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Encyclopedia > New London, Connecticut
City of New London
Downtown New London on the
  west bank of the Thames River.
Official seal of City of New London
Seal
Nickname: The Whaling City
Motto: MARE LIBERUM
Coordinates: 41°21′20″N 72°05′58″W / 41.35556, -72.09944
NECTA Norwich-New London
Region Southeastern Connecticut
Settled 1646 (Pequot Plantation)
Named 1658 (New London)
Incorporated (city) 1784
Government
 - Type Council-manager
 - City council Margaret Mary Curtin, Mayor
Kevin J. Cavanagh, Dep. Mayor
William M. Cornish
Charles Frink
Jane L. Glover
Robert M. Pero
Elizabeth A. Sabilia
 - City Manager Martin H. Berliner
 - Supt. of Schools Christopher Clouet
Area
 - City 27.9 km²  (10.76 sq mi)
 - Land 14.3 km² (5.54 sq mi)
 - Water 13.5 km² (5.23 sq mi)
 - Urban 318.66 km² (123.03 sq mi)
Elevation 17 m (56 ft)
Population (2005)[1] [2]
 - City 26,174
 - Density 1,824/km² (4,725/sq mi)
 - Metro 266,618
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 06320
Website: City of New London

New London is a seaport city and a port of entry on the northeast coast of the United States. It is located at the mouth of the Thames River in southeastern Connecticut. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x708, 164 KB) Original photo by OWL taken on 2004-07-22 at 11:04 A.M. I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Central business district. ... The Thames River, seen from the waterfront in New London, Connecticut The Thames River is a short river and tidal estuary in the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... Image File history File links Seal_of_City_of_New_London. ... The Seal of the City of New London, Connecticut, depicts a sailing ship at sea with a scroll overhead proclaiming The Whaling Citys motto, MARE LIBERUM -- Latin for Free seas. ... // A nickname is a name of a person or thing other than its proper name. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... Hugo Grotius (Huig de Groot, or Hugo de Groot; Delft, 10 April 1583 – Rostock, 28 August 1645) worked as a jurist in the Dutch Republic and laid the foundations for international law, based on natural law. ... Image File history File links US-CT-New_London. ... A New England City and Town Area or NECTA is a geographic entity in the New England region of the United States. ... The Southeastern Connecticut region comprises, as the name suggests, the southeastern corner of the state of Connecticut. ... The council-manager government is one of 2 main variations of representative municipal government (for contrast, also see Mayor-Council government). ... The council-manager government is one of 2 main variations of representative municipal government (for contrast, also see Mayor-Council government). ... In education, a superintendent is an individual that has executive oversight and administration rights, usually within an educational entity or organization. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Basic Definition In geography, the elevation of a geographic location is its height above mean sea level (or some other fixed point). ... The metre or meter is a measure of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Mr. ... A port of entry is a place where one may lawfully enter a country. ... The Thames River, seen from the waterfront in New London, Connecticut The Thames River is a short river and tidal estuary in the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... The Southeastern Connecticut region comprises, as the name suggests, the southeastern corner of the state of Connecticut. ...


The harbor at New London is the best on Long Island Sound [1]. Connecticut College and the United States Coast Guard Academy are located on the west bank. Naval Submarine Base New London and the Electric Boat Corporation are located on the east bank in neighboring Groton. New York City waterways: 1. ... Connecticut College is a coeducational, highly selective private liberal arts college located in New London, Connecticut. ... The United States Coast Guard Academy (USCGA), located in New London, Connecticut is a U.S. military academy that provides education to future officers of the United States Coast Guard. ... The town of Groton, Connecticut is host to SUBASE New London and the Electric Boat division of General Dynamics. ... Electric Boat, a division of General Dynamics Corporation, is a major contractor for submarine work for the United States Navy. ... Waterfront of Groton, Connecticut looking upriver Groton is a town located on the Thames River in New London County, Connecticut. ...


New London was founded in 1646. It was a base of American naval operations during the Revolutionary War and was a major whaling port in the 19th century. New London Harbor is home port to the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Chinook, the Coast Guard's tall ship Eagle, and to seventeen [2] nuclear-powered attack submarines of the U.S. Navy. 1646 (MDCXLVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... A Cutter is a United States Coast Guard vessel 65 feet in length or greater, having adequate accommodations for crew to live on board. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is a branch of the United States armed forces and is involved in maritime law enforcement, mariner assistance, search and rescue, and national defense. ... The USCGC Eagle. ... The USCGC Eagle (WIX-327) (ex-Horst Wessel) is a 295 barque used as a training cutter for members of the US Coast Guard. ... The Virginia class (or SSN-774 class) of attack submarines are the first U.S. subs to be designed for a broad spectrum of open-ocean and littoral missions around the world. ... The United States Navy, also known as the USN or the U.S. Navy, is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for conducting naval operations. ...


The Norwich-New London metropolitan area (NECTA [3]) includes twenty-one towns [4] and 266,618 people [5]. The population of the city of New London is 26,174 [6]. Nickname: Coordinates: NECTA Norwich-New London Region Southeastern Connecticut Settled 1659 Incorporated (city) 1784 Consolidated 1952 Government  - Type Council-manager  - City council Benjamin P. Lathrop, Mayor Mark M. Bettencourt Jacqueline Caren John D. Crooks Lawrence N. Goldman John P. Mereen John M. Newson  - City manager Robert Zarnetske Area  - City 76. ... A New England City and Town Area or NECTA is a geographic entity in the New England region of the United States. ...

Contents

Geography

49% of New London's area is water.
49% of New London's area is water.

In terms of land area, New London is one of the smallest cities in Connecticut. Of the whole 10.76 square miles (27.9 km²), nearly half is water; 5.54 square miles (14.3 km²) is land [7]. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the unit of measure. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ...


The town and city of New London are coextensive. Between 1705 and 1801 sections of the original town were ceded to form newer towns. The towns of Groton, Ledyard, Montville, and Waterford; and portions of Salem and East Lyme; now occupy what had earlier been the outlying area of New London [8]. The system of local government in use in New England is very different from that found throughout the rest of the United States. ... The system of local government in use in New England is very different from that found throughout the rest of the United States. ... Waterfront of Groton, Connecticut looking upriver Groton is a town located on the Thames River in New London County, Connecticut. ... Ledyard is a town in New London County, Connecticut, United States, located along the Thames River. ... Montville is a town in New London County, Connecticut, United States. ... Waterford is a town in New London County, Connecticut, United States. ... Salem is a town in New London County, Connecticut, United States. ... East Lyme is a town in New London County, Connecticut, United States. ...


New London is bounded on the west and north by the town of Waterford, on the east by the Thames River and Groton, and on the south by Long Island Sound.


The geographic coordinates of the state superior courthouse in New London are 41° 21' 20" N, 72° 5' 58" W [9] .

Transportation

New London is visited daily by Amtrak's Acela Express
New London is visited daily by Amtrak's Acela Express

By land, New London is practically midway between New York City and Boston. The major seaboard interstate highway, I-95, passes through the city, and New London's Amtrak station is on the passenger rail Northeast Corridor. The city of Worcester, Massachusetts is 74 miles (119 km) northward, principally via Interstate 395, and the Connecticut capital, Hartford, is 53 miles (85 km) to the northwest via a sequence of state highways. Northbound Acela Express headed by power unit 2007. ... Northbound Acela Express headed by power unit 2007. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Interstate Highways in the 48 contiguous states. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 95 Interstate 95 (abbreviated I-95) is a well-known, important, and heavily traveled highway in the United States Interstate Highway System. ... Other service Other information Code NLC New London is a train station in New London, Connecticut. ... Most of the NEC (those sections shown in red, except Boston to the Rhode Island state line) is owned by Amtrak. ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Worcester County Settled 1673 Incorporated 1684 Government  - Type Council-manager also known as Plan E  - City Manager Michael V. OBrien  - Mayor Konstantina B. Lukes  - City Council Dennis L. Irish Michael C. Perotto Joseph M. Petty Gary Rosen Kathleen... Interstate 395 (abbreviated I-395) is a 67-mile-long north-south interstate highway that begins at Interstate 95 in East Lyme, Connecticut and ends at Interstate 90 in Auburn, Massachusetts, where it becomes Interstate 290. ... Nickname: Location in Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates: , Country United States State Connecticut NECTA Hartford Region Capitol Region Named 1637 Incorporated (city) 1784 Consolidated 1896 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Eddie Perez Area  - City  18. ...


New London is served by local taxi companies, regional Southeast Area Transit buses, interstate Greyhound Lines buses, the Cross Sound Ferry to Long Island, the Fishers Island Ferry District, and in summer by the Block Island Express ferry. Greyhound Lines is the largest inter-city common carrier of passengers by bus in North America, serving 2,200 destinations in the United States. ... Cross Sound Ferrys New London terminus, and New London skyline, viewed from across the Thames River Cross Sound Ferry is a year-round passenger and vehicle ferry boat service based in New London, Connecticut, which provides transport to and from New London and Orient Point, New York, crossing Long... Map showing Long Island; to the north is Connecticut and to the west are New York City and New Jersey. ... Fishers Island, shown highlighted Fishers Island is a small island, approximately 9 miles (14 km) long and 1 mile (1. ... Block Island, shown in red, off the coast of the State of Rhode Island. ...


The Groton-New London Airport is located in neighboring Groton; and two major airports, T. F. Green and Bradley International, are within 75 minutes driving time. Groton-New London Airport (IATA Airport Code GNL) is a state-owned airport offering military and general service located in Groton, Connecticut. ... Waterfront of Groton, Connecticut looking upriver Groton is a town located on the Thames River in New London County, Connecticut. ... Runway layout at PVD T. F. Green Airport (IATA: PVD, ICAO: KPVD, FAA LID: PVD), also known as Theodore Francis Green State Airport, is a public airport located in Warwick, six miles (10 km) south of Providence, in Kent County, Rhode Island, USA. Dedicated in 1931, the airport was named... BDL redirects here. ...


Rail freight is by the Providence & Worcester Railroad and the New England Central Railroad. Seagoing cargo at the State Pier is handled by Logistec. The Providence and Worcester Railroad (AAR reporting marks PW) is a Class II railroad in the United States. ... The New England Central Railroad is a subsidiary of RailAmerica. ...


Demographics

Population since 1810
Population since 1810
Population 1756-1800 [10]
1756 †‡ 3,171
1774 †‡ 5,888
1782 †‡ 5,688
1800 ‡ 5,150
† Includes area taken to form other towns in 1786 and 1801
‡ Includes area taken to form other towns in 1801

As of the census² of 2000, there were 25,671 people, 10,181 households, and 5,385 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,635.5/mi² (1,789.1/km²). There were 11,560 housing units at an average density of 2,087.4/mi² (805.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 19.71% Hispanic or Latino of any race, 18.64% African American, 0.88% Native American, 2.12% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 9.13% from other races, 63.49% White and 5.67% from two or more races. Image File history File links New_London_Population. ... Image File history File links New_London_Population. ... 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The following is a list of sources used in the creation of encyclopedia articles on various geographic topics and locations, such as cities, counties, states, and countries. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 10,181 households out of which 27.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 30.4% were married couples living together, 17.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 47.1% were non-families. 37.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 3.00. This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 22.8% under the age of 18, 17.6% from 18 to 24, 29.6% from 25 to 44, 17.9% from 45 to 64, and 12.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 95.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.8 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $33,809, and the median income for a family was $38,942. Males had a median income of $31,405 versus $25,426 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,437. About 13.4% of families and 15.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.5% of those under age 18 and 11.4% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...

Government

Ballot on voting machine
Ballot on voting machine

New London has a form of government centering on a professional city manager and elected city council. Distinct town and city government structures formerly existed, and technically continue. However, they now govern exactly the same territory, and have elections on the same ballot on Election Day in November of odd-numbered years; the officials of town and city interact essentially as do a single town's, or city's, officials, who have different but related responsibilities and powers.
Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1000x617, 140 KB) Photo by Ralph Thayer, New London I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1000x617, 140 KB) Photo by Ralph Thayer, New London I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The council-manager government is one of 2 main variations of representative municipal government (for contrast, also see Mayor-Council government). ... More than one country has a day called Election Day. ...


History

New London in 1813

Before English settlement, nearby tribal people called the site of New London by a name the English spelled "Nameaug". John Winthrop, Jr. led the first English to settle there in 1646, making it about the 13th modern Connecticut town settled by colonists; they informally named it Pequot (from the name of a tribe). The Connecticut legislature wanted to name the town "Faire Harbour," but the citizens protested, declaring that they would prefer to be called Nameaug to Faire Harbour. The legislature relented and the city officially took its current name (after London, England) on March 10, 1658. Download high resolution version (1609x953, 419 KB)New London [Connecticut] in 1813. ... Download high resolution version (1609x953, 419 KB)New London [Connecticut] in 1813. ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... John Winthrop (February 12, 1606-April 5, 1676), generally known as John Winthrop the Younger, was governor of Connecticut. ... 1646 (MDCXLVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Pequot are a tribal nation of Native Americans who, in the 17th century, inhabited much of what is now Connecticut. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 13 - Edward Sexby, who had plotted against Oliver Cromwell, dies in Tower of London February 6 - Swedish troops of Charles X Gustav of Sweden cross The Great Belt (Storebælt) in Denmark over frozen sea May 1 - Publication of Hydriotaphia, Urn Burial and The Garden of Cyrus by...


Prior to the Battle of Groton Heights, New London was burned by the loyalist Benedict Arnold in the attempts to destroy the colonial privateer fleet and storage of goods and naval stores within the city. The main defensive fort for New London, Fort Griswold, located across the Thames River in Groton, was well known by Arnold who sold its secrets to the British fleet so they could avoid its artillery fire. The Battle of Groton Heights was a battle of the American Revolutionary War. ... Benedict Arnold V (January 14, 1741 – June 14, 1801) was a general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. ... Classical drawing of Fort Griswold by Benedict Arnold Fort Griswold is an American military base, now decommissioned, in Groton, Connecticut that played a key role in the early stages of the American Revolutionary War. ... Waterfront of Groton, Connecticut looking upriver Groton is a town located on the Thames River in New London County, Connecticut. ...


Connecticut's independent legislature, in its January session of 1784, made New London one of the first two cities (along with New Haven) brought from de facto to formalized incorporations. 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without...


For several decades during the middle of the nineteenth century, New London was the second busiest whaling port after New Bedford, Massachusetts. The wealth that whaling brought into the city furnished the capital to fund much of the city's present architecture. New Bedford is a city in Bristol County, Massachusetts, located about 56 miles (90 kilometers) south of Boston, 31 miles (50 kilometers) southeast of Providence, Rhode Island, and about 8 miles (13 kilometers) east of Fall River. ...

State Street in c. 1920
State Street in c. 1920

The family of Nobel and Pulitzer-Prize playwright Eugene O'Neill, and most of his own first 26 years, were intimately connected to New London. He lived for years there, and as an adult was employed and wrote his first seven or eight plays in the city. (A major O'Neill archive is located at Connecticut College there, and a family home there is a museum and Registered National Landmark operated by the O'Neill Theater Center.) Image File history File links State_Street,_New_London,_CT.jpg‎ State Street, looking East, New London, CT; from a c. ... Image File history File links State_Street,_New_London,_CT.jpg‎ State Street, looking East, New London, CT; from a c. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Nobel Prize medal. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... Eugene Gladstone ONeill (October 16, 1888 – November 27, 1953) was a Nobel- and four-time Pulitzer Prize-winning American playwright. ... Connecticut College is a coeducational, highly selective private liberal arts college located in New London, Connecticut. ...


On February 22, 2005, the United States Supreme Court decided in Kelo v. City of New London, that the city may seize privately owned real property under eminent domain so that it could be used for private economic development, deciding the tax revenue from the private development satisfied the requirement for public interest for eminent domain.
February 22 is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Holding The governmental taking of property from one private owner to give to another in furtherance of economic development constitutes a permissible public use under the Fifth Amendment. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Eminent domain (U.S.), compulsory purchase (United Kingdom, New Zealand, Ireland), resumption/compulsory acquisition (Australia) or expropriation (Canada, South Africa) in common law legal systems is the inherent power of the state to seize a citizens private property, expropriate private property, or rights in private property, without the owner... Economic development is a sustainable increase in living standards that implies increased per capita income, better education and health as well as environmental protection. ...


Towns created from New London

New London originally had a larger extent when it was first established as a town. Several towns have since been created from New London as indicated below.

Waterfront of Groton, Connecticut looking upriver Groton is a town located on the Thames River in New London County, Connecticut. ... Ledyard is a town in New London County, Connecticut, United States, located along the Thames River. ... Montville is a town in New London County, Connecticut, United States. ... Salem is a town in New London County, Connecticut, United States. ... Waterford is a town in New London County, Connecticut, United States. ... East Lyme is a town in New London County, Connecticut, United States. ...

Prominent features

Lyman Allyn Art Museum
Lyman Allyn Art Museum

New London hosts Connecticut College, Mitchell College, and the United States Coast Guard Academy, as well as the small private secondary school The Williams School. The Connecticut College Arboretum is a fine, 750 acre (3 km²) arboretum and botanical garden. The Lyman Allyn Art Museum is located on the Connecticut College Campus. Housed in a handsome Neo-Classical building designed by Charles A. Platt, the permanent collection of over 15,000 objects includes paintings, sculpture, drawings, prints, furniture, decorative arts, and American art from the 18th through 20th centuries. Image File history File linksMetadata New_London_Art_Museum. ... Image File history File linksMetadata New_London_Art_Museum. ... Connecticut College is a coeducational, highly selective private liberal arts college located in New London, Connecticut. ... Mitchell College is a college in New London, Connecticut, USA. It was founded in 1938. ... The United States Coast Guard Academy (USCGA), located in New London, Connecticut is a U.S. military academy that provides education to future officers of the United States Coast Guard. ... The Williams School is a coeducational independent high school located on the campus of Connecticut College in New London, Connecticut. ... The Connecticut College Arboretum is a 300 ha (750 acres) arboretum and botanical gardens, founded in 1931, and located on the campus of Connecticut College and in the towns of New London and Waterford, Connecticut. ... An arboretum is a botanical garden primarily devoted to trees and other woody plants, forming a living collection of trees intended at least partly for scientific study. ... Inside the United States Botanic Garden Inside the Rio de Janeiro Botanic Garden (Brazil), 1890 Botanical gardens (in Latin, hortus botanicus) grow a wide variety of plants primarily categorized and documented for scientific purposes, but also for the enjoyment and education of visitors, a consideration that has become essential to... The Lyman Allyn Art Museum is located in New London, Connecticut. ... Charles Adams Platt (New York October 16, 1861–Cornish, New Hampshire September 12, 1933 was a prominent landscape gardener and architect of the American Renaissance movement, who introduced formal gardens of Italianate design to an American audience, with his influential book Italian Gardens (1893). ...


Ye Antientist Burial Ground, circa 1652, is one of the earliest colonial graveyards in New England. Here is a significant repository not only of the first generation of settlers, but an open air museum of the early stonecutter's art as well. Of all Connecticut burying grounds, this in New London may hold the greatest variety of different carving schools. There is also a historical site in the remains of Fort Griswold (located across the Thames River in Groton, CT), dedicated to Americans that fell in the Battle of Groton Heights defending the fort and the city against British invaders. New London is also home to Fort Trumbull.
Ye Antientist Burial Ground: In this ancient cemetery, the graves are irregularly disposed, crowding upon each other without avenues or spaces between families, and most of the head stones are either rude in form and material, or quaint and grotesque in the workmanship and inscription. ... Classical drawing of Fort Griswold by Benedict Arnold Fort Griswold is an American military base, now decommissioned, in Groton, Connecticut that played a key role in the early stages of the American Revolutionary War. ... The Battle of Groton Heights was a battle of the American Revolutionary War. ...


Notable residents

Cassie, singer For the Canadian actress, see Cassie Steele. ...

John Winthrop, the Younger (1606-1676), statesman, metallurgist, alchemist, and physician. Founder of New London. Able and popular Governor of Connecticut (1657, 1659-1676). Obtained from Charles II the generous Charter of the Colony of Connecticut in 1662. Made an Original Fellow of the Royal Society in 1663 -- the only resident in North America. Physician to some 500 families out of a population of about 5,000 persons. Treated an average of twelve patients a day by traveling around the colony. [11] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Gov. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ... The premises of The Royal Society in London (first four properties only). ...


Fitz-John Winthrop (1638-1707; son of John Winthrop, the Younger), soldier, statesman. Governor of Connecticut (1698-1707). In 1694 argued before William and Mary in defense of the colony against covetous Massachusetts and New York, and won royal reaffirmation of the Charter of 1662. [12] William III Mary II The phrase William and Mary usually refers to the joint sovereignty over the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of Scotland of King William III and his wife Queen Mary II. Their joint reign began in February, 1689, when they were called to the throne by...


Gurdon Saltonstall (1666-1724), clergyman. Governor of Connecticut (1708-1724). Proponent of the controversial Saybrook Platform. [13] Saybrook Platform refers to conservative religious proposals adopted at Saybrook, Connecticut, in September, 1708, which attempted to stem the tide of disunity among the established Congregational churches and restore discipline among both the clergy and their congregations. ...


Sarah Kemble Knight (1666-1727), teacher, businesswoman, diarist. Author (1704) of The Journal of Madame Knight. (ISBN 1-55709-115-3). [14] Sarah Kemble Knight (1666 - 1727) a preacher and traveler, born in Boston, the daughter of Thomas Kemble, a merchant. ...


Eliphalet Adams (1677-1753), clergyman. An eminent Hebraist, he learned the language of the Nehantics and Pequots, and established schools for those tribes. His congregation elected not to adopt the Saybrook Platform. A renowned preacher and sought-after speaker, many of his sermons were contemporaneously printed. [15] Eliphalet Adams (March 26, 1677—April 1753) was an eminent minister of New London, Connecticut. ... A Hebraist is a specialist in Hebrew and Hebraic studies. ... The Mashantucket Pequots are a small Native American tribe in Connecticut which operates the successful Foxwoods Resort Casino. ... Saybrook Platform refers to conservative religious proposals adopted at Saybrook, Connecticut, in September, 1708, which attempted to stem the tide of disunity among the established Congregational churches and restore discipline among both the clergy and their congregations. ...


Joshua Hempstead (1678-1758), farmer, surveyor, carpenter, gravestone carver, trader, petty attorney, public official, and diarist. Author of Diary of Joshua Hempstead of New London, Connecticut, 1711-1758. (ISBN 0-9607744-1-6). [16]

Detail of reverse of a 1776 Connecticut 1s. note
Detail of reverse of a 1776 Connecticut 1s. note

Timothy Green (1679-1757), printer. Second in the succession of Connecticut printers. Moved from Boston to New London in 1714 to replace Thomas Short, the first printer in Connecticut, who had died in 1712. Euonymous sire to later New London printers Timothy Green (1703-1763) and Timothy Green (1737-1796). [17] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Thomas Short (1682-1712), printer. Moved from Massachusetts Bay Colony to New London in 1709 to be the first printer in Connecticut. Printed in 1710 the Saybrook Platform and the election sermon of Eliphalet Adams -- one or the other being "the first book printed in Connecticut", depending on the source. Saybrook Platform refers to conservative religious proposals adopted at Saybrook, Connecticut, in September, 1708, which attempted to stem the tide of disunity among the established Congregational churches and restore discipline among both the clergy and their congregations. ... Eliphalet Adams (March 26, 1677—April 1753) was an eminent minister of New London, Connecticut. ...


Dudley Saltonstall (1738-1796), naval officer, nephew of Governor Gurdon Saltonstall. First commander of Continental Navy's first flagship, the Alfred. Dudley Saltonstall was commander of the Penobscot Expedition in 1779 against a British army fort in Maine, during the Revolutionary War, which is generally acknowledged as the worst naval defeat in United States history. ... Continental Navy Jack The Continental Navy was authorized by the Continental Congress on October 13, 1775. ...


Nathaniel Shaw, Jr. (1735-1782), merchant, financier. Continental Naval Agent for Connecticut during the Revolutionary War.

Nathan Hale appeared on US postage stamps issued in 1925 and 1929. Likeness is from statue by Bela Lyon Pratt.

Nathan Hale (1755-1776), schoolmaster, patriot. Yale College Class of 1773. An active and enthusiastic teacher, and an early champion of education for daughters as well as sons. Appointed Master of the Union School in New London, and elected First Sergeant of his militia unit there. Commissioned a captain in the Continental Army in 1776. Volunteered to reconnoitre behind enemy lines during the Battle of Long Island. Captured, he was condemned without trial by the English general William Howe. In spirit and deportment as he faced his death, the twenty-one year-old so impressed the enemy company in witness that his last words are remembered as, "I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country." In 1925 the first of two U.S. Postage stamps honoring Nathan Hale was issued, in 1963 the USS Nathan Hale (SSBN-623) was launched at Groton, and in 1985 the General Assembly made Captain Nathan Hale the Connecticut State Hero. The Nathan Hale Schoolhouse in New London (Union Schoolhouse, c. 1775) is preserved by the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution and is open to the public. Image File history File links NathanHaleStamp. ... Image File history File links NathanHaleStamp. ... Statue of Nathaniel Hawthorne in Salem, Massachusetts. ... For the U.S. Congressman, see Nathan W. Hale. ... For other uses, see Yale (disambiguation). ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... Combatants United States Kingdom of Great Britain Commanders George Washington, Israel Putnam William Howe, Charles Cornwallis, Henry Clinton Strength 11,000-13,000 (about 10,000 of which were militia ) 22,000 (including 9,000 Hessians) Casualties 1,719 total (312 dead, 1,407 wounded, captured or missing) 377 total... Sir William Howe, 5th Viscount Howe, KB, PC (August 10, 1729 – July 12, 1814) was an English General who was Commander-in-Chief of British forces during the American Revolutionary War, one of the three Howe brothers. ... USS Nathan Hale (SSBN 623) was the sixth Lafayette-class nuclear powered fleet ballistic missile submarine produced. ... Electric Boat, a division of General Dynamics Corporation, is a major contractor for submarine work for the United States Navy. ... The Connecticut General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ...


Nathan Belcher ( June 23, 1813 - June 2, 1891) was a United States Representative from Connecticut. Nathan Belcher (June 23, 1813 - June 2, 1891) was a United States Representative from Connecticut. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ...


Edward Clark Potter (1857-1923), sculptor. Works include the iconic "Lions" (1911) of the New York Public Library. Edward Clark Potter (November 26, 1857 - June 21, 1923) was an American sculptor. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

Issued Oct. 16, 1967 at New London CT

Eugene O'Neill (1888-1953), playwright. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Eugene Gladstone ONeill (October 16, 1888 – November 27, 1953) was a Nobel- and four-time Pulitzer Prize-winning American playwright. ...

A reporter for The New London Telegraph before meeting success as a playwright, his autobiographical Ah, Wilderness! (O'Neill's only comedy) and Long Day's Journey Into Night are set at Monte Cristo Cottage, the family's home in New London. The Monte Cristo Cottage is preserved by the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center and is open to the public. Nobel Prize in Literature medal. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Drama was first awarded in 1918. ... Ah, Wilderness! is a play by Eugene ONeill, and has the distinction of being the only true comedy he would ever write. ... Long Days Journey Into Night is a dramatic play in four acts by Eugene ONeill, widely considered to be his masterwork. ...


Daniel Burrows (October 26, 1766 - January 23, 1858) was a United States Representative from Connecticut. Daniel Burrows (October 26, 1766 - January 23, 1858) was a United States Representative from Connecticut. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ...


Among the living, New London is the birthplace of

  • Swing saxophonist Larry Elgart of the "Les and Larry Elgart Orchestra".
  • Major league baseball player John Ellis.
  • Broadway award-winning, and twice Emmy-nominated actress Glenne Headly.
  • Model, actress, and emerging R&B artist Cassandra "Cassie" Ventura.
  • Dawn Robinson, singer and member of En Vogue

Among the living, New London is the home of John Ellis may refer to: John Ellis, 18th century scientist John Willis Ellis (1920–1961), North Carolina governor John Ellis, a baseball player John Ellis (born 1952), founding member of the 1970s punk band The Vibrators John Ellis, a drummer for the band Judas Priest John Ellis (born 1930), British... An Emmy Award. ... Glenne Headly (born on 13 March 1955 in New London, Connecticut, USA) is an American actress. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... For the Canadian actress, see Cassie Steele. ...

Also, see list of Connecticut College people. Holding The governmental taking of property from one private owner to give to another in furtherance of economic development constitutes a permissible public use under the Fifth Amendment. ... Connecticut College is a coeducational, highly selective private liberal arts college located in New London, Connecticut. ...


Culture

Literature

  • Knight, Sarah Kemble [1825] (1992). The journal of Madam Knight, 1704. Chester, Ct: Applewood Books, 72 pages. ISBN 1-5570911-5-3. 
  • Hempstead, Joshua [1901] (1998). Diary of Joshua Hempstead: a record of life in colonial New London, Connecticut, 1711-1758. New London: New London County Historical Society, 750 pages. ISBN 0-9607744-3-2. 
  • Twain, Mark [1892]. "A Curious Experience", Merry Tales. New York: Charles L. Webster & Co. 
  • Stone, Clifford [1976]. The Great Sunflower: A Novel. Seattle: Vanguard Press. ISBN 0-8149-0775-X. 
  • Gerba, Janet Burnett [1995]. With no little regrett [sic]: an historical novel based on The journal of Madam Knight. Rutland, Vt: Colonial American Press, 275 pages. ISBN 0-9647752-0-4. 
  • King, Matthew [2003]. The New London State of Mind. New London: WhaleheadKing.com. 
  • King, Matthew [2005]. Why Not New London?. New London: WhaleheadKing.com. 
  • King, Matthew [2006]. New London Eel Stew. New London: WhaleheadKing.com. 

Sarah Kemble Knight (1666 - 1727) a preacher and traveler, born in Boston, the daughter of Thomas Kemble, a merchant. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 — April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, writer, and lecturer. ... Eugene Gladstone ONeill (October 16, 1888 – November 27, 1953) was a Nobel- and four-time Pulitzer Prize-winning American playwright. ... Ah, Wilderness! is a play by Eugene ONeill, and has the distinction of being the only true comedy he would ever write. ... Eugene Gladstone ONeill (October 16, 1888 – November 27, 1953) was a Nobel- and four-time Pulitzer Prize-winning American playwright. ... Long Days Journey Into Night is a dramatic play in four acts by Eugene ONeill, widely considered to be his masterwork. ...

Local music

  • United States Coast Guard Band - Stationed at the United States Coast Guard Academy in New London and attracting a cadre of talented musicians from all parts of the country, the official musical representative of the nation's oldest continuous seagoing service was organized with the assistance of John Philip Sousa in March 1925 and regularly stages free concerts open to the public.
  • The Idlers of the United States Coast Guard Academy an all-male vocal group specializing in sea chantys and patriotic music, call New London home. The Idlers often perform in and around New London for both Coast Guard functions and local charitable activities. Founded 1957.
  • Eastern Connecticut Symphony Orchestra. Founded 1946.
  • New London Fire Fighter's Pipe's & Drums - The New London Firefighter's Pipes And Drums was established in 2001. It consists of New London Firefighters. [18]

New London has been home to an active and vital original music scene since the 70s. Some musicians who call New London home: United States Service Bands Each of the branches of the U.S. military, has a headquarters band organization, all but one of which are in the Washington, D.C. area. ... The United States Coast Guard Academy (USCGA), located in New London, Connecticut is a U.S. military academy that provides education to future officers of the United States Coast Guard. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is a branch of the United States armed forces and is involved in maritime law enforcement, mariner assistance, search and rescue, and national defense. ... Portrait of John Philip Sousa taken in 1900 John Philip Sousa (November 6, 1854 – March 6, 1932) was an American composer and conductor of the late Romantic era known particularly for American military marches. ... Background The Idlers of the United States Coast Guard Academy are an all-male A Cappella ensemble specializing in the performance of sea chanteys and patriotic music. ... The United States Coast Guard Academy (USCGA), located in New London, Connecticut is a U.S. military academy that provides education to future officers of the United States Coast Guard. ...

  • Brad Fury. Solo acoustic artist also plays guitar and sings for 61 Fury and is an up and coming show booker/promoter in the area.
  • Brazen Hussy. Surging melody over driving punk beats.
  • Brian Skidmore. "The Ukulele King of Northern Downtown New London."
  • Burned In Effigy. Metal / Hardcore / Heavy.
  • Cassie. Pop / Hip-Hop / R&B
  • Dr. VonFiend. A mysterious conglomeration personality stemming from the underground New London music group known only as Paleo.
  • Fatal Film. Noisy rock and roll.
  • Geoff Kaufman. "Acoustic music...with a pinch of salt."
  • Incognito Sofa Love. Funk / Jazz / Rock.
  • Low-Beam. Indie sonic pop.
  • Matt Gouette. Multi-instrumentalist singer/songwriter known for his varied musical stylings, songwriting, and production
  • Paul Brockett Road Show. Yodeling and folk, with a New London twist.
  • Quiet Life. Folk inspired Indie Rock.
  • 61 Fury (band). Punk rock band best known for their dark lyrical content and catchy upbeat hooks.
  • Stressbomb. Hardcore / Alternative / Punk.
  • The American Infidels. Punk rock.
  • The Reducers. Old-school punk/pub rock, since 1978.
  • the VAGITARIANS. guerrilla feminist punk rock
  • The Chuck Hestons. Noise Pop, since 2002.
  • The Suicide Dolls. New London Noise Rock.

For the Canadian actress, see Cassie Steele. ... 61 Fury is a punk rock band from North Stonington, CT consisting of lead vocalist/guitarist Brad Fury, bassist/vocalist Trevor Savage, lead guitarist Johnny 5 and drummer Cris Cunnilingus. ...

Art

In the late 70's, during the City Arts time, several artists moved into the city. Many art galleries now serve artists both in and out of town.


Resident Artists

  • George K. Clarke - Abstract artist and photographer [19]

See also

List of Registered Historic Places in New London County, Connecticut: // Bozrah Congregational Church and Parsonage — 17 and 23 Bozrah St. ...

Further reading

  • Caulkins, Frances Manwaring [1852] (1985). History of New London Connecticut from the first survey of the coast in 1612 to 1852. New London: New London County Historical Society. ISBN 0-8328-0008-2. 
  • Starr, William Holt (1876). A Centennial Historical Sketch of the Town of New London. New London: G.E. Starr. OCLC 5956004. 
  • Holloway, Charles Molyneux (December 1886). "Historic New London". The New England Magazine 5 (26): 119-141. Retrieved on 2006-10-08. 
  • Stone, Gregory N. (June 2000). The Day Paper. The Story of One of America's Last Independent Newspapers. New London: The Day Publishing Company. ISBN 0-9672028-0-9. 
  • Ruddy, John J. (September 2000). Reinventing New London. Arcadia Publishing. ISBN 0-7385-0480-7. 
  • Powell, Walter L. (December 2000). Murder or Mayhem?: Benedict Arnold's New London, Connecticut Raid, 1781. Thomas Publications. ISBN 1-57747-059-1. 
  • Richter, Robert A. (2001). Touring Eugene O'Neill's New London. eOneill.com. Connecticut College. Retrieved on 2006-10-19. “Due to urban renewal in the 1960s, Bradley Street no longer exists, but during O'Neill's day it hummed with activity. At the turn of the last century traveling salesmen reported that New London had 'the liveliest, most wide-open red-light district between New York and Boston.' Bradley Street was the district's hub, even though the New London Police Headquarters was located here.”

OCLC Online Computer Library Center was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (282nd in leap years). ... This article might not be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia entry. ... This article might not be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia entry. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 19 is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • New London Main Street - Non-profit organization for the revitalization of New London's Historic Waterfront District.
  • New London County Historical Society - Incorporated 1870. Historical and genealogical research library in the 1758 Shaw-Perkins Mansion.
  • The Antiquarian & Landmarks Society - Keepers of the 1678 Joshua Hempstead House in New London, the Nathan Hale Homestead in Coventry, and others.
  • New London Maritime Society - Museum in New London's 1833 U.S. Custom House, site of 1839 Amistad landing.
  • Chart Room - Selected historic maps of New London since 1614.
  • Ocean Beach Park - City park since Hurricane of '38. New London's beach and boardwalk on Long Island Sound.
  • Connecticut Storytelling Center - At Connecticut College. Holds annual storytelling festival in April.
  • Connecticut East Tourism - Connecticut Commission on Culture & Tourism.
  • One New London - Local political party.
  • Maps and aerial photos Coordinates: 41.354069° -72.10104°
    • Street map from Google Maps, or Yahoo! Maps, or Windows Live Local
    • Satellite image from Google Maps, Windows Live Local, WikiMapia
    • Topographic map from TopoZone
    • Aerial image or topographic map from TerraServer-USA

  Results from FactBites:
 
New London, Connecticut - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1169 words)
New London, Connecticut is a city in New London County, at the mouth of the Thames River and on the northeastern shore of Long Island Sound.
Connecticut's independent legislature, in its January session of 1784, made New London one of the first two cities (along with New Haven) brought from de facto to formalized incorporations.
New London lies across the Thames from the town of Groton, home of a United States Navy submarine base and of "EB", the Electric Boat Division of the General Dynamics Corporation, which built most existing U.S. nuclear-powered submarines there.
New London, Connecticut - definition of New London, Connecticut in Encyclopedia (912 words)
New London, Connecticut is a city in New London County, at the mouth of the Thames River and on the northwestern shore of Long Island Sound.
New London lies across the Thames from the town of Groton, Connecticut, home of a United States Navy submarine base and of "EB", the Electric Boat Division of the General Dynamics Corporation, which built most existing U.S. nuclear-powered submarines there.
New London has a form of government centering on a professional city manager and elected city council.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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