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Encyclopedia > New International Encyclopedia

The New International Encyclopedia was an encyclopedia first published in the 1910s. It was printed in two editons. The first edition was published from 1902 to 1914 by Dodd, Mead and Company. The second edition was copyrighted in 1917 and afterwards by Dodd, Mead and Company, Inc. The Second Edition contains more volumes than the First Edition. // Events and trends The 1910s represent the culmination of European militarism which had its beginings during the second half of the 19th Century. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1914 (MCMXIV) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Frank Howard Dodd, (1844-1916), was the leading publisher at Dodd, Mead and Company of New York City from 1870 until his death, January 16, 1916. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ...


The 1926 output was printed in Cambridge, Massachusetts by The University Press. Boston Bookbinding Company of Cambridge produced the covers. Thirteen books enclosing twenty-three volumes comprise the encyclopedia, which includes a supplement after Volume 23. Each book contains about 1600 pages. 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Cambridge City Hall Cambridge is a city in the Greater Boston area of Massachusetts, United States. ...


A great deal of biographic material is recorded in the New International Encyclopedia. The supplement includes a short paragraph on the activities of a Bavarian named Adolf Hitler from 1920-24. Many of the names which are used to describe the scientific identities of plants and animals are now obsolete. Bavarian can either when used as an adjective, refer to the German state of Bavaria; or refer to the Bavarian or Austro-Bavarian language, a group of closely related Austria and the South Tyrol. ... ▶ (help· info) (April 20, 1889 – April 30, 1945) was Chancellor of Germany from 1933 and Führer (Leader) of Germany from 1934 to his death by suicide. ...


Numerous colorful maps which display the nations, states, colonies, and protectorates which existed early in the 20th century are included. The maps are valuable for their depictions of national and colonial borders in Europe, Asia, and Africa at the time of World War One. Drawings, illustrations, and photographs are plentiful, too. Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ...

Contents


Contributors and Office Editors

More than five-hundred educated men and some women submitted and composed the information contained in the New International Encyclopedia.

◊Editors of the First Edition
◊Editors of the Second Edition
EXAMPLES
  • Washington Irving Lincoln Adams (Photography).
  • Mary Warren Allen, (Bibliographer).
  • Samuel Angus, Ph.D., Professor of Hellenistic Greek, Hartford Theological Seminary. (Ostraka, etc.).
  • Edith Arrowsmith, (Department of Reader's Handbook).
  • Robert Arrowsmith, Ph. D., Formerly Professor of Latin and Greek, Teachers College, Columbia University. (Department of Reader's Handbook).
  • Maurice Bloomfield, Ph. D., LL. D., Professor of Sanskrit and Comparative Philology, Johns Hopkins University. (Topics in Oriental Literature).
  • Mrs. Ella A. Boole, Ph. D., President New York State W. C. T. U. (Woman's Christian Temperance Union and other articles).
  • Demarchus C. Brown, M. A. (Indiana State librarian).
  • Alexander F. Chamberlain, Ph. D., Professor of anthropology, Clark University. (South American Indian tribes and Peoples; Asiatic tribes and Peoples).
  • Colby Mitchell Chester, Rear-Admiral United States Navy (Naval Observatory)
  • Wynfrid Laurence Henry Duckworth, M.D., Sc. D., M. A., Fellow of Jesus College, Cambridge, England; University Lecturer in Physical Anthropology, and Senior Demonstrator of Human Anatomy. (Man, Science of).
  • A. A. Goldenweiser, Ph. D., Instructor in Anthropology, Columbia University. (Animism and Ancestor worship).
  • William Everett Hooper, Associate Editor, Railway Age Gazette, (Supervisor of Department of Railways).
  • Wolfgang L. G. Joerg, Assistant Editor of the Bulletin of the American Geographical Society, (Topics in Geography).
  • Joseph J. Kral, (Topics in Gazateer).
  • William S. Lahey, B. Lit. (Jersey City).
  • Charles F. Marvin, Chief of the United States Weather Bureau. (Meteorology).
  • Charles W. Mead, Assistant Curator of Anthropology, Department of Archæology, American Museum of Natural History, New York. (Peruvian Antiquities).
  • Nelson P. Mead, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of History, College of the City of New York. (War in Europe).
  • Grace A. Owen, (Topics in Modern History).
  • Walter Pach, B. A., (Biographies in Painting and Sculpture).
  • Harry Fielding Reid, C. E., Ph. D., Professor of Dynamical Geology and Geography, Johns Hopkins University. (Glacier).
  • Paul Samuel Reinsch, Ph. D., Formerly Professor of Political Science, University of Wisconsin; United States Minister to China. (Political Science).
  • J. Salwyn Schapiro, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of History, The College of the City of New York. (Modern History).
  • Munroe Smith, J.U.D., LL. D., Professor of Roman Law and Comparative Jurisprudence, Columbia University. (Topics in European Law).
  • Preserved Smith, Author of The Life and Letters of Martin Luther.
  • Ralph S. Thompson, (Music and Biography).
  • Frank Weitenkampf, L. H. D., Chief, Arts and Prints Division, New York Public Library. (Mezzotint; Meryon).
  • R. H. Whitbeck. A. B., Professor of Geography, University of Wisconsin. (New Jersey{Physiographic Portion}).
  • Miss Elizabeth Wilson, Secretarial Department, National Board, Young Women's Christian Association. (Young Women's Christian Association).
  • Levi Edgar Young, Professor of History, University of Utah. (Mormons).

Daniel Coit Gilman Daniel Coit Gilman (1831-1908) was an American educator. ... Harry Thurston Peck (November 24, 1856 - March 23, 1914) was an American classical scholar, author, editor, and critic, born at Stamford, Conn. ... Frank Moore Colby (1865–1925) was an American educator and writer, born in Washington, D. C.. From 1893 to 1895 he was a member of the editorial staff of Johnsons Cyclopedia in the department of history and political science, and in 1898 he became editor of the International Year... New York University (NYU) is a major research university in New York City. ... Talcott Williams, (1849–1928), was an American journalist and educator, born at Abeih, Turkey, the son of Congregational missionaries. ... Columbia University is a private university in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. ... Dr. Samuel Angus (August 27, 1881 - November 1943) was professor of New Testament and Church History at St Andrews College in Sydney from 1915 to 1943. ... Maurice Bloomfield February 23, 1855 - June 12, 1928, American Sanskrit scholar, was born on the 23rd of February 1855, in Bielitz, in what was at that time Austrian Silesia (today it is in Poland). ... Ella Alexander Boole (July 26, 1858 - March 13, 1952) was a U.S. temperance leader. ... Alexander Francis Chamberlain (1865 - 1914) was a Canadian USA. Categories: Anthropologists ... Colby Mitchell Chester, (1844- ), was a United States Navy officer. ... Charles Frederick Marvin (1858- ?), was an American meteorologist, born at Putnam, Ohio. ... Harry Fielding Reid, (1859- ), was an American geologist, born in Baltimore, and educated at the Pennsylvania Military Academy (C.E., 1876) and at Johns Hopkins (A.B., 1880; Ph. ... Paul Samuel Reinsch, (1869- ), was an American political scientist and diplomat. ... The University of Wisconsin was founded in 1848 and is the largest university in the state of Wisconsin. ... Jacob Salwyn Schapiro (December 19, 1879 - December 30, 1973) was a Professor Emeritus of History at the City College of New York. ... (Edmund) Munroe Smith, (born 1854), was an American jurist and historian, born in Brooklyn. ... Frank Weitenkampf, (1866- ), was an American authority on engraving and library official, born in New York, where he studied for two years at the Art Students League. ... Neysa Moran McMein (1888-1949) Y.W.C.A. In Service for the Girls of the World, Poster, 1919 The YWCA (Young Womens Christian Association) is a world-wide organisation. ... The University of Utah (also The U or the U of U) is a public university in Salt Lake City, Utah. ...

Others

Contributors with their own article in Wikipedia include:

External links NOAA biography Categories: Stub | 1838 births | 1916 deaths | Meteorologists ... Cleveland Abbe, Jr. ... Wilbur Cortez Abbott (1868- ) was an American historian and educator, born at Kokomo, Ind. ... Charles Christopher Adams (1873- ) was an American zoölogist, born at Clinton, Ill, and educated at Illinois Wesleyan University, Harvard, and the University of Chicago. ... Thomas Sewall Adams, (1873 – ), was an American economist and educator, born in Baltimore, Md. ... Cyrus Adler (1863 - 1940) was a U.S. educator, Jewish religious leader and scholar. ... Hartley Burr Alexander, Ph. ... Joseph Sweetman Ames (1864-1943) was a physics professor at Johns Hopkins University, provost of the university from 1926 until 1929, and university president from 1929 until 1935. ... Oscar Phelps Austin ( ? - ? ) was an American statistician, born in Newark, Ill. ... Moses Nelson Baker, Ph. ... Erwin Hinckly Barbour, Ph. ... Louis Agricola Bauer, C.E., Ph. ... William Beebe (July 29, 1877 – June 4, 1962), American naturalist, explorer, and author. ... Marcus Benjamin (1857–1932) was an American editor, born at San Francisco, California, and educated at the Columbia University School of Mines. ... Edward Wilber Berry (1875 - 1945) was an American paleontologist and botanist, the principal focus of his research was paleobotany. ... Frederic Mayer Bird (1838-1908) was an American clergyman, educator, and hymnologist born in Philadelphia, Pa. ... Maurice Bloomfield February 23, 1855 - June 12, 1928, American Sanskrit scholar, was born on the 23rd of February 1855, in Bielitz, in what was at that time Austrian Silesia (today it is in Poland). ... Edward Gaylord Bourne, Ph. ... William Bowie, B.S., C.E., M.A. (1872- ) was an American engineer born at Annapolis Junction, Md. ... Isaiah Bowman (26 December 1878, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada – 6 January 1950, Baltimore) was an American geographer. ... David Josiah Brewer (January 20, 1837-March 28, 1910), was an American jurist. ... Albert Perry Brigham, A.M. (1855- ) was an American geologist, born at Perry, N.Y. and educated at Colgate College, Hamilton Theological Seminary, and Harvard University. ... William Keith Brooks, LL.D., Ph. ... Image:Broom R.jpg Robert Broom Prof. ... Henry Augustus Buchtel D.D., LL.D. (1847- ) was an American public official and educator, born near Akron, Ohio. ... Francis Marion Burdick, LL.D. (1845-1920) was an American professor of law, born at De Ruyter, N. Y. He graduated at Hamilton College in 1869, and in 1872 from Hamilton College Law School. ... William Hubert Burr, C.E. (1851- ) was an American civil engineer, born at Watertown, Conn. ... William Campbell, D.Sc. ... Henry Smith Carhart, Ph. ... Rolla C. Carpenter, C.E., M.M.E., LL.D. (1852-1919) was an American engineer, born in Orion, Mich. ... William Henry Carpenter, Ph. ... Paul Carus (1852‑1919). ... John White Chadwick, A.M. (1840-1904) was an American clergyman of the Unitarian Church. ... Charles Joseph Chamberlain, Ph. ... Edward Potts Cheyney, A.M., LL.D. (1861- ) was an American historical and economic writer, born at Wallingford, Pa. ... Russell Henry Chittenden, Ph. ... Alexander Hamilton Church ( ? - ? ) was an English efficiency engineer and author. ... William Churchill, F.R.A.I. (1859-1920) was an American Polynesian ethnologist and philologist, born in Brooklyn, N. Y., and educated at Yale. ... Hubert Lyman Clark, Ph. ... William Bullock Clark, Ph. ... Adolphe Cohn, LL.B., A.M. (1851- ) was an American educator, born in Paris and educated at the University of Paris. ... Frank Nelson Cole, Ph. ... Rt. ... Hermann Collitz (1855-1935) was an emininent German historical linguist and Indo-Europeanist, who spent much of his career in the United States. ... Charles Arthur Conant (1861—1915 was an American expert on banking and finance. ... Frederic Taber Cooper, Ph. ... Edward Tanjore Corwin, D.D., Litt. ... John Merle Coulter, Ph. ... Henry Chandler Cowles (February 27, 1869 - September 12, 1939) was an American ecological pioneer. ... Isaac Joslin Cox, Ph. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Wilbur Lucius Cross (1862 - 1948) was a U.S. educator and political figure. ... Charles B. Davenport at a 1921 eugenics conference. ... Frederick Samuel Dellenbaugh (1853- ) was an American explorer, born in McConnelsville, Ohio. ... Theodore Low De Vinne ((1828-1914) was an American printer, born at Stamford, Conn. ... Davis Rich Dewey (1858-1942), American economist and statistician, was born at Burlington, Vermont, on 7 April 1858. ... Melvil Dewey (December 10, 1851–December 26, 1931) was the inventor of the Dewey Decimal Classification system for library classification. ... Samuel Warren Dike, LL.D. (1839-1913) was an American Congregational clergyman, born at Thompson, Conn. ... Henry Otis Dwight, LL.D. (1843-1917) was an American Congregational missionary, born in Constantinople, Turkey, the son of H. G. O. Dwight. ... Mortimer Lamson Earle, Ph. ... Richard Eddy, D.D. (1828-1906) was an American Universalist clergyman, born at Providence, R. I. He was a chaplain of the Sixtieth New York Volunteers during the War Between the States. ... Thomas William Edmondson, Ph. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Samuel Atkins Eliot, D.D. (1862- ) was an American Unitarian clergyman, son of Charles W. Eliot. ... Richard Theodore Ely (born April 13, 1854 in Ripley, New York; died October 4, 1943 in Old Lyme, Connecticut) was an American economist. ... Ephraim Emerton, Ph. ... John Erskine Can refer to more than one person: John Erskine (educator) was a U.S. educator and author. ... Marshall Davis Ewell, LL.D. (1844- ) was an American lawyer, born at Oxford, Mich. ... Livingston Farrand (1867-1939) was the fourth president of Cornell University. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Charles Ernest Fay (1846- ) was an American linguist and Alpinist, born at Roxbury, Mass. ... Albert Warren Ferris, A.M., M.D. (1856- ) was an American psychiatrist, born in Brooklyn, N. Y., and educated at the College of Physicians and Surgeons (Columbia University). ... George Wilton Field, Ph. ... Henry Theophilus Finck (1854- ) was an American musical critic, born at Bethel, Mo. ... Jeremiah Denis Mathias Ford, Ph. ... Frank Hugh Foster, Ph. ... Frank Fowler, N.A. (1852-1910) was an American figure and portrait painter, born in Brooklyn, N.Y. He studied painting in Europe at Florence, Italy for two years under Edwin White, and for seven years under Carolus-Duran in Paris, and at the École des Beaux-Arts. ... Arthur Lincoln Frothingham, Jr. ... Henry Gannett, M.E.; LL.D. (1846-1914) was an American geographer. ... Henry Laurence Gantt (1861-1919) was a mechanical engineer and management consultant who is most famous for developing the Gantt chart in the 1910s. ... James Wilford Garner, Ph. ... Gordon Hall Gerould, B.A., B.Litt. ... Franklin Henry Giddings, Ph. ... Henry Herbert Goddard (1866 – 1957) was a prominent American psychologist and eugenicist in the early 20th century. ... Charles Buxton Going, Ph. ... James Isaac Good, D.D. (1850- ) was an American Reformed church clergyman and historian, born at York, Pa. ... Frank Johnson Goodnow, Ph. ... Richard James Horatio Gottheil, Ph. ... Louis Herbert Gray, Ph. ... William Elliot Griffis William Elliot Griffis, D.D., L.H.D. (September 17, 1843 – 1928) was an American orientalist, author and Congregational preacher. ... George Ellery Hale (June 29, 1868 – February 21, 1938) was an American solar astronomer. ... William Hallock, Ph. ... Alfred Dwight Foster Hamlin, A.M., L.H.D. (1855-09-05–1926) was an American architect, born at Constantinople, Turkey, the son of Cyrus Hamlin. ... Gilbert Dennison Harris, Ph. ... William Henry Paine Hatch, Ph. ... Erasmus Haworth, Ph. ... Paul Leland Haworth (1876- ) was an American author, born at West Newton, Ind. ... Carlton Joseph Huntley Hayes, Ph. ... Angelo Heilprin (March 31, 1853, at Sátoralja-Ujhely, Hungary - 1907) was the American naturalist, geologist, and traveler; son of Michael Heilprin, a Polish origin scholar. ... William James Henderson, A.M. (1855- ) was an American musical critic and scholar, born at Newark, N. J.. He graduated from Princeton in 1876 and immediately began work as a journalist, later as a reporter, then as the musical critic of the New York Times, and in 1902 of the... Daniel Webster Hering, Ph. ... Walter Lowrie Hervey, Ph. ... Charles Shattuck Hill, C.E. (1868- ) was an American editor, born at Fairfield, Vt. ... Friedrich Hirth, Ph. ... William Herbert Hobbs, Ph. ... George Hodges (theologian), D.D., DC.L., LL.D. (1856-1919) was an American Protestant Episcopal theologian, born at Rome, N. Y., and educated at Hamilton College (A.B., 1877; A.M., 1882; LL.D., 1912). ... Jacob Harry Hollander, B.A., Ph. ... William Henry Holmes (1846 – 1933) was an American anthropologist, archaeologist, geologist and museum director. ... Franklin William Hooper, LL.D. (1851-1914) was an American institute director. ... Edward Washburn Hopkins, Ph. ... William Temple Hornaday, Sc. ... Walter Hough, Ph. ... George Elliott Howard, Ph. ... Leland Ossian Howard, Ph. ... William Henry Howell, Ph. ... James Gibbons Huneker (1860-1921) was an American musical writer and critic, born at Philadelphia, Pa. ... Edward Hunter (1839- ) was an American soldier, born at Gardiner, Me. ... George Leland Hunter, A.B. (1867- ) was an American authority on decorative art. ... Louis Doremus Huntoon, E.M., M.A. (1869- ) was an American mining engineer, born at Paterson, N. J., and educated at the New York College of Pharmacy and the School of Mines (Columbia (1895). ... Frederick Remsen Hutton, M.E., Sc. ... James Monroe Ingalls (1837- ) was an American soldier and an authority on ballistics. ... Ernest Ingersoll (1852- ) was an [[United States|American naturalist, born at Monroe, Mich. ... Abraham Valentine Williams Jackson, L.H.D., Ph. ... Melancthon Williams Jacobus, A.B., D.D. (1855- ) was an American theologian, Born at Allegheny City, Pa. ... Harold Jacoby, Ph. ... Edgar Jadwin, C.E. (August 7, 1865-March 2, 1931 in Honesdale, Pennsylvania) graduated first in the United States Military Academy class of 1890 and was commissioned in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. ... Joseph Jastrow, Ph. ... Morris Jastrow, Jr. ... Arthur Whipple Jenks, D.D. (1863-1922) was an American Protestant Episcopal theologian. ... Jeremiah Whipple Jenks (1856—1929) was an American economist who held professorships at both Cornell University and New York University. ... Alvin Saunders Johnson, Ph. ... Joseph French Johnson (1853- ) was an American economist, born at Hardwick, Mass. ... Christopher Johnston, Ph. ... Robert Matteson Johnston, M.A. (1867-1920) was an American historian, born in Paris and educated in Europe (France, Germany, England). ... David Starr Jordan David Starr Jordan (January 19, 1851-September 19, 1931) American eugenicist and a leading ichthyologist, educator and peace activist. ... Isaac Leon Kandel, M.A., Ph. ... James Furman Kemp, E.M., Sc. ... Charles Foster Kent, Ph. ... Sumner Increase Kimball, Sc. ... George Kirchwey (1855-1942) was dean of Columbia Law School from 1901 to 1910 and was later warden of Sing Sing Correctional Facility. ... Charles Knapp (1868- ) was an American classical scholar, born in New York City; he graduated from Columbia University in 1887, then received the degree of Ph. ... George Williams Knox, D.D., LL.D. (1853-1912) was an American Presbyterian theologian and writer, born at Rome, N. Y. He graduated from Hamilton College in 1874 and from Auburn Theological Seminary in 1877, after which he went as a missionary to Japan, where he was professor of homiletics... Gustav Kobbé A.M. (1857-1918) was an American music critic and author, born in New York. ... Horatio Sheafe Krans, Ph. ... George Kriehn, Ph. ... Albert Geouffre de Lapradelle, LL.D. (1871- ) was a French jurisconsult, born in Paris. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Benjamin Barr Lindsey (1869-1943) was an American judge and social reformer. ... Burton Edward Livingston, Ph. ... Francis Ernest Lloyd, M.A. was an American botanist, born in Manchester, England, and educated at Princeton (A.B., 1891; A.M., 1895), in New Jersey, and in Europe at Munich and Bonn, in Germany. ... Robert Henry Lowie (1883 – 1957) was an Austrian-born American anthropologist. ... Frederic Augustus Lucas, Sc. ... Hamilton Wright Mabie, A.M., L.H.D., LL.D. (1846-1916) was an American essayist, editor, critic, and lecturer, born at Cold Spring, N. Y., educated at Williams College (1867) and Columbia (School of Law, 1869). ... George Grant MacCurdy, A.M., Ph. ... W J Mcgee, LL.D. (1853-1912) was an American geologist, anthropologist, and ethnologist, born near Dubuque, Iowa. ... Evander Bradley McGilvary, Ph. ... William Douglas Mackenzie, D.D., LL.D. (1859- ) was an American Congregational theologian, born at Fauresmith, Orange River Colony, South Africa, educated in Edinburgh at Watsons College School (1875) and at the Congregational Theological Hall (1880-82). ... Lawrence Amos McLouth, A.B., LL.D. (1863- ) was an American Germanic scholar, born at Ontonagon, Mich. ... Thomas Guthrie Marquis, (1864&345; ) was a Canadian author, born at Chatham, New Brunswick, and educated at Queens University, Kingston, where he graduated in 1889. ... Otis Tufton Mason, Ph. ... Royal Meeker, Ph. ... Elmer Truesdell Merrill, LL.D. (1860- ) was an American Latin scholar, born at Millville, Mass. ... Adolf Meyer could refer to several individuals: Adolf Meyer, 1866-1950 Swiss-born US psychiatrist Adolf Meyer, 1881-1921 German architect This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Paul Monroe, Ph. ... James Mooney (1861-1921) was a notable anthropologist who lived for several years among the Cherokee. ... Clifford Herschel Moore, Ph. ... Lewis Freeman Mott, Ph. ... Wilhelm Max Müller, Ph. ... Dana Carleton Munro, L.H.D. (1866- ) was an American historian, brother of Wilfred Harold Munro, born at Bristol, R.I. He was educated at Brown (A.M., 1890) and in Europe at Strassburg and Freiburg. ... Charles Edward Munroe (24 May 1849 - 1938) was a U.S. chemist, and discoverer of the Munroe effect. ... Ehrman Syme Nadal, A.M. (1843- ) was an American author, born at Lewisburg, W. Va. ... Edward Everett Nourse, D.D. (1863Lj ) was an American Congregational theologian, born at Bayfield, Wis. ... Alpheus Spring Packard (February 19, 1839 - February 14, 1905) was an American entomologist and palaeontologist. ... Condé Benoist Pallen, Ph. ... Harry Thurston Peck (November 24, 1856 - March 23, 1914) was an American classical scholar, author, editor, and critic, born at Stamford, Conn. ... Lyman Pierson Powell, D.D., LL.D. (1866- ) was an American Protestant Episcopal clergyman and college president, born at Farmington, Del. ... Mihajlo Idvorski Pupin, Ph. ... Charles Comfort Tiffany (1829-1907) was an American Protestant Episcopalian clergyman, born in Baltimore. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Henry Clay Vedder, D.D. (1853- ) was an American Baptist church historian, born at De Ruyter, N. Y. He graduated at the University of Rochester in 1873 and at Rochester Theological Seminary in 1876. ... Williston Walker, D.D., L.H.D., Ph. ... James Joseph Walsh, M.D., LL.D., Litt. ... Raymond Weeks, Ph. ... Benjamin Willis Wells, Ph. ... Everett Pepperrell Wheeler, M.A., LL.B. (1840- ) was an American lawyer and author, born in New York City. ... William Morton Wheeler William Morton Wheeler (March 19, 1865 - 1937) was an American entomologist, myrmecologist and Harvard Professor. ... Cornélis DeWitt Willcox (1861- ) was an American army officer and scholar, born at Geneva, Switzerland. ... Walter Francis Willcox, Ph. ... Henry Parker Willis, Ph. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Dean Conant Worcester, D.Sc. ... David Gilbert Yates, M.D, was an American surgeon, born in New Jersey. ...

Foreign-born in certain places in 1910

An account of the number of foreign-born people living in certain places is given for the year 1910. 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

77, 043 (Total population, 558,485)
1,693,918 (Total population, approximately 2,189,520)
19,767 (Total population, 233,650)
10,344 (Total population, 82,331)
60,000 (Total population, 319,918)
85,938 (Total population, 301,408)
27,686 (Total population, 339,075)
140,436 (Total population, 533,905)
125,706 (Total population, 687,029).
Foreign-born white
13,345,545 (Sixteen per cent of the total population of white people in the nation). (Total population in the nation, 91,972,266, of which 68,386,412 were native white people)
Foreign-born white males in 1910, 7,523,788
Foreign-born white females in 1910, 5,821,757
(In 1900, 10,213,817 foreign-born white people existed).

Baltimore skyline at dusk Motto: The Greatest City in America (formerly The City That Reads; BELIEVE is not the official motto but rather a specific campaign) Nickname: Charm City Mob Town B-more Location in Maryland Founded 30 July 1729 Incorporated 1797 County Independent city Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor... ... Nickname: The Circle City, Indy, Naptown Motto: {{{motto}}} Official website: http://www. ... Kansas City is a city and county seat of Wyandotte County, Kansas; it is part of the Unified Government which also includes Bonner Springs and Edwardsville. ... The City of Los Angeles (from Spanish; Los Ángeles) is the second-largest city in the United States in terms of population, as well as one of the worlds most important economic, cultural, and entertainment centers. ... Downtown Minneapolis as viewed from the Stone Arch Bridge Motto: En Avant (French: forward) Nickname: City of Lakes location in Hennepin County, Minnesota Founded 1850s Incorporated 1867 County Hennepin County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor R.T. Rybak (DFL) Area  - Total  - Water 142. ... New Orleans (local pronunciations: , , or ) (French: La Nouvelle-Orléans, pronounced in standard French accent) is a major U.S. port city and historically the largest city in the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... Skyline of downtown Pittsburgh Pittsburgh is a city in Western Pennsylvania, United States, and the county seat of Allegheny County. ... Saint Louis (pronounced in English, in French), frequently spelled St. ... 1900 (MCM) is a common year starting on Monday. ...

Negroes in certain places in 1910

An account of the number of negroes living in certain places is given for the year 1910. Negro means black in Spanish, Portuguese and ancient Italian languages, being derived from the Latin word niger of the same meaning. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

85,098 (Total population, 558,485)
44,103 (Total population, approximately 2,189,520)
21,816 (Total population, 233,650)
9,286 (Total population, 82,331)
7,000 (Total population, 319,198)
22,763, or 44 per cent of the 51,521 total population
89,262 (Total population, 339,075)
84,549 (Total population, 1,549,008)
34,217 (Total population, 533,905)
43,960 (Total population, 687,029)
9,827,763 (Total population, 91,972,366)

Baltimore skyline at dusk Motto: The Greatest City in America (formerly The City That Reads; BELIEVE is not the official motto but rather a specific campaign) Nickname: Charm City Mob Town B-more Location in Maryland Founded 30 July 1729 Incorporated 1797 County Independent city Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor... ... Nickname: The Circle City, Indy, Naptown Motto: {{{motto}}} Official website: http://www. ... Kansas City is a city and county seat of Wyandotte County, Kansas; it is part of the Unified Government which also includes Bonner Springs and Edwardsville. ... The City of Los Angeles (from Spanish; Los Ángeles) is the second-largest city in the United States in terms of population, as well as one of the worlds most important economic, cultural, and entertainment centers. ... Motto: Nickname: The Azalea City Location in Alabama Founded 1702 Incorporated 1814 County Mobile County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Sam Jones Area  - Total  - Water 412. ... New Orleans (local pronunciations: , , or ) (French: La Nouvelle-Orléans, pronounced in standard French accent) is a major U.S. port city and historically the largest city in the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... Independence Hall, as it appears today. ... Skyline of downtown Pittsburgh Pittsburgh is a city in Western Pennsylvania, United States, and the county seat of Allegheny County. ... Saint Louis (pronounced in English, in French), frequently spelled St. ...

Statements on foreign-born and negroes living in certain places

Alternately, or additionally in some cases, generalized accounts of the ethnic identities of the residents of certain places is given for the early years of the twentieth century, (i. e., circa 1910), expressed as a paragraph or a sentence. Negro means black in Spanish, Portuguese and ancient Italian languages, being derived from the Latin word niger of the same meaning. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

CIRCA 1910.
Population in 1900, 89,872, including 2,500 persons of foreign birth and 35,900 of negro descent.
The thirteenth census (1910) of the United States gave the total population of Baltimore as 558,485, divided into 118,851 families, occupying 101,905 dwellings. Of this number, 268,195 were males and 290,290 were females; 481,442 were native born and 77,043 were foreign born. The total number of whites was 473,387 and of colored 85,098. Of the native whites, 261,474 had native parents and 134,870 had foreign parents.
While it is claimed for Boston that it still retains its old American spirit and character, the city has a larger foreign element than many other large American cities. The percentage of people of foreign birth in 1890 was 35.37, and those of foreign parentage constituted 60.9; while in 1900 the former constituted 34.8 per cent, and in 1910 35.9 per cent, of the total population. Of the foreign nationalities, the Irish are most strongly represented. The largest immigration of Irish took place in the decade 1845-55, the immigrants settling in the once fashionable section of the North End. The Scottish, English, and Germans are represented in much smaller numbers, while in later years the immigration has been made up largely of Italians and Russian Jews, the latter having taken the place of the Irish in the North End of the city. The colored population is very small, having been less than 12,000 in 1900 and under 14,000 in 1910.
The city had increased in 1870 to 298,977, ranking fifth among American cities; in 1880, to 503,185, ranking fourth; in 1890 to 1,099,850, ranking second; in 1900, to 1,698,575; and in 1910, to 2,185,283, still ranking second. (The exact number of people is unknown, however, due to the rapid increases).
Chicago has a remarkably high per cent (36) of foreign-born population, and of the native-born, 54 per cent are of foreign parentage. Of the foreign nationalities the Germans are most numerous, aggregating more than twice the number of Irish, the latter having shown an inclination to remain in the Eastern towns. The numbers of those who are of foreign birth or parentage are given in the following list after the names of the countries from whence they were derived: Germany, 501,832; Austria, 227,958; Ireland, 204,821; England and Scotland, 85,894; Canada, 66,453; Russia, 184,757; Scandinavian countries, 184,747; and various other countries of Europe, 303,909; making a total under this classification (exclusive of Canadians) of 1,693,918, i. e., about 77 and one-half per cent of the entire population of the city. The population rose to 2,701,705 in 1920, an increase of approximately 23 per cent. 44,103 negroes were enumerated in 1910.
There are few negroes, but many foreigners, the foreign born in 1910 numbering 195,700, or more than one-third of the total. (Population in 1910, 560,663). Among the foreign born the Germans are predominant, constituting in 1910 about 29 per cent. Bohemians and other Slavs come next with 18 per cent, and thereafter the Hungarians with 11 per cent, the Russians with 9 per cent, the Irish with 8 per cent, the English with 6 per cent, the Italians with 4 per cent, and the Canadians with less than 4 per cent. The native whites of foreign parents numbered 171,560, and with the foreign-born inhabitants made up 75 per cent of the city's population.
(The total population accelerated from 285,704 in 1900 to 465,466 in 1910 and to 993,739 in 1920). (The following information may indicate the 1910 figures, not those of 1920, despite the wording). Of the last, 156,565 were foreign born, the German and Canadian elements being the largest. About two-thirds of the native born were native white of foreign parents. The colored population numbered only 5,741.
Of the population, 61.8 per cent are white of native parents, 18.3 percent white with foreign or mixed parents, and 9.5 per cent negro. (Total population in 1910, 248,381).
There were 27,686 persons of foreign birth and 89,262 negroes. Of the former, about 8000 were Italians, 6000 Germans, 3600 French, and 3000 Irish.
In 1910, the foreign-born whites numbered 1,927,703, or 40.4 percent of the total population of the city. In Manhattan alone, 47.4 per cent of the population was foreign born. The negro population in 1910 numbered 91,709.
Of the white population 61.9 per cent is of foreign parentage, but native whites of foreign parentage comprise 32 per cent of the entire population. The negroes numbered 84,549 in 1910; Chinese, Japanese, and Indians, 1,177. The largest classes of European descent are Irish, German, Russian, English, and Italian. French, Greeks, Armenians, Hungarians, Bohemians, and Poles are present in lesser numbers. (In 1910, 1,549,008 people lived in Philadelphia).
In 1910, 393,469 were native born, 140,436 foreign born, and 191,483 of foreign or mixed parentage. The great industries of the Pittsburgh district draw this large alien population. The colored population in 1910 was 34,217, or 6.4 percent of a total population of 533,905.
From 1810, the date of the first Federal census, to 1880, the totals include with the city of Saint Louis the population of Saint Louis County, which in 1880 was separately enumerated at 31,888. The great growth between 1840 (35,979) and 1850 (104,978) had for one of its causes the German emigration following the revolutionary movement of 1848. This influence has been continuous. In 1910, 47,765 out of the total of 125,706 foreign-born residents of the city were natives of the German Empire. This was 38 per cent, exclusive of Austrians of German race. In 1910, 11.3 per cent of the foreign-born population was of Irish nativity, 4.1 per cent of English, 12.3 per cent of Russian, 6 of Italian, and 8.8 of Austrian. Although the total of foreign-born is comparatively small, the native population born of white foreign parents is 246,946, the native population born of native white parents being 269,836. The negro population was 43,960. (In 1910, 687,029 people lived in the city).
In 1910, San Francisco had a population of 416,912, 50.3 per cent of the population being native whites, 43.1 per cent foreign-born whites, and 6.4 per cent belonging to colored races. There were 24,137 Germans, 23,151 Irish, 9,815 English, 6,244 French, 4,641 Austrians, 10,582 Chinese, and 6,988 Japanese. The number of Chinese is diminishing, while the Japanese are increasing slowly or not at all. The Chinese are segregated in a quarter of their own, which has been rebuilt since the fire with almost, if not all, of its former charm and color, while Japanese colonies may be found in several parts of the city.
1920 census (Total population, 105,710,620)
White, 94,820,915
Native white, total, 81,108,161
Foreign-born white, 13,712,754
Negro, 10,463,131
Indian, 244,437
Chinese, 61,639
Japanese, 111,010
All other, 9,488
In 1915 the population of the district was 357,749; of whom 258,940 were white and 98,809 were colored.

Atlanta is the capital of and largest city in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... 1900 (MCM) is a common year starting on Monday. ... 1900 (MCM) is a common year starting on Monday. ... Negro means black in Spanish, Portuguese and ancient Italian languages, being derived from the Latin word niger of the same meaning. ... Baltimore skyline at dusk Motto: The Greatest City in America (formerly The City That Reads; BELIEVE is not the official motto but rather a specific campaign) Nickname: Charm City Mob Town B-more Location in Maryland Founded 30 July 1729 Incorporated 1797 County Independent city Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Colored and Colored People (or Colored Folk in the plural sense) are North American terms that were commonly used to describe people of African Ancestry. ... Nickname: City on a Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Solar System), Athens of America Motto: {{{motto}}} Official website: www. ... 1890 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1900 (MCM) is a common year starting on Monday. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: England Travel guide to England from Wikitravel English language English law English (people) List of monarchs of England – Kings of England family tree List of English people Angeln (region in northern Germany, presumably the origin of the Angles for whom England is named) UK... The word Jew (Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... Colored and Colored People (or Colored Folk in the plural sense) are North American terms that were commonly used to describe people of African Ancestry. ... 1900 (MCM) is a common year starting on Monday. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1890 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1900 (MCM) is a common year starting on Monday. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The term Eastern can have multiple meanings depending on its context. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: England Travel guide to England from Wikitravel English language English law English (people) List of monarchs of England – Kings of England family tree List of English people Angeln (region in northern Germany, presumably the origin of the Angles for whom England is named) UK... ... The neutrality and factual accuracy of this article are disputed. ... A satellite composite image of Europe // Etymology Picture of Europa, carried away by bull-shaped Zeus. ... 1920 (MCMXX) is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... Negro means black in Spanish, Portuguese and ancient Italian languages, being derived from the Latin word niger of the same meaning. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... ... Negro means black in Spanish, Portuguese and ancient Italian languages, being derived from the Latin word niger of the same meaning. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Bohemia This article is about the historical region in central Europe; for other uses, see Bohemia (disambiguation). ... Slav, Slavic or Slavonic can refer to: Slavic peoples Slavic languages Slavic mythology Church Slavonic language Old Church Slavonic language Slavonian can also refer to Slavonia, a region in eastern Croatia. ... The English are an ethnic group generally associated with England and the English language. ... The Detroit skyline at night as seen from Canada Nickname: The Motor City, Motown Motto: {{{motto}}} Official website: http://www. ... 1900 (MCM) is a common year starting on Monday. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1920 (MCMXX) is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... Colored and Colored People (or Colored Folk in the plural sense) are North American terms that were commonly used to describe people of African Ancestry. ... Kansas City is a city covering parts of Jackson, Clay, Cass, and Platte counties in Missouri, USA. Although it is the largest city in Jackson County, the suburb of Independence is the county seat. ... Negro means black in Spanish, Portuguese and ancient Italian languages, being derived from the Latin word niger of the same meaning. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... New Orleans (local pronunciations: , , or ) (French: La Nouvelle-Orléans, pronounced in standard French accent) is a major U.S. port city and historically the largest city in the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... Negro means black in Spanish, Portuguese and ancient Italian languages, being derived from the Latin word niger of the same meaning. ... -1... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Manhattan Borough,highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... Negro means black in Spanish, Portuguese and ancient Italian languages, being derived from the Latin word niger of the same meaning. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Independence Hall, as it appears today. ... Negro means black in Spanish, Portuguese and ancient Italian languages, being derived from the Latin word niger of the same meaning. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the continent. ... The English are an ethnic group generally associated with England and the English language. ... Bohemia This article is about the historical region in central Europe; for other uses, see Bohemia (disambiguation). ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Skyline of downtown Pittsburgh Pittsburgh is a city in Western Pennsylvania, United States, and the county seat of Allegheny County. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Colored and Colored People (or Colored Folk in the plural sense) are North American terms that were commonly used to describe people of African Ancestry. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Saint Louis (pronounced in English, in French), frequently spelled St. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Emigration is the act and the phenomenon of leaving ones native country to settle abroad. ... —Alexis de Tocqueville, Recollections The European Revolutions of 1848, in some countries known as the Spring of Nations, were the bloody consequences of a variety of changes that had been taking place in Europe in the first half of the 19th century. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The term German Empire commonly refers to Germany, from its foundation as a unified nation-state on January 18, 1871, until the abdication of Emperor Wilhelm II on November 9, 1918. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: England Travel guide to England from Wikitravel English language English law English (people) List of monarchs of England – Kings of England family tree List of English people Angeln (region in northern Germany, presumably the origin of the Angles for whom England is named) UK... Negro means black in Spanish, Portuguese and ancient Italian languages, being derived from the Latin word niger of the same meaning. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... San Franciscos famous fog and famous Golden Gate Bridge. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Colored and Colored People (or Colored Folk in the plural sense) are North American terms that were commonly used to describe people of African Ancestry. ... The English are an ethnic group generally associated with England and the English language. ... Negro means black in Spanish, Portuguese and ancient Italian languages, being derived from the Latin word niger of the same meaning. ... ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Colored and Colored People (or Colored Folk in the plural sense) are North American terms that were commonly used to describe people of African Ancestry. ...

Foreign-born by States in 1910

  • New Hampshire The population per square mile in 1910 was 47.7. The State lost largely in the latter part of the nineteenth century through immigration to the Western States, but in recent years this outflow has been offset to a considerable extent by the increase in immigration of foreign-born population, particularly French Canadians. The urban population, i. e., that of places of 2500 or more, was, in 1910, 255,099, and the rural population, 175,473. The native whites of native parentage in that year were 230,231; the native whites of foreign or mixed parentage, 103,177; the foreign-born whites 96,558. Of the foreign-born whites the largest number came from Canada and Ireland. By sex the population was divided in 1910 into 216,290 males and 214,282 females. The males of voting age numbered 136,668.
  • Utah In 1910 it ranked forty-first amongst the States in population. (Total: 373,351). The negro population numbered 1,444, the Indian 3,123, and the Japanese 2,110. The native whites numbered 303,190 and the foreign-born whites 63,393. Among the foreign born, the English were by far the most numerous; the Danes numbered 8,300, the Swedes, 7,227, and the Greeks 4,039.

State nickname: Granite State, Mother of Rivers, White Mountain State, Switzerland of America [1] Official languages English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Governor John Lynch (D) Senators Judd Gregg (R) John Sununu (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 46th 24,239 km² 3. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... French Canadian is a term that has several different connotations. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Utah is one of the Four Corners states, and is bordered by: Idaho (at 42°N) and Wyoming (at 41°N and 111°W) in the north, by Colorado (at 109°W) in the east, at a single point by New Mexico to the southeast (at the Four Corners Monument... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Negro means black in Spanish, Portuguese and ancient Italian languages, being derived from the Latin word niger of the same meaning. ...

Railroads

The names of many of the railroads which had existed early in the twentieth century are mentioned at thousands of place names.

EXAMPLES
In 2005, the well-constructed, sturdy Pan Handle (Railroad) bridge is an important transit bridge which carries electric trolleys (streetcars) across the Monongahela river. It is the third-to-last bridge over that river before the river meets with the Allegheny to form the Ohio river.

Nickname: The Glass City Motto: {{{motto}}} Official website: www. ... 1911 map The Pennsylvania Railroad (AAR reporting mark PRR) was an American railroad existing 1846–1968, after which it merged into Penn Central Transportation. ... The Pere Marquette Railroad (AAR reporting mark: PM) was a railroad that operated in the Great Lakes region of the United States. ... Grand Trunk Railway logo or herald The Grand Trunk Railway (GTR) was a historic railway system headquartered in Montreal, Quebec which operated in the Canadian provinces of Quebec and Ontario, as well as the U.S. states of Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont. ... The Detroit skyline at night as seen from Canada Nickname: The Motor City, Motown Motto: {{{motto}}} Official website: http://www. ... Mackinaw City is a village in Emmet County, with a small portion lying within Cheboygan County, in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Duluth is a city in and the county seat of St. ... ... Industrial area along the riverfront of River Rouge River Rouge is a city located in Wayne County, Michigan. ... Michigan Central Railroad operated in the states of Michigan, Indiana, Ontario, and Illinois in the United Statesand Canada. ... Downtown Albuquerque Albuquerque is the largest city in the state of New Mexico, United States. ... Categories: Rail stubs | Defunct railroad companies of the United States | Arizona railroads | California railroads | Colorado railroads | Illinois railroads | Iowa railroads | Kansas railroads | Louisiana railroads | Missouri railroads | Nebraska railroads | New Mexico railroads | Oklahoma railroads | Texas railroads ... Historic downtown Pocatello Pocatello is a city located in Bannock County, with a small portion in neighboring Power County, in southeastern Idaho. ... Motto: The Golden Heart City Founded Incorporated November 10, 1903  County Fairbanks North Star Borough Mayor Steve M. Thompson Area  - Total  - Water 84. ... The Tanana Valley Railroad was a narrow-gauge railroad that operated in the Tanana Valley of Alaska from 1905 to about 1917, when it was purchased by the government and began to be converted to standard gauge. ... Chena was a small town in interior Alaska near the confluence of the Chena River and the Tanana whose heyday was in the first two decades of the 1900s. ... Chitina is a census-designated place located in Valdez-Cordova Census Area, Alaska. ... Saskatoon is a mid-sized city located in central Saskatchewan, Canada, on the South Saskatchewan River. ... The Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR; AAR reporting marks CP, CPAA, CPI), known as CP Rail between 1968 and 1996, is a Canadian Class I railway that is operated by Canadian Pacific Railway Limited. ... The Canadian Northern Railway (CNoR) is a historic Canadian railway. ... The Grand Trunk and Pacific Railroad was the third Canadian transcontinental railroad built to the Pacific coast in the early twentieth century. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Fredericpolis silvae filia noblis (Fredericton noble daughter of the forest) Image:Fredericton, New Brunswick Location. ... The Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR; AAR reporting marks CP, CPAA, CPI), known as CP Rail between 1968 and 1996, is a Canadian Class I railway that is operated by Canadian Pacific Railway Limited. ... State Capitol building in Salem Salem (IPA: ) is the capital of the state of Oregon in the United States of America, and county seat of Marion County. ... The Southern Pacific Railroad (AAR reporting mark SP) was an American railroad. ... Downtown Seattle skyline Nickname: The Emerald City Motto: {{{motto}}} Official website: http://www. ... Great Northern may refer to: the Great Northern Diver, Gavia adamsii, a bird the Great Northern War, a war fought by Russia, Denmark-Norway, and Saxony-Poland against Sweden the Great Northern Railway, an Irish railway the Great Northern Railway, a United States railroad the Great Northern Railway, a British... Northern Pacific Railway Categories: Stub | Defunct railroad companies of the United States | Idaho railroads | Minnesota railroads | Montana railroads | North Dakota railroads | Oregon railroads | Washington railroads | Wisconsin railroads ... The Milwaukee Road, officially the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. ... The Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR; AAR reporting marks CP, CPAA, CPI), known as CP Rail between 1968 and 1996, is a Canadian Class I railway that is operated by Canadian Pacific Railway Limited. ... Grand Trunk Railway logo or herald The Grand Trunk Railway (GTR) was a historic railway system headquartered in Montreal, Quebec which operated in the Canadian provinces of Quebec and Ontario, as well as the U.S. states of Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont. ... City nickname:Californias Country Music Capital County Kern County, California Area  - Total  - Water 296. ... The Southern Pacific Railroad (AAR reporting mark SP) was an American railroad. ... Categories: Rail stubs | Defunct railroad companies of the United States | Arizona railroads | California railroads | Colorado railroads | Illinois railroads | Iowa railroads | Kansas railroads | Louisiana railroads | Missouri railroads | Nebraska railroads | New Mexico railroads | Oklahoma railroads | Texas railroads ... California is a city located in Moniteau County, Missouri. ... Missouri Pacific (MoPac; AAR reporting mark MP) was one of the first railroads in the United States west of the Mississippi River. ... Central City is the county seat of Gilpin County, Colorado. ... Chadron is a city located in Dawes County, Nebraska. ... The Chicago and North Western Railway (AAR reporting marks: CNW, CNWS, CNWZ; unofficial abbreviation: C&NW) was a Class I railroad in the United States. ... Hammond is the largest city in Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana. ... The Illinois Central (AAR reporting mark IC) was a railroad carrier in the central United States, with its primary routes from Chicago to New Orleans and Sioux Falls. ... Fort Payne is a city located in DeKalb County, Alabama. ... The Alabama Great Southern Railroad Company, Ltd. ... Key West buoy marking the Southernmost point in the continental United States is located in Key West, Florida, at the end of U.S. Highway 1. ... The Florida East Coast Railway (AAR reporting mark FEC) is a Class II railroad operating in the US state of Florida; in the past, it has been a Class I railroad. ... County Mecklenburg Mayor Pat McCrory, (R) Area  - Total  - Water 629. ... The Southern Railway (AAR designation SOU) was the product of nearly 150 predecessor lines that were combined, reorganized and recombined since the 1830s. ... All-time system map, showing all lines in the Norfolk Southern system prior to 1974 The Norfolk Southern Railway (AAR reporting mark NS) was the final name of a railroad running from Norfolk, Virginia southwest and west to Charlotte, North Carolina. ... Orrville is a city located in Wayne County, Ohio. ... The Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago Railway was a major part of the Pennsylvania Railroad system, extending the PRR west from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania via Fort Wayne, Indiana to Chicago, Illinois. ... The Wheeling and Lake Erie Railway (WLE)s oldest predecessor rail line began in Ohio, with the organization of the Carroll County Rail Road on March 9, 1850. ... Jim Thorpe is a borough located in Carbon County, Pennsylvania. ... 1884 map of the Pennsylvania, Reading and Lehigh Valley Railroads The Delaware, Lehigh, Schuylkill and Susquehanna Railroad Company (AAR reporting mark LV) was incorporated April 21, 1846 in Pennsylvania. ... Allegheny was a city in western Pennsylvania, located on the north shore of the junction of the Allegheny and Ohio Rivers, across from Pittsburgh. ... The Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago Railway was a major part of the Pennsylvania Railroad system, extending the PRR west from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania via Fort Wayne, Indiana to Chicago, Illinois. ... 1911 map The Pennsylvania Railroad (AAR reporting mark PRR) was an American railroad existing 1846–1968, after which it merged into Penn Central Transportation. ... Skyline of downtown Pittsburgh Pittsburgh is a city in Western Pennsylvania, United States, and the county seat of Allegheny County. ... 1911 map The Pennsylvania Railroad (AAR reporting mark PRR) was an American railroad existing 1846–1968, after which it merged into Penn Central Transportation. ... 1918 map The New York Central Railroad (AAR reporting mark NYC), known simply as the New York Central in its publicity, was a railroad operating in the North-Eastern United States. ... 1876 map The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O) is one of the oldest railroads in the United States, with an original line from the port of Baltimore, Maryland west to the Ohio River at Wheeling, West Virginia and Parkersburg, West Virginia. ... Categories: Rail stubs | Defunct railroad companies of the United States | Illinois railroads | Indiana railroads | Ohio railroads ... The Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. ... The Monongahela River is a river on the Allegheny Plateau in West Virginia and Pennsylvania. ... The Allegheny River (historically, especially in New York state, also spelled Allegany River) is a principal tributary of the Ohio River, which it forms with the Monongahela River at the downtown Pittsburghs Golden Triangle point. The river is approximately 325 mi (523 km) long, in the U.S. states... The Ohio River is a principal tributary of the Mississippi River, 1,579 km (981 mi) long in the eastern United States. ... Uniontown is a city located in Fayette County, Pennsylvania. ... 1911 map The Pennsylvania Railroad (AAR reporting mark PRR) was an American railroad existing 1846–1968, after which it merged into Penn Central Transportation. ... 1876 map The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O) is one of the oldest railroads in the United States, with an original line from the port of Baltimore, Maryland west to the Ohio River at Wheeling, West Virginia and Parkersburg, West Virginia. ...

Pony Express Fees

  • At first the cost was $5.00 for a ½-ounce (15.55 gm) letter; later the charge was reduced to $2.50.
  • Riders were paid $100 to $125 per month. Each rider was expected to cover 75 miles (121 km) a day.

The quickest trip was that made for the delivery of President Lincoln's inaugural address. About 1400 miles (2253 km) from St. Joseph, Mo. to Sacramento, Cal. being covered in 7 days and 17 hours. Mail passing through Panama required about 22 days. Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... Saint Joseph is a city located in Buchanan County, Missouri. ... Nickname: City of Trees Motto: {{{motto}}} Official website: http://www. ...


The first pony express left on April 3, 1860. Eventually there were 190 stations, 200 station keepers, 200 assistant station keepers, 80 riders, and between 400 and 500 horses. The company ceased operations in October, 1861, on the completion of the line of the Pacific Telegraph Company. The Utah portion of the Pony Express Trail. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... In 1861, Benjamin Franklin Ficklin joined Jeptha Wade and Hiram Sibley in helping to form Pacific Telegraph Company. ...


Maps list of 172 maps (1926 edition, in colors)


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The New International Version (NIV) is an English translation of the Christian Bible which is the most popular of the modern translations of the Bible made in the twentieth century.
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Unlike the RSV and New Revised Standard Version, the NIV is an explicitly Protestant translation; the deuterocanonical books were not included in the translation.
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