St. Charles Avenue, known for its street car line, is called Royal Street below Canal Street. Elsewhere in the city, Canal Street serves as the dividing point between the "South" and "North" portions of various streets. In the local parlance downtown means "downriver from Canal Street" while uptown means "upriver from Canal Street". Downtown neighborhoods include the French Quarter, Tremé, the 7th Ward, Faubourg-Marigny, Bywater (the Upper Ninth Ward), and the Lower Ninth Ward. Uptown neighborhoods include the Warehouse District, the Lower Garden District, the Garden District, the Irish Channel, the University District, Carrollton, Gert Town, Fontainebleau, and Broadmoor. However, the Warehouse and Central Business Districts, despite being above Canal Street, are frequently called "Downtown" as a specific region, as in the Downtown Development District. French Quarter: upper Chartres street looking down towards Jackson Square and the spires of St. ... Treme (historically sometimes called Tremé or Faubourg Tremé) is a neighborhood in the downtown portion of the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Faubourg Marigny or simply Marigny is a neighborhood in the downtown section of New Orleans, Louisiana, just down river from the famous French Quarter. ... The Bywater is a neighborhood of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The Ninth Ward or 9th Ward is a distinctive region of New Orleans, Louisiana that is located in the easternmost downriver portion of the city. ... Uptown is a large area of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The Garden District is a residential area of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Carrollton is a neighborhood of uptown New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. It is the part of uptown New Orleans furthest up river from the French Quarter. ... The Central Business District is an area of New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


Other major districts within the city include Bayou St. John, Mid-City, Gentilly, Lakeview, Lakefront, New Orleans East, and Algiers (across the Mississippi River to the south). Algiers is a community in Louisiana, part of the city of New Orleans. ...


Architecture

Main article: Buildings and architecture of New Orleans
One Shell Square, at 51 floors, stands as the tallest building in New Orleans and Louisiana.
One Shell Square, at 51 floors, stands as the tallest building in New Orleans and Louisiana.
An aerial view of New Orleans (1999).
An aerial view of New Orleans (1999).

New Orleans is world-famous for its abundance of unique architectural styles, as it reflects the city's historical roots and multicultural heritage. The city has seventeen historic landmark districts, administered by the New Orleans Historic District Landmarks Commission (HDLC). Many styles of housing exist in the city, including the shotgun house (originating from New Orleans) and the California bungalow style. Creole townhouses, notable for their large courtyards and intricate iron balconies, line the streets of the French Quarter. Throughout the city, there are many other historic housing styles: Creole cottages, American townhouses, double-gallery houses, and Raised Center-Hall Cottages. St. Charles Avenue is famed for its large Antebellum homes and its mansions in various styles such as Greek Revival, Colonial, and Victorian styles such as Queen Anne and Italianate. New Orleans is also noted for its large, European-style Catholic cemeteries, which can be found throughout the city. Colorful architecture in New Orleans, both old and new The Buildings and architecture of New Orleans are reflective of the History of New Orleans and the citys multicultural heritage. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 449 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (478 × 638 pixel, file size: 84 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 449 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (478 × 638 pixel, file size: 84 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free... One Shell Square, located at 701 Poydras Street in the Central Business District of New Orleans, Louisiana, is a 51-story, 697 ft. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 1002 pixel, file size: 314 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 1002 pixel, file size: 314 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A modest shotgun house in New Orleans Bayou St. ... A typical Bungalow in Louisvilles Deer Park Neighborhood California Bungalows, commonly called simply bungalows in America, are a form of residential structure that were widely popular across America and, to some extent, the world around the years 1910 to 1925. ... French Quarter: upper Chartres street looking down towards Jackson Square and the spires of St. ... St. ... Antebellum is a Latin word meaning before war(ante means before and bellum is war). ... The Tower of the Winds, Athens from The Antiquities of Athens, 1762. ... Colonial house and street. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... An American Queen Anne style home in Lebanon, Illinois. ...


For much of its history, New Orleans' skyline consisted of only low- and mid-rise structures. The soft soils of New Orleans are susceptible to subsidence, and there was doubt about the feasibility of constructing large high rises in such an environment The 1960s brought the World Trade Center New Orleans and Plaza Tower, which demonstrated that high rises could stand firm on New Orleans' soil. One Shell Square took its place as the city's tallest building in 1972. The oil boom of the early 1980s redefined New Orleans' skyline again with the development of the Poydras Street corridor. Today, New Orleans' high rises are clustered along Canal Street and Poydras Street in the Central Business District. World Trade Center New Orleans, located at 2 Canal Street in the Central Business District of New Orleans, Louisiana, is a 33-story, 407 feet (124 m)-tall skyscraper. ... Crescent City Towers (formerly the Plaza Tower and dubbed as the Crescent City Residences in the early phases of the redesign) is a 45-story, -tall skyscraper in New Orleans, Louisiana, designed in the modern style by Leonard R Spangenberg, Jr & Associates. ... One Shell Square, located at 701 Poydras Street in the Central Business District of New Orleans, Louisiana, is a 51-story, 697 ft. ... Canal Street is a major thoroughfare in the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The Central Business District is an area of New Orleans, Louisiana. ...

See also: List of tallest buildings in New Orleans

New Orleans Central Business District For much of its history, New Orleans skyline consisted of only low and mid rise structures. ...

Tourism and culture

According to current travel guides, New Orleans is in the top ten of the most visited cities in the United States, and tourism is a major staple in the area's economy.[41] 10.1 million visitors came to New Orleans in 2004, and the city was on pace to break that level of visitation in 2005. Annually, tourism in New Orleans is a $5.5 billion industry and accounts for 40 percent of New Orleans' tax revenues. Tourism employed 85,000 people, making it New Orleans' top industry.[42] The city's annual large events such as Mardi Gras, the Sugar Bowl, the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival (known by locals as "Jazz Fest"), the Voodoo Music Experience, Southern Decadence, and the Essence Music Festival help fuel its mammoth tourism industry. Events held less frequently, such as Super Bowls and portions of NCAA tournaments, also contribute. For other uses, see Mardi Gras (disambiguation). ... The Sugar Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game played in the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, often known as Jazz Fest, is an annual celebration of the music and culture of New Orleans and Louisiana. ... Since its 1999 debut, the VOODOO MUSIC EXPERIENCE (http://www. ... Southern Decadance is a week-long, predominantly gay-male event held in New Orleans, Louisiana and its environs by the gay and lesbian community in early September, climaxing with a parade through the French Quarter on the Sunday before Labor Day. ... Essence Music Festival is an annual music festival celebrating contemporary African-American music and culture. ...


Prior to Katrina in the Greater New Orleans Area, there were 265 hotels with an inventory of 38,338 rooms. In May 2007, there were over 140 metro area hotels and motels in operation with over 31,000 rooms in inventory.[43].


A CNN poll ranking US cities was released in October 2007, ranking New Orleans first in eight categories, behind only New York City, which ranked first in 15. According to the poll, New Orleans is the best US city for live music, cocktail hours, flea markets, antique shopping, nightlife, "wild weekends," "girlfriend getaways," and cheap food. The city also ranked second for gay friendliness, overall food and dining, friendliness of residents, and people-watching, behind San Francisco, California, Chicago, Illinois, Charleston, South Carolina, and New York City, respectively. However, among the top 25 U.S. travel destinations as established by the poll, the city was voted last in terms of safety and cleanliness and near the bottom as a family vacation destination. "We weren't surprised to see New Orleans' great performance," said Amy Farley, a senior editor at Travel + Leisure, which printed the complete results in its November issue. "New Orleans is legendary for its great after dark scene."[44] The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... San Francisco redirects here. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... Travel + Leisure is an American magazine initially published in 1971 as a spin-off of Playboy, and is now a subsidiary of American Express. ...


In 2007, Louisiana began to offer tax incentives for music and theatre productions, leading many to begin referring to New Orleans as "Broadway South". This will likely become an important aspect of the city and region's economy in the near future, most notably further boosting the tourism industry.[45] New Orleans has many major attractions, from the world-renowned Bourbon Street and the French Quarter's notorious nightlife to St. Charles Avenue (home of Tulane and Loyola Universities), the historic Pontchartrain Hotel, and many stately 19th century mansions. Magazine Street, with its many historic antique shops and boutique stores, is also popular tourist attraction. The famous sign of Bourbon Street in New Orleans. ... French Quarter: upper Chartres street looking down towards Jackson Square and the spires of St. ... St. ... Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Logo of Loyola University New Orleans Loyola University New Orleans is a private, co-educational Jesuit university in the United States with 5,000 students (3,000 undergraduates). ... The Pontchartrain Hotel is an historic hotel building on St. ... Magazine Street is a major thoroughfare in New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


Favorite tourist scenes in New Orleans include the French Quarter (known locally as "the Quarter" or Vieux Carré), which dates from the French and Spanish eras and is bounded by the Mississippi River, Rampart Street, Canal Street and Esplanade Avenue. The French Quarter contains many popular hotels, bars, and nightclubs, most notably around Bourbon Street. Other notable tourist attractions in the Quarter include Jackson Square, St. Louis Cathedral, the French Market (including Café du Monde, famous for café au lait and beignets), and jazz at Preservation Hall. Jackson Square is a historic park in the French Quarter of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Saint Louis Cathedral (French: Cathédrale de Saint-Louis), also known as the Basilica of St. ... Café du Monde is open 24 hours a day Beignet and iced café au lait at Cafe Du Monde in New Orleans Café du Monde is a coffee shop on Decatur Street in the French Quarter in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Look up café au lait in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Beignet and iced café au lait at Café Du Monde in New Orleans A beignet ([bεɲ.e] pronounced ben–YAY, from the Middle French word for bump), in American English, refers to a French doughnut being a pastry made from deep-fried dough and sprinkled with confectioners sugar. ... Preservation Hall is a noted jazz performance hall located at 726 St. ...

Horse carriage entering Royal Street
Horse carriage entering Royal Street

Also located in the French Quarter is the old New Orleans Mint, formerly a branch of the United States Mint, which now operates as a museum. Located on Royal Street is The Historic New Orleans Collection, a museum and research center housing art and artifacts relating to the History of New Orleans and the Gulf South. The Ionic portico of the façade of the New Orleans Mint today, as seen from across Esplanade Avenue. ... Seal of the U.S. Mint Denver United States mint building The United States Mint primarily produces circulating coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce. ... Royal Street may refer to one of the following: Royal Street, Perth, Australia Royal Street, New Orleans Category: ... The Gulf South is a region of the United States that consists of Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, all of which border the Gulf of Mexico on the Gulf Coast of the United States. ...


Near the Quarter in the neighboring Warehouse District sits the National World War II Museum, opened on June 6, 2000, as the National D-Day Museum, dedicated to providing information and materials related to the allied invasion of Normandy, France. Also nearby is Confederate Memorial Hall, containing the second largest collection of Confederate memorabilia in the world in the oldest continually operating museum in Louisiana (although the museum is closed for renovations as of June 2008). The National World War II Museum, formerly known as the National D-Day Museum, is a museum located in the Central Business District of New Orleans, Louisiana, at the corner of Andrew Higgins and Magazine Street. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... This article is about the assault phase of Operation Overlord. ... Confederate Memorial Hall is a museum located in New Orleans, Louisiana containing historical artifacts related to the Confederate States of America and the American Civil War. ...


To tour the port, one can ride the Natchez, an authentic steamboat with a calliope which cruises the Mississippi the length of the city twice daily. The in New Orleans The Str. ... For other uses, see Steamboat (disambiguation). ... Circus calliope, lithograph by Gibson & Co. ...


Art museums in the city include the Contemporary Arts Center, the New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) in City Park, and the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Audubon Park, the Audubon Zoo, and the Aquarium of the Americas are also located in the city. New Orleans is also noted for its many beautiful cemeteries. Some notable cemeteries in the city include Saint Louis Cemetery and Metairie Cemetery. Significant gardens include Longue Vue House and Gardens and the New Orleans Botanical Garden. Gardens are also found in places like City Park and Audubon Park. City Park still has one of the largest (if not the largest) stands of oak trees in the world. Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati, OH The Contemporary Arts Center (CAC) is a pioneering contemporary art museum located in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... The New Orleans Museum of Art (often referred to as NOMA) in New Orleans, Louisiana, was established nearly a hundred years ago and is the citys oldest fine arts institution. ... The mission of The Ogden Museum of Southern Art, University of New Orleans, is to broaden the knowledge, understanding and appreciation of the visual arts and culture of the American South through its permanent collections, changing exhibitions, educational programs, publications, research center, and its Goldring-Woldenberg Institute for the Advancement... Audubon Park entrance gates on the St. ... The Audubon Zoo is a zoo located in New Orleans and is part of the Audubon Nature Institute. ... The Audubon Aquarium of the Americas is a renowned aquarium in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Recognized as one of the leading aquariums in the United States, the Aquarium of the Americas is run by the Audubon Institute, which also supervises the Audubon Zoo and Audubon Park (in a different part... Saint Louis Cemetery is the name of three Roman Catholic cemeteries in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Metairie Cemetery is a cemetery in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Longue Vue House and Gardens (8 acres) is a Classical Revival mansion and garden located at 7 Bamboo Road, New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The New Orleans Botanical Garden is a botanical garden located in the City Park, New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


There are also various points of interest in the surrounding areas. Many wetlands are in close proximity to the city, including Honey Island Swamp. Chalmette Battlefield and National Cemetery, located just south of the city, is the site of the 1815 Battle of New Orleans. Honey Island swamp is one of the least-altered river swamps in the United States. ... Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve is a unit of the National Park Service in southeastern Louisiana. ... For other uses of the name, see Battle of New Orleans (disambiguation). ...


Entertainment and performing arts

Main article: Music of New Orleans
Mounted Krewe Officers in the Thoth Parade during Mardi Gras.
Mounted Krewe Officers in the Thoth Parade during Mardi Gras.

Greater New Orleans is home to numerous celebrations, including Mardi Gras and the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. New Orleans' most popular celebration is Carnival, officially beginning on the Feast of the Epiphany, which locals sometimes refer to as "Twelfth Night". The Carnival season is often known (especially by out-of-towners) by the name of its last day, Mardi Gras (French for "Fat Tuesday"), which is held the Tuesday before the beginning of the Catholic liturgical season of Lent, which commences on Ash Wednesday. This article is under construction. ... Image File history File links ToHorses. ... Image File history File links ToHorses. ... For other uses, see Mardi Gras (disambiguation). ... Revelers, Frenchmen Street, Faubourg Marigny. ... The New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, often known as Jazz Fest, is an annual celebration of the music and culture of New Orleans and Louisiana. ... For other uses, see Carnival (disambiguation). ... ... Twelfth Night is a holiday in some branches of Christianity marking the coming of the Epiphany, concluding the Twelve Days of Christmas, and is defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as the evening of the fifth of January, preceding Twelfth Day, the eve of the Epiphany, formerly the last day... For other uses, see Mardi Gras (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Lent (disambiguation). ... In the Western Christian calendar, Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent. ...


The largest of the city's many musical festivals is the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. Commonly referred to simply as "Jazz Fest", it is one of the largest music festivals in the nation, featuring crowds coming from all over the world to experience music, food, arts, and crafts. Despite the name, it features not only jazz but a large variety of music, including both native Louisiana music and internationally-known popular music artists. Along with Jazz Fest, New Orleans' Voodoo Music Experience (known as Voodoo Fest) and Essence Music Festival are both large music festivals featuring local and internationally known music artists. The New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, often known as Jazz Fest, is an annual celebration of the music and culture of New Orleans and Louisiana. ... Since its 1999 debut, the VOODOO MUSIC EXPERIENCE (http://www. ... Essence Music Festival is an annual music festival celebrating contemporary African-American music and culture. ...


Other major events in the city include Southern Decadence, the French Quarter Festival, and the Tennessee Williams Literary Festival. Southern Decadance is a week-long, predominantly gay-male event held in New Orleans, Louisiana and its environs by the gay and lesbian community in early September, climaxing with a parade through the French Quarter on the Sunday before Labor Day. ... Thomas Lanier Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983), better known as Tennessee Williams, was a major American playwright who received many of the top theatrical awards. ...


Throughout the Greater New Orleans area, various ethnic groups have retained their distinctive language traditions to this day. Although rare, Kreyol Lwiziyen is still spoken by Louisiana Creole people. Also rare, an archaic Louisiana-Canarian Spanish dialect is spoken by the Isleños people, but it can usually only be heard by older members of the Isleños population. Kreyol Lwiziyen is a French-based creole spoken in Louisiana. ... This article is about an ethnic culture in Louisiana, USA. For uses of the term Creole in other countries and cultures, see Creole (disambiguation). ... Islenos (from the Spanish isleños, plural of islander) are descendants of Canary Islanders who came to America and settled in the lower Mississippi River Delta of Louisiana between 1778 and 1783. ...

Louis Armstrong, famous New Orleans jazz musician.
Louis Armstrong, famous New Orleans jazz musician.

New Orleans has always been a significant center for music, with its intertwined European, Latin American, and African-American cultures. New Orleans' unique musical heritage was born in its pre-American and early American days with a unique blending of European instruments with African rhythms. As the only North American city to allow slaves to gather in public and play their native music (largely in Congo Square, now located within Louis Armstrong Park), likely due to the more relaxed attitudes of French and Creole slave owners as compared to their Anglo-American neighbors, New Orleans give birth to an indigenous music: jazz. With New Orleans' large, educated, and influential Creole, Haitian, and free black population, these African beats intertwined with trained musicians and the city's now famous brass bands gained wide popularity and remain popular today. New Orleans musical traditions also borrow heavily from Acadiana to the west, home of Cajun music and Zydeco music, as well as the Delta blues from its hinterlands in the Mississippi Delta. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2228x2841, 524 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): New Orleans, Louisiana ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2228x2841, 524 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): New Orleans, Louisiana ... Louis[1] Armstrong[2] (4 August 1901[3] – July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo[4] and Pops, was an American jazz musician. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... For the popular-music magazine, see Musician (magazine). ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... It was in the Nineteenth Century in Congo Square in New Orleans that observers heard the beat of the bamboulas, the wail of the banzas and saw the multitude of African dances that had survived through the years. ... Louis Armstrong Park is a 32-acre park located in the Treme neighborhood of New Orleans, Louisiana, just across Rampart Street from the French Quarter. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Cajun music, an emblematic music of Louisiana, is rooted in the ballads of the French-speaking Acadians of Canada. ... Zydeco is a form of folk music, originated in the beginning of the 20th century among the Creole peoples of south-west Louisiana and influenced by the music of the French-speaking Cajuns. ... Blues music redirects here. ...


The city created its own spin on the old tradition of military brass band funerals. Traditional New Orleans funerals feature sad music (mostly dirges and hymns) on the way to the cemetery and happy music (hot jazz) on the way back. Such traditional musical funerals still take place when a local musician, a member of a club, krewe, or benevolent society, or a noted dignitary has passed. Until the 1990s most locals preferred to call these "funerals with music", but out-of-town visitors have long dubbed them "jazz funerals". A brass band a musical group consisting mostly or entirely of brass instruments, often with a percussion section. ... A Krewe (pronounced identically to English crew) is an organization that puts on a parade and or a ball for the Carnival season. ... Jazz funeral is a unique American funeral tradition which occurs in New Orleans. ...


Decades later, New Orleans was home to a distinctive brand of rhythm and blues that contributed greatly to the growth of rock and roll. A great example of New Orleans' sound in the 1960s is the #1 US hit "Chapel of Love" by the Dixie Cups, a song which had the distinction of knocking the Beatles out of the top spot on the Billboard Hot 100. New Orleans became a hotbed for funk music in the 1960s and 70s. By the late 1980s it had developed its own localized variant of hip hop called bounce music which, while never commercially successful outside of the Deep South, remained immensely popular in the poor African-American neighborhoods of the city through the 1990s. R&B redirects here. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Chapel Of Love is a song written by Jeff Barry, Ellie Greenwich and Phil Spector, and made famous by The Dixie Cups. ... The Dixie Cups were an American pop music girl group of the 1960s. ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The states in dark red comprise the Deep South. ...


A cousin of bounce, New Orleans hip hop has seen commercial success locally and internationally. Also, a form of southern rock or cowpunk has become popular across college campuses throughout the United States. New Orleans bands which helped originate this wave include The Radiators, Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Rebirth Brass Band, Better Than Ezra, Cowboy Mouth, Rising Sun and Dash Rip Rock. Notable aspects of the New Orleans music scene are Lil Wayne, Master P, Birdman, Juvenile, Cash Money Records, and No Limit Records. Throughout the 1990s many sludge metal bands started in the New Orleans area. Heavy metal in New Orleans has avoided the standardisation of the style by MTV and other media. Bands like Eyehategod,[46] Soilent Green,[47] Crowbar[48] and Down[49] have incorporated styles such as hardcore punk, doom metal and southern rock to create an original and heady brew of swampy and aggravated metal.[46][47][48][49] New Orleans, Louisiana, usually renowned as a center for musical creativity and influence, has been said to have an underdeveloped hip-hop scene compared to larger cities like New York and Los Angeles. ... Southern rock is a subgenre of rock music. ... Cowpunk or Country Punk is a subgenre of punk rock that began in southern California in the 1980s, especially Los Angeles. ... The Radiators, also known as The New Orleans Radiators, are a rock band from New Orleans, Louisiana, who have combined the traditional musical styles of their native city with more mainstream rock and R&B influences to form a bouncy, funky variety of swamp-rock they call fish head music... Dirty Dozen Brass Band The Dirty Dozen Brass Band is a New Orleans, Louisiana brass band. ... Rebirth Brass Band The Rebirth Brass Band is a New Orleans brass band. ... Better Than Ezra is an alternative rock trio based in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... This article is about the New Orleans rock band. ... The Land of the Rising Sun is one of the names of Japan. ... Taking their name from a love interest of Elly Mays on The Beverly Hillbillies, Dash Rip Rock was formed as a three-piece rockabilly band in Baton Rouge, Louisiana during the summer of 1984. ... Dwayne Michael Carter, Jr. ... Percy Miller (born April 29, 1969), better known as Master P, (P. Miller) is an American Rapper and Producer. ... Bryan Baby Williams (born on February 15, 1969 in New Orleans, Louisiana), also known as Birdman, is a record executive and rapper. ... Cash Money Records is an American hip hop record label. ... No Limit Records is a record label that began in 1990 as the No Limit Record Shop in Richmond, California. ... Sludge metal is a form of heavy metal music that is generally regarded as a fusion of the doom metal and hardcore punk genres, often displaying southern rock influence. ... Eyehategod is an American sludgecore band from Louisiana who are known for their dark, sludgy riffs combined with equally dark lyrics. ... For the 1973 movie, see Soylent Green. ... Crowbar is an American doom / sludge metal band from Louisiana, characterized by their extremely slow, low-keyed, heavy and brooding songs. ... Down is an American southern heavy metal supergroup formed in 1991. ... Hardcore punk is a subgenre of punk rock that originated in North America around 1980. ... Doom metal is a form of heavy metal music that emerged as a recognized sub-genre during the first half of the 1980s. ...


New Orleans is the southern terminus of the famed Highway 61. Highway 61 Revisited is Bob Dylans sixth studio album, released in 1965 by Columbia Records. ...


Film

In an effort to diversify its economy, Louisiana began offering tax incentives for movie production companies in 2002. This led to a substantial increase in the number of films shot in the New Orleans area giving it a new nickname - "Hollywood South". Many big-budget and critically acclaimed feature films have been made in and around New Orleans, such as Ray, Runaway Jury, The Pelican Brief, The Skeleton Key, Hard Times, Glory Road, All the King's Men, Déjà Vu, Last Holiday, Waiting..., Failure to Launch, Stay Alive,and many other full-length films and documentaries. Hollywood stars Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie have made New Orleans their home with the purchase of a home in the French Quarter, and a new movie studio complex is to be built in the Treme neighborhood. K-Ville, a cop drama series set in post-Katrina New Orleans, aired on the Fox Network in 2007-08. In 2008, The Naked Brothers Band (a teenage pop/rock band) filmed The Naked Brothers Band: Polar Bears the most recent TV movie filmed here in New Orleans. The film aired on June 6, 2008 On Nickelodeon. Ray is a 2004 biographical film focusing on thirty years[2]of the life of legendary rhythm and blues musician Ray Charles. ... This article is about the film. ... The Pelican Brief, rated PG-13 in the U.S., is a legal crime thriller based on the novel by the same name written by John Grisham and was adapted into a feature film in 1993, directed by Alan J. Pakula and starring Julia Roberts in the role of young... The Skeleton Key is a 2005 horror-suspense film released in the UK on 22 July and in the USA on August 12. ... Hard Times is a novel by Charles Dickens, first published in 1854. ... Glory Road is a 2006 film released on January 13, 2006. ... Promotional poster for All the Kings Men All the Kings Men (2006) is an adaptation of the 1946 Pulitzer Prize winning novel by Robert Penn Warren and a remake of the 1949 Academy Award-winning movie, All the Kings Men. As of December 2005, extended post-production... Déjà Vu is a science fiction crime thriller directed by Tony Scott and produced by Jerry Bruckheimer. ... Last Holiday is a film directed by Wayne Wang and starring Queen Latifah, LL Cool J, Timothy Hutton and Alicia Witt and was filmed on-site in New Orleans, Louisiana and at Barrandov Studios, in the Czech Republic. ... Waiting. ... Failure to Launch (2006) is an American romantic comedy film. ... For other uses, see Stay Alive (disambiguation). ... ... William Bradley Brad Pitt (born December 18, 1963) is an Academy award-nominated American actor, film producer, and social activist. ... Jolie redirects here. ... Treme (historically sometimes called Tremé or Faubourg Tremé) is a neighborhood in the downtown portion the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... K-Ville (an abbreviation of Katrinaville) [1] is an upcoming American television drama created by Jonathan Lisco, centered on policing New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. ... The police procedural is a sub-genre of the mystery story which attempts to accurately depict the activities of a police force as they investigate crimes. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company is a television network in the United States. ... The Naked Brothers Band may refer to: The Naked Brothers Band (film) - an independent mockumentary film (2005) The Naked Brothers Band (TV series) - a Nickelodeon television series (2007) anthony anthony is gay Category: ...


Food

Main article: Cajun cuisine

New Orleans is world-famous for its food. The indigenous cuisine is distinctive and influential. From centuries of amalgamation of local Creole, haute Creole, and New Orleans French cuisines, New Orleans food has developed. Local ingredients, French, Spanish, Italian, African, Native American, Cajun, and a hint of Cuban traditions combine to produce a truly unique and easily recognizable Louisiana flavor. Dishes typical of Creole food Louisiana Creole cuisine is a style of cooking originating in Louisiana (centered on the Greater New Orleans area) that blends French, Mediterranean, French Caribbean, African, and American influences. ... Cajun cuisine originates from the French-speaking Acadian or Cajun immigrants deported by the British from Acadia in Canada to the Acadiana region of Louisiana, USA. It is what could be called a rustic cuisine — locally available ingredients predominate, and preparation is simple. ...


Unique specialties include beignets (locally pronounced like "ben-yays"), square-shaped fried pastries that could be called "French doughnuts" (served with coffee and chicory, known as café au lait); Po'boy and Italian Muffaletta sandwiches; Gulf oysters on the half-shell, fried oysters, boiled crawfish, and other seafood; étouffée, jambalaya, gumbo, and other Creole dishes; and the Monday favorite of red beans and rice (Louis Armstrong often signed his letters, "Red beans and ricely yours"). New Orleans residents enjoy some of the best restaurants in the United States that cater specifically to locals, and visitors are encouraged to try the local establishments recommended by their hosts. Another New Orleans specialty is the Praline (locally pronounced like "pra-lean", not "pray-lean") a delicious candy made with brown sugar, granulated sugar, cream, butter and pecans (When the word Pecan is pronounced in Louisiana, the letter "a" is pronounced with the long "a" sound. It is incorrect if pronounced with the sound of the short "a".). Beignet and iced café au lait at Café Du Monde in New Orleans A beignet ([bεɲ.e] pronounced ben–YAY, from the Middle French word for bump), in American English, refers to a French doughnut being a pastry made from deep-fried dough and sprinkled with confectioners sugar. ... A crawfish poboy. ... Central Grocery, origin of the muffuletta. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Spaghetti with seafood (Spaghetti allo scoglio). ... Étouffée or etouffee is a Creole seafood dish typically served over rice, similar to gumbo, very popular in New Orleans and in the Cajun country of the Atchafalaya Basin to the west. ... Improvised looking bowl of jambalaya This article is about the food. ... For other uses, see Gumbo (disambiguation). ... Louis[1] Armstrong[2] (4 August 1901[3] – July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo[4] and Pops, was an American jazz musician. ...


Sports

Main article: Sports in New Orleans

Professional sports teams include the New Orleans Saints (NFL), the New Orleans Hornets (NBA), the New Orleans VooDoo (AFL), and the New Orleans Zephyrs (PCL). There is also an all-female flat track roller derby team, Big Easy Rollergirls, and an all-female football team, New Orleans Blaze. The Louisiana Superdome is the home stadium of the Saints and hosts the annual Sugar Bowl and other prominent events. The New Orleans Arena is the home of the Hornets and many events that aren't large enough to need the Superdome. New Orleans is also home to the Fair Grounds Race Course, the nation's third-oldest thoroughbred track, and the Zurich Classic, a golf tournament on the PGA Tour. In 2008 New Orleans hosted the NBA All-Star Game. The game showcased the Hornets' own Chris Paul and David West. New Orleans is home to a wide variety of sporting events. ... City New Orleans, Louisiana Team colors Gold and black Head Coach Sean Payton Owner Tom Benson and Rita Benson LeBlanc General manager Mickey Loomis Mascot Gumbo the dog League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1967–present) Eastern Conference (1967-1969) Capitol Division (1967; 1969) Century Division (1968) National Football Conference... NFL redirects here. ... The New Orleans Hornets are a professional basketball team based in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... NBA redirects here. ... Conference National Division Southern Year founded 2004 Home arena New Orleans Arena City, State New Orleans, Louisiana Head Coach Mike Neu ArenaBowl championships none Conference titles none Division titles 1: 2004 Wild Card berths none The New Orleans VooDoo is a team in the Arena Football League, and is owned... The Arena Football League (AFL) was founded in 1987 as an American football indoor league. ... League Pacific Coast League Division American Conference Year founded 1993 Major League affiliation New York Mets Home ballpark Zephyr Field Previous home ballparks Mile High Stadium City Metairie, Louisiana Current uniform colors navy, green Previous uniform colors Logo design The wordmark Zephyrs in navy blue outlined in white and green. ... The Pacific Coast League (PCL) is a minor league baseball league operating in the West and Midwest of the United States. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... The New Orleans Blaze is a womens football team in the National Womens Football Association. ... The Louisiana Superdome, often informally referred to simply as the Superdome, The Dome or even the New Orleans Superdome is a large, multi-purpose sports and exhibition facility located in the Central Business District of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The New Orleans Arena is an indoor arena in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Fair Grounds Race Course is a thoroughbred racetrack in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The Zurich Classic of New Orleans is a regular golf tournament on the PGA Tour. ... The PGA Tour is an organization that operates the USAs main professional golf tours. ... Christopher Emmanuel Paul (born May 6, 1985) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays point guard for the New Orleans Hornets of the NBA. His nickname is CP3. ... David West is the name of several people, including David West (basketball), power forward for the NBAs New Orleans Hornets; David West, RSW, the watercolourist. ...


Economy

A tanker on the Mississippi River in New Orleans.
A tanker on the Mississippi River in New Orleans.
Intracoastal Waterway near New Orleans
Intracoastal Waterway near New Orleans

New Orleans is the home to one of the largest and busiest ports in the world, accounts for a major portion of the nation's refinery and production of petroleum, has a top 50 research university (in Tulane University) as well as half a dozen other institutions of higher education, and is renowned for its cultural tourism. Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 189 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 189 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1500x1000, 507 KB) This image is a work of a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers employee, taken or made during the course of the persons official duties. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1500x1000, 507 KB) This image is a work of a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers employee, taken or made during the course of the persons official duties. ... Tug and barge on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway Navigation on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW), where it intersects with Bayou Perot, in the vicinity of New Orleans The Intracoastal Waterway is a 4,800-km (3,000-mile) recreational and commercial waterway along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the... Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


New Orleans is an industrial and distribution center and the busiest port system in the world by gross tonnage. The Port of New Orleans is the 5th-largest port in the United States based on volume of cargo handled, second-largest in the state after the Port of South Louisiana, and 12th-largest in the U.S. based on value of cargo. The Port of South Louisiana, also based in the New Orleans area, is the world's busiest in terms of bulk tonnage, and, when combined with the Port of N.O., it forms the 4th-largest port system in volume handled. For other uses, see Port (disambiguation). ... The Port of New Orleans is a port located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The Port of South Louisiana is the largest volume shipping port in the United States and fifth largest in the world(2003 World Port Rankings). ...


Like Houston, Texas, New Orleans is located in proximity to the Gulf of Mexico, and the many oil rigs lie just offshore. Louisiana ranks fifth in oil production and eighth in reserves in the United States. It is also home to two of the four Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) storage facilities: West Hackberry in Cameron Parish and Bayou Choctaw in Iberville Parish. Other infrastructure includes 17 petroleum refineries with a combined crude oil distillation capacity of nearly 2.8 million barrels per day, the second highest in the nation after Texas. Louisiana has numerous ports including the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port (LOOP), which is capable of receiving ultra large oil tankers. With all of the product to distribute, Louisiana is home to many major pipelines supplying the nation: Crude Oil (Exxon,Chevron, BP, Texaco, Shell, Scurloch-Permian, Mid-Valley, Calumet, Conoco, Koch, Unocal, Dept. of Energy, Locap), Product (TEPPCO, Colonial, Plantation, Explorer, Texaco, Collins), and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Dixie, TEPPCO, Black Lake, Koch, Chevron, Dynegy, Kinder, Dow, Bridgeline, FMP, Tejas, Texaco, UTP).[50] There are a few energy companies that have their regional headquarters in the city, including Chevron and Shell Oil Company. Houston redirects here. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) is an emergency petroleum store maintained by the United States Department of Energy. ... This article is about the fuel brand. ... Chevron Corporation (NYSE: CVX) is one of the worlds largest global energy companies. ... This article is about the energy corporation. ... Texaco is the name of an American oil retail brand. ... The Shell emblem known as the Pecten Shell Oil Company (SOC) is the Houston, Texas based wholly-owned subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell. ... Mid valley or midvalley may refer to: The mid-Willamette Valley in the U.S. state of Oregon. ... Calumet is the name (or part of the name) of a number of places in the United States of America: Calumet, Iowa Calumet, Michigan Calumet, Minnesota Calumet, Oklahoma Calumet, Wisconsin Calumet City, Illinois Calumet County, Wisconsin Calumet Farm was a well-known Thoroughbred horse breeding farm. ... Categories: Companies traded on NYSE | Corporation stubs | Oil companies of the United States | Fortune 500 companies | Companies based in Texas ... Koch is German for cook. Koch can refer to the following: Bill Koch - cross-country skier Billy Koch - Major league baseball relief pitcher Carl Ludwig Koch and his son Ludwig Carl Christian Koch - German entomologists specializing in arachnology Carl Wilhelm Otto Koch, (1810 - 1876), mayor of Leipzig Charles G. Koch... The Unocal Corporation (NYSE: UCL), based in Los Angeles, California, was founded in 1890 as the Union Oil Company of California. ... Black Lake is a lake in the northern part of New York in the USA and is the largest lake in Saint Lawrence County. ... Dynegy is a large operator of power plants and a player in the natural gas liquids business, based in Houston, Texas. ... Kinder is the german world for children; it may also refer to: Kinder Scout, a plateau in England Kinder, a trademark of Italian Ferrero SpA, products bearing this name include Kinder Surprise, Kinder Chocolate bars, Kinder Happy Hippo, Kinder Maxi, Kinder Pinguí and Kinder Bueno. ... Dow may be: a surname, see Dow (name) Dow Thomas, the second Dow to arrive in North America - early 1630s. ... FMP is a three-letter acronym. ... Tejas may refer to: Tejas and Jayhawk, the code name for a microprocessor developed by Intel. ... UTP is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, as described below: In genetics, uridine 5-triphosphate In telecommunications, unshielded twisted pair cabling The USS Thomas Paine The United Tasmania Party Universiti Teknologi Petronas In computer science, Unifying Theories of Programming In Software testing, Unit Test Plan - see Test Plan... Chevron Corporation (NYSE: CVX) is one of the worlds largest global energy companies. ... The Shell emblem known as the Pecten Shell Oil Company (SOC) is the Houston, Texas based wholly-owned subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell. ...


The city is the home and worldwide headquarters of a single Fortune 500 company: Entergy Corporation, an energy and infrastructure providing company. Freeport-McMoRan, the city's other Fortune 500 company, merged its copper and gold exploration unit with an Arizona company and relocated that division to Phoenix, Arizona. Other companies with a significant presence or base in New Orleans include the worldwide headquarters of the Entergy and its subsidiaries, Freeport-McMoRan, AT&T, IBM, Navtech, Harrah's (downtown casino), Popeye's Fried Chicken, Zatarain's, Whitney Bank (corp. HQ), Capital One (banking HQ), Tidewater (Corp. HQ), McMoran Exploration, and Energy Partners (corp.HQ). The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... Entergy Corporation (NYSE: ETR), based in New Orleans, Louisiana, is a Delaware chartered corporation engaged in electric power production, retail distribution operations, energy marketing and trading, and gas transportation. ... Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc. ... Entergy Corporation (NYSE: ETR), based in New Orleans, Louisiana, is a Delaware chartered corporation engaged in electric power production, retail distribution operations, energy marketing and trading, and gas transportation. ... This article is about the current AT&T. For the 1885-2005 company, see American Telephone & Telegraph. ... For other uses, see IBM (disambiguation) and Big Blue. ... Harrahs Entertainment, Inc. ... Popeyes Chicken & Biscuits logo Popeyes Chicken & Biscuits is a chain of fried chicken fast food restaurants that is controlled by Atlanta-based AFC Enterprises, which is also the operator of Churchs Chicken and Cinnabon. ... Started in New Orleans by Emile A. Zatarain, Sr. ... Whitney National bank is a regional community banking institution headquartered in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Capital One Bank in Wake Village, Texas Capital One Financial Corp. ...


The city is also host to the World Cultural Economic Forum (WCEF). The Forum, held annually at the New Orleans Convention Center, is directed towards promoting cultural, economic development opportunities through the strategic convening of cultural ambassadors and leaders from around the world. The first WCEF is scheduled to take place in October of 2008.[51]


The federal government has a significant presence in the area. The NASA Michoud Assembly Facility is located in the eastern portion of Orleans Parish, known as New Orleans East, and is operated by Lockheed-Martin. It is a large manufacturing facility where external fuel tanks for space shuttles are produced, and it also houses the National Finance Center, operated by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). United States Government redirects here. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... Michoud Assembly Facility in 1968 The Michoud Assembly Facility is an 832 acre (3. ... Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) is a leading multinational aerospace manufacturer and advanced technology company formed in 1995 by the merger of Lockheed Corporation with Martin Marietta. ... USDA redirects here. ...


Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1810 17,242
1820 27,176 57.6%
1830 46,082 69.6%
1840 102,193 121.8%
1850 116,375 13.9%
1860 168,675 44.9%
1870 191,418 13.5%
1880 216,090 12.9%
1890 242,039 12%
1900 287,104 18.6%
1910 339,075 18.1%
1920 387,219 14.2%
1930 458,762 18.5%
1940 494,537 7.8%
1950 570,445 15.3%
1960 627,525 10%
1970 593,471 −5.4%
1980 557,515 −6.1%
1990 496,938 −10.9%
2000 484,674 −2.5%
Est. 2007 239,124 [52] −50.7%
Historical Population Figures[53]
New Orleans contains many distinctive neighborhoods.
New Orleans contains many distinctive neighborhoods.

As of the census[54] of 2000, there were 484,674 people, 188,251 households, and 112,950 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,684.3 inhabitants per square mile (1,036.4 /km²). There were 215,091 housing units at an average density of 1,191.3 inhabitants per square mile (460.0 /km²). The racial makeup of the city was 67.25% African American, 28.05% White, 0.20% Native American, 2.26% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.93% from other races, and 1.28% from two or more races. 3.06% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. The United States Census of 1810 was the third Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1820 was the fourth Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Download high resolution version (1297x1167, 329 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Download high resolution version (1297x1167, 329 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...

See also: Greater New Orleans

The last population estimate before Hurricane Katrina was 454,865 as of July 1, 2005.[55] A population analysis released in August 2007 estimated the population to be 273,000, 60% of the pre-Katrina population and an increase of about 50,000 since July 2006.[56] A September 2007 report by The Greater New Orleans Community Data Center, which tracks population based on U.S. Postal Service figures, found that in August 2007, just over 137,000 households received mail. That compares with about 198,000 households in July 2005, representing about 70% of pre-Katrina population.[57] The New Orleans Metropolitan Area, or Greater New Orleans, is the largest metropolitan area in Louisiana, centered around New Orleans. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


A 2006 study by researchers at Tulane University and the University of California, Berkeley determined that there are as many as 10,000 to 14,000 undocumented workers, mostly from Mexico, currently residing in New Orleans.[58] Janet Murguia, president and chief executive officer of the National Council of La Raza, stated that there could be up to 120,000 Hispanic workers in New Orleans. In June 2007, one study stated that the hispanic population had risen from 15,000 pre-Katrina to over 50,000.[59] Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Sather Tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... It has been suggested that illegal alien be merged into this article or section. ... Janet Murguia has served as the President and Chief Executive Officer of the National Council of La Raza (NCLR) since January 1, 2005. ... “NCLR” redirects here. ...


The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has stated that some public housing developments, which were originally going to be torn down, are going to be re-opened temporarily; the public housing developments will be redeveloped in phases. On March 21, 2007, the House of Representatives passed a bill blocking any demolition of housing developments until HUD shows solid plans for redevelopment, informing HUD that they must contact all former developments on August 1, 2007 and that the buildings must be livable by October 2007. The House's measure must be approved by the United States Senate.[60] Developers who take advantage of federal tax credits to build other low income and affordable housing, along with residents' continued receipt of federal grant money, should help residents to return to the region. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, often abbreviated HUD, is a Cabinet department of the United States government. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States...


Religion

Saint Louis Cathedral is a symbol of New Orleans.
Saint Louis Cathedral is a symbol of New Orleans.

New Orleans is notably absent from the Protestant Bible Belt that dominates religion in the Southern United States. In New Orleans and the surrounding Gulf Coast area, the predominant religion is Catholicism. Within the Archdiocese of New Orleans (which includes not only the city but the surrounding Parishes as well), 35.9% percent of the population is Roman Catholic.[61] The influence of Catholicism is reflected in many of the city's French and Spanish cultural traditions, including its many parochial schools, street names, architecture, and festivals, including Mardi Gras. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1712x2050, 656 KB) Opis en: St. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1712x2050, 656 KB) Opis en: St. ... Saint Louis Cathedral (French: Cathédrale de Saint-Louis), also known as the Basilica of St. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The approximate extent of the Bible Belt, indicated in red The Bible Belt is an informal term for an area of the United States of America in which socially conservative Christian Evangelical Protestantism is a dominant part of the culture. ... Historic Southern United States. ... As a Christian ecclesiastical term, Catholic—from the Greek adjective , meaning general or universal[1]—is described in the Oxford English Dictionary as follows: ~Church, (originally) whole body of Christians; ~, belonging to or in accord with (a) this, (b) the church before separation into Greek or Eastern and Latin or... The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans (in Latin Archidioecesis Novae Aureliae) is an ecclesiastical division of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Revelers, Frenchmen Street, Faubourg Marigny. ...


New Orleans also famously has a presence of its distinctive variety of Voodoo, due in part to syncretism with Roman Catholic beliefs, the fame of voodoo practitioner Marie Laveau, and New Orleans' distinctly Caribbean cultural influences.[62][63][64] Although the exotic image of Voodoo within the city has been highly promoted by the tourism industry, there are only a small number of serious adherents to the religion. Conference National Division Southern Year founded 2004 Home arena New Orleans Arena City, State New Orleans, Louisiana Head Coach Mike Neu ArenaBowl championships none Conference titles none Division titles 1: 2004 Wild Card berths none The New Orleans VooDoo is a team in the Arena Football League, and is owned... For the linguistic term, see syncretism (linguistics). ... Portrait of Marie Laveau, after a painting by Frank Schneider, in turn after George Catlin; the original hangs in the Cabildo in New Orleans. ...


Dialect

See also: Yat (New Orleans)

New Orleans has developed a distinctive local dialect over the years. This dialect is neither Cajun nor the stereotypical Southern accent so often misportrayed by film and television actors. It does, like earlier Southern Englishes, feature frequent deletion of post-vocalic "r". One dialect is similar to the New York "Brooklynese" dialect to people unfamiliar with it. There are many theories to how this dialect came to be, but it likely resulted from New Orleans' geographic isolation by water and the fact that New Orleans was a major port of entry into the United States throughout the 19th century. Many of the immigrant groups who reside in Brooklyn also reside in New Orleans, with Irish, Italians (especially Sicilians), and Germans being the largest groups, as well as a very sizeable Jewish community.[65] Yat refers to a unique collection of dialects of English spoken in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Cajuns are an ethnic group mainly living in Louisiana, consisting of the descendants of Acadian exiles and peoples of other ethnicities with whom the Acadians eventually intermarried on the semitropical frontier. ... Southern American English is a group of dialects of the English language spoken throughout the Southern region of the United States, from Southern and Eastern Maryland, West Virginia and Kentucky to the Gulf Coast, and from the Atlantic coast to throughout most of Texas. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... New York Dialect is the variety of the English language spoken by most European Americans in New York City and much of its metropolitan area including Northern New Jersey, Westchester and Rockland counties, and all of Long Island. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ...


One of the strongest varieties of the New Orleans accent is sometimes identified as Yat, from the greeting "Where y'at?" This distinctive accent is dying out generation by generation in the city itself but remains very strong in the surrounding Parishes. Yat refers to a unique collection of dialects of English spoken in New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


Government

New Orleans has a mayor-council government. The city council consists of five council members who are elected by district and two at-large councilmembers. Mayor Ray Nagin was elected in May 2002 and was reelected in the mayoral election of May 20, 2006. Mayor-Council government is one of two variations of government most commonly used in modern representative municipal governments in the United States. ... The New Orleans mayoral election of 2006 is scheduled to take place on April 22, 2006. ...


The New Orleans Police Department provides professional police services to the public in order to maintain order and protect life and property. The Orleans Parish Civil Sheriff's Office serves papers involving lawsuits and provides security for the Civil District Court and Juvenile Courts. The Criminal Sheriff, Marlin Gusman, maintains the parish prison system, provides security for the Criminal District Court, and provides backup for the New Orleans Police Department on an as-needed basis. The New Orleans Police Department or NOPD has primary responsibility for law enforcement in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Service of process is the procedure employed to give legal notice to a person (defendant etc. ...


The city of New Orleans and the parish of Orleans operate as a merged city-parish government.[66] Before the city of New Orleans became co-extensive with Orleans Parish, Orleans Parish was home to numerous smaller communities. The original city of New Orleans was composed of what are now the 1st through 9th wards. The city of Lafayette (including the Garden District) was added in 1852 as the 10th and 11th wards. In 1870, Jefferson City, including Faubourg Bouligny and much of the Audubon and University areas, was annexed as the 12th, 13th, and 14th wards. Algiers, on the west bank of the Mississippi, was also annexed in 1870, becoming the 15th ward. Four years later, Orleans Parish became coextensive with the city of New Orleans when the city of Carrollton was annexed as the 16th and 17th wards. The U.S. state of Louisiana is divided into 64 parishes in the same way that 48 of the other states of the United States are divided into counties (Alaska is divided into boroughs and census areas). ... Algiers is a community in Louisiana, part of the city of New Orleans. ... Carrollton is a neighborhood of uptown New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. It is the part of uptown New Orleans furthest up river from the French Quarter. ...


New Orleans' government is now largely centralized in the city council and mayor's office, but it maintains a number of relics from earlier systems when various sections of the city ran much of their affairs separately. For example, New Orleans has seven elected tax assessors, each with their own staff, representing various districts of the city, rather than one centralized office. A constitutional amendment passed on November 7, 2006, will consolidate the seven assessors into one by 2010. is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also: List of mayors of New Orleans

The post of Mayor of the city of New Orleans, Louisiana has been held by the following individuals since New Orleans came under American administration following the Louisiana Purchase: ^ a b c d e Resigned. ...

Crime

New Orleans has a high violent crime rate. Homicides peaked at 421 in 1994, a rate of 86 per 100,000 residents.[67]


The homicide rate rose and fell year to year throughout the late 1990s, but the overall trend from 1994 to 1999 was a steady reduction in homicides.


From 1999 to 2004, the homicide rate again increased. New Orleans had the highest homicide rate of any major American city in 2002 (53.3 per 100,000 people) and again in 2003 (275 homicides).[68] It should be stated that the number of homicides has decreased since 1994 - the number of homicides in 2004 was about 275, cutting the 1994 count by one-third.


Violent crime is a serious problem for New Orleans residents, but far less of a problem for tourists. As in other U.S. cities of comparable size, the incidence of homicide and other violent crimes is highly concentrated in certain low-income neighborhoods, such as housing projects, that are sites of open-air drug trade.[68] The homicide rate for the entire New Orleans metropolitan area was 24.4 per 100,000 in 2002.[69] New Orleans, Louisiana has long been notorious for having some of the roughest, most dangerous housing projects in the country. ... The New Orleans Metropolitan Area, consisting of the Greater New Orleans region and three addtional parishes which share the perimeter of Lake Ponchartrain, is the largest metropolitan area in the U.S. state of Louisiana, centered around the city of New Orleans. ...


After Hurricane Katrina, media attention focused on the reduced violent crime rate following the exodus of many New Orleanians. Conversely, a number of cities that took in Katrina evacuees had a significant increase in their murder rate.[70] Houston, for example, had a 25%[71] increase in murders from the previous year. Captain Dwayne Ready stated, "We also recognize that Katrina evacuees continue to have an impact on the murder rate." Police have not kept records of how evacuees have affected crime rates other than homicide.[71] As more residents return to New Orleans, the trend is starting to reverse itself, although calculating the homicide rate remains difficult given that no authoritative source can cite a total population figure.[72]


There were 22 homicides in July 2006, the same as the monthly average for the city from 2002 until Hurricane Katrina.[73] There were 161 homicides in 2006.[74]


On Thursday, January 11, 2007, several thousand New Orleans residents marched through city streets and gathered at City Hall for a rally demanding police and city leaders tackle the crime problem. Mayor Ray Nagin said he was "totally and solely focused" on addressing the problem. The city of New Orleans implemented checkpoints starting in early January 2007 from the hours of 2 a.m and 6 a.m. in high-crime areas, and, as of January 20, 2007, they had made over 60 arrests and issued more than 100 citations. is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... fuck you // Fuck you Fuck you fuck you Fuck you Fuck you Fuck you Fuck you Fuck you Fuck you Fuck you Fuck you btw Mister Nagin, don`t be angry. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Although the city has lost more than 40% of its pre-Katrina population, the city has recaptured an infamous unwanted title as the nation's "murder capital", according to the FBI.[75] By November 2007, local media reports claimed homicides had already eclipsed the previous year's numbers.[76] The city recorded a total of 209 homicides in 2007. The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ...


Education

Schools

New Orleans Public Schools is the city's school district and one of the area's largest (along with the Jefferson Parish School District). It is widely recognized as the lowest performing school district in Louisiana. According to researchers Carl L. Bankston and Stephen J. Caldas, 12 of the 103 schools in New Orleans showed reasonably good performance at the beginning of the twenty-first century.[77] Following Hurricane Katrina, the state of Louisiana took over most of the schools within the system (all schools that fell into a nominal "worst-performing" metric); about 20 new charter schools have been started since the storm, educating 15,000. New Orleans Public Schools is a school district that serves all of New Orleans, Louisiana, United States. ... Carl L. Bankston III (born August 8, 1952, New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American sociologist and author. ...


The Greater New Orleans area has approximately 200 parochial schools, with the vast majority being run by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans. The prevalence of very good parochial schools has been both a cause and a consequence of the troubles in the public schools. Because so many middle class students have been enrolled in non-public schools, middle class support for public education has been relatively weak. At the same time, the apparent low quality of public schools in New Orleans has encouraged middle class families to educate their children in private or parochial schools. This has contributed to major underfunding of the public school system. The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans (in Latin Archidioecesis Novae Aureliae) is an ecclesiastical division of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


Colleges and universities

A large number of institutions of higher education exist within the city, including Tulane University and Loyola University New Orleans, the city's major private universities. The University of New Orleans is a large public research university in the city. Dillard University, Southern University at New Orleans, and Xavier University of Louisiana are among some of the leading historically black colleges and universities in the United States (Xavier is the only predominantly black Catholic university in the US). Louisiana State University Medical School is the state's flagship public university medical school which also conducts research. Our Lady of Holy Cross College, Notre Dame Seminary, and the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary are several smaller religiously affiliated universities. Other notable schools include Delgado Community College, the William Carey College School of Nursing, the Culinary Institute of New Orleans, Herzing College, and Commonwealth University. Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Logo of Loyola University New Orleans Loyola University New Orleans is a private, co-educational Jesuit university in the United States with 5,000 students (3,000 undergraduates). ... The University of New Orleans, often locally called UNO, is a medium sized public urban university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Dillard University is a private, liberal arts college in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The Southern University at New Orleans is a University in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Xavier University of Louisiana is a historically African-American Roman Catholic University located off Carrollton Avenue in Mid-City New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Louisiana State University School of Medicine refers to two separate medical schools in Louisiana: LSU School of Medicine in New Orleans and LSU School of Medicine in Shreveport. ... Our Lady of Holy Cross College is a fully accredited, coeducational, Catholic college founded in 1916 by the Marianites of Holy Cross in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Notre Dame Seminary is a resident, accredited graduate theological school in New Orleans, Louisiana, founded in 1923 for the education of young men to be priests of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary is a private, non-profit institution of higher learning associated with the Southern Baptist Convention, located in the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Delgado Community College is a private community college found throughout the New Orleans, Louisiana metro area, with campuses on both the East and West Bank of New Orleans as well as on the East Bank of Jefferson Parish, Louisiana and on the Northshore of Lake Pontchartrain in Covington, Louisiana and... William Carey College is a college in southern Mississippi, in the United States. ... Herzing College was one of the first post-secondary institutions founded to train students for the computer industry. ...


Libraries

There are numerous academic and public libraries and archives in New Orleans, including Monroe Library at Loyola University, Howard-Tilton Memorial Library at Tulane University,[78] the Law Library of Louisiana,[79] and Earl K. Long Library at the University of New Orleans.[80] Librarians and patrons in a typical larger urban public library A public library is a library which is accessible by the public and is often operated by civil servants and funded from public sources. ... Logo of Loyola University New Orleans Loyola University New Orleans is a private, co-educational Jesuit university in the United States with 5,000 students (3,000 undergraduates). ... Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


The New Orleans Public Library includes 13 locations, most of which were damaged by Hurricane Katrina. However, only four libraries remained closed in 2007.[81] The main library includes a Louisiana Division housing city archives and special collections.[82] The New Orleans Public Library (NOPL) is the public library service of the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


Other research archives are located at the Historic New Orleans Collection[83] and the Old U.S. Mint.[84] The Ionic portico of the façade of the New Orleans Mint today, as seen from across Esplanade Avenue. ...


An independently operated lending library called Iron Rail Book Collective specializes in radical and hard-to-find books. The library contains over 8,000 titles and is open to the public. It was the first library in the city to re-open after Hurricane Katrina. Iron Rail Book Collective is an all volunteer run radical library and bookstore in New Orleans. ...


Media

The major daily newspaper is the The Times-Picayune, publishing since 1837. Weekly publications include The Louisiana Weekly and Gambit Weekly.[85] Also in wide circulation is the Clarion Herald, the newspaper of the Archdiocese of New Orleans, which is published weekly from September to May and biweekly from June to August. The Times-Picayune is the major daily U.S. newspaper serving New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The Louisiana Weekly is a weekly newspaper published in New Orleans. ... Gambit Weekly is a New Orleans, Louisiana-based alternative weekly newspaper that was established in 1981. ... The Clarion Herald is the official newspaper of the Archdiocese of New Orleans. ... The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans (in Latin Archidioecesis Novae Aureliae) is an ecclesiastical division of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


Greater New Orleans is well served by television and radio. The market is the 54th largest Designated Market Area (DMA) in the U.S., serving 566,960 homes and 0.509% of the U.S.[86] Major television network affiliates serving the area include: A designated market area is a group of counties in the United States that are covered by a specific television station. ...

WWOZ[2], the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Station, broadcasts 24 hours per day of jazz, blues, Zydeco, and New Orleans music at 90.7 FM and at www.wwoz.org. Two radio stations that were influential in promoting New Orleans-based bands and singers were 50,000-watt WNOE-AM (1060) and 10,000-watt WTIX-AM (690). These two stations competed head-to-head from the late 1950s to the late 1970s. WWL-TV CBS 4 is the CBS affiliate serving New Orleans, Louisiana, southeast Louisiana and parts of southern and coastal Mississippi. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... WDSU NBC 6 is the NBC affiliate for the New Orleans, Louisiana television market. ... The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... WVUE was also the callsign for Channel 12 in Wilmington, Delaware in the Early 1950s. ... FOX redirects here. ... WYES TV 12 is local PBS affiliate owned by Greater New Orleans Educational Television Foundation. ... Note: Public Broadcasting Services is a broadcaster in Malta. ... WHNO - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... World Harvest Television network logo LeSEA is an acronym that stands for Lester Sumrall Evangelistic Association. ... WGNO, ABC 26 is the ABC affiliate for the greater New Orleans, Louisiana area, as well parts of southern and coastal Mississippi. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... WLAE-TV is a PBS member station based in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Note: Public Broadcasting Services is a broadcaster in Malta. ... WNOL WB 38is the WB affiliate in the greater New Orleans market. ... The CW Television Network, normally abbreviated to The CW, also known as The New CW in its first season of the network, is a television network in the United States launched during the 2006 television season. ... WPXL is the local i Network (formerly PAX) affiliate in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... . The initial letter is shown capitalized due to technical restrictions. ... WUPL, My 54, is the My Network TV affiliate for the Greater New Orleans, Louisiana area. ... My Network TV (sometimes written MyNetworkTV, and unofficially abbreviated MNT or MNTV) is an upcoming television network in the United States, owned by News Corporation, which is scheduled to launch on September 5, 2006. ... A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ... WIST is an all talk station based in New Orleans, Louisiana. ...

See also: List of radio stations in Louisiana (New Orleans area)

// AM 580 KJMJ-AM (Religious,originating station of Catholic network Radio Maria USA) 840 KWDF-AM (Southern Gospel) 970 KSYL-AM (Talk) 1110 KTTP-AM (Religious) 1270 KVCL-AM (Smooth Jazz) 1400 KVLA-AM (Off air)(Vidalia, Louisiana) 1400 KWLA-AM (Oldies)(Many, Louisiana) 1410 KDBS-AM (Sports) 1450 KNOC...

Infrastructure

Transportation

A Saint Charles Avenue streetcar traveling Canal Street
A Saint Charles Avenue streetcar traveling Canal Street

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (477x638, 106 KB) Summary Saint Charles Avenue Streetcar on Canal Street Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (477x638, 106 KB) Summary Saint Charles Avenue Streetcar on Canal Street Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Streetcars

New Orleans has three active streetcar lines. The St. Charles line is the oldest continuously operating streetcar line in America, and each car is a historic landmark. The Riverfront line runs parallel to the river from Esplanade Street through the French Quarter to Canal Street to the Convention Center above Julia Street in the Arts District. The Canal Street line uses the Riverfront line tracks from the intersection of Canal Street and Poydras Street, down Canal Street, then branches off and ends at the cemeteries at City Park Avenue with a spur running from the intersection of Canal and Carrollton Avenue to the entrance of City Park at Esplanade near the entrance to the New Orleans Museum of Art. Streetcars in New Orleans have been an integral part of the citys public transportation network since the first half of the 19th century. ... A tram system, tramway, or street railway is a railway on which trams (streetcars, trolleys) run. ... The St. ...


The city's streetcars were also featured in the Tennessee Williams play, A Streetcar Named Desire. The streetcar line to Desire Street became a bus line in 1948. There are proposals to revive a Desire streetcar line, running along the neutral grounds of North Rampart and St. Claude, as far downriver as Poland Avenue, near the Industrial Canal. Thomas Lanier Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983), better known as Tennessee Williams, was a major American playwright who received many of the top theatrical awards. ... A Streetcar Named Desire is a 1947 play written by American playwright Tennessee Williams for which he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1948. ...


Hurricane Katrina destroyed the power lines supplying the St. Charles Avenue line. The associated levee failures flooded the Mid-City facility storing the red streetcars which normally run on the Riverfront and Canal Street lines. Restoration of service has been gradual, with vintage St. Charles line cars running on the Riverfront and Canal lines until the more modern red cars are back in service; they are being individually restored at the RTA's facility in the Carrollton neighborhood. On December 23, 2007, streetcars were restored to running on the St. Charles line up to Carrolton Avenue. The much-anticipated re-opening of the second portion of the historic route, which continues until the intersection of Carrolton Avenue and Claiborne Avenue, was commemorated on June 28, 2008.[87]


Buses

Public transportation in the city is operated by New Orleans Regional Transit Authority ("RTA"). There are many bus routes connecting the city and suburban areas. The Jefferson Parish Department of Transit Administration[88] operates Jefferson Transit which provides service between the city and its suburbs.[89] A taxi serving as a bus Public transport comprises all transport systems in which the passengers do not travel in their own vehicles. ... The New Orleans Regional Transit Authority (or RTA) is a body established by the Louisiana State Legislature in 1979; since 1983 it has controlled bus and light-rail service in the City of New Orleans. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Jefferson Parish is a parish in Louisiana that includes most of the suburbs of New Orleans. ...


Roads

See also: Famous streets of New Orleans

New Orleans proper is served by interstate highways, Interstate 10, Interstate 610 and Interstate 510. I-10 travels east-west through the city as the Pontchartrain Expressway. In the far eastern part of the city, New Orleans East, it is known as the Eastern Expressway. I-610 provides a direct shortcut for traffic passing through New Orleans via I-10, allowing that traffic to bypass I-10's southward curve. In the future, New Orleans will have another interstate highway, Interstate 49, which will be extended from its current terminus in Lafayette to the city. New Orleans, Louisiana includes such notable streets as: Basin Street Bourbon Street Caffin Avenue Canal Street Carrollton Avenue Claiborne Avenue Decatur Street Desire Street Elysian Fields Avenue Erato Street Esplanade Avenue Magazine Street Metairie Road Rampart Street Royal Street St. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 10 Interstate 10 (abbreviated I-10) is the southernmost east-west, coast-to-coast interstate highway in the United States. ... Interstate 610 (abbreviated I-610) is an alternate route of I-10 that lies entirely within the boundaries of Orleans Parish, Louisiana. ... The Interstate 510 number has also been used for a portion of what is now I-10 in Phoenix, Arizona. ... The Pontchartrain Expressway should not be confused with the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway which connects the north and south shores of Lake Pontchartrain. ... Eastern New Orleans is a large section of the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 49 Interstate 49 (abbreviated I-49) is an intrastate interstate highway located entirely within the state of Louisiana in the southern United States. ... : Hub City : The Heart of Cajun Country United States Louisiana Lafayette 47. ...


In addition to Interstate Highways, U.S. 90 travels through the city while U.S. 61 terminates in the city's downtown center. In addition, U.S. 11 terminates in the eastern portion of the city. U.S. Route 90 is an east-west United States highway. ... U.S. Route 61 is the official designation for a United States highway that runs 1,400 miles from New Orleans, Louisiana, to the city of Wyoming, Minnesota. ... U.S. Route 11 is a north-south United States highway extending 1,645 miles[1] (2,647 km) across the eastern United States. ...


New Orleans is home to many bridges, The tolled Crescent City Connection is perhaps the most notable. It serves as New Orleans' major bridge across the Mississippi River, providing a connection between the city's downtown on the eastbank and its westbank suburbs. Other bridges that cross the Mississippi River in the New Orleans area are the Huey P. Long Bridge, over which U.S. 90 travels, and the Hale Boggs Memorial Bridge, which carries Interstate 310. The Crescent City Connection, abbreviated as CCC, (formerly the Greater New Orleans Bridge) refers to twin cantilever bridges, that carry U.S. Route 90 Business over the Mississippi River in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... This article is about a bridge in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana; a second Huey P. Long Bridge is in Baton Rouge. ... The Luling Bridge (also known as the Hale Boggs Memorial Bridge) is a cable-stayed bridge over the Mississippi River in St. ... Interstate 310 (abbreviated I-310) is a short spur route of Interstate 10 near New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


The Twin Span, a five-mile (8 km) causeway in eastern New Orleans carries I-10 across Lake Pontchartrain. Also in eastern New Orleans, Interstate 510/LA 47 travels across the Intracoastal Waterway/Mississippi River Gulf Outlet via the Paris Road Bridge, connecting New Orleans East and suburban Chalmette. The I-10 Twin Span Bridge, known locally as the Twin Spans, consists of two parallel trestle bridges. ... The Hindenburgdamm rail causeway across the Wadden Sea to the island of Sylt in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany In modern usage, a causeway is a road or railway elevated by a bank, usually across a broad body of water or wetland. ... Lake Pontchartrains north shore at Fontainebleau State Park near Mandeville, Louisiana in 2004 Lake Pontchartrain (local English pronunciation ) (French: Lac Pontchartrain, pronounced ) is a brackish lake located in southeastern Louisiana. ... The Interstate 510 number has also been used for a portion of what is now I-10 in Phoenix, Arizona. ... Louisiana Highway 47 (LA 47) is a state highway located in New Orleans and Chalmette. ... Tug and barge on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway Navigation on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW), where it intersects with Bayou Perot, in the vicinity of New Orleans The Intracoastal Waterway is a 4,800-km (3,000-mile) recreational and commercial waterway along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the... The Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet Canal (also known as MRGO, MR-GO or Mr. ... The Green Bridge is the unofficial local name of the Paris Road Bridge carrying Louisiana Highway 47 across the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet between St. ... Eastern New Orleans is a large section of the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The unincorporated community of Chalmette is the parish seat of St. ...


The tolled Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, consisting of two parallel bridges, are, at 24 miles (39 km) in length, the longest bridges in the world. Built in the 1950s (southbound span) and 1960s (northbound span), the bridges connect New Orleans with its suburbs on the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain via Metairie. Not to be confused with the Pontchartrain Expressway, a section of Interstate 10 and U.S. 90 Business in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... , Metairie (local pronunciations , ) is a suburb of New Orleans. ...


Airports

The metropolitan area is served by Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport, located in the suburb of Kenner. New Orleans also has several regional airports located throughout the metropolitan area. These include the Lakefront Airport, Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base New Orleans (locally known as Callendar Field) in the suburb of Belle Chasse and "Southern Seaplane," also located in Belle Chasse. Southern Seaplane has a 3,200-foot (980 m) runway for wheeled planes and a 5,000-foot (1,500 m) water runway for seaplanes. New Orleans' airport suffered some damage as a result of Hurricane Katrina, but as of April 2007 it contained the most traffic and is the busiest airport in the state of Louisiana, and it is the sixth busiest in the Southeast. Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport (IATA: MSY, ICAO: KMSY), formerly Moisant Field, is located in Kenner, Louisiana and is the primary commercial airport for the New Orleans metropolitan area of southeast Louisiana and the second largest airport on the United States Gulf Coast. ... Kenner is a suburb of New Orleans that has a population of 70,517 (census 2000). ... New Orleans Lakefront Airport, located in downtown New Orleans, Louisana was constructed in the mid 1930s on a man-made peninsula jutting into Lake Pontchartrain. ...


Rail

The city is served by rail via Amtrak. The New Orleans Union Passenger Terminal is the central rail depot, and is served by three trains: the Crescent, operating between New Orleans and New York City; the City of New Orleans, operating between New Orleans and Chicago; and the Sunset Limited, operating through New Orleans between Orlando, Florida, and Los Angeles, California. From late August of 2005 to the present, the Sunset Limited has remained officially a Florida-to-Los Angeles train, being considered temporarily truncated due to the lingering effects of Hurricane Katrina. At first (until late October 2005) it was truncated to a San Antonio-to-Los Angeles service; since then (from late October 2005 on) it has been truncated to a New Orleans-to-Los Angeles service. As time has passed, particularly since the January 2006 completion of the rebuilding of damaged tracks east of New Orleans by their owner CSX Transportation Inc., the obstacles to restoration of the Sunset Limited's full route have been more managerial and political than physical. Vermonter at the Brattleboro, Vermont, station, 18 March 2004. ... New Orleans Union Passenger Terminal (NOUPT) is the main train station in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The Crescent is a passenger train operated by Amtrak in the eastern part of the United States. ... Amtraks City of New Orleans stops at the Memphis, Tennessee station in 2005. ... Amtraks eastbound Sunset Limited at the Houston Amtrak station. ...


With the strategic benefits of both a major international port and one of the few double-track Mississippi River crossings, the city is served by six of the seven Class I freight railroads in North America: Union Pacific Railroad, BNSF Railway, Norfolk Southern Railway, Kansas City Southern, CSX, and Canadian National Railway. The New Orleans Public Belt provides interchange services between the railroads. A Class I railroad in the United States, or a Class I railway (also Class I rail carrier) in Canada, is one of the largest freight railroads, as classified based on operating revenue. ... Union Pacific redirects here. ... The BNSF Railway (AAR reporting marks BNSF), headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas, is one of the four remaining transcontinental railroads and one of the largest railroad networks in North America (only one competitor, the Union Pacific Railroad, is larger in size). ... Norfolk Southern Headquarters Norfolk, Virginia. ... Categories: Railway companies of the United States ... CSX redirects here. ... The Canadian National Railway (CN; AAR reporting marks CN, CNA, CNIS) is a Canadian Class I railway operated by the Canadian National Railway Company headquartered in Montreal, Quebec. ... The New Orleans Public Belt Railroad (AAR reporting mark NOPB) is a non-profit terminal switching railroad, a commission operated by the State of Louisiana. ...


Recently, many have proposed extending New Orleans's public transit system by adding light rail routes from downtown along Airline Highway through the airport to Baton Rouge and from downtown to Slidell and the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Proponents of this idea claim that these new routes would boost the region's economy, which has been badly damaged by Hurricane Katrina, and serve as an evacuation option for hospital patients out of the city.[90] This article is about light rail systems in general. ... Capitol Building Baton Rouge is the capital of Louisiana, a state of the United States of America. ... Slidell is a city in St. ... The coastline of Mississippi which is commonly refered to as the Mississippi Gulf Coast is comprised of three Mississippi counties which lie on the Gulf of Mexico: Hancock County, Mississippi, Harrison County, Mississippi, and Jackson County, Mississippi. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ...


Algiers Ferry

Main article: Algiers Ferry
Ferry connecting New Orleans and Algiers
Ferry connecting New Orleans and Algiers

The Canal Street Ferry connects the heart of New Orleans with the neighborhood of Algiers Point on the other side of the Mississippi River. This service has been in continuous operation since 1827. Pedestrians ride for free while automobiles are charged a fee. Service is from 6 am until midnight. Ferryboat Thomas Jefferson approaches the Algiers side of the ferry route; Ferryboat Frank X. Arminger seen at dock at right foreground. ...


Utilities

Natural gas and electricity dominate the home heating market with similar market shares totaling about 47 percent each.


Sister cities

New Orleans has ten sister cities:[91] Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Venezuela. ... Nickname: Motto: Ave María Santísima, sin pecado concebida, en el primer instante de su ser natural. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The City of Holdfast Bay is a Local Government Area in the south western suburbs of Adelaide, South Australia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Austria. ... Innsbruck is a city in western Austria, and the capital of the federal state of Tyrol. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Juan-les-Pins is a district of Antibes, in southeastern France, on the Côte dAzur. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Venezuela. ... Nickname: Motto: Muy noble y leal Maracaibo Municipality in Zulia State Coordinates: , Country State Municipality Maracaibo Founded 1529 Government  - Mayor Gian Carlo Di Martino (MVR) Area  - Total 550 km² (212. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Matsue (松江市 Matsue-shi) is the capital city of Shimane Prefecture in the Chugoku region of Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... Cathedral on the Plaza Mayor, the oldest in North America [1]. Mérida is the capital and largest city of the Mexican state of Yucatán. ... Mexico or, in Spanish, México, is: Mexico, a federal republic in North America Mexico City, that countrys capital city Mexican Federal District, the federal district containing that capital city Estado de México (State of Mexico), one of that republics 31 constituent states Mexico is also the... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Republic_of_the_Congo. ... Pointe-Noire is a port city in the Republic of the Congo. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... San Miguel de Tucumán (usually referred to as simply Tucumán) is the largest city in northwestern Argentina. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Honduras. ... Tegucigalpa IPA: (Tegus for short), population 1,200,000 (2006) (metro area), is the capital of Honduras (together with Comayagüela), and the countrys largest city. ...

Nicknames

The city's several nicknames are illustrative:

  • Crescent City alludes to the course of the Mississippi River around and through the city.
  • The Big Easy was possibly a reference by musicians in the early 20th century to the relative ease of finding work there. It also may have originated in the Prohibition era when the city was considered one big speak-easy due to the inability of the federal government to control alcohol sales in open violation of the 18th Amendment. The term was used by local columnist Betty Gillaud in the 1970s to contrast life in the city to that of New York City.[92] The name also refers to New Orleans' status as a major city, and at one time "one of the cheapest places in America to live" and came into popular usage throughout the United States in the wake of the 1987 film The Big Easy, which was set in New Orleans.[93]
  • The City that Care Forgot was given by American writer Mark Twain, and refers to the outwardly easy-going, carefree nature of many of the residents.
  • America's Most Interesting City appears on welcome signs at the city limits.
  • Hollywood South is a reference to the large number of films, big and small, shot in the city since 2002.
  • The Northernmost Caribbean City is a reference from the Boston Globe as well as other travel guides due in part to the similarities of culture with the Caribbean islands.

The Lower Mississippi River is the portion of the Mississippi River downstream of Cairo, Illinois. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Amendment XVIII in the National Archives Prohibition agents destroying barrels of alcohol. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... The Big Easy is a neo-noir film directed by Jim McBride and executive produced by Mort Engelberg. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ...

See also

Louisiana portal
New Orleans portal

Image File history File links Flag_of_Louisiana. ... Image File history File links Portal. ... The film Hurricane on the Bayou is about the wetlands of Louisiana before and after Hurricane Katrina. ... This is a list of individuals who are natives of, or are notable as residents of, or in association with the city of New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. // Academia Stephen Ambrose, historian and University of New Orleans professor Humberto Fontova, Cuban-American historian Louise S. McGehee, educator Sean OKeefe, LSU... The city of New Orleans, Louisiana is part of a number of fictional works. ... The New Orleans Police Department or NOPD has primary responsibility for law enforcement in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Orléans (Latin, meaning golden) is a city and commune in north-central France, about 130 km (80 miles) southwest of Paris. ... The effect of Hurricane Katrina on New Orleans was catastrophic due to failure of the flood protection that experts agree worldwide should have protected the city. ... The Ionic portico of the façade of the New Orleans Mint today, as seen from across Esplanade Avenue. ... The USS Orleans Parish (LST-1069) was one of 612 LST-542-class tank landing ships (LSTs) built for the United States Navy during World War II. Named after Orleans Parish, Louisiana, she was the only U.S. Naval vessel to bear the name. ...

References

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Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

External links

Find more about New Orleans on Wikipedia's sister projects:
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  • Official Website of the City of New Orleans
  • Official Tourism Website of the City of New Orleans
  • New Orleans PodCasting - Listen to the voices that are rebuilding New Orleans
  • New Orleans travel guide by Wikitravel
  • History of New Orleans
  • A sampling of New Orleans music including jazz, R&B, rock and roll, funk, and brass band
  • New Orleans Cemeteries aka "The Cities of the Dead"
  • Army Corps of Engineers interactive map showing flood risk

Coordinates: 29°58′N, 90°03′W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...



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