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Encyclopedia > New Hollywood

New Hollywood or post-classical Hollywood refers to the brief time between roughly 1967 (Bonnie and Clyde, The Graduate) and 1982 (One from the Heart) when a new generation of young filmmakers came to prominence in America, drastically changing not only the way Hollywood films were produced and marketed, but also the kinds of films that were made. These individuals and the films they made were part of the studio system, and were not "independent filmmakers" as sometimes they have been erroneously considered. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Classical Hollywood cinema designates both a visual and sound style for making motion pictures and a mode of production that arose in the Los Angeles film industry of the 1910s and 1920s. ... Lauren steiger, born in 1992 at Royal Womens hospital started acting and modelling at the age of 2 and is now currently 15 working in Milan on the catwalks. ... Bonnie and Clyde (1967) is a film about Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, bank robbers who roamed the central United States during the Great Depression. ... For the novel of the same name, see The Graduate (novel). ... // This is the year of film E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, which will become the highest grossing movie for almost 15 years (until Titanic), earning double or triple against any major film of the 1980s. ... One from the Heart is a 1982 musical film directed by Francis Ford Coppola. ... An independent film, or indie film, is usually a low-budget film that is produced by a small movie studio. ...

Contents

Background and overview

Following the advent of television and the Paramount Case, which nearly broke the movie business, traditional Hollywood Studios first tried to lure audiences with spectacle. Widescreen processes and technical improvements, such as Cinemascope, stereo sound and others, were invented in order to retain the dwindling audience by giving them a larger-than-life experience. United States v. ... A Fox logo used to promote the CinemaScope process. ...


Hence during the Fifties and early Sixties, Hollywood film production was dominated by musicals, historical epics, and other films that benefited from the larger screens, wider framing and improved sound. This proved commercially viable during most of the 1950s. However, by the late Sixties, audience share was dwindling at an alarming rate. Several costly flops, including Cleopatra and Hello, Dolly! put severe strain on the studios. This article is about the 1963 film. ... Hello, Dolly! is a 1969 American musical film, based on the Broadway production of the same name. ...


A problem the Studios all recognized was that they did not know how to reach the youth audience. By the time the baby boomer generation was coming of age in the 1960s and 1970s, Old Hollywood was hemorrhaging money; they had no idea what the audience wanted. European art films, especially the French New Wave, and Japanese cinema, were all making a splash in America — the huge market of disaffected youth seemed to find something of themselves when they saw movies like Michelangelo Antonioni's Blowup, with its oblique narrative structure and full-frontal female nudity. Studio heads were baffled. Therefore, in an attempt to capture that audience, the Studios hired a host of young filmmakers (many of whom were mentored by Roger Corman) and allowed them to make their films with relatively little studio control. For the video game, see Baby Boomer (video game). ... European cinema is the cinema of Europe. ... U.S. theatrical release poster for German New Wave director Werner Herzogs 1973 drama Aguirre: The Wrath of God An art film (also called an “art cinema”, “art movie”, or in the US, an independent film or “art house film”) is a typically serious, noncommercial, independently made film that... François Truffauts New Wave film Jules et Jim The New Wave (French: la Nouvelle Vague) was a blanket term coined by critics for a group of French filmmakers of the late 1950s and 1960s, influenced (in part) by Italian Neorealism. ... Cinema has a history in Japan that spans more than 100 years. ... Michelangelo Antonioni (September 29, 1912 - July 30, 2007) was an Italian modernist film director whose films are widely considered as some of the most influential in film aesthetics. ... For blowups in algebraic geometry, see blowing up. ... Roger Corman Roger William Corman (born April 5, 1926), sometimes nicknamed King of the Bs for his output of B-movies (though he himself rejects this appelation as inaccurate), is a prolific American producer and director of low-budget exploitation movies. ...


Characteristics of the New Hollywood films

This new generation of Hollywood filmmaker was film school-educated, counterculture-bred, and, most importantly from the point of view of the studios, young, and therefore able to reach the youth audience they were losing, or so they hoped. This group of young filmmakers — actors, writers and directors — dubbed the New Hollywood by the press, briefly changed the business from the producer-driven Hollywood system of the past, and injected movies with a jolt of freshness, energy, sexuality, and an obsessive passion for film itself. A film school is a generic term for any educational institution dedicated to teaching moviemaking, including, but not limited to, film production, theory, and writing for the screen. ... In sociology, counterculture is a term used to describe the values and norms of behavior of a cultural group, or subculture, that run counter to those of the social mainstream of the day, the cultural equivalent of political opposition. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Screenwriters, scenarists, or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. ...

Poster for Bonnie & Clyde
Poster for Bonnie & Clyde

Technically, the greatest change the New Hollywood filmmakers brought to the artform was an emphasis on realism. This happened because these filmmakers happened on the scene just as the Motion Picture Association of America film rating system was introduced and location shooting was becoming more viable. Because of breakthroughs in film technology, specifically smaller microphones that could be hidden in clothing, lighter cameras that did not require heavy support gear, and simpler post-production systems, the New Hollywood filmmakers could shoot 35mm in exteriors with relative ease. Since location shooting was, by definition, cheaper (no sets need be built to shoot an existing exterior), New Hollywood filmmakers rapidly developed the taste for location shooting, which had the effect of heightening the realism of their films, especially when compared to the artificiality of previous musicals and spectacles. Aside from realism, often their films featured anti-establishment political themes, use of rock music, and sexual freedom deemed "counter-cultural" by the studios. Furthermore, many figures of the period openly admit to using drugs such as LSD and marijuana. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The Motion Picture Association of Americas film rating system is used in the United States and its territories to rate a films suitability for certain audiences. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ... Cannabis, also known as marijuana[1] or ganja,[2] is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa L. subsp. ...


The most important picture for the New Hollywood generation was Bonnie & Clyde. Produced by Warren Beatty, its mix of humor and horror, graphic violence and sex, as well as its theme of glamorous disaffected youth was an unqualified hit with audiences. The Graduate, Easy Rider and Midnight Cowboy followed in quick succession, all of them major successes, Midnight Cowboy earning the Academy Award for best picture. Bonnie and Clyde (1967) is a film about Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, bank robbers who roamed the central United States during the Great Depression. ... Henry Warren Beatty (born March 30, 1937), better known as Warren Beatty, is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American actor, producer, screenwriter, and director. ... For the novel of the same name, see The Graduate (novel). ... Wyatt, Mary (Toni Basil), Billy and Karen (Karen Black) wandering the streets of a parade filled New Orleans. ... This article is about the 1969 film. ...


These initial successes paved the way for the studio to relinquish almost complete control to these brash young filmmakers. In the mid-1970s, idiosyncratic, startling original films such as Paper Moon, Dog Day Afternoon and Taxi Driver among others (see below), enjoyed enormous critical and commercial success. These successes by the members of New Hollywood led each of them in turn to make more and more extravagant demands, both on the studio and eventually on the audience. Paper Moon is an American motion picture comedy that was released in 1973 and was directed by Peter Bogdanovich. ... Dog Day Afternoon is a 1975 film directed by Sidney Lumet and written by Frank Pierson. ... This article is about the 1976 American film. ...


The close of the New Hollywood era

Jaws in 1975 and Star Wars in 1977, retrospectively, marked the beginning of the end for New Hollywood. With their unprecedented box-office successes, Steven Spielberg's Jaws and George Lucas's Star Wars jumpstarted Hollywood's blockbuster mentality, giving studios a new paradigm as to how to make money in this changing commercial landscape. The focus on high-concept premises, with greater concentration on tie-in merchandise (such as toys), spin-offs into other media (such as soundtracks), and the use of sequels (which had been made more respectable by Coppola's The Godfather Part II), all showed the studios how to make money in the new environment. It has been suggested that Orca (Jaws boat) be merged into this article or section. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... Steven Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... Blockbuster, as applied to film or theater, denotes a very popular and/or successful production. ... High concept, in film, is a term typically used to refer to the style and mode of production developed by Hollywood studios in the late 1970s. ... The Godfather Part II is a 1974 motion picture directed by Francis Ford Coppola from a script he co-wrote with Mario Puzo. ...


On realizing potentially how much money could be made in films, major corporations started buying up the Hollywood studios. The corporate mentality these companies brought to the filmmaking business would slowly squeeze out the more idiosyncratic of these young filmmakers, while ensconcing the more malleable and commercially successful of them.


The New Hollywood's ultimate demise came after a string of box office failures that many critics viewed as self-indulgent and excessive. Directors had enjoyed unprecedented creative control and budgets during the New Hollywood era, but expensive flops including At Long Last Love, New York, New York, and Sorcerer caused the studios to increase their control over productions. The term box office can refer to either: A place where tickets are sold to the public for admission to a venue The amount of business a particular production, such as a movie or theatre show, does. ... At Long Last Love is an American motion picture musical that was released in 1975 and was directed by Peter Bogdanovich. ... For other uses, see New York, New York (disambiguation). ... Sorcerer is a 1977 film produced and directed by William Friedkin, starring Roy Scheider, Bruno Cremer, Francisco Rabal and Amidou. ...


New Hollywood excess culminated in two unmitigated financial disasters: Michael Cimino's Heaven's Gate (1980) and Francis Ford Coppola's One from the Heart (1982). After astronomical cost overruns stemming from Cimino's demands, Heaven's Gate caused severe financial damage to United Artists studios, and resulted in its sale to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Coppola, having flourished after the near financial disaster of Apocalypse Now, plowed all of the enormous success of that film into American Zoetrope, effectively becoming his own studio head. As such, he bet it all on One from the Heart, which closed in less than a week, bankrupting Coppola and his fledgling studio. (Following the box-office disaster, Hollywood wags started referring to the picture as "One Through the Heart".) Michael Cimino (born February 3, 1939, New York City) is an Australia film director. ... Heavens Gate is a 1980 western movie, which depicts a highly fictionalized account of the Johnson County War, a dispute between land barons and European immigrants in Wyoming in the 1890s. ... Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) is a five-time Academy Award winning American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... One from the Heart is a 1982 musical film directed by Francis Ford Coppola. ... This article is about the film studio. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... Apocalypse Now is a 1979 Academy Award and Golden Globe winning American film set during the Vietnam War. ... American Zoetrope is the name of the studios founded by Francis Ford Coppola, named after a collection of zoetropes he was given in the late 1960s by filmmaker and collector of early motion picture making equipment, Mogens Skot-Hansen. ...


These two costly examples, as well as the above-mentioned box-office failures, coupled with the new commercial paradigm of Jaws and Star Wars gave studios a clear and renewed sense of where the market was going: high-concept, mass-audience, wide-release films. Therefore, the costly and risky strategy of surrendering control to the director ended, and with that, the New Hollywood era. This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological...


The exploits of the New Hollywood generation are infamously chronicled in the book Easy Riders, Raging Bulls by Peter Biskind. Easy Riders, Raging Bulls is a book by Peter Biskind about 1970s Hollywood, a stand alone period of American film that produced such classics as The Godfather, The Godfather: Part II, Taxi Driver, Jaws, Star Wars, The Exorcist and The Last Picture Show. ... Peter Biskind is a journalist and author famous for some of his entertaining and provocative portrayals of life in Hollywood in books like Easy Riders, Raging Bulls: How the Sex-Drugs-and-Rock N Roll Generation Saved Hollywood, Down and Dirty Pictures: Miramax, Sundance, and the Rise of Independent Film...


New Hollywood and independent filmmaking

It can often seem that the members of the New Hollywood generation were independent filmmakers. Indeed, some of their members have tacitly signaled that they were the precursors of the independent film movement of the 1990s.


However, this is not the case. The New Hollywood generation was firmly entrenched in the studio system, which financed the development, production and distribution of their films. None of them ever independently financed or independently released a film of their own, or ever worked on an independently financed production during the height of the generation's influence. Seemingly "independent" films such as Taxi Driver, Midnight Cowboy, The Last Picture Show and others were all studio films: the scripts were based on studio pitches and subsequently paid for by the studios, the production financing was from the studio, and the marketing and distribution of the films were designed and controlled by the studio. This article is about the 1976 American film. ... This article is about the 1969 film. ... The Last Picture Show is a 1971 film directed by Peter Bogdanovich, adapted from a 1966 novel by Larry McMurtry. ...


There were only two truly independent movies of the New Hollywood generation: Easy Rider in 1969, at the beginning of the period, and Bogdanovich's They All Laughed, at the end. Peter Bogdanovich bought back the rights from the studio to his 1980 film and paid for its distribution out of his own pocket, convinced that the picture was better than what the studio believed — he eventually went bankrupt because of this. Wyatt, Mary (Toni Basil), Billy and Karen (Karen Black) wandering the streets of a parade filled New Orleans. ... They All Laughed is a 1981 movie directed by Peter Bogdanovich. ... Peter Bogdanovich Serbian Cyrillic Петар Богдановић (born July 30, 1939) is a Serbian-American film director, writer and actor. ...


Truly independent filmmakers such as John Cassavetes, George Romero and Melvin Van Peebles — who secured outside financing and filmed their own scripts — were never a part of the New Hollywood generation, and should not be considered as such. John Nicholas Cassavetes (December 9, 1929–February 3, 1989) was a Greek American actor, screenwriter, and director. ... George A. Romero (born 4 February 1940) is an American director, writer, editor, actor and composer. ... Melvin Van Peebles, circa 2001, as seen in the documentary The Real Deal (What it Was. ...


List of important figures in the New Hollywood era

Many of the filmmakers listed below did multiple chores on various film productions through their careers. They are here listed by the category they are most readily recognized as.


Writers and directors

Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Königsberg on December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian, and playwright. ... For other persons named Robert Altman, see Robert Altman (disambiguation). ... Hal Ashby (September 2, 1929 - December 27, 1988) was an American film director and Academy Award winner. ... Peter Bogdanovich Serbian Cyrillic Петар Богдановић (born July 30, 1939) is a Serbian-American film director, writer and actor. ... John Boorman (born January 18, 1933 in Shepperton, Surrey, United Kingdom), is a British filmmaker, currently based in Ireland, best known for his feature films such as Point Blank, Deliverance, Excalibur, and The General. ... Michael Cimino (born February 3, 1939, New York City) is an Australia film director. ... Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) is a five-time Academy Award winning American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... Sidney Paddy Chayefsky (January 29, 1923 - August 1, 1981) was an acclaimed dramatist who transitioned from the golden age of American live television in the 1950s to have a successful career as a playwright and screenwriter for Hollywood. ... Brian De Palma (born Brian Russell DePalma on September 11, 1940 in Newark, New Jersey) is a controversial American film director, best known for directing the Al Pacino classic Scarface, and the Academy Award-winning The Untouchables. ... William Friedkin (born August 29, 1935 in Chicago, Illinois) is an Academy Award-winning American movie and television director, producer and screenwriter best known for directing The Exorcist and The French Connection in the early 1970s. ... Monte Hellman (born in 1932 in New York City, New York) is an American film director, producer, and film editor. ... Philip Kaufman (born October 23, 1936) is a film director and screenwriter from Chicago, Illinois. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... Portrait of Sidney Lumet, May 7, 1939. ... Terrence Terry Malick (born November 30, 1943 in Waco, Texas) is an American film director. ... John Milius (born April 11, 1944 in St. ... Mike Nichols (born Michael Igor Peschkowsky) is an Academy Award winning movie director of films such as The Graduate and Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?. He was born on November 6, 1931 in Berlin, to a Jewish Russian family. ... Alan Jay Pakula (April 7, 1928 - November 19, 1998) was an American film producer, writer and director noted for his contributions to the conspiracy thriller genre. ... David Samuel Sam Peckinpah (February 21, 1925 – December 28, 1984) was an American film director who achieved iconic status following the release of his 1969 Western epic The Wild Bunch. ... Roman Polański (born August 18, 1933) is an Academy Award-winning film director, writer, actor, and producer. ... Arthur Penn (born September 27, 1922 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a film director of thoughtful films that dont always find an audience. ... Sydney Pollack (born July 1, 1934 in Lafayette, Indiana) is an American actor, producer, and director. ... Robert (Bob) Rafelson (born February 21, 1933 in New York City) is an American film director, writer and producer. ... John Richard Schlesinger CBE (February 16, 1926 – July 25, 2003) was an English film director. ... Paul Joseph Schrader (born July 22, 1946 in Grand Rapids, Michigan) is a screenwriter and film director, renowned for his characters that fall into desperation while their world crumbles around them. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, writer and producer and founder of the World Cinema Foundation. ... Steven Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... Towne in the 1960 movie Last Woman on Earth Robert Towne (born November 23, 1934) is an American actor, screenwriter and director. ...

Cinematographers, editors, and production designers

Dede Allen (born Dorothea Carothers Allen, 3 December, 1925, in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American film editor. ... Bill Butler (born April 7, 1931) is an American cinematographer, part of the New Hollywood generation. ... Caleb Deschanel (born September 21, 1944) is an American cinematographer. ... Conrad L. Hall (June 21, 1926 - January 4, 2003) was a top-billed Hollywood cinematographer. ... This article is about the cinematographer. ... Marcia Lucas (née Griffin) was married to George Lucas between 1969 and 1983. ... Walter Murch speaking 13 March 2005 Walter Scott Murch (born July 12, 1943) is an Academy Award–winning film editor/sound mixer. ... Thelma Schoonmaker (born January 3, 1940) is an American Academy Award-winning film editor who has worked with director Martin Scorsese for over thirty-five years. ... Dean Tavoularis Dean Tavoularis (born January 1, 1932) is an American motion picture production designer whos work appeared in numerious box office hits such as The Godfather movies, Apocalypse Now, The Brinks Job, One from the Heart and Bonnie and Clyde. ... Haskell Wexler (born February 6, 1922 in Chicago, Illinois) is an Academy Award-winning American cinematographer, and a film producer and director. ... Gordon Willis (born May 28, 1931 in Queens, New York) is a highly respected Hollywood cinematographer best known for his work on the The Godfather series and on some of Woody Allens most popular films. ... Vilmos Zsigmond (born June 16, 1930) is a Hungarian-American cinematographer. ...

Producers and executives

Charles Blühdorn (September 20, 1926_February 20, 1983) was an Austrian-born American industrialist. ... Roger Corman Roger William Corman (born April 5, 1926), sometimes nicknamed King of the Bs for his output of B-movies (though he himself rejects this appelation as inaccurate), is a prolific American producer and director of low-budget exploitation movies. ... There have been several well-known people named Robert Evans, including: Robert Evans (author) Robert_Evans_(film_producer) Robert Evans (politician) Robert Evans is also the name of a firefighter who was killed in the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 Bob Evans This is a disambiguation... Julia Phillips (April 7, 1944 – January 1, 2002) was an Academy Award-winning film producer and author. ... Michael Phillips is a prominent Canadian psychiatrist known for his work in mental illness and suicide prevention. ... Fred Roos (May 22, 1934, Santa Monica, California) is a noted American film producer. ... Producer Bert Schneider was behind a number of important and topical films of the late 60s and early 70s. ...

Actors

Henry Warren Beatty (born March 30, 1937), better known as Warren Beatty, is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American actor, producer, screenwriter, and director. ... Karen Black (born July 1, 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated American actress, screenwriter, singer and songwriter. ... Peter Lawrence Boyle (October 18, 1935 – December 12, 2006)[1][2] was an Emmy Award-winning American actor who is perhaps best known for his role as Frank Barone on the sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond. ... Ellen Burstyn (born December 7, 1932 as Edna Rae Gillooly in Detroit, Michigan) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... John Frank Charles Cazale (August 12, 1935 – March 12, 1978) was a distinguished Golden Globe Award nominated American film and stage actor whose brief career spanned several acclaimed films of the 1970s. ... Julie Frances Christie (born 14 April 1941) is an English Academy Award-winning film actress. ... Jill Clayburgh (born April 30, 1944) is an American actress of stage, motion pictures, and television. ... Robert De Niro in 1988 Robert De Niro (born August 17, 1943) is a two-time Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American film actor, director, and producer. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... Faye Dunaway (born January 14, 1941, in Bascom, Florida) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Robert Selden Duvall (born January 5, 1931) is an Academy Award and four-time Golden Globe winning American film actor and director. ... Shelley Duvall was born July 7, 1949 in Houston, Texas. ... This article is about the actor/producer/director. ... Jane Fonda (born December 21, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress, writer, political activist, former fashion model, and fitness guru. ... Peter Henry Fonda (born February 23, 1940) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Eugene Allen Gene Hackman[1] (born January 30, 1930) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Dustin Lee Hoffman (born August 8, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning, BAFTA-winning, and five-time Golden Globe-winning American method actor. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ... Madeline Kahn (September 29, 1942 – December 3, 1999) was an Academy Award-nominated Jewish American actress of movie, television, and theater distinguished by an unusual gift for comedy. ... Diane Keaton (born Diane Hall on January 5, 1946) is an Academy Award-winning American film actress, director and producer. ... Harvey Keitel (born May 13, 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor from New York City. ... Margot Kidder (born October 17, 1948) is a Canadian-American film and television actress who achieved fame playing Lois Lane in the Superman movies of the 1970s and 1980s. ... Kristoffer Kris Kristofferson (born June 22, 1936) is an influential American country music songwriter, singer and actor. ... Alice MacGraw (born April 1, 1938 in Pound Ridge, Westchester County, New York) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe award winning American actress. ... Nicholson as Wilbur Force in The Little Shop of Horrors (1960). ... Alfredo James Pacino (born April 25, 1940) is an Academy, Golden Globe, Tony, BAFTA, Emmy, and SAG award winning American actor who is best known for playing the roles of Tony Montana in the 1983 film Scarface and Michael Corleone in The Godfather Trilogy . ... Robert Redford (born Charles Robert Redford, Jr. ... Vanessa Redgrave, CBE (born 30 January 1937) is an Academy Award winning English actress and member of the Redgrave family, one of the enduring theatrical dynasties. ... Jennifer Salt was a lead actress in the late 1960s early 70s. ... Cybill Shepherd Cybill Lynne Shepherd (born February 18, 1950 in Memphis, Tennessee) is an American actress. ... Mary Louise Streep, mostly known as Meryl Streep (born June 22, 1949) is an Academy Award-winning American actress who has worked in theatre, television, and film. ... Barbra Joan Streisand (born April 24, 1942) is an American singer, theatre and film actress, composer, liberal political activist, film producer and director. ... Roy Richard Scheider (born November 10, 1932 in Orange, New Jersey) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe-nominated American actor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... John Vincent Voight (born December 29, 1938) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Christopher Walken (born March 31, 1943) is an Academy Award-winning American film and theatre actor. ...

Others

Pauline Kael (June 19, 1919 – September 3, 2001) was an American film critic who wrote for The New Yorker magazine from 1968 to 1991. ... Sue Mengers was the Hollywood talent agent to many of the most important members of the New Hollywood generation of filmmakers and actors in the 1960s, 1970s and early 1980s. ...

List of notable New Hollywood films

The following is a chronological list of those films from the New Hollywood period that are generally considered to be seminal or notable. (For a more comprehensive list of films from the period, see List of films from the New Hollywood era.) The following is a chronological list of films from the New Hollywood era (1967-82/83) of American cinema, including both those that are generally considered to be central films of the period and those of more minor importance. ...

Bonnie and Clyde (1967) is a film about Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, bank robbers who roamed the central United States during the Great Depression. ... For the novel of the same name, see The Graduate (novel). ... Guess Whos Coming to Dinner is a 1967 Academy Award-winning comedy-drama film starring Spencer Tracy, Sidney Poitier, Katharine Hepburn, and Katharine Houghton. ... This article is about the 1968 film directed by George A. Romero. ... Rosemarys Baby is an Academy Award-winning 1968 horror film directed by Roman Polanski and starring Mia Farrow. ... Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid is a 1969 Western film that tells the story of bank robber Butch Cassidy (played by Paul Newman) and his partner The Sundance Kid (played by Robert Redford). ... Wyatt, Mary (Toni Basil), Billy and Karen (Karen Black) wandering the streets of a parade filled New Orleans. ... This article is about the 1969 film. ... The Wild Bunch is a 1969 English language western film directed by Sam Peckinpah, in which an aging group of outlaws hope to have one final score while the West is turning into a modern society. ... For other uses, see They Shoot Horses, Dont They? (disambiguation). ... Five Easy Pieces is a 1970 film written by Carole Eastman (as Adrien Joyce) and Bob Rafelson, and directed by Rafelson. ... Little Big Man is a 1970 film directed by Arthur Penn and based on the 1964 novel by Thomas Berger. ... Love Story is a 1970 romantic drama film written by Erich Segal based on his 1970 best-selling novel, and directed by Arthur Hiller. ... M*A*S*H is a 1970 satirical American dark comedy film directed by Robert Altman, based extremely loosely on the novel written by Richard Hooker. ... The French Connection is a 1971 Hollywood film directed by William Friedkin. ... Harold and Maude is a movie directed by Hal Ashby in 1971. ... Klute is a 1971 film which tells the story of a prostitute who assists a detective in solving a mystery. ... The Last Picture Show is a 1971 film directed by Peter Bogdanovich, adapted from a 1966 novel by Larry McMurtry. ... McCabe and Mrs. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... THX 1138 was George Lucas first full length movie. ... Deliverance is a 1972 Warner Bros. ... This article is about the 1972 film. ... American Graffiti is a 1973 film directed by George Lucas. ... Badlands is a 1973 film directed by Terrence Malick from his own script. ... The Exorcist is an Academy Award-winning 1973 American horror and thriller film, adapted from the 1971 novel of the same name by William Peter Blatty, dealing with the demonic possession of a young girl, and her mother’s desperate attempts to win back her daughter through an exorcism conducted... The Last Detail is a 1973 film which tells the story of two United States Navy shore patrol policemen who decide to take out a young sailor for one last night on the town before he goes to jail for eight years. ... For other uses, see Mean Streets (disambiguation). ... Paper Moon is an American motion picture comedy that was released in 1973 and was directed by Peter Bogdanovich. ... For other uses, see Serpico (disambiguation). ... Alice is a 1974 film which tells the story of a widow who moves with her young son to Tucson, Arizona to start her life over again, and finds a job working at a diner. ... Chinatown is a 1974 film directed by Roman Polanski and written by Robert Towne, starring Jack Nicholson, Faye Dunaway, and John Huston. ... The Conversation is an Academy Award nominated 1974 mystery thriller about audio surveillance, written and directed by Francis Ford Coppola and starring Gene Hackman, John Cazale, Teri Garr, and Cindy Williams; it also features an early performance by Harrison Ford and an uncredited appearance from Robert Duvall. ... The Godfather Part II is a 1974 motion picture directed by Francis Ford Coppola from a script he co-wrote with Mario Puzo. ... The Sugarland Express is a 1974 feature film starring Goldie Hawn and William Atherton. ... One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest is a 1975 film directed by Miloš Forman. ... Dog Day Afternoon is a 1975 film directed by Sidney Lumet and written by Frank Pierson. ... Nashville is a 1975 film which mixes themes of U.S. presidential politics with those of the country music and gospel music businesses in Nashville, Tennessee. ... It has been suggested that Orca (Jaws boat) be merged into this article or section. ... Shampoo is a 1975 motion picture directed by Hal Ashby, and starring Warren Beatty, Julie Christie, Goldie Hawn, and Lee Grant. ... Carrie is a 1976 American horror film directed by Brian De Palma based on the novel by Stephen King, with a screenplay written by Lawrence D. Cohen. ... Marathon Man is a 1976 film based on the novel of the same name by William Goldman. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... For other uses, see Rocky (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 1976 American film. ... Annie Hall is a 1977 romantic comedy film directed by Woody Allen from a script he co-wrote with Marshall Brickman. ... This article is about the film; for the definition of the UFO related phenomenon, see Close encounter. ... Julia is a 1977 dramatic film based on playwright Lillian Hellmans novel Pentimento, which tells the story of her relationship with her lifelong friend Julia, who worked as an anti-fascist in the years prior to World War II. The movie was adapted by Alvin Sargent from the novel. ... For other uses, see New York, New York (disambiguation). ... Sorcerer is a 1977 film produced and directed by William Friedkin, starring Roy Scheider, Bruno Cremer, Francisco Rabal and Amidou. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... 3 Women is a 1977 film directed by Robert Altman. ... Coming Home is a 1978 film which tells the story of a handicapped Vietnam War veterans difficulty in re-entering civilian life after his return from the war. ... For other uses, see Deer Hunter. ... Days of Heaven is a 1978 film written and directed by Terrence Malick and starring Richard Gere, Brooke Adams, Sam Shepard and Linda Manz. ... F.I.S.T. is a 1978 movie directed by Norman Jewison and starring Sylvester Stallone. ... DVD cover ...And Justice for All is a 1979 film which tells the story of a defense lawyer who finds himself defending a corrupt judge charged with rape, even though he personally doesnt care for his client. ... Apocalypse Now is a 1979 Academy Award and Golden Globe winning American film set during the Vietnam War. ... This article is about the 1979 movie. ... Cruising is the name of a film released in 1980, directed by William Friedkin and starring Al Pacino. ... For other uses, see Atlantic City (disambiguation). ... Dressed to Kill is a 1980 horror film written and directed by Brian de Palma. ... Heavens Gate is a 1980 western movie, which depicts a highly fictionalized account of the Johnson County War, a dispute between land barons and European immigrants in Wyoming in the 1890s. ... This article is about the 1980 film. ... Blow Out is a 1981 film by Brian DePalma starring John Travolta as Jack Terry, a movie sound effect technician from Philadelphia who, while recording sounds for a low-budget horror film, accidentally captures audio evidence of the possible assassination of the Pennsylvania governor who was planning to run for... Reds is a 1981 film starring Warren Beatty and Diane Keaton. ... Body Heat is a 1981 neo-noir film written and directed by Lawrence Kasdan. ... They All Laughed is a 1981 movie directed by Peter Bogdanovich. ... One from the Heart is a 1982 musical film directed by Francis Ford Coppola. ...

See also

This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...

Bibliography

Peter Biskind's Easy Riders, Raging Bulls Peter Biskind is a journalist and author famous for some of his entertaining and provocative portrayals of life in Hollywood in books like Easy Riders, Raging Bulls: How the Sex-Drugs-and-Rock N Roll Generation Saved Hollywood, Down and Dirty Pictures: Miramax, Sundance, and the Rise of Independent Film... Easy Riders, Raging Bulls is a book by Peter Biskind about 1970s Hollywood, a stand alone period of American film that produced such classics as The Godfather, The Godfather: Part II, Taxi Driver, Jaws, Star Wars, The Exorcist and The Last Picture Show. ...


External links

  • Bonnie and Clyde at the Internet Movie Database
  • Interview with Peter Biskind, author of Easy Riders, Raging Bulls

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