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Encyclopedia > New Haven Colony
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The New Haven Colony was an English colonial venture in Connecticut in North America from 1637 to 1662. A Puritan minister named John Davenport led his flock from exile in Holland back to England and finally to America in the spring of 1637. The group arrived in Boston on the ship Ann on June 26, but decided to strike out on their own, based on their impression that the Massachusetts Bay Colony was lax in its religious observances. Jump to: navigation, search Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK... Jump to: navigation, search State nickname: The Constitution State Other U.S. States Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Governor M. Jodi Rell (R) Senators Chris Dodd (D) Joe Lieberman (D) Official languages English Area 14,371 km² (48th)  - Land 12,559 km²  - Water 1,809 km² (12. ... Jump to: navigation, search World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America North America is a continent in the northern hemisphere, bordered on the north by the Arctic Ocean, on the east by the North Atlantic Ocean, on the south by the Caribbean Sea, and on... Events February 3 - Tulipmania collapses in Netherlands by government order February 15 - Ferdinand III becomes Holy Roman Emperor December 17 - Shimabara Rebellion erupts in Japan Pierre de Fermat makes a marginal claim to have proof of what would become known as Fermats last theorem. ... Events March 18 – Short-timed experiment of the first public buses holding 8 passengers begins in Paris May 3/May 2 - Catherine of Braganza marries Charles II of England – as part of the dowry, Portugal cedes Bombay and Tangier to England May 9 - Samuel Pepys witnessed a Punch and Judy... Jump to: navigation, search The Puritans were members of a group of English Protestants seeking further reforms or even separation from the established church during the Reformation. ... John Davenport(1597 - 1670) was a puritan clergyman and founder of the American city of New Haven. ... Jump to: navigation, search Motto: Je Maintiendrai (French for I will maintain) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam. ... Jump to: navigation, search Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK... Events February 3 - Tulipmania collapses in Netherlands by government order February 15 - Ferdinand III becomes Holy Roman Emperor December 17 - Shimabara Rebellion erupts in Japan Pierre de Fermat makes a marginal claim to have proof of what would become known as Fermats last theorem. ... Jump to: navigation, search For other instances of Boston, see Boston (disambiguation) Boston is the capital and largest city in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States. ... Jump to: navigation, search June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on the coast of North America in the 1600s, centered around the present-day city of Boston, which is now in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, one...


That fall Theophilus Eaton led an exploration party south to Long Island Sound in search of a suitable site. He purchased land from the Indians at the mouth of the Quinnipiac River. In the spring of 1638 the group set out, and on April 14 they arrived at their 'New Haven' on the Connecticut shore. The site seemed ideal for trade with a good port midway between Boston and New Amsterdam and access to the furs of the Connecticut River valley. However, while the colony succeeded as a settlement and religious experiment, its future as a trade center was some years away. Theophilus Eaton (1590 – January 7, 1658) was a merchant, farmer, and British colonial leader who was the co-founder and first governor of New Haven Colony, Connecticut. ... Jump to: navigation, search New York City waterways: 1. ... The Quinnipiac River is a river in the New England region of the United States, located entirely in the state of Connecticut. ... Jump to: navigation, search City nickname: The Elm City Location in the state of Connecticut Founded April 24, 1638 County New Haven County Mayor John DeStefano, Jr. ... Dutch Revival buildings from the early 20th century on Pearl Street in lower Manhattan recall the Dutch origins of the city. ... The Connecticut River as seen from the French King Bridge in western Massachusetts The Connecticut River is the largest river in New England, flowing south from the Connecticut Lakes in northern New Hampshire, along the border between New Hampshire and Vermont, through Western Massachusetts and central Connecticut into Long Island...


In 1639 they adopted a set of Fundamental Articles for self-government, partly as a result of a similar action in the river towns. A governing council of seven was established, with Eaton as chief magistrate and Cunningham as pastor. The articles required that "...the word of God shall be the only rule..." and this was maintained even over English common law tradition. Since the bible contained no reference to trial by jury, they eliminated it and the council sat in judgement. Only members of their church congregation were eligible to vote. Events January 14 - Connecticuts first constitution, the Fundamental Orders, is adopted. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Fundamental Orders were adopted by the Connecticut council on January 14, 1639. ... This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ...


The colony's success soon attracted other believers, as well as those who were not Puritans. They expanded into additional towns: Milford and Guilford in 1639, Stamford in 1640, and later to Fairfield, Medford, Greenwich, and Branford. These towns formally joined together as the New Haven Colony in 1643. They based their government on that of Massachusetts but maintained stricter discipline to the Puritan discipline. Milford is a partially independent city that is located partially in New Haven County in Connecticut. ... Guilford is a town located in New Haven County, Connecticut. ... Stamford is a city located in Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 117,083. ... Jump to: navigation, search Events December 1 - Portugal regains its independence from Spain and João IV of Portugal becomes king. ... Fairfield is a town located in Fairfield County, Connecticut, about five miles southwest of Bridgeport on the Gold Coast of Connecticut. ... Greenwich is a town located in Fairfield County, Connecticut. ... Academy in Branford. ... Jump to: navigation, search // Events January 21 - Abel Tasman discovers Tonga February 6 - Abel Tasman discovers the Fiji islands. ... Jump to: navigation, search State nickname: Bay State Other U.S. States Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney (R) Senators Edward Kennedy (D) John Kerry (D) Official language(s) English Area 27,360 km² (44th)  - Land 20,317 km²  - Water 7,043 km² (25. ...


An uneasy competition ruled their relations with the Connecticut River settlements centered on Hartford. The colony published a complete legal code in 1656, but the law remained very much church centered. Eaton stayed as governor until his death in 1658, when leadership of the Colony was given to Francis Newman, followed by William Leete in 1660. When a royal charter was issued to Connecticut in 1662, New Haven's period as a separate colony ended and its towns were merged into the government of Connecticut Colony in 1665. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... // Events Mehmed Köprülü becomes Grand Vizier of the Ottoman Empire. ... Events January 13 - Edward Sexby, who had plotted against Oliver Cromwell, dies in Tower of London February 6 - Swedish troops of Charles X Gustav of Sweden cross The Great Belt (Storebælt) in Denmark over frozen sea May 1 - Publication of Hydriotaphia, Urn Burial and The Garden of Cyrus by... Jump to: navigation, search Francis Newman (?-1660) was an English colonist in America, Governor of New Haven Colony in 1658-59. ... Events Expulsion of the Carib indigenous people from Martinique by French occupying forces. ... Events March 18 – Short-timed experiment of the first public buses holding 8 passengers begins in Paris May 3/May 2 - Catherine of Braganza marries Charles II of England – as part of the dowry, Portugal cedes Bombay and Tangier to England May 9 - Samuel Pepys witnessed a Punch and Judy... Jump to: navigation, search The Connecticut Colony was an English colony that became the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... Events March 4 - Start of the Second Anglo-Dutch War. ...


Also see: New Haven, Connecticut, History of Connecticut. Jump to: navigation, search City nickname: The Elm City Location in the state of Connecticut Founded April 24, 1638 County New Haven County Mayor John DeStefano, Jr. ... The History of Connecticut begins as a number of unrelated colonial villages. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
New Haven, Connecticut - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4417 words)
New Haven is generally considered to be halfway between the greater New York metropolitan area and the greater New England area, and can be said to be culturally split between the influence of the larger cities and its own New England roots.
New Haven was incorporated as a city in 1784, and Roger Sherman, one of the signers of the Constitution and author of the "Connecticut Compromise", became the new city's first mayor.
New Haven was home to one of the important early events in the burgeoning anti-slavery movement when, in 1839, the trial of mutineering Mendi tribesmen being transported as slaves on the Spanish slaveship Amistad was held in New Haven's United States District Court.
Connecticut's Heritage Gateway (991 words)
New Haven Colony was a separate entity until its absorption into Connecticut under the Charter of 1662.
They soon converted the town into an unsanctioned colony, but their over optimism and poor judgement were largely responsible for its eventual downfall." (from the abstract) A new elite rose after 1665.
New Haven claimed some land which was used for a commercial port and outpost though deep in Swedish and Dutch territory.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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