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Encyclopedia > New Haven, Connecticut
New Haven, Connecticut

Flag
Official seal of New Haven, Connecticut
Seal
Nickname: The Elm City
Location in Connecticut
Location in Connecticut
Coordinates: 41°18′36″N 72°55′25″W / 41.31, -72.92361
NECTA New Haven
Region South Central Region
Settled 1638
Incorporated (city) 1784
Consolidated 1895
Government
 - Type Mayor-board of aldermen
 - Mayor John DeStefano, Jr. (D)
Area
 - City 20.31 sq mi (52.6 km²)
 - Land 18.9 sq mi (49.0 km²)
 - Water 1.4 sq mi (3.6 km²)
 - Urban 285.3 sq mi (738.9 km²)
Elevation 59 ft (18 m)
Population (2006)[1]
 - City 124,001
 - Density 6,601.9/sq mi (2,549/km²)
 - Urban 569,000
 - Metro 846,766
  Metro area refers to New Haven County
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 0651x
Area code(s) 203
FIPS code 09-52000
GNIS feature ID 0209231
Website: http://www.cityofnewhaven.com/

New Haven is the second- or third-largest municipality[2] in Connecticut, after Bridgeport and possibly Hartford, with a core population of about 124,000.[1] "New Haven" may also refer to the wider Greater New Haven area, which has nearly 600,000 inhabitants in the immediate area.[3][4] It is located in New Haven County, on New Haven Harbor, on the northern shore of Long Island Sound. New Haven (from haven, meaning a harbor or sanctuary) is the name of a number of places, most in the United States of America. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 395 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,816 × 1,390 pixels, file size: 3 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links NewHavenFlag. ... New Haven city seal File links The following pages link to this file: New Haven, Connecticut ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 594 pixelsFull resolution (936 × 695 pixel, file size: 28 KB, MIME type: image/png) (All user names refer to en. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... A New England City and Town Area or NECTA is a geographic entity in the New England region of the United States. ... Mayor-Council government is one of two variations of government most commonly used in modern representative municipal governments. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... John DeStefano, Jr. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... This article is about the physical quantity. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 1,000 km² and 10,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Area code 203 covers the Southwestern part of Connecticut. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... “Bridgeport” redirects here. ... When used by itself in a sentence, the term Hartford can refer to one of several places in the United States. ... The Greater New Haven area is the metropolitan area whose extent includes those towns in Connecticut that share an economic, social, political, and historical focus on New Haven, Connecticut. ... New Haven County is located in the south central part of the state of Connecticut. ... New Haven Harbor is an inlet on the north side of Long Island Sound in the state of Connecticut in the United States. ... New York City waterways: 1. ...


Founded in 1638, New Haven was laid out in a grid of four streets by four streets creating what is now commonly known as the "Nine Squares,"[5][6] now the center of Downtown New Haven. This grid layout, which includes the 16-acre New Haven Green at its center, has been internationally recognized as one of the earliest, largest and most well-known examples of colonial city planning in the Americas [1][2]. The city also became known for instituting the first public tree planting program in America, eventually producing a canopy of mature trees (including some large elms) that gave New Haven the nickname "The Elm City." A simple grid plan road map (Windermere, Florida). ... Downtown New Haven is the neighborhood located in the heart of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ... The New Haven Green is a public park and recreation area located in the downtown district of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ...


The city is best known as the home of Yale University and the National Historic Landmark New Haven Green. Along with Yale, healthcare (hospitals, biotechnology), professional services (legal, architectural, marketing, engineering), financial services and retail trade form the base of the economy. Since the mid-1990s, the city's downtown area has seen extensive revitalization.[7] Yale redirects here. ... The New Haven Green is a public park and recreation area located in the downtown district of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ... Downtown New Haven is the neighborhood located in the heart of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ...

Contents

History

Pre-colonial and colonial history

The historic New Haven Green.
The historic New Haven Green.

Before European arrival, the New Haven area was the home of the Quinnipiac tribe of Native Americans, who lived in villages around the harbor and subsisted off local fisheries and the farming of maize. The area was briefly visited by Dutch explorer Adriaen Block in 1614. Dutch traders set up a small trading system of beaver pelts with the local inhabitants, but trade was sporadic and the Dutch did not settle permanently in the area. Image File history File links Festival. ... Image File history File links Festival. ... The New Haven Green is a public park and recreation area located in the downtown district of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ... This article is about the Native American nation. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... For other uses, see Harbor (disambiguation). ... This article is about the maize plant. ... Blocks map of his 1614 voyage, with the first appearance of the term New Netherland Adriaen Block (1567–1627) was a Dutch private fur trader and navigator who explored the coastal and river valley areas between present-day New Jersey and Massachusetts during four voyages from 1611 to 1614... For other uses, see Beaver (disambiguation). ...


In April 1638, five hundred Puritans who left the Massachusetts Bay Colony under the leadership of the Reverend John Davenport and the London merchant Theophilus Eaton sailed into the harbor. These settlers were hoping to establish a better theological community than the one they left in Massachusetts and sought to take advantage of the excellent port capabilities of the harbor. The Quinnipiacs, who were under attack by neighboring Pequots, sold their land to the settlers in return for protection. For the record label, see Puritan Records. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on... Contemporary portrait of John Davenport John Davenport (April 9, 1597 – March 15, 1670) was a puritan clergyman and co-founder of the American colony of New Haven. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Theophilus Eaton (1590 – January 7, 1658) was a merchant, farmer, and British colonial leader who was the co-founder and first governor of New Haven Colony, Connecticut. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... See Main articles: Mashantucket Pequot Eastern Pequot Tribal Nation. ...

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
A statue in front of the old court house, on Elm Street, in New Haven.

By 1640, the town's theocratic government and nine square grid plan were in place, and the town was renamed Newhaven from Quinnipiac. However, the area north of New Haven remained Quinnipiac until 1678, when it was renamed Hamden. The settlement became the headquarters of the New Haven Colony. At the time, the New Haven Colony was separate from the Connecticut Colony which had been established to the north focusing on Hartford. One of the principal differences between the two colonies was that the New Haven colony was an intolerant theocracy that did not permit other churches to be established while the Connecticut colony permitted the establishment of other churches. Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 572 KB) Summary A statue in New Haven, CT. Behind Woolsey Hall. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 572 KB) Summary A statue in New Haven, CT. Behind Woolsey Hall. ... The system of local government in use in New England is very different from that found throughout the rest of the United States. ... The New Haven Colony was an English colonial venture in Connecticut in North America from 1637 to 1662. ... A map of the Connecticut, New Haven, and Saybrook colonies. ... Hartford redirects here. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      For the metal band, refer to Theocracy (band). ...


Economic disaster struck the colony in 1646, however, when the town sent its first fully loaded ship of local goods back to England. This ship never reached the Old World, and its disappearance stymied New Haven's development in the face of the rising trade power of Boston and New Amsterdam. In 1660, founder John Davenport's wishes were fulfilled and Hopkins School was founded in New Haven with money from the estate of Edward Hopkins. Boston redirects here. ... This article is about the settlement in present-day New York City. ... For the Minnesota school, see Hopkins Senior High School; for the university, see Johns Hopkins University. ... Cnwb 23:54, 30 August 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ...


In 1661, the judges who had signed the death warrant of Charles I of England were pursued by Charles II. Two judges, Colonel Edward Whalley and Colonel William Goffe, fled to New Haven to seek refuge from the king's forces. John Davenport arranged for these "Regicides" to hide in the West Rock hills northwest of the town. A third judge, John Dixwell, joined the other regicides at a later time. Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... Edward Whalley (c. ... William Goffe (1605? - 1679?), English parliamentarian, son of Stephen Goffe, puritan rector of Stanmer in Essex, began life as an apprentice to a London salter, a zealous parliamentarian, but on the outbreak of the civil war he joined the army and became captain in Colonel Harleys regiment of the... For other uses, see Regicide (disambiguation). ... West Rock is a traprock hill that rises to the northwest of downtown New Haven, Connecticut. ... John Dixwell (1607 - 18 March 1689) was one of the judges who tried King Charles I of England and condemned him to death. ...


New Haven became part of the Connecticut Colony in 1664, when the two colonies were merged under political pressure from England, according to folklore as punishment for harboring the three judges (in reality, done in order to strengthen the case for the takeover of nearby New Amsterdam, which was rapidly losing territory to migrants from Connecticut)[citation needed]. Some members of the New Haven Colony seeking to establish a new theocracy elsewhere went on to establish Newark, New Jersey. This article is about the settlement in present-day New York City. ... Nickname: Map of Newark in Essex County Coordinates: , Country State County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Government  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]  - Total 26. ...


It was made co-capital of Connecticut in 1701, a status it retained until 1873. In 1716, the Collegiate School relocated from Old Saybrook to New Haven and established New Haven as a center of learning. In 1718, the name of the Collegiate School was changed to Yale College in response to a large donation from Welsh merchant Elihu Yale. Not to be confused with capitol. ... Old Saybrook is a town in Middlesex County, Connecticut, United States. ... For other uses, see Yale (disambiguation). ... Elihu Yale Elihu Yale, (April 5, 1649 – July 8, 1721), was the first benefactor of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut in the United States. ...


For over a century, New Haven citizens had fought alongside British forces, as in the French and Indian War. As the American Revolution approached, General David Wooster and other influential residents hoped that the conflict with Britain could be resolved short of rebellion. But on April 23, 1775 (still celebrated in New Haven as Powder House Day), the Second Company, Governor's Foot Guard, of New Haven entered the struggle against the British. Under Captain Benedict Arnold, they broke into the powder house to arm themselves and began a three-day march to Cambridge, Massachusetts. Other New Haven militia members were on hand to escort George Washington from his overnight stay in New Haven on his way to Cambridge. Contemporary reports, from both sides, remark on the New Haven volunteers' professional military bearing, including uniforms. Combatants France First Nations allies: Algonquin Lenape Wyandot Ojibwa Ottawa Shawnee Great Britain American Colonies Iroquois Confederacy Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,040 killed, wounded or captured The French and... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... David Wooster (1710–1777) was an American military leader from Connecticut. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Powder House Day is celebrated in New Haven, Connecticut on April 23, commemorating the day in 1775 when the Second Company, Governors Foot Guard, under Captain Benedict Arnold, broke into the powder house to arm themselves and began a march to Cambridge, Massachusetts, marking the entry of New Haven... For other persons named Benedict Arnold, see Benedict Arnold (disambiguation). ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - Total 7. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ...


British forces under General William Tryon raided the 3,500-person town in July of 1779 , but did not torch it as they had with Danbury in 1777 , or Fairfield and Norwalk a week after the New Haven raid, leaving many of the town's colonial features preserved. William Tryon (January 27, 1729 to 1788) was colonial governor of the Province of North Carolina (1765-1771) and the Province of New York (1771-1780, though he did not retain much power in the colony beyond 1777). ... Nickname: Located in Fairfield County, Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated (town) 1702 Incorporated (city) 1889 Consolidated 1965 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Mark D. Boughton (R) Area  - City 114. ... Fairfield is a town located in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... Norwalk is a city in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. ...


Towns created from New Haven

Towns in the New Haven area
Towns in the New Haven area

New Haven was the original settlement in New Haven Colony; over time other new towns separated from its territory and incorporated. The following is a complete list of towns established from parts of the original New Haven settlement.[8] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 507 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (515 × 609 pixel, file size: 16 KB, MIME type: image/png)Subject: Map of townships in the New Haven Area Derived from sub-county SVG map of Connecticut at Libre Map Project using Adobe SVG viewer and... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 507 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (515 × 609 pixel, file size: 16 KB, MIME type: image/png)Subject: Map of townships in the New Haven Area Derived from sub-county SVG map of Connecticut at Libre Map Project using Adobe SVG viewer and... The system of local government in use in New England is very different from that found throughout the rest of the United States. ...

Wallingford is a town in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated 1780 Government  - Type Council-manager  - Town manager Michael A. Milone  - Council Matt Hall, Mayor Elizabeth Esty, D-1 Thomas Ruocco, R-2 Diane Visconti, D-3 Tim White, R-4 Matthew Altieri D-at large Michael Ecke D-at large David Orsini, R... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated (town) 1806 Incorporated (city) 1867 Consolidated 1922 Government  - Type Council-manager  - Council leaders Mark Benigni, Mayor Matthew C. Dominello, Deputy Mayor Stephen T. Zerio, Council Leader Keith Gordon, Deputy Leader Patricia D. Lynes, Deputy Leader  - City manager Lawrence J. Kendzior Area  - City... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , Country State NECTA New Haven Region South Central Region Named 1653 Government  - Type Representative town meeting  - First selectman Cheryl P. Morris (D) Area  - Town  28. ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated 1831 Government  - Type Council-manager  - Town manager Karl F. Kilduff  - Town council Andrew Esposito III, Mayor Joanne S. Wentworth, Deputy Mayor Mary E. Bigelow Andrew M. Bozzuto Vincent J. Candelora Michael J. Doody Donald J. Fucci II Arthur M. Hausman, Jr. ... Woodbridge is a town located in New Haven County, Connecticut. ... Nickname: A Small City with a Big Heart Coordinates: NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region South Central Region Named 1640 Incorporated (city) 1959 Government type Mayor-council  - Mayor James L. Richetelli, Jr. ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated 1832 Government  - Type Selectman-town meeting  - First selectman Derrylyn Gorski Area  - Town 55. ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: Counties New Haven County Mayor Joseph A. Maturo, Jr. ... Hamden is a town in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated 1786 Government  - Type Selectman-town meeting  - First Selectwoman Janet McCarty Area  - Total 54. ... Orange is a town located in New Haven County, Connecticut. ... Nickname: A Small City with a Big Heart Coordinates: NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region South Central Region Named 1640 Incorporated (city) 1959 Government type Mayor-council  - Mayor James L. Richetelli, Jr. ... West Haven is a city in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. ...

Post-colonial history

A sign on New Haven Green that details the city history.
A sign on New Haven Green that details the city history.

New Haven was incorporated as a city in 1784 , and Roger Sherman, one of the signers of the Constitution and author of the "Connecticut Compromise," became the new city's first mayor. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 942 KB) Summary A sign on New Haven Green that details the citys history. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 942 KB) Summary A sign on New Haven Green that details the citys history. ... The New Haven Green is a public park and recreation area located in the downtown district of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ... Shermans marble statute in the National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol. ... The Connecticut Compromise, also known as the Great Compromise, was an essential agreement between large and small states reached during the Philadelphia Convention of 1787 that in part defined the legislative structure and representation that each state would have under the United States Constitution. ...


The city struck fortune in the late 18th-century with the inventions and industrial activity of Eli Whitney, a Yale graduate who remained in New Haven to develop the cotton gin and establish a gun-manufacturing factory in the northern part of the city near the Hamden town line. That area is still known as Whitneyville, and the main road through both towns is known as Whitney Avenue. The factory is now the Eli Whitney Museum which has a particular emphasis on activities for children, and exhibits pertaining to the A. C. Gilbert Company. Whitney pioneered the replacement of hand-shaped piecework with industrial mass-production and interchangeable parts and was the first defense contractor. His methods made early Connecticut a powerful manufacturing economy; so many arms manufacturers sprang up that the state became known as 'The Arsenal of America'. It was in Whitney's gun-manufacturing plant that Samuel Colt invented the automatic revolver in 1836. Eli Whitney Eli Whitney (b. ... Endmills for a milling machine. ... Hamden is a town in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. ... The Eli Whitney Museum is a building erected as a musket factory by Eli Whitney on a site he purchased on September 17, 1798. ... The A. C. Gilbert Company was an American toy company, once one of the largest toy companies in the world. ... Samuel Colt (19th century engraving) Samuel Colt (born Hartford, Connecticut July 19, 1814 - died Hartford, Connecticut January 10, 1862) was an American inventor and industrialist. ... For other uses, see Revolver (disambiguation). ...


The Farmington Canal, created in the early 1800s, was a short-lived transporter of goods into the interior regions of Connecticut and Massachusetts, and ran from New Haven to Northampton, Massachusetts. The Farmington Canal was a major private canal built in the early 1800s to provide water transportation from New Haven to internal parts of Connecticut, Massachusetts and beyond. ... Nickname: Motto: caritas, educatio, justitia Location in Hampshire County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Hampshire Settled and Charter granted 1654 Incorporated as a city 1884 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Mary Clare Higgins Area  - City  35. ...


New Haven was home to one of the important early events in the burgeoning anti-slavery movement when, in 1839, the trial of mutineering Mendi tribesmen being transported as slaves on the Spanish slaveship Amistad was held in New Haven's United States District Court. There is a statue of Joseph Cinqué, the informal leader of the slaves, beside City Hall. See "Museums" below for more information. This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... The Mende are a large West African ethnic group (population approximately 2 million), speakers of the Mende language, living primarily in Sierra Leone and Liberia. ... Slave ships were cargo boats specially converted for the purpose of transporting slaves, especially freshly caught black African slaves. ... This article is about the ship. ... Joseph Cinqué. Portrait by Nathaniel Jocelyn, 1839 Sengbe Pieh (1815 – ca. ...


The Civil War boosted the local economy with wartime purchases of industrial goods. After the war, New Haven's population grew and doubled by the start of the 20th century, most notably due to the influx of immigrants from southern Europe, particularly Italy. Today, roughly half the populations of East Haven, West Haven, and North Haven are Italian-American.[citation needed] Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


Modern history

New Haven's growth continued during the two World Wars, with most new inhabitants being African Americans from the South and Puerto Ricans. The city reached its peak population after World War II. The area of New Haven is only 17 square miles (44 km²), encouraging further development of new housing after 1950 in adjacent, suburban towns. Moreover, as in other US cities in 1950s, New Haven began to suffer from an exodus of middle-class workers. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 932 KB) Summary This is Harkness Tower in New Haven, CT. My wife took this picture. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 932 KB) Summary This is Harkness Tower in New Haven, CT. My wife took this picture. ... Harkness Tower Harkness Tower is a prominent Gothic structure at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, built from 1917 to 1921. ... Yale redirects here. ... Downtown New Haven is the neighborhood located in the heart of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Historic Southern United States. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The 1950s are noted in United States history as a time of both compliance and conformity and also of rebellion. ... This article is about the socio-economic class from a global vantage point. ...


In 1954, then-mayor Richard C. Lee began some of the earliest major urban renewal projects in the United States. Certain sections of Downtown New Haven were destroyed and rebuilt with new office towers, a hotel, and large shopping complexes. Other parts of the city were affected by the construction of Interstate 95 along the Long Wharf section, Interstate 91 and the Oak Street Connector. The Oak Street Connector (Route 34), running between Interstate 95, downtown and The Hill neighborhood, was originally intended as a highway to the city's western suburbs but, due to neighborhood opposition, was only completed as a highway to the downtown area, with the area to the west becoming a boulevard. Richard Charles Lee (March 12, 1916 - February 2, 2003) (sometimes called Mr. ... Urban Renewal redirects here. ... Downtown New Haven is the neighborhood located in the heart of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ... Interstate 95, the main north-south Interstate Highway on the East Coast of the United States, runs in a general east-west compass direction for 111. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 91 Interstate 91 (abbreviated I-91) is an interstate highway in the New England section of the United States. ... The Oak Street Connector is a 1. ... Route 34 (CT-34) is 24. ... Interstate 95, the main north-south Interstate Highway on the East Coast of the United States, runs in a general east-west compass direction for 111. ... Downtown New Haven is the neighborhood located in the heart of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ...


From the 1960s through the early 1990s, central areas of New Haven continued to decline both economically and in terms of population despite attempts to resurrect certain neighborhoods through renewal projects. In the mid-1990s New Haven began to stabilize and grow, though poverty in some central neighborhoods remains a problem. The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ...


1970 trial

New Haven in 1970 witnessed the largest trial in Connecticut history. Black Panther Party co-founder Bobby Seale and ten other Party members were tried for murdering an alleged informant. May Day, 1970 saw the beginning of the pretrial proceedings for the first of the two New Haven Black Panther trials; it was met with a demonstration by twelve thousand Black Panther supporters, including a large number of college students, who had come to New Haven individually and in organized groups and were housed and fed by community organizations and by Yale students in their dorms. The Black Panther Party (originally called the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense) was an African American organization founded to promote civil rights and self-defense. ... Bobby Seale Bobby Seale (born October 22, 1936) is an American civil rights activist, who along with Dr. Huey P. Newton co-founded the Black Panther Party For Self Defense in 1966. ... This article is about the holidays celebrated on May 1. ... On May 20, 1969, Black Panther Party founder and national chairman Bobby Seale spoke at Yale University. ...


The demonstrations continued through the Spring. By day protesters assembled on the New Haven Green across the street from the Courthouse to hear speakers including Jean Genet, Benjamin Spock, Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, and John Froines; afterwards, many taunted the New Haven police, and in return were tear gassed and retreated to their temporary quarters. The police behind them half-heartedly assaulted the dormitories, as was customary for such demonstrations at the time, but on the whole it was peaceful, with very little injury or property damage and only two minor bombings. The National Guard were kept ready on the highways into the city, but police chief Jim Ahern determined that the city police were controlling the situation adequately, and that the presence of the Guard would only inflame the situation; the events at Kent State University a few days later were to prove him prescient. The New Haven Green is a public park and recreation area located in the downtown district of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ... Jean Genet (French IPA: ) (December 19, 1910) – April 15, 1986), was a prominent, controversial French writer and later political activist. ... Dr. Spock with his grand-daughter Susannah in 1967 Benjamin McLane Spock (May 2, 1903 - March 15, 1998) was an American pediatrician whose book Baby and Child Care, published in 1946, is one of the biggest best-sellers of all time. ... Abbott Howard Abbie Hoffman (November 30, 1936 – April 12, 1989) was a self-identified communo-anarchist,[1] social and political activist in the United States, co-founder of the Youth International Party (Yippies), and later, a fugitive from the law, who lived under an alias following a conviction for dealing... Jerry Rubin (July 14, 1938 – November 28, 1994) was a high-profile American social activist during the 1960s and 1970s. ... John Froines is a chemist and anti-war activist. ... A riot control agent is a type of lachrymatory agent (or lacrimatory agent). ... The United States National Guard is a reserve forces component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air National Guard). ... For the events of May 4, 1970, see Kent State shootings Kent State University (also known as Kent, Kent State or KSU) is one of America’s largest university systems, the third largest university in Ohio after Ohio State University (57,748) and the University of Cincinnati (35,364), and...


This coincided with the beginning of the national student strike of May 1970. Yale (and many other colleges) went "on strike" from just before May Day until the end of the term; as at many colleges it was not actually "shut down", but classes were made "voluntarily optional" for the time and students were graded pass/fail for work done up to then.


New Haven in modern political history

New Haven is the birthplace of U.S. President George W. Bush,[9] who was born when his father, former president George H. W. Bush, was living in New Haven while a student at Yale. A predominantly Democratic city, New Haven voters overwhelmingly supported Al Gore in the 2000 election and Yale graduate John Kerry in 2004. In addition to being the site of the college educations of both Presidents Bush, New Haven was also a temporary home to former president Bill Clinton and U.S. Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton, who met while they were students at Yale Law School. New Haven was also the residence of conservative thinker William F. Buckley, Jr. in 1951 , when he wrote his influential God and Man at Yale. In July 2007, New Haven became the first city in the United States to offer municipal identification cards to residents regardless of immigration status.[10] They are designed to facilitate residents' access to certain city services, such as the library, to function as local debit cards and parking meter cards, and to allow all to open bank accounts, thus eliminating the need for immigrants in particular to carry around large sums of cash, a situation which, it is said by city officials and activists, made them a target of street crime. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... The United States presidential election of 2000 was a contest between the Democratic candidate Al Gore versus the Republican candidate of George W. Bush. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... U.S. presidential election, 2004 detailed results. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... The Sterling Law Building Sculptural ornamentation on the Sterling Law Building Yale Law School, or YLS, is the law school of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. ... This article is about the conservative journalist and commentator. ... God and Man at Yale: The Superstitions of Academic Freedom, is a book that was published in 1951, and was written by William F. Buckley, who eventually became the leading voice in the conservative movement of the twentieth century. ...


Since the mid-1950s and spearheaded by its former long-serving mayor, Richard C. Lee, New Haven has undertaken numerous urban redevelopment projects, but with overall mixed results. The downtown area in particular has been the site of sometimes dubious experiments in urban redesign, with new hotels, retail complexes, parking structures, a sports colliseum, and office towers built under a labyrinth of city, state, federal and private efforts. Of recent note, as each of these pieces of the redevelopment puzzle transform, become obsolete or again redeveloped, New Haven tends to bear the brunt of a fair share of painful analysis in regard to its ongoing rebuilding efforts, mostly in response to the overhyped claims of success that many similar projects touted over a generation ago.


During the 1950s and 60s, New Haven received more urban renewal funding per capita than any city in the U.S. New Haven became the de facto showcase of the new modern redeveloped[original research?] city and plans for its downtown development were featured on the cover of Time Magazine in the early 1960s. Some projects, such as the brutalist-styled New Haven Coliseum (demolished in 2007), drew major crowds but were ultimately considered to be victims of modernist over-design and rapid obsolescence. In 2004, the central structure of the mall was converted to luxury apartments, joining a renovated 4-star Omni hotel and new street-level retail. Other numerous smaller projects have in-fill design qualities and are mixed-use. Urban Renewal redirects here. ... Brutalism is an architectural style that spawned from the modernist architectural movement and which flourished from the 1950s to the 1970s. ... The Coliseum on the morning of the implosion, with much of the structure stripped away. ...


Current plans for downtown include developing the sites of the Colliseum and Macy's and Malley's department stores and relocating Gateway Community College, Long Wharf Theatre and a mixed-use development there. A major focus has been the "Ninth Square," named from the original nine square layout of New Haven center. This area has experienced an influx of hundreds of new and renovated apartment and condominium units, plus a significant number of upscale restaurants and nightclubs have opened. Long Wharf Theatre started life in a warehouse alongside the harbor of Newhaven, Connecticut, in 1965, the brainchild of 2 alumni of Yale University, Jon Jory and Harlan Kleiman, intent on creating a resident professional theatre company. ...


Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 52.4 km² (20.2 mi²). 48.8 km² (18.9 mi²) of it is land and 3.6 km² (1.4 mi²) of it (6.91%) is water. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 834 KB) Summary Taken by me, H0n0r, aerial view of downtown New Haven, Connecticut. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 834 KB) Summary Taken by me, H0n0r, aerial view of downtown New Haven, Connecticut. ... Downtown New Haven is the neighborhood located in the heart of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ... The Yale Center for British Art is an art museum associated with Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut in the United States. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


New Haven's best-known geographic features are its large deep harbor, and two reddish basalt "trap rocks" which rise to the northeast and northwest of the city core. These trap rocks are known respectively as East Rock and West Rock, and both serve as extensive parks. West Rock has been tunneled through to make way for the east-west passage of the Wilbur Cross Parkway (the only highway tunnel through a natural obstacle in Connecticut), and once served as the hideout of the "Regicides" (see: Regicides Trail). Most New Haveners refer to these men as "The Three Judges." East Rock features the prominent Soldiers and Sailors war monument on its peak as well as the "Great/Giant Steps" which run up the rock's cliffside. East Rock in May, 2005. ... West Rock is a traprock hill that rises to the northwest of downtown New Haven, Connecticut. ... The Wilbur Cross Parkway is a limited access highway in Connecticut, comprising the portion of Route 15 between Milford and Meriden. ... For other uses, see Regicide (disambiguation). ... Regicides Trail is a hiking trail, about 7 miles (11 km) long, roughly following the edge of a basalt, or traprock, cliff northwest of New Haven, Connecticut. ...


The city is drained by three rivers, the West, Mill, and Quinnipiac, named in order from west to east. The West River discharges into the West Haven Harbor, while the Mill and Quinnipiac Rivers discharge into the New Haven Harbor. Both harbors are embayments of Long Island Sound. In addition, several smaller streams flow through the city's neighborhoods, including Wintergreen Brook, the Beaver Ponds Outlet, Wilmot Brook, Belden Brook, and Prospect Creek. Not all of these small streams have continuous flow year-round. The West River is a freshwater stream in southern Connecticut. ... The Mill River is a river in the New England region of the United States, located entirely in the state of Connecticut. ... The Quinnipiac River is a river in the New England region of the United States, located entirely in the state of Connecticut. ... West Haven is a city in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. ... New York City waterways: 1. ...


Streetscape

New Haven has a long tradition of urban planning and a purposeful design of the city's layout. Upon founding, New Haven was laid out in a grid plan of nine square blocks; the central square was left open, in the tradition of many New England towns, as the city green (a commons area). The city instituted the first public tree planting program in America. Most of the elms that gave New Haven the nickname "Elm City" perished in the mid-20th century due to Dutch Elm disease. The New Haven Green is currently home to three separate historic churches which speak to the original theocratic nature of the city.[5] The Green remains the social center of the city today. It was named a National Historic Landmark in 1970. Urban planning is concerned with the ordering and design of settlements, from the smallest towns to the worlds largest cities. ... A simple grid plan road map (Windermere, Florida). ... The village green in Comberton in Cambridgeshire, UK, with a pond, a village sign and a bench to enjoy the view For the community in New York, see Village Green, New York. ... Species See Elm species, varieties, cultivars and hybrids Elms are deciduous and semi-deciduous trees making up the genus Ulmus, family Ulmaceae, found throughout the Northern Hemisphere from Siberia to Indonesia, Mexico to Japan. ... Branch death, or Flagging, at multiple locations in the crown of a diseased elm. ... The New Haven Green is a public park and recreation area located in the downtown district of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...


Downtown New Haven, occupied by nearly 7,000 residents, has a more residential character than most downtowns.[11] The downtown area provides about half of the city's jobs and half of its tax base[11] and in recent years has become filled with dozens of new upscale restaurants, several of which have garnered national praise (such as Ibiza, recognized by Esquire (magazine) and Wine Spectator magazines as well as the New York Times as the best Spanish food in the country), in addition to shops and thousands of apartments and condominium units.[citation needed] Downtown New Haven is the neighborhood located in the heart of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ... August 2005 issue of Esquire Esquire is a mens magazine by the Hearst Corporation. ... Wine Spectator is a lifestyle magazine that focuses on wine that was founded as a newsprint tabloid by Bob Morrisey in 1976. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


Neighborhoods

The city has many distinct neighborhoods. In addition to Downtown, centered on the central business district and the Green, are the following neighborhoods: the west central neighborhoods of Dixwell and Dwight; the southern neighborhoods of The Hill, historic water-front City Point (or Oyster Point), and the harborside district of Long Wharf; the western neighborhoods of Edgewood, West River, Westville, Amity, and West Rock-Westhills; East Rock, Cedar Hill, Prospect Hill, and Newhallville in the northern side of town; the east central neighborhoods of Mill River and Wooster Square, an Italian-American neighborhood; Fair Haven, a neighborhood that is with majority Puerto Rican families and other Latino groups, located between the Mill and Quinnipiac rivers; Quinnipiac Meadows and Fair Haven Heights across the Quinnipiac River; and facing the eastern side of the harbor, The Annex and East Shore (or Morris Cove).[12][13] The Central Business District of Sydney, Australia. ... The New Haven Green is a public park and recreation area located in the downtown district of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ... City Point is a neighborhood in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. It is located at the southwest of the city and is bordered on the west by the city of West Haven, on the north by Amtrak railroad tracks, on the east by Hallock Avenue, and on the south by the... Long Wharf is a waterfront district and neighborhood of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ... Edgewood is a neighborhood in the western part of the city of New Haven, Connecticut, officially defined[2] by Whalley Avenue on the north, Chapel Street on the south, the West River on the west (the border of Westville), and Sherman Avenue on the east. ... Westville is a neighborhood of the city of New Haven, Connecticut located in the northwestern part of the city, primarily bordering the neighboring town of Woodbridge, Connecticut, the neighborhood of West Rock-Westhills, and the geographic landmark of West Rock. ... The valley of Amity is an area located partly in the town of Woodbridge, Connecticut and partly in the city of New Haven. ... East Rock is a neighborhood in the city of New Haven, Connecticut, named for a nearby hill of the same name. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mill River is a neighborhood in the city of New Haven, Connecticut located between the more famous neighborhoods of Wooster Square and Fair Haven. ... Wooster Square is a neighborhood in the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ... The northern portion of Front Street in Fair Haven, as seen from the Grand Avenue bridge in May, 2005. ... Quinnipiac Meadows is a neighborhood in the eastern part of the city of New Haven, Connecticut located on the Quinnipiac river and north of Fair Haven Heights. ... Fair Haven Heights is a neighborhood in the eastern part of the city of New Haven, Connecticut, located east of the Quinnipiac river. ... East Shore, also known as Morris Cove, is a neighborhood of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ...


Economy

Data from City-Data.com
Data from City-Data.com[14]

Though New Haven's economy originally was based in manufacturing, Yale University has caused a large shift in the city's economic support. Over half (56%) of the city's economy is now made up of services, in particular education and healthcare, with Yale as the city's largest employer, followed by Yale New Haven Hospital.[15] Yale and Yale-New Haven are not only the city's largest employers, but also among of the state's largest, providing more $100,000+-salaried positions than any other employer in Connecticut.[citation needed] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 570 pixelsFull resolution (1037 × 739 pixel, file size: 72 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A pie chart made in Excel demonstrating the distribution of the economy of New Haven, Connecticut. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 570 pixelsFull resolution (1037 × 739 pixel, file size: 72 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A pie chart made in Excel demonstrating the distribution of the economy of New Haven, Connecticut. ...


Demographics

Historical population of
New Haven
[16][17]
1790 4,487
1800 4,049
1810 5,772
1820 7,147
1830 10,180
1840 12,960
1850 20,345
1860 39,267
1870 50,840
1880 62,882
1890 86,045
1900 108,027
1910 133,605
1920 162,537
1930 162,665
1940 160,605
1950 164,443
1960 152,048
1970 137,707
1980 126,021
1990 130,474
2000 123,626
2005 124,001 (estimate)

As of the census² of 2000, there were 123,626 people, 47,094 households, and 25,854 families residing in the central municipality, the City of New Haven. The population density was 2,532.2/km² (6,558.4/mi²). There were 52,941 housing units at an average density of 1,084.4/km² (2,808.5/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 43.46% White, 37.36% African American, 0.43% Native American, 3.90% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 10.89% from other races, and 3.91% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 21.39% of the population. Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The following is a list of sources used in the creation of encyclopedia articles on various geographic topics and locations, such as cities, counties, states, and countries. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 47,094 households out of which 29.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 27.5% were married couples living together, 22.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 45.1% were non-families. 36.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 3.19. Matrimony redirects here. ...


The ages of New Haven's residents are as follows: 25.4% under the age of 18, 16.4% from 18 to 24, 31.2% from 25 to 44, 16.7% from 45 to 64, and 10.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 29 years. For every 100 females there were 91.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.6 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $29,604, and the median income for a family was $35,950. Males had a median income of $33,605 versus $28,424 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,393. About 20.5% of families and 24.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 32.2% of those under age 18 and 17.9% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


In 2001, the New Haven metropolitan area had the third-highest per capita income in the country, after San Francisco and Silicon Valley, California. While the city of New Haven is of the most impoverished cities in the United States, the suburbs surrounding it are some of the most wealthy. [18] In 2006, analyzing a slightly differently-defined urban area, it had the 32nd highest, which also placed it among the top 10% highest per-capita income metropolitan areas in the country.[19]


Education

Colleges and universities

Yale University, at the heart of downtown, is one of the city's best known features and its largest employer [3]. New Haven is also home to other centers of higher education, including Southern Connecticut State University and Albertus Magnus College. The University of New Haven is located not in New Haven but in neighboring West Haven. Quinnipiac University is located north of New Haven, in the towns of Hamden and North Haven. Gateway Community College has a campus in New Haven, located in the Long Wharf district. Yale redirects here. ... Southern Connecticut State University, one of four state universities in Connecticut, is located in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Albertus Magnus College is a small private liberal arts college in New Haven, Connecticut. ... The University of New Haven is a private, comprehensive, coeducational university located in suburban West Haven, Connecticut that was originally founded in 1920 as the New Haven Junior College (a division of Bostons Northeastern University). ... West Haven is a city in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. ... Quinnipiac University is a private four-year university in Hamden, Connecticut, located on about 500 acres (2 km²), just north of New Haven. ... GateWay Community College is located in Phoenix, Arizona. ... Long Wharf is a waterfront district and neighborhood of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ...


Primary and secondary schools

Wilbur Cross High School and Hillhouse High School are New Haven's two largest public secondary schools. Hopkins School, a private school, was founded in 1660 and is the fifth oldest educational institution in the United States.[20] New Haven is home to a number of other private schools as well as public magnet schools including High School in the Community, Hill Regional Career High School, Co-op High School and the Sound School, all of which draw students from New Haven and suburban towns. New Haven is also home to Amistad Charter school and Elm City Prep. Wilbur Cross High School is a high school in the New Haven School District. ... For the Minnesota school, see Hopkins Senior High School; for the university, see Johns Hopkins University. ...


The school district is called New Haven Public Schools.


Newspapers and media

New Haven is served by the daily New Haven Register, the weekly "alternative" (which is corporate run by Tribune, the company owning The Hartford Courant) New Haven Advocate and the online daily New Haven Independent. The city's Spanish-speaking community is served by Registro, a Spanish-language twice-weekly operated by The New Haven Register's parent company. The Register also backs PLAY magazine, a weekly entertainment publication. It is also served by several student-run papers, including the Yale Daily News, the weekly Yale Herald and a humor tabloid, Rumpus Magazine. WTNH Channel 8, the ABC affiliate for Connecticut, WCTX Channel 59, the MyNetworkTV affiliate for the state, and Connecticut Public Television station WEDY channel 65, a PBS affiliate, broadcast from New Haven. The New Haven Register is a Connecticut newspaper based out of New Haven, Connecticut. ... The New Haven Advocate is a weekly alternative newspaper published in New Haven, Connecticut. ... A front page of the Yale Daily News. ... The Yale Herald is a weekly newspaper run by students at Yale University. ... Rumpus Magazine is a tabloid publication produced by students at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. ... WTNH, channel 8, is the ABC affiliate for the state of Connecticut, licensed to New Haven and serving the Hartford/New Haven television market. ... This article is about the American broadcast network. ... WCTX is the UPN affiliate for the state of Connecticut and Springfield, MA. It is licensed to New Haven and broadcasts its analog signal on UHF channel 59, and its digital signal on UHF channel 39. ... MyNetworkTV (sometimes written My Network TV, and unofficially abbreviated MyNet, MyTV, MNT, or MNTV) is a television network in the United States, owned by News Corporation. ... Connecticut Public Television (CPTV) is a statewide public television network, providing PBS programming in Connecticut. ... Connecticut Public Television is a PBS member station broadcasting in Connecticut. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ...


Culture and notable features

Architecture

New Haven has many architectural landmarks dating from every important time period and architectural style in American history. The city has been home to a number of architects and architectural firms that have also left their mark on the city including Ithiel Town and Henry Austin in the 19th century and Cesar Pelli, Warren Platner, Kevin Roche, Herbert Newman and Barry Svigals in the 20th. The Yale School of Architecture has fostered this important component of the city's economy. Cass Gilbert, of the Beaux-Arts school, designed New Haven's Union Station and the New Haven Free Public Library and was also commissioned for a City Beautiful plan in 1919. Marcel Breuer, Alexander Jackson Davis, Philip C. Johnson, Gordon Bunshaft, Louis Kahn, James Gamble Rogers, Frank Gehry, Charles Moore, Stefan Behnisch, James Polshek, Paul Rudolph, Eero Saarinen and Robert Venturi all have designed buildings in New Haven. Home of Ithiel Town, New Haven, CT Ithiel Town (October 3, 1784 - June 13, 1844) was a prominent American architect and civil engineer. ... Henry Austin (December 4, 1804—December 17, 1891) was a prominent and prolific American architect based in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Pellis Petronas Twin Tower César Pelli (born October 12, 1926 in Tucumán, Argentina) is a noted architect known for designing some of the worlds tallest buildings and other major urban landmarks. ... Kevin Roche (b. ... Barry Svigals, FAIA (1948-) is a Connecticut-based architect and sculptor. ... The Yale School of Architecture is one of the constituent schools of Yale University. ... The Woolworth Building in New York City was the worlds tallest building when it was built in 1913. ... Beaux Arts was an architectural style that was popular in the early twentieth century. ... Union Station is the main railroad passenger station in New Haven, Connecticut. ... The City Beautiful movement was a Progressive reform movement in North American architecture and urban planning that flourished in the 1890s and 1900s with the intent of using beautification and monumental grandeur in cities to counteract the perceived moral decay of poverty-stricken urban environments. ... Marcel Lajos Breuer (May 21, 1902 Pécs, Hungary – July 1, 1981 New York City), architect and furniture designer, was an influential Hungarian-born modernist of Jewish descent. ... The Federal Customs House (now Federal Hall, New York City, with Ithiel Town, 1833 – 42 Alexander Jackson Davis (A.J. Davis) (New York City July 24, 1803 – January 14, 1892) was the most successful and influential American architect of his generation. ... Philip Cortalyou Johnson (July 8, 1906 (Cleveland, Ohio) – January 25, 2005 (New Canaan, Connecticut)) was a distinguished American architect. ... Gordon Bunshaft (May 9, 1909–August 6, 1990) was a 20th century architect educated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... Salk Institute, La Jolla, California Louis Isadore Kahn (February 20, 1901/1902 – March 17, 1974) was a world-renowned architect who practiced in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... A tribute to Rogers in a Yale residential college James Gamble Rogers (b. ... Frank Owen Gehry, CC (born Ephraim Owen Goldberg, February 28, 1929) is a Pritzker Prize winning architect based in Los Angeles, California. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... James Polshek (born 1930) is an American architect currently residing in New York. ... Paul Rudolph (October 23, 1918 Elkton, Kentucky – August 8, 1997 New York City), American architect and Dean of the Architecture Department at Yale University. ... Saarinens Gateway Arch frames The Old Courthouse, which sits at the heart of the city of Saint Louis, near the rivers edge. ... Robert Charles Venturi (June 25, 1925 -) is an award winning American architect. ...


Many of the city's neighborhoods are well-preserved as walkable "museums" of 19th and 20th century American architecture, particularly by the New Haven Green, Hillhouse Avenue and other residential sections close to Downtown New Haven. Overall, a large proportion of the city's land area is comprised of National (NRHP) historic districts. One of the best sources on local architecture is "New Haven: Architecture and Urban Design", by Elizabeth Mills Brown. The New Haven Green is a public park and recreation area located in the downtown district of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ... Sheffield-Town Mansion, Hillhouse Avenue Hillhouse Avenue, described, according to tradition, by both Charles Dickens and Mark Twain as the most beautiful street in America, [1], is in New Haven, Connecticut and is home to many nineteenth century mansions including the presidents house at Yale University. ... Downtown New Haven is the neighborhood located in the heart of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ...


The five tallest buildings in New Haven are:[21]

  1. Connecticut Financial Center 383 ft (117 m) 26 Floors
  2. Knights of Columbus Building 321 ft (98 m) 23 Floors
  3. Kline Biology Tower 250 ft (76 m) 16 Floors
  4. Crown Towers 233 ft (71 m) 22 Floors
  5. Harkness Tower 217 ft (66 m)

Located in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Harkness Tower Harkness Tower is a prominent Gothic structure at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, built from 1917 to 1921. ...

Cuisine

Credit for creation of the hamburger sandwich is disputed, but some say that it was first served in the United States in 1895 by Louis Lassen, operator of Louis' Lunch. The restaurant is one of eight featured in "Hamburger America",[22] a documentary film that premiered on Sundance cable television network on 4 July 2005. This article is about the food item. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... Sundance Channel logo used from 1996 to 2002. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


A major destination for Italian immigrants in the early 20th century, New Haven also claims to be the birthplace of pizza in the United States (see Gennaro Lombardi for a rival American claim, or the pizzerie Da Michele or Brandi of Naples, Italy, which claim to have invented the margherita in 1889). New-Haven-style pizza, called apizza (pronounced ah-BEETS in the local Italian dialect), is made in a coal- or wood-fired brick oven, and is notable for its thin crust. Apizza may be Red (with a tomato-based sauce) or White (garlic and olive oil), and pies ordered "plain" are made without the otherwise customary mozzarella cheese (pronounced sca-MOTZ, as it was originally smoked mozzarella, known as "scamorza" in Italian). White clam pie is a local specialty. An Italian immigrant to the US in 1897 who opened a small grocery store in New Yorks Little Italy. ... Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ... Margherita is the Italian word for daisy and may refer to: Margherita of Savoy, former Queen Consort of Italy and wife of Umberto I (1851-1926) Daisy—Democracy is Freedom, an Italian political party Margherita, a type of pizza named after the Queen Consort The Italian name for Jamaame, a... Apizza (pronounced ah-BEETS) is a style of Neapolitan pizza common in New Haven, Connecticut. ... For other uses, see Tomato (disambiguation). ... Binomial name L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... For the Popeye character, see Olive Oyl. ... Mozzarella is an Italian fresh cheese made from water buffalo or (more often outside of Italy) cows milk, the second used for most types of pizza or served with sliced tomatoes and basil in Insalata caprese. ... For other uses, see Clam (disambiguation). ...


The tradition of immigration in New Haven has continued to a significant extent, particularly in the late 1990s and 2000s, and as a result there are now literally hundreds of ethnic restaurants and small markets (as well as even a few supermarkets) specializing in various foreign foods, including noted Eritrean, Malaysian, Ethiopian, Spanish, Mexican, Thai, Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Indian, Jamaican, Cuban, Peruvian, Syrian/Lebanese, and Turkish restaurants. Many of these establishments are supported by the large immigrant populations in the area.


The city also has more top Zagat-rated restaurants than any other town or city in Connecticut, including many new additions such as upmarket downtown restaurants Bentara, Foster's, Pacifico, and Ibiza. Over 120 restaurants are located within two blocks of the New Haven Green. Claire's Corner Copia at Chapel and College Streets claims to be the oldest vegetarian restaurant in the country. Also of note are "The Carts," about 20 lunch carts from neighborhood restaurants that cater to the Yale-New Haven Hospital pedestrian traffic in the center of the Hospital Green (Cedar and York Sts.) during weekday lunchtimes. The New Haven Green is a public park and recreation area located in the downtown district of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ... For animals adapted to eat primarily plants, sometimes referred to as vegetarian animals, see Herbivore. ... Yale-New Haven Hospital (abbreviated YNHH) is a world-renowned 944-bed hospital located in downtown New Haven, Connecticut. ...


Popular culture

A view of the buildings around Yale University in New Haven, with its distinctive architecture.

New Haven was the location of one of Jim Morrison's infamous arrests while he fronted the rock group The Doors. The near-riotous concert and arrest in 1967 at the New Haven Arena was commemorated by Morrison in the lyrics to "Peace Frog" which include the missive "...blood in the streets in the town of New Haven..." This was also the first time a rock star had ever been arrested in concert.[citation needed] Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 741 KB) Summary A view of the buildings around Yale University in New Haven, with its distinctive architecture, in New Haven, CT. My wife took this photo. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 741 KB) Summary A view of the buildings around Yale University in New Haven, with its distinctive architecture, in New Haven, CT. My wife took this photo. ... For other persons named James or Jim Morrison, see James Morrison. ... The Doors were an American rock band formed in 1965 in Los Angeles by vocalist Jim Morrison, keyboardist Ray Manzarek, drummer John Densmore, and guitarist Robby Krieger. ... New Haven Arena was an indoor arena in New Haven, Connecticut. ...


New Haven serves as the home city of the annual International Festival of Arts and Ideas. The International Festival of Arts and Ideas takes place on the New Haven Green (in New Haven, Connecticut) every summer for fifteen days in mid-June. ...


Doonesbury comic-strip creator Garry Trudeau attended Yale University. There he met fellow student and later Green Party candidate for senator Charlie Pillsbury, a long-time New Haven resident for whom Trudeau's comic strip is named. During his college years, Pillsbury was known by the nickname "The Doones". Doonesbury is a comic strip by Garry Trudeau, popular in the United States and other parts of the world. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Garry Trudeau Garretson Beekman Trudeau (born July 21, 1948, in New York City) is an American cartoonist, best known for the Doonesbury comic strip. ... This article is about the American political party, Green Party. ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ...


New Haven has been depicted in a number of movies. Scenes in the film All About Eve (1950) are set at the Taft Hotel on the corner of College and Chapel Streets. The hotel was since converted into apartments. New Haven was fictionalized in the movie The Skulls, which focused on conspiracy theories surrounding the real-life Skull and Bones secret society which is located in New Haven. The city was also fictionally portrayed in the movie Amistad concerning the events around the mutiny trial of that ship's rebelling captives. For other uses, see All About Eve (disambiguation). ... The Skulls was a 2000 film starring Joshua Jackson, Paul Walker, and Leslie Bibb; and directed by Rob Cohen. ... For the pirate flag, see Jolly Roger. ... Amistad (Spanish for friendship) is a 1997 Steven Spielberg movie based on a slave mutiny that took place aboard a ship of the same name in 1839. ...


Several recent movies have been filmed in New Haven, including In Bloom, with Uma Thurman, Mona Lisa Smile, with Julia Roberts, and Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Harrison Ford and Cate Blanchett.[23] In Bloom is an upcoming 2007 film directed by Vadim Perelman and starring Uma Thurman and Evan Rachel Wood. ... Uma Karuna Thurman (born April 29, 1970) is an Academy Award-nominated American actress. ... Julia Fiona Roberts (born October 28, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning American film actress and former fashion model. ... Dr. Henry Walden Jones, Jr. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... Catherine Élise Blanchett (born May 14, 1969), better known as Cate Blanchett, is an Academy Award- and Golden Globe Award-winning Australian actress. ...


New Haven has been featured as a setting in the TV show Gilmore Girls. One of the show's protagonists, Rory Gilmore, graduated from Yale, and wrote for the Yale Daily News. Gilmore Girls is a long-running, Emmy Award winning, and Golden Globe nominated American television drama/comedy created by Amy Sherman-Palladino and starring Lauren Graham and Alexis Bledel. ... Yale redirects here. ... A front page of the Yale Daily News. ...


Sports and athletics

Much like other mid-sized Northeastern industrial cities, New Haven has historically supported its minor league hockey teams enthusiastically, having had a hockey team for 76 years. The New Haven Eagles were founding members of the American Hockey League in 1936, playing at the old New Haven Arena on Grove Street. The New Haven Blades of the Eastern Hockey League played from 1954 to 1972 before being succeeded by the New Haven Nighthawks of the AHL, which played at the then-new New Haven Coliseum, a sports and entertainment facility that hosted such performers and others as the U.S. Olympic Hockey Team, Aerosmith, Grateful Dead, Bruce Springsteen, Van Halen, Yes, and the Steve Miller Band before closing in 2003, when the state-funded Arena at Harbor Yard in Bridgeport later became the preferred venue. The New Haven Eagles were one of five inaugural franchises to the Canadian American Hockey League which later became the American Hockey League (AHL). ... The American Hockey League (AHL) is a professional ice hockey league in North America, that serves as the primary developmental circuit for the National Hockey League (NHL). ... New Haven Arena was an indoor arena in New Haven, Connecticut. ... The Eastern Hockey League was a minor professional ice hockey league that was known as the EHL. // Eastern Amateur Hockey League (1933-1953) The league was founded in 1933 as the Eastern Amateur Hockey League (EAHL). ... The Coliseum on the morning of the implosion, with much of the structure stripped away. ... The US national ice hockey team is the national team for the United States, based in Ann Arbor, Michigan. ... This article is about the band Aerosmith. ... This article is about the band. ... Springsteen redirects here. ... This article is about the band Van Halen. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Steve Miller Band (1967-present) is a Blues & Classic Rock band, led by rock singer, Steve Miller on guitar and lead vocals. ... The Bridgeport Arena at Harbor Yard is a 8,281-seat multi-purpose arena in Bridgeport, Connecticut. ...


The Nighthawks were replaced by the short-lived Senators in 1993. After a hiatus, hockey returned in 1997, with the Beast of New Haven, a team famous for its ugly logo. Playing in a newly refurbished Coliseum, this team lasted only two seasons, ending AHL hockey in New Haven. New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Played in the American Hockey League in 1997-99. ...


The New Haven Knights of the United Hockey League then took up residence in the Coliseum, playing there until the Coliseum closed in 2002. Afterward, fans' allegiance shifted to the Yale University hockey team, which plays at Ingalls Rink; the Quinnipiac University hockey team; or United Hockey League's Danbury Trashers, owned by James Galante, who attempted to purchase and save the New Haven Coliseum and the New Haven Knights, though the Trashers have been disbanded and Galante is currently incarcerated for alleged mob ties. The United Hockey League (UHL) is a professional ice hockey league with teams in the United States. ... Ingalls Rink, or in full, David S. Ingalls Rink, is a hockey rink designed by architect Eero Saarinen and built between 1953 and 1959 for Yale University. ... The United Hockey League (UHL) is a professional ice hockey league with teams in the United States. ... The Danbury Trashers are a United Hockey League ice hockey team located in Danbury, Connecticut. ...


New Haven had been known for its blue collar fans who favor rough play, especially the "Crazies" who sat in "The Jungle" — Section 14 at the Coliseum, behind and adjacent to the opposing team's bench. These fans were renowned for being extremely tough on opposing teams, relentlessly screaming obscenities and taunts at opposing players (and sometimes at hometown players), making New Haven an intimidating place to play even though outright physical violence in the stands was rare. Section 14ers maintain a website called "Section 14 Online" which can be found at Section14.com. A blue-collar worker is a working class employee who performs manual or technical labor, such as in a factory or in technical maintenance trades, in contrast to a white-collar worker, who does non-manual work generally at a desk. ...


New Haven was home to the minor league baseball team the New Haven Ravens, an Eastern League AA unit, from 1994 to 2003. Yale Field, across the town line in West Haven, was renovated for the team, which was very successful in its first few seasons before losing support. The Ravens won the Eastern League championship in 2000, giving New Haven its first professional championship since the New Haven Blades' championship in 1956. The Ravens have since moved to Manchester, New Hampshire, becoming the New Hampshire Fisher Cats. The New Haven County Cutters baseball team began play at Yale Field in 2004 in the independent Northeast (now Can-Am) League. For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... Categories: Baseball stubs | Minor league baseball teams | New Hampshire sports ... The Eastern League is a minor league baseball league which operates primarily in the northeastern United States, although it now has a team in Ohio. ... Nickname: Location in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Hillsborough County Incorporated 1751 Government  - Mayor Frank Guinta (R) Area  - City  34. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... The New Hampshire Fisher Cats are a minor league baseball team based in Manchester, New Hampshire. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Cover of Car and Driver magazine, showing transparent diagram of CanAm racer The Canadian-American Challenge Cup or Can Am, was an SCCA/CASC sports car racing series from 1966 to 1974. ...


In 2002, New Haven had an af2 minor-league arena football franchise, the Ninjas, who were successful but had to leave when the Coliseum was closed the following year af2 (short for arenafootball2) is the name of the Arena Football Leagues minor league, which started play in 2000. ... Arena football is a sport invented by Jim Foster, a former executive of the United States Football League and the National Football League. ...


The New York Giants of the NFL played an exhibition game against the Detroit Lions in 1960 in the Yale Bowl, a pro-football first for the city. The New York Jets played exhibition games in the Bowl through the 1970s, and in 1973 and 1974, the Giants made the Yale Bowl their home field while Giants Stadium in the Meadowlands in East Rutherford, New Jersey was under construction. As of 2006, the Yale Bowl is the second-largest stadium in New England, and is often full when rivals Yale and Harvard play what has become known as "The Game". This article is about the current National Football League team. ... NFL redirects here. ... City Detroit, Michigan Team colors Honolulu Blue, Silver, and Black Head Coach Rod Marinelli Owner William Clay Ford, Sr. ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White, Jersey Jets Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... The Yale Bowl is a football stadium in New Haven, Connecticut on the border of West Haven. ... Giants Stadium, frequently referred to as The Meadowlands, is the home stadium for the New York Giants and New York Jets football teams of the NFL, and the Red Bull New York soccer team of MLS. It is located in East Rutherford, New Jersey in the Meadowlands Sports Complex, which... The Meadowlands Sports Complex is a sports and entertainment facility located in East Rutherford, New Jersey owned and operated by the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority (NJSEA). ... Map highlighting East Rutherfords location within Bergen County. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Half-time festivities at The Game, Yale Bowl The Game (always capitalized) is a title given to several U.S. college football rivalry games, but most particularly the annual contest between Harvard and Yale. ...


On March 20, 1914, the first United States figure skating championship was held here. is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Figure skating is an ice skating sporting event where individuals, mixed couples, or groups perform spins, jumps, and other moves on the ice, often to music. ...


From July 1July 9, 1995, the city hosted the Ninth Special Olympics World Summer Games. is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... The crowd at the 2003 Special Olympics World Summer Games Opening Ceremonies in Croke Park, Dublin, Ireland. ...


The Connecticut Tennis Center at Yale University hosts the Pilot Pen International, a professional men's and women's tennis event, every August. The 15,000 seat Tennis Center Stadium at the Connecticut Tennis Center is the fourth largest tennis venue in the world,[citation needed] behind only to Arthur Ashe Stadium at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in New York City, the stadium at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden in Indian Wells, California, and Court Philippe Chatrier at Stade Roland Garros in Paris. The Cullman-Heyman Tennis Center is a tennis complex located on the campus of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Yale redirects here. ... Pilot Pen Tennis is a professional tennis tournament held in New Haven, U.S.. Held since 1990 its the tradional tournament just a week before the beginning of the fourth and last Grand Slam tournament of the season: the U.S. Open. ... Tennis Center Stadium is the main tennis court at the Pilot Pen Tennis tournement in New Haven, Connecticut. ... The Cullman-Heyman Tennis Center is a tennis complex located on the campus of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. ... ... Bronze Statue at the USTA National Tennis Center. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The new Wembley Stadium in London is the most expensive stadium ever built; it has a seating capacity of 90,000 This article is about the building type. ... Aerial photo of the Indian Wells Tennis Garden. ... Indian Wells is a city located in Riverside County, California, in the Palm Springs area, in between Palm Desert and La Quinta. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Court Philippe Chatrier is the main tennis court at the Stade Roland Garros in Paris, France. ... Outside the Philippe Chatrier Court, Roland Garros Stade de Roland Garros (Roland Garros Stadium) is located in southwest Paris, France, and has been the home of the French Open Grand Slam tennis tournament, played every year in May and June. ... This article is about the capital of France. ...


New Haven has a very large cycling community[citation needed], which is represented by a large advocacy and community group, ElmCityCycling. Group rides are held several times per week. Founded in 2001, ElmCityCycling is a cycling advocacy group based in New Haven, Connecticut. ...


Theatre

The city hosts numerous theatres and production houses including the Yale Repertory Theatre, the Long Wharf Theatre, and the Shubert Theatre. There is also theatre activity from the Yale School of Drama, which works through the Yale University Theatre and the student-run Yale Cabaret. Southern Connecticut State University hosts the Lyman Center for the Performing Arts. Yale Repertory Theatre at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut was founded by Robert Brustein, dean of the Yale School of Drama in 1966, with the goal of facilitating a meaningful collaboration between theatre professionals and talented students. ... Long Wharf Theatre started life in a warehouse alongside the harbor of Newhaven, Connecticut, in 1965, the brainchild of 2 alumni of Yale University, Jon Jory and Harlan Kleiman, intent on creating a resident professional theatre company. ... The Shubert Theatre is a 1600 seat theatre in New Haven, Connecticut, originally opened in 1914. ... Yale School of Drama traces its roots to the Yale Dramatic Association, the second oldest college theatre association in the country, founded in 1900. ... Yale Cabaret is run by students in the Yale School of Drama. ... Southern Connecticut State University, one of four state universities in Connecticut, is located in New Haven, Connecticut. ...


The Shubert Theater once premiered many major theatrical productions before their Broadway debuts. Productions that premiered at the Shubert include Oklahoma!, Carousel, South Pacific, The King and I, and The Sound of Music, as well as the Tennessee Williams' play A Streetcar Named Desire. Oklahoma! was the first musical play written by composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II (see Rodgers and Hammerstein). ... Carousel is a 1945 stage musical by Richard Rodgers (music) and Oscar Hammerstein II (book and lyrics) that was adapted from Ferenc Molnars play Liliom. ... This article is about the stage musical. ... The King and I is a musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, with a script based on the book Anna and the King of Siam by Margaret Landon. ... For other uses, see The Sound of Music (disambiguation). ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...


Museums

New Haven has a variety of museums, many of them associated with Yale. The Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library features an original copy of the Gutenberg Bible. There is also the Connecticut Children's Museum; the Knights of Columbus museum near that organization's world headquarters; the Peabody Museum of Natural History; the Yale University Collection of Musical Instruments; the Eli Whitney museum (across the town line in Hamden, Connecticut, on Whitney Avenue); the Yale Center for British Art, which houses the largest collection of British art outside the U.K.,[citation needed] and the Yale University Art Gallery, the nation's oldest college art museum.[citation needed] New Haven is also home to the New Haven Museum and Historical Society on Whitney Avenue, which also has a library of many primary source treasures dating from Colonial times to the present. Artspace on Orange Street is a contemporary art gallery, showcasing the work of local, national, and international artists. Yale Universitys Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library was a 1963 gift of the Beinecke family. ... A copy of the Gutenberg Bible owned by the U.S. Library of Congress The Gutenberg Bible (also known as the 42-line Bible or the Mazarin Bible) is a printed version of the Latin Vulgate translation of the Bible that was printed by Johannes Gutenberg, in Mainz, Germany in... The Connecticut Childrens Museum building houses three programs, interwoven in purpose and philosophy: Creating Kids Child Care Center, Creating Curriculum Child Care Provider Training Program and the Connecticut Childrens Museum itself. ... Knights of Columbus emblem The Knights of Columbus is the worlds largest Roman Catholic fraternal service organization. ... The Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale University was founded by the philanthropist George Peabody in 1866 at the behest of his nephew Othniel Charles Marsh, the early paleontologist. ... The Yale University Collection of Musical Instruments is a museum belonging to Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Eli Whitney Eli Whitney (b. ... Hamden is a town in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. ... The Yale Center for British Art is an art museum associated with Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut in the United States. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the European Union. ... The Yale University Art Gallery is located at 1111 Chapel Street in New Haven, Connecticut. ... , The New Haven Museum and Historical Society (originally known as the New Haven Colony Historical Society) was founded in 1863 in New Haven, Connecticut for the purposes of preserving and presenting the region’s history. ... artspace is at the West Edge where art galleries, studios, museums, parks, restaurants, antique shops, artists residences, and numerous public art installations exist. ...


New Haven is also the home port of a life-size replica of the historical Freedom Schooner Amistad, which is open for tours at Long Wharf pier at certain times during the summer. Also at Long Wharf pier is the Quinnipiack schooner, offering sailing cruises of the harbor area throughout the summer. The Quinnipiack also functions as a floating classroom for hundreds of local students. Freedom Schooner Amistad is operated by AMISTAD America, Inc. ...


Music

The New Haven Green is the site of many free music concerts, especially during the summer months. These have included the New Haven Symphony Orchestra, the July Free Concerts on the Green in July, and the New Haven Jazz Festival in August. The Jazz Festival, which began in 1982, was one of the longest-running free outdoor festivals in the U.S., until it was canceled for 2007. Headliners such as Dave Brubeck, Ray Charles and Celia Cruz have historically drawn 30,000 to 50,000 fans, filling up the New Haven Green to capacity. The New Haven Symphony Orchestra gave its first concert in 1895 and is the fourth oldest orchestra in the United States. ...


New Haven is also home to the concert venue Toad's Place. The city has retained an alternative art and music underground that has helped to influence post-punk era music movements such as indie/college rock and underground hip-hop. Other local venues include Cafe Nine, BAR, Firehouse 12, and Rudy's. Toads Place is a historic concert venue and nightclub located on York Street in New Haven, Connecticut. ...


The Yale School of Music also contributes to the city's music scene by offering hundreds of free concerts throughout the year at venues in and around the Yale campus. The Yale School of Music has received a gift of $100 million that will allow the school to subsidize fully the tuition for all students, Yale President Richard C. Levin has announced. ...


Points of interest

Five Mile Point Lighthouse (2005)
Five Mile Point Lighthouse (2005)

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3264x2448, 2574 KB) Author: Charles Barneby, Source Camera: Canon PowerShot Pro 1 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3264x2448, 2574 KB) Author: Charles Barneby, Source Camera: Canon PowerShot Pro 1 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Five Mile Point Light, also known as Old New Haven Lighthouse, is a lighthouse in Connecticut, United States, on the harbor entrance to Long Island Sound, Connecticut The offshore, working lighthouse, located five miles from the center of New Haven, is the Five Mile Point Light. The older one, no... The Marsh Botanical Garden [1] (8 acres) is a botanical garden, arboretum, and greenhouses located on the Yale University campus at 277 Mansfield street, New Haven, Connecticut. ... Yale redirects here. ...

Miscellaneous

Five Mile Point Lighthouse (1991)
Five Mile Point Lighthouse (1991)

In 1892 , local confectioner George C. Smith of the Bradley Smith Candy Co. invented the first lollipops.[24] Image File history File links Sunglass. ... Image File history File links Sunglass. ... The term confectionery refers to food items rich in sugar. ... For other uses, see Lollipop (disambiguation). ...


The Frisbee is said to have originated on the Yale campus, based on the tin pans of the Frisbie Pie Company which were tossed around by students on the New Haven Green.[citation needed] The Frisbie Pie Company (1871-1958) was founded by William Russell Frisbie in Bridgeport, Connecticut. ... The New Haven Green is a public park and recreation area located in the downtown district of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ...


New Haven serves as the world headquarters of the Knights of Columbus organization, which maintains its headquarters and a small museum downtown. The organization was founded in the city in 1882.[25] Knights of Columbus emblem The Knights of Columbus is the worlds largest Roman Catholic fraternal service organization. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


New Haven hosted the first Bell PSTN (telephone) switch office. The District Telephone Company of New Haven created the world's first telephone exchange and first telephone directory (1878) and installed the first public phone (1880).[citation needed] The company expanded and became the Connecticut Telephone Company, then the Southern New England Telephone Company (now part of ATT).[citation needed] The Bell System was a trademark and service mark used by the United States telecommunications company American Telephone & Telegraph Company (AT&T) and its affiliated companies to co-brand their extensive circuit-switched telephone network and their affiliations with each other. ... The public switched telephone network (PSTN) is the concatenation of the worlds public circuit-switched telephone networks, in much the same way that the Internet is the concatenation of the worlds public IP-based packet-switched networks. ... A telephone operator manually connecting calls with patch cables at a telephone switchboard. ... Moscow phone book, 1930. ... The Southern New England Telephone Company (commonly referred to as SNET by its customers) started operations on January 27, 1878 as the District Telephone Company of New Haven. ... AT&T (formerly an abbreviation for American Telephone and Telegraph) Corporation (NYSE: T) is an American telecommunications company. ...


The Erector Set, the popular and culturally important construction toy, was invented in New Haven by A.C. Gilbert in 1911, and was manufactured by the A. C. Gilbert Company at the Erector Square factory in New Haven, Connecticut, from 1913 until the company's bankruptcy in 1967.[citation needed] Erector Set is the trade name of a construction toy that was wildly popular in the United States during much of the 20th century. ... Alfred Carlton Gilbert (February 13, 1884 _ January 24, 1961), was an American inventor, athlete, toymaker and businessman. ...


The first memorial to victims of the Holocaust on public land in America[citation needed] stands in New Haven's Edgewood Park at the corner of Whalley and West Park Avenues; it was built in 1977 with funds collected from the community[26] and is maintained by Greater New Haven Holocaust Memory, Inc.[not in citation given].[27] The ashes of victims killed and cremated at Auschwitz are buried under the memorial.[28] For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... Edgewood is a neighborhood in the western part of the city of New Haven, Connecticut, officially defined[2] by Whalley Avenue on the north, Chapel Street on the south, the West River on the west (the border of Westville), and Sherman Avenue on the east. ... The crematorium at Haycombe Cemetery, Bath, England. ... Auschwitz, in English, commonly refers to the Auschwitz concentration camp complex built near the town of Oświęcim, by Nazi Germany during World War II. Rarely, it may refer to the Polish town of Oświęcim (called by the Germans Auschwitz) itself. ...


Infrastructure

Hospitals and medicine

The New Haven area supports several medical facilities that are considered some of the best hospitals in the country. These include Yale-New Haven Hospital (including the Yale-New Haven Children's Hospital), and the Hospital of Saint Raphael. A large Veterans Affairs hospital is located nearby in West Haven. To the west in Milford is Milford Hospital and to the north in Meriden is the MidState Medical Center. Yale-New Haven Hospital (abbreviated YNHH) is a world-renowned 944-bed hospital located in downtown New Haven, Connecticut. ... Hospital of Saint Raphael or Saint Raphael Hospital is a 511-bed hospital and an academic health center affiliated with Yale University School of Medicine, located in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. It was founded by the Sisters of Charity of Saint Elizabeth in 1907. ... The United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is a government-run military veteran benefit system with Cabinet-level status. ... Milford Hospital is an acute-care community hospital located in Milford, Connecticut. ...


Transportation

Railroad

New Haven is connected to New York City by both intercity and commuter rail, provided by Amtrak and Metro-North Railroad respectively, and some New Haven residents commute to work in New York City (just under two hours away by train). The city's main railroad station is Union Station, which serves Metro-North trains to New York, Shore Line East commuter trains to New London, and Amtrak trains to New York, Hartford, Boston, and Springfield, Massachusetts. An additional station at State Street provides Shore Line East and a few peak-hour Metro-North passengers easier access to Downtown. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... The Metro-North Commuter Railroad Company, or MTA Metro-North Railroad, or, more commonly, Metro-North, is a suburban commuter rail service that is run and managed by an authority of New York State, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, or, more simply, the MTA. Metro-North runs service between New York... Union Station is the main railroad passenger station in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Shore Line East (SLE) is a commuter rail service operating in southern Connecticut, USA. A fully owned subsidiary of the Connecticut Department of Transportation (ConnDOT), SLE provides weekday service along the Northeast Corridor from New London west to New Haven, with continuing service to Bridgeport and Stamford, and connecting service... Hartford redirects here. ... Boston redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in Hampden County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Hampden Settled 1636 Incorporated 1852 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Charles Ryan (D) Area  - Total 33. ... Downtown New Haven is the neighborhood located in the heart of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ...


The start of the New Haven Railroad began in a small area of New Haven called Cedar Hill Area. It has long been forgotten since its days of grandeur, but still has all the elements in place from the great railroad days. This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


A commuter rail line to run along the existing Amtrak line from New Haven through Hartford to Springfield, MA has been proposed by the Connecticut Department of Transportation (ConnDOT) and is currently in the planning phase.


Major highways

New Haven lies at the intersection of Interstate 95 on the coast - which provides access southwards and/or westwards to the western coast of Connecticut and to New York City, and eastwards to the eastern Connecticut shoreline, Rhode Island, and eastern Massachusetts - and Interstate 91, which leads northward to the interior of Massachusetts and Vermont and the Canadian border. I-95 is infamous for traffic jams increasing with proximity to New York City; on the east side of New Haven it passes over the Quinnipiac River via the Pearl Harbor Memorial, or "Q Bridge", which often presents a major bottleneck to traffic. I-91, however, is relatively less congested, except at the intersection with I-95 during peak travel times. Interstate 95, the main north-south Interstate Highway on the East Coast of the United States, runs in a general east-west compass direction for 111. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 91 Interstate 91 (abbreviated I-91) is an interstate highway in the New England section of the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Interstate 95, the main north-south Interstate Highway on the East Coast of the United States, runs in a general east-west compass direction for 111. ... The Quinnipiac River is a river in the New England region of the United States, located entirely in the state of Connecticut. ... The Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge, known locally as the Q Bridge, is a bridge that carries Interstate 95 (Connecticut Turnpike) over the mouth of the Quinnipiac River in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Interstate 91 is an interstate highway in the New England section of the United States. ...


The Oak Street Connector (Route 34) intersects I-91 at exit 1, just south of the I-95/I-91 interchange, and runs northwest for a few blocks as an expressway spur into downtown before emptying onto surface roads. The Wilbur Cross Parkway (Route 15) runs parallel to I-95 west of New Haven, turning northwards as it nears the city and then running northwards parallel to I-91 through the outer rim of New Haven, and Hamden, offering an alternative to the I-95/I-91 journey (restricted to non-commercial vehicles). Route 15 in New Haven is also the site of the only highway tunnel in the state (officially designated as Heroes' Tunnel), running through West Rock, home to West Rock Park and the Three Judges Cave. The Oak Street Connector is a 1. ... Route 34 (CT-34) is 24. ... The Wilbur Cross Parkway is a limited access highway in Connecticut, comprising the portion of Route 15 between Milford and Meriden. ... Route 15 (CT-15) is a highway in Connecticut that runs 83. ... Hamden is a town in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. ... West Rock is a traprock hill that rises to the northwest of downtown New Haven, Connecticut. ... Judges Cave at West Rock Ridge State Park West Rock Ridge is a state park located in the northwest corner of New Haven, Connecticut. ... The Wilbur Cross Parkways Heroes Tunnel through West Rock West Rock is a traprock hill, elevation about 400 feet, located northwest of downtown New Haven, Connecticut. ...


In addition to these expressways, the city also has several major surface arteries. U.S. Route 1 (Columbus Avenue, Union Avenue, Water Street, Forbes Avenue) runs in an east-west direction south of downtown serving Union Station and leading out of the city to Milford, West Haven, East Haven and Branford. The main road from downtown heading northwest is Whalley Avenue (partly signed as Route 63) leading to Westville and Woodbridge. Heading north towards Hamden, there are two major thoroughfares, Dixwell Avenue and Whitney Avenue. To the northeast are Middletown Avenue (Route 17) to the Montowese section of North Haven, and Foxon Boulevard to the Foxon section of East Haven and to the town of North Branford. To the west is also Route 34 which leads to the city of Derby. Other major intracity routes are Ella Grasso Boulevard (Route 10), College Street, Temple Street, Church Street, Elm Street, and Grove Street. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: U.S. Route 1 U.S. Route 1 (also called U.S. Highway 1, and abbreviated US 1) is a United States highway which parallels the east coast of the United States. ... Union Station is the main railroad passenger station in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Nickname: A Small City with a Big Heart Coordinates: NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region South Central Region Named 1640 Incorporated (city) 1959 Government type Mayor-council  - Mayor James L. Richetelli, Jr. ... West Haven is a city in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: Counties New Haven County Mayor Joseph A. Maturo, Jr. ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , Country State NECTA New Haven Region South Central Region Named 1653 Government  - Type Representative town meeting  - First selectman Cheryl P. Morris (D) Area  - Town  28. ... Route 63 is a principal arterial state highway from New Haven up to Canaan, running for 52. ... Westville is a neighborhood of the city of New Haven, Connecticut located in the western part of the city. ... Woodbridge is a town located in New Haven County, Connecticut. ... Hamden is a town in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. ... Route 17 is a primary north-south state route beginning in New Haven, through Middletown, and ending in Glastonbury, with a length of 36. ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated 1831 Government  - Type Council-manager  - Town manager Karl F. Kilduff  - Town council Andrew Esposito III, Mayor Joanne S. Wentworth, Deputy Mayor Mary E. Bigelow Andrew M. Bozzuto Vincent J. Candelora Michael J. Doody Donald J. Fucci II Arthur M. Hausman, Jr. ... Route 34 (CT-34) is 24. ... Derby is a town located in New Haven County, Connecticut. ... CT 10 is a 54. ...


Airport

Tweed-New Haven Airport, located three miles east of the city, provides daily service through US Airways. Tweed-New Haven Airport (IATA Airport Code HVN) is a municipal airport offering commercial and general service in New Haven, Connecticut. ... US Airways is an American low-cost airline[1] headquartered in Tempe, Arizona, owned by US Airways Group, Inc. ...


Seaport

New Haven Harbor is home to The Port of New Haven, a deep-water seaport with three berths capable of hosting vessels and barges as well as the facilities required to handle break-bulk cargo. The port has the capacity to load 200 trucks a day from the ground or via loading docks. Rail transportation access is available, with a private switch engine for yard movements and private siding for loading and unloading. There is approximately 400,000 square feet (40,000 m²) of inside storage and 50 acres of outside storage available at the site. Five shore cranes with a 250-ton capacity and 26 forklifts, each with a 26-ton capacity, are also available.[29] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 233 pixelsFull resolution (3683 × 1071 pixel, file size: 6. ... New Haven Harbor is an inlet on the north side of Long Island Sound in the state of Connecticut in the United States. ...


Power supply facilities

Electricity for New Haven is generated by 448 MW oil and gas-fired generating station located on the shore at New Haven Harbor.[30] In addition, Pennsylvania Power and Light (PPL) Inc. operates a 220 MW peaking natural gas turbine plant in nearby Wallingford. Near New Haven there is the static inverter plant of the HVDC Cross Sound Cable. PPL, formerly known as PP&L or Pennsylvania Power and Light, is an electric company headquartered in Allentown, Pennsylvania, USA. It currently controls over 11,000 megawatts (MW) of electrical generating capacity in the United States, primarily in Pennsylvania and Montana, and delivers electricity to customers in the United Kingdom... A static inverter station is the terminal equipment for a high voltage direct current transmission line, in which direct current is converted to three-phase alternating current, and, usually, the reverse. ... HVDC or high-voltage, direct current electric power transmission systems contrast with the more common alternating-current systems as a means for the bulk transmission of electrical power. ... The Cross Sound Cable is a 40 kilometer (about 25 miles) long bipolar High-voltage direct current (HVDC) submarine power cable between New Haven, Connecticut, USA and Shoreham, Long Island New York , USA. The Cross Sound Cable can transmit a maximum power of 330 MW at a voltage of 150...


Sister cities

New Haven has the following sister cities designated by Sister Cities International:[citation needed] Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ... Sister Cities International is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting and fostering town twinning, especially between cities in the United States and cities in other countries. ...

Some of these were selected because of historical connection — Freetown because of the Amistad trial. Others, such as Amalfi and Afula-Gilboa, reflect ethnic groups in New Haven. Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Afula (עפולה; Hebrew: ; ; Arabic: ‎ ) is a city in the North District of Israel, often known as the Capital of the Valley, Jezreel Valley. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Amalfi is a town and commune in the province of Salerno, in the region of Campania, Italy, on the Gulf of Salerno, 24 miles southeast of Naples. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... City flag City coat of arms Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Région Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Département Vaucluse (préfecture) Arrondissement Avignon Canton Chief town of 4 cantons Intercommunality Communauté dagglomération du Grand Avignon Mayor Marie-Josée Roig... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sierra_Leone. ... For other cities of the same name, see Freetown (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Vietnam. ... Huế (順化 in Chinese characters) is a city in Vietnam. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nicaragua. ... León is a city in Nicaragua, Central America, located at 12. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... This article is about the city. ... This article is about the history, geography, and people of the island known as Taiwan. ...


In 1990, the United Nations named New Haven a "Peace Messenger City". UN and U.N. redirect here. ...


Notable New Haven natives and long-term residents

Lauren Ambrose at the premiere of Psycho Beach Party at the 24th Lesbian & Gay Film Festival in San Francisco in June 2000 Lauren Ambrose (born Laura Anne DAmbruoso, 20 February 1978) is an American film and television actress, best known for portraying the character Claire Fisher on the popular... Ben Allison (b. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... see also Holy Orders The following terms have traditional meanings for the Anglican Church, and possibly beyond: A churchman is in principle a member of a church congregation, in practice someone in holy orders. ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... For other uses, see Natural selection (disambiguation). ... Henry Austin (December 4, 1804—December 17, 1891) was a prominent and prolific American architect based in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Roger Sherman Baldwin (January 4, 1793–February 19, 1863) was an American lawyer involved in the Amistad case, who later became governor of Connecticut and United States Senator. ... Shermans marble statute in the National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol. ... Lyman Beecher (October 12, 1775 – January 10, 1863) was a Presbyterian clergyman, temperance movement leader, and the father of several noted leaders, including Harriet Beecher Stowe, Henry Ward Beecher, Charles Beecher, Edward Beecher, Isabella Beecher Hooker, and Catharine Beecher, and a leader of the Second Great Awakening of the United... Michael Bolotin (born February 26, 1953), better known as Michael Bolton, is an American singer-songwriter, known for his soft rock ballads and tenor vocals. ... Timothy Charles Buckley III (February 14, 1947 – June 29, 1975) was an experimental vocalist and performer who incorporated jazz, psychedelia, funk, soul, and avant-garde rock in a short career spanning the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... This article is about Ctrl+Alt+Del, the webcomic. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Walter Chauncey Camp (April 7, 1859 – March 14, 1925) was a sports writer and football coach known as the Father of American Football. Along with John Heisman, Amos Alonzo Stagg, Glenn Scobey Warner, and George Halas, Camp was one of the most significant people in the history of American football. ... I do Lil Abner!!, a self-portrait by Al Capp, excerpted from the April 16-17 1951 Lil Abner strips. ... Lil Abner was a comic strip in United States newspapers, featuring a fictional clan of hillbillies in the town of Dogpatch. ... The Carpenters were a vocal and instrumental duo, consisting of siblings Karen and Richard Carpenter. ... Loren MazzaCane Connors (b. ... Thomas William Corcoran (January 4, 1869 - June 25, 1960) was a short stop in the Major Leagues who played for the Pittsburgh Burghers (1890), the Philadelphia Athletics (1891), the Brooklyn Grooms/Brooklyn Bridegrooms (1892-1896), the Cincinnati Reds (1897-1906), and the San Francisco Giants in 1907. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Michael Crowley is an American journalist, and currently senior editor and columnist at The New Republic magazine. ... For other uses, see New Republic. ... Chad Dawson was born to Wanda and Rick Dawson in Hartsville, South Carolina in 1982. ... Rosa DeLauro Rosa L. DeLauro (born March 2, 1943), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1991, representing the 3rd District of Connecticut (map). ... George Dixon played running back for the Montreal Alouettes of the Canadian Football League from 1959 to 1965. ... Jerome Francis Donovan (February 1, 1872 - November 2, 1949) was a United States Representative from New York. ... Reverend Timothy Dwight, portrait by John Trumbull Timothy Dwight (May 14, 1752–January 11, 1817) was an American Congregationalist minister, theologian, educator, and author. ... Paul Fusco (born January 29, 1953 in New Haven, Connecticut) is an American voice actor who is best known as the voice, creator, and puppeteer of ALF. He is also Vice President of Alien Productions. ... This article discusses the sitcom. ... Marcus Giamatti (born October 3, 1961 in New Haven, Connecticut) is an American actor. ... Paul Edward Valentine Giamatti (born June 6, 1967) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Yale redirects here. ... In 1920, the owners of Major League Baseball, in order to reestablish confidence of fans in the sport following the Black Sox Scandal, established the office of Commissioner of Baseball. ... Angelo Bartlett Bart Giamatti (April 4, 1938 – September 1, 1989) was the President of Yale University, and later, the 7th commissioner of Major League Baseball in the United States. ... Josiah Willard Gibbs (February 11, 1839 New Haven – April 28, 1903 New Haven) was one of the very first American theoretical physicists and chemists. ... Mathematical physics is the scientific discipline concerned with the application of mathematics to problems in physics and the development of mathematical methods suitable for such applications and for the formulation of physical theories. ... Physical chemistry is the application of physics to macroscopic, microscopic, atomic, subatomic, and particulate phenomena in chemical systems[1]within the field of chemistry traditionally using the principles, practices and concepts of thermodynamics, quantum chemistry, statistical mechanics and kinetics. ... Vector calculus (also called vector analysis) is a field of mathematics concerned with multivariate real analysis of vectors in two or more dimensions. ... Theory Issues Culture By region Lists Anarchism Portal Politics Portal ·        Emma Goldman (June 27, 1869 – May 14, 1940) aka Red Emma, was a Lithuanian-born anarchist known for her writings and speeches. ... Fredrick Ernest Goldsmith (b. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Candy Cummings William Arthur Candy Cummings (October 18, 1848 - May 16, 1924) was a 19th century professional baseball pitcher in the National Association and National League. ... For other persons named Charles Goodyear, see Charles Goodyear (disambiguation). ... Gerry Hemingway (b. ... Jack Hitt is an American author. ... Harpers redirects here. ... Ralph Isaacs Ingersoll (February 8, 1789 - August 26, 1872) was a United States Representative from Connecticut. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... This photo from around 1913 shows Ives in his day job. He was the director of a successful insurance agency. ... Henry Leavenworth (December 10, 1783–July 21, 1834) was a American soldier. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is a United States Senator from Connecticut. ... Floyd Douglas Little (born July 4, 1942 in New Haven, Connecticut) was a three-time American football All-American running back at Syracuse University. ... Paul MacCready (born September 25, 1925 in New Haven, Connecticut) is an American aeronautical engineer. ... Bruce Andrew Morrison (b. ... This is about the urban planner; for other uses, see Robert Moses (disambiguation). ... George Lloyd Murphy (July 4, 1902–May 3, 1992) was an American dancer, actor, and politician. ... muu Cesar Pelli (born October 12, 1926 in San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina) is a noted Argentine architect known for designing some of the worlds tallest buildings and other major urban landmarks. ... Liz Phair (born Elizabeth Clark Phair on April 17, 1967 in New Haven, Connecticut) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist. ... A rare spoken word album by Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. ... Jesse Richards as Frank in his film Franks Wild Years Jesse Richards (born July 17, 1975) is a painter, filmmaker and photographer from New Haven, Connecticut and was affiliated with the British art movement Stuckism. ... Emily Saliers, born on July 22, 1963 in New Haven, Connecticut, is a singer-songwriter and member of the Indigo Girls. ... Indigo Girls are an American folk rock duo, consisting of Amy Ray and Emily Saliers. ... Artie Shaw (May 23, 1910, New York, New York – December 30, 2004, Thousand Oaks, California) is considered to be one of the best jazz musicians of his time. ... Shermans marble statute in the National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to... Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Syng inkstand, with which the Constitution was signed The Constitution of the United States is the supreme... Cover of Time Magazine (December 27, 1926) Alfred Pritchard Sloan, Jr. ... General Motors Corporation (NYSE: GM), also known as GM, is an American automobile maker with worldwide operations and brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Holden, Hummer, Opel, Pontiac, Saturn, Saab and Vauxhall. ... Dr. Spock with his grand-daughter Susannah in 1967 Benjamin McLane Spock (May 2, 1903 - March 15, 1998) was an American pediatrician whose book Baby and Child Care, published in 1946, is one of the biggest best-sellers of all time. ... Allen McIntyre Stack (January 23, 1928 in New Haven, Connecticut – September 12, 1999 in Honolulu, Hawaii) was a U.S. backstroke swimmer, who won the 100m Backstroke at the 1948 Summer Olympics in London. ... Lawrence Henry Larry Summers (born November 30, 1954) is an American economist and academic. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Home of Ithiel Town, New Haven, CT Ithiel Town (October 3, 1784 - June 13, 1844) was a prominent American architect and civil engineer. ... Eli Whitney Eli Whitney (b. ... Madeline Rose Zima (born September 16, 1985) is an American actress. ...

Notable Yale alumni and faculty

Yalies are persons affiliated with Yale University, commonly including alumni, current and former faculty members, students, and others. ...

Notable Hopkins School alumni

The following is a list of Hopkins School people in alphabetical order. ...

Literature

  • Leonard Bacon, Thirteen Historical Discourses, (New Haven, 1839)
  • C. H. Hoadley (editor), Records of the Colony of New Haven, 1638-1665, (two volumes, Hartford, 1857-58)
  • J. W. Barber, History and Antiquities of New Haven, (third edition, New Haven, 1870)
  • C. H. Levermore, Town and City Government of New Haven, (Baltimore, 1886)
  • C. H. Levermore, Republic of New Haven: A History of Municipal Evolution, (Baltimore, 1886)
  • E. S. Bartlett, Historical Sketches of New Haven, (New Haven, 1897)
  • F. H. Cogswell, "New Haven" in L. P. Powell (editor), Historic Towns of New England, (New York, 1898)
  • H. T. Blake, Chronicles of New Haven Green, (New Haven, 1898)
  • E. E. Atwater, History of the Colony of New Haven, (New edition, New Haven, 1902)
  • Douglas W. Rae, City: Urbanism and Its End, (New Haven, 2003)
  • New Haven City Yearbooks
  • Michael Sletcher, New Haven: From Puritanism to the Age of Terrorism, (Charleston, 2004)
  • William Lee Miller, The Fifteenth Ward and the Great Society, (Houghton Mifflin/Riverside, 1966)
  • Preston C. Maynard and Majorey B. Noyes,(editors), "Carriages and Clocks, Corsets and Locks: the Rise and Fall of an Industrial City-New Haven, Connecticut" (University Press of New England, 2005.)

See also

Other articles about people and places in New Haven, CT.


References

  1. ^ a b Annual Estimates of the Population for All Incorporated Places in Connecticut (CSV). 2006 Population Estimates. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division (June 21, 2006). Retrieved on June 28, 2007.
  2. ^ In US Census estimates between 2000 and 2006, New Haven and Hartford's populations have been estimated to have been within 511 of each other. In 2003 and 2005, New Haven was estimated to be larger. Since such differences are well within the margin of error in these estimates, which is actually larger will not be known until the 2010 Census.
  3. ^ U.S. Census Bureau - Population in New England City and Town Areas (NECTAs) in Alphabetical Order and Numerical and Percent Change: 1990 and 2000
  4. ^ South Central Regional Council of Governments
  5. ^ a b New Haven: The Elm City
  6. ^ Landmarks in Yale's History
  7. ^ http://www.conntact.com/article_page.lasso?id=37852
  8. ^ Connecticut Register and Manual
  9. ^ http://www.whitehouse.gov/president/biography.html
  10. ^ http://www.newhavenindependent.org/archives/2007/07/immigrants_line.php Immigrants, Supporters Pour in For ID, retrieved 2007-07-25
  11. ^ a b http://www.cityofnewhaven.com/CityPlan/pdfs/PlanningPrograms/ComprehensivePlan/SectionVIDowntown.pdf Comprehensive Report: New Haven pg3
  12. ^ Harrison's illustrated guide to greater New Haven, (H2 Company, New Haven, 1995).
  13. ^ Maps of the New Haven Neighborhoods (PDF) are available from the City of New Haven's City Plan Department. There are also quick traces from the above PDFs in Google Earth/Map Shapes of the New Haven Neighborhoods (KML).
  14. ^ New Haven Economy. City-Data.com. Advameg Inc. (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-03.
  15. ^ http://www.city-data.com/us-cities/The-Northeast/New-Haven-Economy.html
  16. ^ http://www.census.gov/population/www/documentation/twps0027.html
  17. ^ http://www.census.gov/popest/cities/SUB-EST2006.html
  18. ^ Metropolitan Area Personal Income and per Capita Personal Income: 2001. United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Retrieved on 2007-10-01.
  19. ^ Iowa Workforce Development News and Trends. Iowa Trends. Retrieved on 2007-10-01.
  20. ^ Who We Are. Hopkins School. Retrieved on 2007-10-01.
  21. ^ Buildings of New Haven
  22. ^ http://www.hamburgeramerica.com/
  23. ^ http://www.nhregister.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=18340961&BRD=1281&PAG=461&dept_id=566835&rfi=6
  24. ^ http://www.conntact.com/archive_index/archive_pages/1632_Business_New_Haven.html Connecticut Business News Journal "Dates of Our Lives"
  25. ^ http://www.kofc.org/un/eb/en/anniversary/historical/index4.html
  26. ^ Shifre Zamkov on the New Haven Holocaust Memorial
  27. ^ Greater New Haven Holocaust Memory, Inc
  28. ^ The Ashes of Memory, Revealed
  29. ^ http://www.city-data.com/us-cities/The-Northeast/New-Haven-Economy.html
  30. ^ http://www.pseg.com/companies/fossil/plants/newhaven.jsp
  31. ^ (1963) Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 
  32. ^ a b [1969] (1979) in Reichler, Joseph L.: The Baseball Encyclopedia, 4th edition, New York: Macmillan Publishing. ISBN 0-02-578970-8. 

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External links

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  • New Haven, Connecticut is at coordinates 41°19′N 72°55′W / 41.31, -72.92Coordinates: 41°19′N 72°55′W / 41.31, -72.92
Neighborhoods of New Haven
Amity | The Annex | Beaver Hills | Cedar Hill | City Point | Dixwell | Downtown | Dwight | East Rock | East Shore | Edgewood | Fair Haven | Fair Haven Heights | The Hill | Long Wharf | Mill River | Newhallville | Prospect Hill | Quinnipiac Meadows | West River | West Rock-Westhills | Westville | Wooster Square

  Results from FactBites:
 
New Haven, Connecticut - Free Encyclopedia (565 words)
New Haven is the third-largest city in Connecticut, and is located in the New Haven County, Connecticut on the northern coast of Long Island Sound.
New Haven was incorporated as a city in 1784.
New Haven's federal district court was the location for the trial of the Amistad mutineers.
New Haven, Connecticut - definition of New Haven, Connecticut - Labor Law Talk Dictionary (3192 words)
New Haven was incorporated as a city in 1784, and Roger Sherman, one of the signers of the Constitution and author of the "Connecticut Compromise", became the new city's first mayor.
New Haven was home to one of the important early events in the burgeoning anti-slavery movement when, in 1839, the trial of mutineering Mendi tribesmen being transported as slaves on the Spanish slaveship Amistad was held in New Haven's United States District Court.
New Haven's population doubled in the time between the war and the start of the 20th century, most notably due to the influx of immigrants from southern Europe, particularly Italy.
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