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Encyclopedia > New Labour

New Labour is an alternative name of the British political Labour Party. The name is primarily used by the party itself in its literature but is also sometimes used by political commentators and the wider media. The rise of the name coincided with a shift towards the right (from the left) of the British political spectrum (albeit a trend to more centrist policies first commenced under the leadership of Neil Kinnock). The Labour Party is a centre-left or social democratic political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... Neil Gordon Kinnock, Baron Kinnock, PC (born March 28, 1942) is a British politician. ...


The name originates from a conference slogan first used by the Labour Party in 1994 and was later seen in a draft manifesto, published by the party in 1996, called New Labour, New Life For Britain. However the term was intended to incorporate a wider rebranding of the party in the eyes of the electorate. The new name coincided with the re-writing of Clause IV of the party's constitution in 1995. Peter Mandelson was a senior figure in this process who exercised a great deal of authority in the party following the death of John Smith and subsequent election of Tony Blair as party leader. 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... A manifesto is a public declaration of principles and intentions, often political in nature. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... This article is about brands in marketing. ... Clause IV of the Labour Party constitution sets out the objects of the Party, and has been the scene of political fights over its direction. ... 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Peter Mandelson The Rt Hon Peter Benjamin Mandelson (born October 21, 1953) is a British Labour politician, and former Member of Parliament for Hartlepool, who is currently European Commissioner for Trade. ... The Rt. ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Tony Blair (born 6 May 1953) is a British MP. He is currently Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, having served as Leader of the Labour Party since John Smiths death in 1994. ...


New Labour (as a series of values) is often characterised as a belief in 'rights and duties', i.e. that a citizen should recognise that s/he possesses responsiblities linked with any legal rights they possess. The belief of a 'stakeholder society' is quite prominent in New Labour thinking. New Labour thought also embraces the notion of the 'Third Way'. The Third Way is a moderate-left political ideology that usually stands for deregulation, decentralisation and lower taxes. ...


The name change coincided with a dramatic revival of the party's fortunes. Unexpectedly defeated for a fourth consecutive time in the 1992 election, the party won the 1997 election with a majority of 179. Following a period of government and in particular after a second election victory in 2001, the name has diminished in significance in British political life. (The Labour Party generally being referred to in the media as 'the Government' rather than 'new Labour'.) However the name is still used in party literature. The UK general election, 1992 was held on April 9, 1992, and was the fourth victory in a row for the Conservatives. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ...


The name has been widely satirised. Critics associate the new name with an unprecedented use of 'spin doctoring' in the party's relationship with media. The Conservative Party attempted to tarnish the new Labour tag during the 1997 election campaign using the slogan 'New Labour, New Danger'. In public relations, spin is a usually pejorative term signifying a heavily biased portrayal in ones own favor of an event or situation that is designed to bring about the most positive result possible. ... The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the centre-right in the United Kingdom. ...


Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, Peter Mandelson and Alistair Campbell are most commonly cited as the creators and architects of the New Labour ethos but its intellectual underpinnigs were originally developed by Marxism Today under the editorship of Martin Jacques. The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Tony Blair (born 6 May 1953) is a British MP. He is currently Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, having served as Leader of the Labour Party since John Smiths death in 1994. ... This article is about the British Chancellor of the Exchequer. ... Peter Mandelson The Rt Hon Peter Benjamin Mandelson (born October 21, 1953) is a British Labour politician, and former Member of Parliament for Hartlepool, who is currently European Commissioner for Trade. ... Alastair John Campbell (born May 25, 1957) was the Director of Communications and Strategy for 10 Downing Street. ... Marxism Today was the theoretical journal of the Communist Party of Great Britain prior to its dissolution in 1991. ... Martin Jacques was editor of Marxism Today till its dissolution in 1991. ...


After Gordon Brown's budgets became more and more Keynesian, Private Eye began to call the party "New" Labour. This article is about the British Chancellor of the Exchequer. ... Keynesian economics, or Keynesianism, is an economic theory based on the ideas of John Maynard Keynes, as put forward in his book The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, published in 1936 in response to the Great Depression of the 1930s. ... Private eye may mean: A private investigator, a private detective for hire Private Eye, a satirical magazine This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


The choice of name echoes slogans in American politics, particularly those of the Democratic Party, such as Roosevelt's New Deal, Kennedy's New Frontier and Clinton's New Covenant. The Federal Government of the United States was established by the United States Constitution. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... The New Deal was President Franklin D. Roosevelts legislative agenda for rescuing the United States from the Great Depression. ... Order: 35th President Vice President: Lyndon B. Johnson Term of office: January 20, 1961 – November 22, 1963 Preceded by: Dwight D. Eisenhower Succeeded by: Lyndon B. Johnson Date of birth: May 29, 1917 Place of birth: Brookline, Massachusetts Date of death: November 22, 1963 Place of death: Dallas, Texas First... The term New Frontier was used by John F. Kennedy in his acceptance speech in 1960 as the Democratic nominee, and was used as a label for his administrations domestic program. ... Order: 42nd President Vice President: Al Gore Term of office: January 20, 1993 – January 20, 2001 Preceded by: George H. W. Bush Succeeded by: George W. Bush Date of birth: August 19, 1946 Place of birth: Hope, Arkansas First Lady: Hillary Rodham Clinton Political party: Democratic William Jefferson Clinton (born... The New Covenant was what President Bill Clinton called for in 1993 to symbolize the new type relationship that he was claiming to establish between the United States Government and its citizens. ...


One of the challenges to that part of the Party which does not wish to be tagged as 'New Labour' is to avoid being tagged as 'Old Labour' - one of the more successful efforts was that of the then Leader of Nottingham Council welcoming the 1997 Labour Local Government Conference to the City - he coined the term 'Classic Labour' for his administration.


Links

See also Nick Cohen Nick Cohen: The left has swerved to the right. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Labour Party (UK) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4721 words)
The Labour Party's origins lie in the late 19th century, when it became apparent that there was an increasing need for a third party in Britain to represent the interests and needs of the large working-class population (for instance, the 1899 Lyons vs. Wilkins judgement that limited certain types of picketing).
The 1960s Labour government, though claiming to be far less radical on economic policy than its 1940s predecessor, introduced several social changes, such as the partial legalisation of homosexuality and the abolition of the death penalty.
New Labour thought also embraces the notion of the 'Third Way', although critics pointed to the lack of any concise statement of its meaning, and the term later fell from use.
New Zealand Labour Party - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2206 words)
Soon afterwards, the labour movement was hit by the Waihi miners' strike, a major industrial disturbance prompted by radicals in the union movement.
Almost immediately, the new Labour Party became involved in the acrimonious debate about conscription, which arose during World War I — the Labour Party strongly opposed conscription, and a number of its leaders were jailed for their stand against it.
Labour was defeated again in the next two elections, but in the 1972 election, the party gained a significant victory.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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