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Encyclopedia > New Hampshire
State of New Hampshire
Flag of New Hampshire State seal of New Hampshire
Flag of New Hampshire Seal
Nickname(s): The Granite State
Motto(s): Live Free or Die
Official language(s) English
Capital Concord
Largest city Manchester
Area  Ranked 46th in the US
 - Total 9,350 sq mi
(24,217 km²)
 - Width 68 miles (110 km)
 - Length 190 miles (305 km)
 - % water 4.1
 - Latitude 42° 42′ N to 45° 18′ N
 - Longitude 70° 36′ W to 72° 33′ W
Population  Ranked 41st in the US
 - Total 1,235,786
 - Density 137.8/sq mi 
53.20/km² (20th in the US)
 - Median income  $57,323 (1st)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Mt. Washington[1]
6,288 ft  (1,917 m)
 - Mean 1,000 ft  (305 m)
 - Lowest point Atlantic Ocean[1]
0 ft  (0 m)
Admission to Union  June 21, 1788 (9th)
Governor John Lynch (D)
Lieutenant Governor None[2]
U.S. Senators Judd Gregg (R)
John Sununu (R)
Congressional Delegation Carol Shea-Porter (D)
Paul Hodes (D) (list)
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Abbreviations NH N.H. US-NH
Website www.nh.gov

New Hampshire (IPA: /nuːˈhæmpʃər/) is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States of America named after the southern English county of Hampshire. The state ranks 44th in land area, 46th in total area of the 50 states, and 41st in population. It became the first post-colonial sovereign nation in the Americas when it broke off from Great Britain in January 1776, and was one of the original thirteen States that founded the United States of America six months later. It was the ninth state to ratify the United States Constitution, bringing that document into effect. New Hampshire was the first U.S. state to have its own state constitution, and is the only state with neither a general sales tax nor a personal income tax.[3] New Hampshire may refer to: New Hampshire, a state in the United States of America New Hampshire (book), a collection of poetry by Robert Frost New Hampshire (chicken), a breed of chicken Category: ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Hampshire. ... Image File history File links Seal_of_New_Hampshire. ... Categories: Stub | U.S. state flags ... New Hampshire has held two Seals since it Declared its Independence from Britain prior to the US Declaration of Independence, and retains both seals, although most people are only familiar with the corporate seal of the State of New Hampshire. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Live Free or Die in the State Emblem Live Free or Die is the official motto of New Hampshire, adopted by the General Court in 1945. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_NH.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): New Hampshire ... The United States does not have an official language, but English is spoken by about 82% of the population as a native language. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... Location in Merrimack County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Merrimack County Incorporated 1733  - City Manager Thomas J. Aspell, Jr. ... Nickname: Location in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Hillsborough County Incorporated 1751 Government  - Mayor Frank Guinta (R) Area  - City  34. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... “km” redirects here. ... Map of states populations (2006) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2006, according to the 2005 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... For information on the income of individuals, see Personal income in the United States. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... The Summit Mount Washington is the highest peak in the American Northeast at 6,288 ft. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... For other persons named John Lynch, see John Lynch (disambiguation). ... This is a complete and current List of United States Lieutenant Governors. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Judd Gregg (born February 14, 1947) is a former Governor of New Hampshire and current United States Senator serving as ranking member of the Senate Budget Committee. ... John Edward Sununu (born September 10, 1964) is a Republican United States Senator from New Hampshire. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Carol Shea-Porter (born December 2, 1952) is a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives from the state of New Hampshire. ... Paul Hodes is an attorney from the state of New Hampshire who formerly served at the Shaheen & Gordon Law Firm. ... These are tables of congressional delegations from New Hampshire to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... ISO 3166-2 codes for the United States of America cover 50 states, 1 district, 6 outlying areas (including 9 minor outlying islands under separate ISO 3166-1 country code UM). ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Regional definitions vary The Northeastern United States is a region of the United States. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The traditional counties as usually portrayed. ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Territories in the Americas colonized or claimed by a European great power in 1750. ... Look up sovereign in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas in an equal-area projection The Americas are the lands of New World, consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... A sales tax is a consumption tax charged at the point of purchase for certain goods and services. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income...


It is internationally famous for the New Hampshire primary, the first primary in the quadrennial U.S. presidential election cycle. The New Hampshire primary is the first of a number of statewide political party primary elections held in the United States every four years, as part of the process of the Democratic and Republican parties choosing their candidate for the presidential elections on the subsequent November. ... The series of U.S. presidential primaries is one of the first steps in the process of electing a President of the United States. ...


Its license plates carry the state motto: "Live Free or Die." The state nickname is "The Granite State", in reference both to its geology and to its tradition of self-sufficiency. Several other official nicknames exist but are rarely used.[4] Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Live Free or Die in the State Emblem Live Free or Die is the official motto of New Hampshire, adopted by the General Court in 1945. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia External link Information about U.S. State Nicknames Categories: U.S. state insignia ... For other uses, see granite (disambiguation). ...


A number of famous individuals come from New Hampshire, such as Senator Daniel Webster, editor Horace Greeley, founder of the Christian Science religion Mary Baker Eddy, author Dan Brown, singer Mandy Moore and comedians Adam Sandler, Sarah Silverman, and Seth Meyers. New Hampshire has produced one president, Franklin Pierce. Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811 – November 29, 1872) was an American editor of a leading newspaper, a founder of the Republican party, reformer and politician. ... Christian Science is a religious teaching regarding the efficacy of spiritual healing according to the interpretation of the Bible by Mary Baker Eddy, in her book Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures (first published in 1875). ... Mary Baker Eddy (born Mary Morse Baker July 16, 1821 – December 3, 1910) founded the Church of Christ, Scientist in 1879 and was the author of its fundamental doctrinal textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures. ... This article is about the writer. ... Amanda Mandy Leigh Moore (born April 10, 1984) is an American pop singer, songwriter and actress. ... Adam Richard Sandler (born September 9, 1966) is an American comedian, actor, musician, screenwriter, and film producer. ... Sarah Kate Silverman (born December 1, 1970) is an American comedian, writer and actress. ... Seth Adam Meyers (born December 28, 1973 in Bedford, New Hampshire) is an American actor and comedian best known as a cast member of Saturday Night Live (SNL). ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ...


New Hampshire's recreational attractions include skiing and other winter sports, observing the fall foliage, summer cottages along many lakes, motor sports at the New Hampshire International Speedway, and Bike Week, a popular motorcycle rally held in Laconia in June. New Hampshire International Speedway is a 1. ... Laconia Motorcycle Week is a motorcycle rally held in June annually. ... Motto: City on the Lakes Location in Belknap County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Belknap County Incorporated 1855 City Council Matthew J. Lahey, Mayor Area    - City 68. ...

Contents

Geography

See List of counties in New Hampshire, mountains, lakes, and rivers

New Hampshire is part of the New England region. It is bounded by Quebec, Canada to the north and northwest; Maine and the Atlantic Ocean to the east; Massachusetts to the south; and Vermont to the west. New Hampshire's major regions are the Great North Woods, the White Mountains, the Lakes Region, the Seacoast, the Merrimack Valley, the Monadnock Region, and the Dartmouth-Lake Sunapee area. New Hampshire has the shortest ocean coastline of any U.S. state, with a length of 18 miles (29 km). List of New Hampshire counties: New Hampshire counties Belknap County: formed in 1840 from parts of Merrimack County and Strafford County. ... This is a list of some of the mountains in the state of New Hampshire. ... This is a partial list of lakes in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ... This is a partial list of rivers in the U.S. state of New Hampshire Androscoggin River Bog Brook Chickwolnepy Brook Clear Stream Dead River Magalloway River Dead Diamond River Swift Diamond River Mollidgewock Brook Moose River Peabody River West Branch Peabody River Stearns Brook Wild River Bellamy River Connecticut... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Great North Woods are spread across four northeastern U.S. states: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and New York and into the Canadian province of Quebec, from the Down East lakes to the Adirondack Mountains. ... The White Mountains Region is located in northern New Hampshire. ... Squam Lake from a mountaintop: a typical vista in the Lakes Region. ... The Seacoast Region is the southeast area of the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ... The Merrimack Valley Region is an area of south-central New Hampshire, approximately 35 miles wide, centered on the Merrimack River, and running from Canterbury south to the Massachusetts border. ... The Monadnock Region is a region in southwestern New Hampshire. ... The Dartmouth-Lake Sunapee area of the U.S. state of New Hampshire, also frequently known as the Upper Valley, spans from Bradford northwest along Interstate 89 to New Hampshires border with Vermont at the city of Lebanon. ...

New Hampshire, showing roads, rivers and major cities
New Hampshire, showing roads, rivers and major cities

New Hampshire was home to the rock formation called the Old Man of the Mountain, a face-like profile in Franconia Notch, until the formation fell apart in May 2003. File links The following pages link to this file: New Hampshire Categories: National Atlas images | New Hampshire maps ... File links The following pages link to this file: New Hampshire Categories: National Atlas images | New Hampshire maps ... For other uses, see Old Man of the Mountain (disambiguation). ... Franconia Notch State Park is located in the White Mountains in northern New Hampshire and straddles 8 miles of Interstate 93 as it passes between the Kinsman Range and Franconia Range. ...


The White Mountains range in New Hampshire spans the north-central portion of the state, with Mount Washington being the tallest in the northeastern U.S., and other mountains like Mount Madison and Mount Adams surrounding it. With hurricane-force winds every third day on the average, over 100 recorded deaths among visitors, and conspicuous krumholtz (dwarf, matted trees much like a carpet of bonsai trees), the upper reaches of Mount Washington claim the title of having the "worst weather on earth." A non-profit weather observatory is located on the peak. Looking south on the Franconia Ridge Trail. ... The Summit Mount Washington is the highest peak in the American Northeast at 6,288 ft. ... Mount Madison is a mountain in the Presidential Range of New Hampshire in the Unitred States. ... Mount Adams is the second highest mountain in New Hampshire, after Mt. ... A Krumholtz or Krummholz formation (from German: krumm, twisted; and holz, wood) is a feature of subarctic and subalpine tree line landscapes, where continual exposure to fierce, freezing winds cause vegetation to become stunted and deformed. ... Maple Bonsai in Heidelberg, Germany Bonsai displayed at a garden show in Tatton Park in Cheshire, England Bonsai   (Japanese: , literally potted plant) is the art of aesthetic miniaturization of trees by growing them in containers. ...


In the flatter southwest corner of New Hampshire, the prominent landmark Mount Monadnock, has given its name to a general class of earth-forms—a monadnock signifying, in geomorphology, any isolated resistant peak rising from a less resistant eroded plain. Mount Monadnock, or Grand Monadnock, is a peak in southwestern New Hampshire, United States, which has drawn attention for years by its relative isolation from other mountains. ... A monadnock or inselberg is an isolated hill, knob, ridge, or small mountain that rises abruptly from a gently sloping or virtually level surrounding plain. ...


Major rivers include the 110 mile (177 km) Merrimack River, which bisects the lower half of the state north-south and ends up in Newburyport, Massachusetts. Its major tributaries include the Contoocook River, Pemigewasset River, and Winnipesaukee River. The 410 mile (670 km) Connecticut River, which starts at New Hampshire's Connecticut Lakes and flows south to Connecticut, defines the western border with Vermont. The state border is not in the center of that river, as is usually the case, but lies at the low-water mark on the Vermont side; so New Hampshire actually owns the entire river where it runs adjacent to Vermont.[5] The "northwesternmost headwaters" of the Connecticut also define the Canadian border with New Hampshire. Merrimack River watershed The Merrimack River (or Merrimac River, an earlier spelling that is sometimes still used) is a -long river in the Northeastern United States. ... Newburyport is a small coastal city in Essex County, Massachusetts, 38 miles (61 km) northeast of Boston. ... The Contoocook River is a 71 mile long river in New Hampshire. ... The Pemigewasset River is a river in the State of New Hampshire, USA. It is approximately 70 miles or 113 kilometers in length. ... Winnipesaukee River in 1907, Franklin, New Hampshire The Winnipesaukee River is a 10. ... The Connecticut River as seen from the French King Bridge in western Massachusetts. ... The Connecticut Lakes are a group of lakes in northern New Hampshire, and form the beginning of the Connecticut River. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


The Piscataqua River and its several tributaries form the state's only significant ocean port where they flow into the Atlantic at Portsmouth. The Salmon Falls River and the Piscataqua define the southern portion of the border with Maine. The state has an ongoing boundary dispute with Maine in the area of Portsmouth Harbor, with New Hampshire claiming dominion over several islands (now known as Seavey Island) that include the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard as well as to the Maine towns of Kittery and Berwick. The Piscataqua River seen from downtown Portsmouth, New Hampshire The Piscataqua River, in the northeastern United States, is a 12 mi (19 km) long tidal estuary formed by the confluence of the Salmon Falls and Cocheco rivers. ... Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country State County Rockingham County Incorporated 1653 Government  - Mayor Steve Marchand  - City manager John P. Bohenko Area  - City  16. ... The Salmon Falls River is a tributary of the Piscataqua River, in the U.S. states of Maine and New Hampshire. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Seavey Island, on which Portsmouth Naval Shipyard resides, is located in the Piscataqua River in Kittery, Maine opposite Portsmouth, New Hampshire. ... Location of town of Kittery in state of Maine Kittery is a town located in York County, Maine. ... Berwick is a town located in York County, Maine. ...


The largest lake is Lake Winnipesaukee, which covers 72 square miles (186 km²) in the east-central part of New Hampshire. Lake Winnipesaukee at Sunset Lake Winnipesaukee is the largest lake in New Hampshire. ...

Lake Winnipesaukee.
Lake Winnipesaukee.

Hampton Beach is a popular local summer destination. About 10 miles (16 km) offshore are the Isles of Shoals, nine small islands (four of which are in New Hampshire) best known as the site of a 19th century art colony founded by poet Celia Thaxter, as well as the alleged location of one of the buried treasures of the pirate Blackbeard. Image File history File linksMetadata Winnipesaukee_Sunset_8-28-2002_(JJH). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Winnipesaukee_Sunset_8-28-2002_(JJH). ... Hampton Beach in late September Hampton Beach is a small resort community on the Atlantic Ocean coast of New Hampshire. ... Isles of Shoals The Isles of Shoals are a group of nine small islands situated approximately 16 km (10 miles) off the east coast of the USA, straddling the border of the states of New Hampshire and Maine. ... Celia Thaxter in Her Garden, 1892, by Childe Hassam American writer of poetry and stories, Celia Thaxter was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire in 1835 and grew up in the Isles of Shoals, first on White Island, where her father, Thomas Laighton, was lighthouse keeper, and then on Smuttynose and... For other uses, see Blackbeard (disambiguation). ...


It is the second-most-forested state in the country, after Maine, in terms of percentage of land covered by woods. This change was caused by the abandonment of farms during the 20th century as many farmers took wage jobs in urban areas or moved to more productive areas. The return of woodlands from open fields forms the subject of many poems by Robert Frost. Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ...


The northern third of the state is locally referred to as the "north country" or "north of the notches," in reference to White Mountain passes that channel traffic. It contains less than 5% of the state's population, suffers from relatively high poverty rates, and is losing population as the logging and paper industries decline. However, the tourist industry, in particular visitors who go to northern New Hampshire to take advantage of the winter skiing season, has helped to offset economic losses from mill closures. In a range of hills, or especially of mountains, a pass (also gap, notch, col, saddle, bwlch or bealach) is a lower point that allows easier access through the range. ... Cross-country skiing (skating style) in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. ...


Climate

New Hampshire experiences a humid continental climate (Koppen climate classification Dfa in southern areas and Dfb in the north), with warm, humid summers, cold, wet winters, and uniform precipitation all year. The climate of the southeastern portion of the state is moderated somewhat by the Atlantic Ocean and averages relatively milder and wetter weather, while the northern and interior portions experience relatively cooler temperatures and lower humidity. Winters are cold and snowy throughout the state, and are especially severe in the northern and mountainous areas. Average annual snowfall ranges from 60" to over 100" across the state.[6] The humid continental climate is a climate found over large areas of land masses in the temperate regions of the mid-latitudes where there is a zone of conflict between polar and tropical air masses. ... The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ...


Average daytime highs are generally in the mid 70s°F to low 80s°F (around 24-28 °C) throughout the state in July, with overnight lows in the mid 50s°F to low 60s°F (13-15 °C). January temperatures range from an average high of 34 °F (1 °C) on the coast to overnight lows below 0 °F (-18 °C) in the far north and at high elevations. Average annual precipitation statewide is roughly 40" with some variation occurring in the White Mountains due to differences in elevation and annual snowfall. Looking south on the Franconia Ridge Trail. ...


Extreme snow events are often associated with a nor'easter, such as the Blizzard of '78 and the Blizzard of 1993, when several feet of snow accumulated across portions of the state over a period of 24 to 48 hours. Lighter snowfall accumulations of several inches occur frequently throughout the winter months, often associated with an Alberta Clipper. Satellite image of the intense noreaster responsible for the North American blizzard of 2006. ... Two major blizzards occurred in the year 1978. ... ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


New Hampshire, on occasion, is affected by hurricanes and tropical storms although by the time they reach the state they are often extratropical, with most storms striking the southern New England coastline and moving inland or passing by offshore in the Gulf of Maine. Most of New Hampshire averages fewer than 20 days of thunderstorms per year and an average of about 2 tornadoes occur annually statewide.[7] This article is about weather phenomena. ... This article is about weather phenomena. ... Extratropical is a term used in advisories and tropical summaries to indicate that a cyclone has lost its tropical characteristics. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Gulf of Maine The Gulf of Maine is a large gulf of the Atlantic Ocean on the northeastern coast of North America. ...


The National Arbor Day Foundation plant hardiness zone map depicts zones 3, 4, 5, and 6 occurring throughout the state[8] and indicates the transition from a relatively cooler to warmer climate as one travels southward across New Hampshire. Arbor Day is an American holiday that encourages the planting and care of trees. ... Temperature scale of hardiness zones, showing the average annual minimum temperature boundaries for the zones A hardiness zone is a geographically-defined zone in which a specific category of plant life is capable of growing, as defined by temperature hardiness, or ability to withstand the minimum temperatures of the zone. ...


Metropolitan areas

Metropolitan areas in the New England region are defined by the U.S. Census Bureau as New England City and Town Areas (NECTAs). The following is a list of NECTAs in New Hampshire: Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 702 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Mike Spenard, http://sven. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 702 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Mike Spenard, http://sven. ... Nickname: Location in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Hillsborough County Incorporated 1751 Government  - Mayor Frank Guinta (R) Area  - City  34. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A New England City and Town Area or NECTA is a geographic entity in the New England region of the United States. ...

From The New Hampshire Economic and Labor Market Information Bureau
Berlin is a city located on the Androscoggin River in north-eastern Coos County, New Hampshire, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 10,331. ... Claremont is a city located in Sullivan County, New Hampshire. ... Location in New Hampshire Founded  -Incorporated 1725 1856  County Merrimack County Mayor Michael L. Donovan Area  - Total  - Water 174. ... Location within New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Merrimack Settled 1764 -Town 1828 -City 1895 Government  - Mayor David Palfrey Area  - Town  29. ... Nickname: Elm City Location Location within New Hampshire Government County Cheshire Settled Incorporated -Town -City 1734 1753 1873 Mayor City Council Michael E.J. Blastos Charles H. Redfern Angelo D. DiBernardo, Jr. ... Laconia is a city located in Belknap County, New Hampshire. ... Location in Grafton County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Grafton County Incorporated 1761 City Manager Gregg Mandsager Mayor Patrick Hayes City Council Dean Sorenson Daniel Nash Karen Liot-Hill Albert Leonard Douglas Gross William Solari Robert Moses Area    - City 107. ... Hartland, Vermont Hartland is a town located in Windsor County, Vermont. ... Manchester is the largest city in New Hampshire and the largest city of northern New England, an area composed of Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine. ... Nashua is a city located in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire. ... New Hampshire State Seal, which depicts the USS Raleigh built in 1776 beside the Piscataqua River. ...


History

Various Algonquian tribes inhabited the area prior to European settlement. English and French explorers visited New Hampshire in 1600–1605 and English fishermen settled in 1623. By 1631, the Upper Plantation comprised modern-day Dover, Durham and Stratham; in 1679, it became the "Royal Province." New Hampshire is a state of the United States of America located in the countrys Northeastern region. ... The Algonquian are one of the most populous and widespread North American Native groups, with tribes originally numbering in the hundreds, and hundreds of thousands who still identify with various Algonquian peoples. ... Nickname: Location within New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country United States State New Hampshire County Strafford Settled 1623 Incorporated 1623 (town) Incorporated 1855 (city) Government  - City Manager Mike Joyal  - Mayor Scott Myers  - City Council Robert Keays David Scott Catherine Cheney Dennis Ciotti Douglas DeDe Dean Trefethen Harvey Turner Area  - City  29. ... Durham is a town in Strafford County, New Hampshire, USA. The population was 12,664 at the 2000 census. ... Stratham is a town located in Rockingham County, New Hampshire. ...

The New Hampshire State House in Concord was designed by Albe Cady. It is the oldest U.S. state capitol where legislators still meet in their original chambers.
The New Hampshire State House in Concord was designed by Albe Cady. It is the oldest U.S. state capitol where legislators still meet in their original chambers.

It was one of the thirteen colonies that revolted against British rule in the American Revolution. By the time of the American Revolution, New Hampshire was a divided province. The economic and social life of the Seacoast revolved around sawmills, shipyards, merchant's warehouses, and established village and town centers. Wealthy merchants built substantial homes, furnished them with the finest luxuries, and invested their capital in trade and land speculation. At the other end of the social scale, there developed a permanent class of day laborers, mariners, indentured servants, and even slaves. It was the first state to declare its independence, but the only battle fought there was the raid on Fort William and Mary, December 14, 1774 in Portsmouth Harbor, which netted the rebellion sizable quantities of gunpowder, small arms, and cannon (General Sullivan, leader of the raid, described it as, "remainder of the powder, the small arms, bayonets, and cartouch-boxes, together with the cannon and ordnance stores") over the course of two nights. This raid was preceded by a warning to local patriots the previous day, by Paul Revere on December 13, 1774 that the fort was to be reinforced by troops sailing from Boston. According to unverified accounts, the gunpowder was later used at the Battle of Bunker Hill, transported there by Major Demerit, who was one of several New Hampshire patriots who stored the powder in their homes until it was transported elsewhere for use in revolutionary activities. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3008x2000, 3356 KB) ç°¡è¿° The New Hampshire State House December, 2004 Source http://en. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3008x2000, 3356 KB) ç°¡è¿° The New Hampshire State House December, 2004 Source http://en. ... New Hampshire State House The New Hampshire State House is the state capitol building of the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ... Betsy Ross purportedly sewed the first American flag with 13 stars and 13 stripes representing each of the 13 colonies. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Fort Willam and Mary in 1705 Fort William and Mary was a colonial defensive post at New Castle, New Hampshire. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country State County Rockingham County Incorporated 1653 Government  - Mayor Steve Marchand  - City manager John P. Bohenko Area  - City  16. ... John Sullivan (b. ... For the song by the Beastie Boys, see Paul Revere (song). ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ...


New Hampshire was a Jacksonian stronghold; the state sent Franklin Pierce to the White House in the election of 1852. Industrialization took the form of numerous textile mills, which in turn attracted large flows of immigrants from Quebec (the "French Canadians") and Ireland. The northern parts of the state produced lumber and the mountains provided tourist attractions. After 1960, the textile industry collapsed, but the economy rebounded as a center of high technology and a service provider. Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ...


Since 1952, New Hampshire gained national and international attention for its presidential primary held early in every presidential election year. It immediately became the most important testing grounds for candidates for the Republican and Democratic nominations. The media give New Hampshire (and Iowa) about half of all the attention paid to all states in the primary process, magnifying the state's decision power (and spurring repeated efforts by out-of-state politicians to change the rules.) The New Hampshire primary is the first of a number of statewide political party primary elections held in the United States every four years, as part of the process of the Democratic and Republican parties choosing their candidate for the presidential elections on the subsequent November. ...


Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1790 141,885
1800 183,858 29.6%
1810 214,460 16.6%
1820 244,161 13.8%
1830 269,328 10.3%
1840 284,574 5.7%
1850 317,976 11.7%
1860 326,073 2.5%
1870 318,300 -2.4%
1880 346,991 9.0%
1890 376,530 8.5%
1900 411,588 9.3%
1910 430,572 4.6%
1920 443,083 2.9%
1930 465,293 5.0%
1940 491,524 5.6%
1950 533,242 8.5%
1960 606,921 13.8%
1970 737,681 21.5%
1980 920,610 24.8%
1990 1,109,252 20.5%
2000 1,235,786 11.4%
Est. 2006 1,314,895 6.4%

As of 2005, New Hampshire has an estimated population of 1,309,940, which is an increase of 10,771, or 0.8%, from the prior year and an increase of 74,154, or 6.0%, since the year 2000. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 23,872 people (that is 75,060 births minus 51,188 deaths) and an increase due to net migration of 51,968 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 11,107 people, and migration within the country produced a net increase of 40,861 people. The United [[States Census of 1790 was the first Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1800 was the second Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1810 was the third Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1820 was the fourth Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


The center of population of New Hampshire is located in Merrimack County, in the town of Pembroke [1]. Center of population is a subject of study in the field of demographics. ... Merrimack County is a county in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ... Pembroke is a town located in Merrimack County, New Hampshire. ...

Demographics of New Hampshire (csv)
By race White Black AIAN Asian NHPI
AIAN is American Indian or Alaskan Native — NHPI is Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander
2000 (total population) 97.56% 1.05% 0.64% 1.56% 0.06%
2000 (Hispanic only) 1.50% 0.13% 0.04% 0.02% 0.01%
2005 (total population) 96.97% 1.29% 0.63% 2.04% 0.07%
2005 (Hispanic only) 2.04% 0.18% 0.04% 0.03% 0.01%
Growth 2000–2005 (total population) 5.36% 30.39% 3.96% 38.30% 13.91%
Growth 2000–2005 (non-Hispanic only) 4.76% 29.02% 3.69% 38.47% 20.29%
Growth 2000–2005 (Hispanic only) 43.91% 39.72% 7.81% 26.49% -25.23%
New Hampshire Population Density Map
New Hampshire Population Density Map

As of 2004, the population includes 64,000 residents born outside the United States (4.9%). Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... Image File history File links New_Hampshire_population_map. ... Image File history File links New_Hampshire_population_map. ...


Ancestry groups

The largest ancestry groups in New Hampshire are: [2]

The large Irish American and French-Canadian populations are descended largely from mill workers, and many still live in the former mill towns, like Manchester. New Hampshire has the highest percentage of residents of French/French-Canadian ancestry of any U.S. state. The fastest growth is along the southern border, which is within commuting range of Boston and other Massachusetts cities. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... A French American or Franco-American is a citizen of the United States of America of French descent and heritage. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... German Americans (German Deutschamerikaner) are citizens of the United States of ethnic German ancestry and currently form the largest ancestry group in the United States, accounting for 17% of the U.S. population. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Scotland. ... Scottish Americans or Scots Americans are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates in the northwest European nation of Scotland. ... Ulster-Scots are an Irish ethnic group descended from mainly Lowland Scots who settled in the Province of Ulster in Ireland, first beginning in large numbers during the 17th century. ... Irish population density in the United States, 1872. ... Canadiens redirects here. ...


According to the 2000 U.S. Census, 3.41% of the population aged 5 and over speak French at home, while 1.60% speak Spanish [3]. The 22nd United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


Religion

Percentage of New Hampshire residents who claimed a particular religious identity (from USA Today):[9] USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ...

    • "Christian" [unspecified] – 5%
  • Jewish – 1%
  • "Other" – 2%
  • No Religion – 17%
  • Groups with less than 1% affiliation – 8%
(may include Mormon/Latter Day Saints, Churches of Christ, non-denominational, Jehovah's Witnesses, Assemblies of God, Muslim/Islamic, Buddhist, Evangelical, Church of God, and Seventh-Day Adventist)

Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the United States denomination known as United Church of Christ. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... The Anglican Church in America (ACA) is a Continuing Anglican church body and the United States branch of the Traditional Anglican Communion. ... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity that identifies with the teachings of the sixteenth-century German reformer Martin Luther. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Athanasius · Augustine · Constantine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Calvin · Luther · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Pentecostal... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The charismatic movement began... Presbyterianism is a Christian denomination following Jesus which is most prevalent within the Reformed branch of Protestant Western Christianity. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A Latter Day Saint is an adherent of the Latter Day Saint movement, a group of denominations tracing their heritage to the teachings of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Church of Christ redirects here. ... In Christianity, the term non-denominational refers to those churches which have not formally aligned themselves with an established denomination, or remain otherwise officially autonomous. ... For other uses, see Assemblies of God (disambiguation). ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... A statue of the Sakyamuni Buddha in Tawang Gompa, India. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      In contemporary usage, the word evangelicalism refers to a collection of religious beliefs, practices, and traditions typified by an emphasis on evangelism [1]. Evangelical Christians describe evangelicalism as... Church of God is a name used by numerous, mostly unrelated bodies, most of which descend from either Pentecostal/Holiness or Adventist traditions. ... The Seventh-day Adventist (abbreviated Adventist[3]) Church is a Protestant Christian denomination which is distinguished mainly by its observance of Saturday, the seventh day of the week, as the Sabbath. ...

Economy

The Bureau of Economic Analysis estimates that New Hampshire's total state product in 2003 was $49 billion. Per capita personal income in 2005 was $37,835, 6th in the nation and 10 percent greater than the national average ($34,495). Its agricultural outputs are dairy products, nursery stock, cattle, apples and eggs. Its industrial outputs are machinery, electric equipment, rubber and plastic products and tourism.[10] New Hampshire experienced a significant shift in its economic base during the last century. Historically, the base was composed of the traditional New England manufactures of textiles, shoe-making, and small machining shops drawing upon low-wage labor from nearby small farms and from parts of Quebec. Today, these sectors contribute only 2% for textiles, 2% for leather goods, and 9% for machining of the state's total manufacturing dollar value (Source: U.S. Economic Census for 1997, Manufacturing, New Hampshire). They experienced a sharp decline due to obsolete plants and the lure of cheaper wages in the South. Download high resolution version (1106x1105, 281 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The U.S. Southern states or The South, known during the American Civil War era as Dixie, is a distinctive region of the United States with its own unique historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ...


The state has no general sales tax, no personal state income tax (the state does tax, at a 5 percent rate, income from dividends and interest) and the legislature has exercised fiscal restraint. Efforts to diversify the state's general economy have been ongoing. A sales tax is a consumption tax charged at the point of purchase for certain goods and services. ... States with no state income tax are in red, states taxing only dividend and interest income are in yellow Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Part of the Taxation series        State income tax is an income tax in the United States that is levied by each...


Additionally, New Hampshire's lack of a broad-based tax system (aside from the controversial state-wide property tax) has resulted in the state's local communities having some of the nation's highest property taxes. Overall, New Hampshire remains ranked 49th among states in combined average state and local tax burden.[11]


Law and government

State line on NH Rt. 111 in Hollis
State line on NH Rt. 111 in Hollis

The Governor of New Hampshire is John Lynch (Democrat). New Hampshire's two U.S. senators are Judd Gregg (Republican) and John E. Sununu (Republican). New Hampshire's two U.S. representatives (see district map) are Carol Shea-Porter (Democrat) and Paul Hodes (Democrat). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 210 KB) I took this picture myself. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 210 KB) I took this picture myself. ... Hollis is a town located in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire. ... // Representation in Washington U.S House Delegation U.S Senatorial Delegation Like the other states, New Hampshire has two Senators in the US Senate. ... For other persons named John Lynch, see John Lynch (disambiguation). ... Judd Gregg (born February 14, 1947) is a former Governor of New Hampshire and current United States Senator serving as ranking member of the Senate Budget Committee. ... John Edward Sununu (born September 10, 1964) is a Republican United States Senator from New Hampshire. ... Congressional districts for representation in the United States House of Representatives are determined after each census. ... Carol Shea-Porter (born December 2, 1952) is a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives from the state of New Hampshire. ... Paul Hodes is an attorney from the state of New Hampshire who formerly served at the Shaheen & Gordon Law Firm. ...


New Hampshire has a bifurcated executive branch, consisting of the Governor and a five-member Executive Council which votes on state contracts over $5,000 and "advises and consents" to the governor's nominations to major state positions such as department heads and all judgeships and pardon requests. New Hampshire does not have a Lieutenant Governor; the Senate President serves as "Acting Governor" whenever the Governor is unable to perform the duties. Executive Council of the State of New Hampshire (commonly Governors Council) is the Executive body of the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ... For the Breton religious festivals, see Pardon (ceremony). ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ...


The New Hampshire General Court is a bicameral legislative body, consisting of the House of Representatives and the Senate. The House of Representatives is the fourth-largest legislative body in the English speaking world with 400 members. Only the United States House of Representatives, the British House of Commons and the British House of Lords are larger.[12] Presumably because the position pays just $100 per year plus mileage, members are more likely to be retired. A survey published by the Associated Press in 2005 found that nearly half the members of the House are retired, with an average age close to 60. [4] The General Court meets in the New Hampshire State House. Type Bicameral Houses Senate (upper) House of Representatives (lower) President Sylvia Larsen, Democrat since December 6, 2006 Speaker Terie Norelli, Democrat since December 6, 2006 Members Senate: 24 House of Representatives: 400 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Meeting place New Hampshire State House Web site http://www. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... New Hampshire State House The New Hampshire State House is the state capitol building of the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ...


The state's sole appellate court is the New Hampshire Supreme Court. The Superior Court is the court of general jurisdiction and the only court which provides for jury trials in civil or criminal cases. The other state courts are the Probate Court, District Court, and the Family Division. The New Hampshire Supreme Court is the supreme court of the U. S. state of New Hampshire, and its sole appellate court seated in Concord. ... The New Hampshire Superior Court is the statewide court of general jurisdiction which provides jury trials in civil and criminal cases. ... This article is about civil law within the common law legal system. ... The term criminal law, sometimes called penal law, refers to any of various bodies of rules in different jurisdictions whose common characteristic is the potential for unique and often severe impositions as punishment for failure to comply. ... New Hampshire Probate Court in the U.S. state of New Hampshire, is the court which has jurisdiction over trusts, wills and estates, adoptions, termination of parental rights, name changes, guardianship of incapacitated persons, guardianship of minors, partition of property and involuntary admissions. ... The New Hampshire Distric Court is the community court of the U.S. state of New Hampshire, located in 36 cities and towns. ... New Hampshire Judicial Branch Family Division (simply Family Divsion) operates ten courts in three counties in the U.S. state of New Hampshire that deal with matters impacting families. ...


The New Hampshire State Constitution is the supreme law of the state, followed by the New Hampshire Revised Statutes Annotated. The State Constitution is the nation's only state constitution which acknowledges the right of revolution, and one of the few that does not expressly mandate the provision of a public school system. Wikisource has original text related to this article: New_Hampshire_Constitution The New Hampshire Constitution is the primary governing document of the State of New Hampshire which became effective on June 2, 1784. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... In political philosophy, the right to revolution (or right of rebellion) is a right articulated by John Locke in Two Treatises of Government as part of his social contract theory. ...


New Hampshire is also the only state with no mandatory seatbelt law for adults, and also has no motorcycle helmet law for adults nor mandatory vehicle insurance for automobiles. Although the state retains the death penalty for limited crimes, the last execution was conducted in 1939. New Hampshire is the only state that does not mandate public kindergarten, partly out of frugality and lack of funding, and partly out of belief in local control, a philosophy under which towns and cities, not the state, make as many decisions as possible. As of 2005, all but two dozen communities in the state provided public kindergarten. Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... For other uses, see Kindergarten (disambiguation). ...


New Hampshire is a "Dillon Rule" state, meaning that powers not specifically granted to municipalities are retained by the state government. Even so, there is within the state's legislature a strong sentiment favoring local control, particularly with regard to land use regulations. Traditionally, local government in New Hampshire is conducted by town meetings, but in 1995, municipalities were given the option of using an official ballot to decide local electoral and budgetary questions, as opposed to the more open and public town meeting. John Forrest Dillon (December 25, 1831 – May 6, 1914) was an American jurist who served on both federal and Iowa state courts, and who authored a highly influential treatise on the power of states over municipal governments. ... A town meeting is a meeting where an entire geographic area is invited to participate in a gathering, often for a political or administrative purpose. ...


New Hampshire is an Alcoholic beverage control state, and through the State Liquor Commission it takes in $100 million from the sale and distribution of liquor.[13] The state also leads the country in per capita sales of all forms of alcohol.[14] Map of Alcoholic Beverage Control States, current as of February 2006. ... The New Hampshire Liquor Commission regulates, and maintains a monopoly on the sale of, alcoholic beverages in the state of New Hampshire. ...


As of January 1, 2008, civil unions are legal in New Hampshire, giving all the rights associated with marriage in the state to same-sex couples.[15] is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Civil unions in New Hampshire are currently being pursued at a state legislative level. ...


Politics

New Hampshire is internationally famous for the New Hampshire primary, the first primary in the quadrennial American presidential election cycle. The primary draws more attention by far than all other primaries, and has often been decisive in shaping the national contest. Critics from other states have tried repeatedly but failed to reduce the state's primary clout. In Dixville Notch in Coos County and Hart's Location in Carroll County, residents vote at midnight the Tuesday the primary is being held. State law grants that a town where all registered citizens have voted may close early and announce their results. These are traditionally the first towns in both New Hampshire and the U.S. to vote in presidential primaries and elections. The New Hampshire primary is the first of a number of statewide political party primary elections held in the United States every four years, as part of the process of the Democratic and Republican parties choosing their candidate for the presidential elections on the subsequent November. ... The series of U.S. presidential primaries is one of the first steps in the process of electing a President of the United States. ... The Balsams, a resort hotel in Dixville Notch and the site of the famous midnight vote Dixville Notch is an unincorporated small village in the Dixville township of Coos County, New Hampshire, USA, which is known for being one of the first places to declare the results in Presidential elections. ... Harts Location is an town in Carroll County, New Hampshire. ...


In the past, New Hampshire has often voted Republican. Some sources trace the founding of the Republican Party to the town of Exeter in 1853. The state is considered to be the most conservative state in the Northeast. However, the state supported Bill Clinton in 1992 and 1996, but prior to that had only strayed from the Republican Party for three candidates—Woodrow Wilson, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Lyndon B. Johnson. GOP redirects here. ... Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Rockingham County Incorporated 1638  - Board of Selectmen Paul Binette, Chairman Robert Eastman Joe Pace William Campbell Lionel Ingram Area    - Town 51. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856—February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... FDR redirects here. ... LBJ redirects here. ...


In recent years, however, in both national and local elections it became a swing state. It was the only U.S. state to give its electoral votes to George W. Bush in the 2000 election but then go Democratic in the 2004 election. New Hampshire gave its four electoral votes to John Kerry in 2004 with 50.2% of the vote. The change from voting Republican was solidified by the 2006 midterm elections, in which both Congressional seats were won by Democrats (Paul Hodes defeated Charlie Bass and Carol Shea-Porter defeated Jeb Bradley); Democratic Governor John Lynch was re-elected in an historic landslide with 74% of the vote; Democrats gained a majority on the Executive Council; and Democrats took both houses of the State Legislature for the first time since 1911. Democrats now hold both the legislature and the governorship for the first time since 1874. [5] Republicans hold both U.S. Senate seats, which were not up for a vote in 2006. Prior to the 2006 elections, New Hampshire was the only New England state in which Republicans held majorities in both legislative chambers.[16] The New Hampshire General Assembly is the largest among state legislatures in the U.S., with 400 members, and has the most representatives per capita (approximately one for every 3,200 citizens). New Hampshire has been known for a Libertarian-like political tradition that values individual freedom and limited exercise of state governmental powers. The Free State Project selected New Hampshire as its destination due to its "Live Free or Die" libertarian-esque heritage.[17] This article is about the US political term. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The United States presidential election of 2000 was a contest between the Democratic candidate Al Gore versus the Republican candidate of George W. Bush. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The United States presidential election of 2004 was held on Election Day, Tuesday, November 2, 2004. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Paul Hodes is an attorney from the state of New Hampshire who formerly served at the Shaheen & Gordon Law Firm. ... Charles Foster Charlie Bass (born January 8, 1952) is a former Republican member of the United States House of Representatives for the second district of New Hampshire(map). ... Carol Shea-Porter (born December 2, 1952) is a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives from the state of New Hampshire. ... Joseph E. Jeb Bradley (born October 20, 1952) is a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives for the New Hampshires 1st congressional district (map). ... For other persons named John Lynch, see John Lynch (disambiguation). ... See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ... For other uses, see State (disambiguation). ... The Free State Project (FSP) is a plan to have 20,000 or more liberty-oriented people move to a single state of the United States, with the intent of influencing local politics and policy. ...


Education

High schools

New Hampshire has more than 150 public high schools, many of which serve more than one town. The largest is Pinkerton Academy in Derry, which is owned by a private non-profit organization and serves as the public high school of a number of neighboring towns. There are at least twenty private high schools in the state. Pinkerton Academy is a secondary school in Derry, New Hampshire. ...

See also: List of high schools in New Hampshire

// This is a list of high schools in the state of New Hampshire. ...

Colleges and universities

See New Hampshire state entry. ... Antioch University New England is a private graduate school located in Keene, New Hampshire. ... Chester College of New England in Chester, New Hampshire is a bachelors degree-granting college that provides a foundation in the liberal arts and the fine arts, complemented by majors in the professional arts. ... Colby-Sawyer College is a small, liberal arts college situated on 190 grassy acres in picturesque New London, New Hampshire which abuts Lake Sunapee, Pleasant Lake and Little Sunapee Lake. ... Daniel Webster College is a four-year, private college in Nashua, NH. Their undergraduate degrees are aviation/air traffic management, aviation flight operations (professional pilot training), aviation management, business management, computer science, information systems, management and information technology, social science, sport management, mechanical engineering, and aeronautical engineering. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... This article is about the university in Rindge. ... This article is about the law school in Concord. ... Hesser College is a for-profit college with several campuses in New Hampshire. ... Lebanon College is a two-year private not-for-profit college located in Lebanon, New Hampshire. ... McIntosh College is a college in Dover, New Hampshire. ... New England College, also known as NEC, is a four-year, private, liberal arts college located in Henniker, New Hampshire. ... The New Hampshire Community Technical Colleges (NHCTC) is an organization of 12 public community colleges located throughout New Hampshire. ... New Hampshire Technical Institute (NHTI) is a two-year community college located in Concord, New Hampshire. ... New Hampshire Community Technical College - Manchester is a college in Manchester, New Hampshire. ... The New Hampshire Institute of Art is a bachelors degree-granting college that provides an undergraduate education in the the fine arts, complemented by majors in the professional arts. ... Rivier College in 2006 Rivier College is a Catholic liberal arts college located in Nashua, New Hampshire, United States. ... Saint Anselm College is a private, Roman Catholic, coeducational liberal arts college in the United States. ... Southern New Hampshire University, also known as SNHU, is a private university in Manchester, New Hampshire. ... The Thomas More College of Liberal Arts is dedicated to Classical education in the Catholic intellectual tradition. ... The University System of New Hampshire (USNH), established in 1963, is responsible for overseeing the University of New Hampshire, Plymouth State University, Keene State College, and Granite State College. ... University of New Hampshire (UNH) is a public university in the University System of New Hampshire (USNH). ... Granite State College is an institution of the University System of New Hampshire. ... Keene State College is liberal arts college in Keene, New Hampshire. ... Plymouth State University, formerly Plymouth State College, is a regional comprehensive university located in Plymouth, New Hampshire and part of the University System of New Hampshire. ... The University of New Hampshire at Manchester (UNH-M) was established in 1985, as the sixth college of the University of New Hampshire. ...

Media

Daily newspapers

Concord Monitor - Concord Conway Daily Sun - Conway Eagle Times - Claremont Fosters Daily Democrat - Dover Laconia Citizen - Laconia Laconia Daily Sun - Laconia Keene Sentinel - Keene New Hampshire Business Review - New Hampshire New Hampshire Union Leader - Manchester Portsmouth Herald - Portsmouth Nashua Telegraph - Nashua The New Hampshire - University of New Hampshire The... The Berlin Daily Sun is a five-day (Monday through Friday) free daily newspaper published in the town of Berlin, New Hampshire, USA, covering the Berlin, Gorham and the North Country. The paper is distributed in Berlin, Gorham, Errol, Milan and Shelburne, New Hampshire, all in Coos County. ... The Concord Monitor is the daily newspaper for Concord, the state capital of New Hampshire. ... The North Country Press Club is the name of a newspaper company based in Conway, New Hampshire. ... The Eagle Times is a daily newspaper based in Claremont, New Hampshire, serving the Connecticut River Valley in New Hampshire and Vermont. ... Claremont is a city in Sullivan County, New Hampshire, USA. The population was 13,151 at the 2000 census. ... The Eagle-Tribune is a newspaper in North Andover, Massachusetts. ...   Settled: 1655 â€“ Incorporated: 1847 Zip Code(s): 01840 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ... Fosters Daily Democrat is a six-day (Monday-Saturday) afternoon broadsheet newspaper published in Dover, New Hampshire, for the communities of southeast New Hampshire and southwest Maine. ... Nickname: Location within New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country United States State New Hampshire County Strafford Settled 1623 Incorporated 1623 (town) Incorporated 1855 (city) Government  - City Manager Mike Joyal  - Mayor Scott Myers  - City Council Robert Keays David Scott Catherine Cheney Dennis Ciotti Douglas DeDe Dean Trefethen Harvey Turner Area  - City  29. ... The Keene Sentinel is a daily newspaper published in Keene, New Hampshire, a small city in the southwest corner of this U.S. state. ... The Citizen is a six-day (Monday-Saturday) daily newspaper in Laconia, New Hampshire, the largest local paper serving the Lakes Region of that state. ... The New Hampshire Union Leader is the daily newspaper of Manchester, the largest city in the state of New Hampshire. ... Nickname: Location in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Hillsborough County Incorporated 1751 Government  - Mayor Frank Guinta (R) Area  - City  34. ... The Portsmouth Herald (and Herald Sunday) is a seven-day daily newspaper serving Greater Portsmouth, New Hampshire. ... The Telegraph of Nashua is a daily newspaper in Nashua, New Hampshire. ... The Valley News (and Sunday Valley News) is a seven-day morning daily newspaper based in Lebanon, New Hampshire, covering the Upper Valley region of New Hampshire and Vermont. ... West Lebanon, New Hampshire, is a small village (pop. ...

Other publications

Seacoast Media Group is a subsidiary of Ottaway Community Newspapers, itself a division of Dow Jones & Company. ... Seacoast Media Group is a subsidiary of Ottaway Community Newspapers, itself a division of Dow Jones & Company. ... Hippo Press is a free weekly alternative newspaper based in Manchester, New Hampshire. ... The Keene Free Press as available on the streets of Keene, New Hampshire. ... The Milford Cabinet is the commonly used name for the weekly newspaper The Cabinet, published in Milford, New Hampshire since 1802. ... The New Hampshire, or TNH, is the only student-run newspaper of the University of New Hampshire since 1911. ... New Hampshire Business Review is a bi-monthly publication, based in Manchester, covering business-related issues in New Hampshire. ... The New Hampshire Gazette is a non-profit, alternative, bi-weekly newspaper published in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. ...

Radio stations

See List of radio stations in New Hampshire.

This page lists radio stations available in the state of New Hampshire as well as those from abutting states with significant presence in the New Hampshire radio markets. ...

Television stations

This is a list of broadcast television stations serving cities in the state of New Hampshire. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... WMUR, an ABC affiliate, is a Manchester, New Hampshire based local television station. ... PBS redirects here. ... New Hampshire Public Television is a television company and public broadcasting mini-network in New Hampshire, licenced by the University of New Hampshire and part of the Public Broadcasting Service network. ... MyNetworkTV (sometimes written My Network TV, and unofficially abbreviated MyNet, MyTV, MNT, or MNTV) is a television network in the United States, owned by News Corporation. ... WZMY is an independent television station serving Southern New Hampshire and the northern fringes of the Boston market. ...

Culture

In the spring, New Hampshire's many sap houses hold sugaring off open houses. In summer, New Hampshire is home to many county fairs, the largest being the Hopkinton State Fair, in Contoocook. New Hampshire's lake region is home to many summer camps, especially around Lake Winnipesaukee, and is a popular tourist destination. In the fall New Hampshire is host to the New Hampshire Highland Games. New Hampshire has also registered an official tartan with the proper authorities in Scotland, used to make kilts worn by the State Police while they serve during the games. The fall foliage peaks in mid October. In the winter, New Hampshire's ski areas attract visitors from a wide area, and New Hampshire has more miles of snowmobile trails than roads.[18] After the lakes freeze over they become dotted with ice fishing ice houses, known locally as bobhouses. Obelisk at 2100 South 1100 East in Sugar House Sugar House (also spelled Sugarhouse) is one of Salt Lake City, Utahs oldest neighborhoods. ... Roundabouts (or carousels) are traditional attractions, often seen at fairs. ... Contoocook is a census-designated place located in Merrimack County, New Hampshire. ... Squam Lake from a mountaintop: a typical vista in the Lakes Region. ... Lake Winnipesaukee at Sunset Lake Winnipesaukee is the largest lake in New Hampshire. ... Opening ceremonies of 2004 Canmore Highland games Highland games are events held throughout the year in Scotland and other countries as a way of celebrating Scottish and Celtic culture and heritage, especially that of the Scottish Highlands. ... For the artificial athletic track surface, see tartan track. ... This article is about the country. ... Maple leaves Autumn leaf color is a phenomenon that affects the normally green leaves of many deciduous trees and shrubs by which they take on, during a few weeks in the autumn months, one or many colors that range from red to yellow. ... // Main article: List of ski areas and resorts This is a list of ski areas and resorts in the United States. ... A snowmobile tour at Yellowstone National Park. ... Ice fishing in the Finnish Miljoonapilkki fishing competition. ...


Professional sports teams

Minor league baseball teams
Minor league hockey team
Arena football team
American Basketball Association
  • Manchester Millrats
Minor league soccer team

For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... The Nashua Pride are a minor league baseball team which plays in Nashua, New Hampshire. ... The New Hampshire Fisher Cats are a minor league baseball team based in Manchester, New Hampshire. ... This is a list of ice hockey leagues from around the world. ... The Manchester Monarchs are an ice hockey team in the American Hockey League. ... af2 (short for arenafootball2) is the name of the Arena Football Leagues minor league, which started play in 2000. ... The Manchester Wolves are a professional arena football team, based at the Verizon Wireless Arena in Manchester, New Hampshire. ... For the league that began in 1999, see American Basketball Association (2000-). The American Basketball Association (ABA) was a professional basketball league founded in 1967, and eventually merged, in part, with the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... The Manchester Millrats are a 2007 expansion team in the American Basketball Association based in Manchester, New Hampshire. ... The United Soccer Leagues Second Division (often referred to as simply, USL-2) is a professional mens soccer league in North America, part of the United Soccer Leagues (USL) league pyramid. ... The New Hampshire Phantoms are a minor league soccer team based in Manchester, New Hampshire. ...

In fiction

Location in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Hillsborough County Incorporated 1760  - Board of Selectmen Joe Byk, Chairman Gene Kellogg Elizabeth Thomas Area    - Town  38. ... Our Town is a play by Thornton Wilder that is set in the fictional community of Grovers Corners, New Hampshire. ... Image:Thorntonwilderteeth. ... Our Town by Thornton Wilder Our Town is a three act play by Thornton Wilder which is, perhaps, the most frequently produced play by an American playwright. ... Cover of the Modern Classics edition of the novel and its sequel Peyton Place is a 1956 novel by Grace Metalious. ... Gilmanton is a town in Belknap County, New Hampshire, United States. ... Archie Comics is an American comic book publisher known for its many series featuring the fictional teenage Archie Andrews, Betty Cooper, Veronica Lodge, Reggie Mantle and Forsythe Jughead Jones characters created by Bob Montana. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... National Lampoons Animal House is a 1978 comedy film in which a misfit group of fraternity boys take on the system at their college. ... Chris Miller (born 1942) is an American screenwriter, most notable for his work on National Lampoon magazine and Animal House (he also had a bit part as Curtis Wayne Hardbar Fuller and was credited as Christian Miller). ... Lil Abner was a comic strip in United States newspapers, featuring a fictional clan of hillbillies in the town of Dogpatch. ... Dogpatch redirects here. ... Seabrook is a town located in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, USA. As of the 2000 census, the town had a total population of 7,934. ... John Knowles (September 16, 1926 - November 29, 2001), b. ... A Separate Peace is John Knowles first published novel, released in 1959. ... , Phillips Exeter Academy (most commonly called Exeter, Phillips Exeter or PEA) is a co-educational independent boarding school for grades 9–12, located on 619 acres in Exeter, New Hampshire, U.S., fifty miles north of Boston [1]. In over two centuries of its existence, Phillips Exeter Academy has played... Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Rockingham County Incorporated 1638  - Board of Selectmen Paul Binette, Chairman Robert Eastman Joe Pace William Campbell Lionel Ingram Area    - Town 51. ... John Winslow Irving (born March 2, 1942 as John Wallace Blunt, Jr. ... The World According to Garp book cover The World According to Garp is a novel by John Irving. ... For the signatory of the Declaration of Independence, see Josiah Bartlett. ... This article is about a TV show. ... Julian May (born July 10, 1931) is an American science fiction writer, best known for her Saga of Pliocene Exile (Saga of the Exiles in the UK) and Galactic Milieu books. ... Julian Mays Galactic Milieu Series of science fiction novels is the sequel (and prequel) to her Saga of Pliocene Exile. ...

Notable residents or natives

The following are people who were either born, raised, or who gained significant prominence for living in New Hampshire: // Ernest Blood - native Matt Bonner - native Chris Carpenter - native Clint Edinger (Hockey) - native Carlton Fisk - native Bode Miller - native Tara Mounsey - native Chad Paronto - native Brian A. Rice (Hockey) - native Kevin... Josiah Bartlett (November 21, 1729–May 19, 1795), was an American physician and statesman who, as a delegate to the Continental Congress for New Hampshire, signed the Declaration of Independence. ... This article is about the writer. ... Kenneth Lauren Burns (born July 29, 1953) is an American director and producer of documentary films known for his style of making use of original prints and photographs. ... Christopher John (Chris) Carpenter (born April 27, 1975 in Exeter, New Hampshire) is a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who has played for the St. ... Mary Baker Eddy (born Mary Morse Baker July 16, 1821 – December 3, 1910) founded the Church of Christ, Scientist in 1879 and was the author of its fundamental doctrinal textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures. ... Carlton Ernest Fisk (born December 26, 1947 in Bellows Falls, Vermont) is a former Major League Baseball catcher who played for 24 years with the Boston Red Sox and Chicago White Sox. ... Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ... Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811 – November 29, 1872) was an American editor of a leading newspaper, a founder of the Republican party, reformer and politician. ... Donald Hall (born September 20, 1928) is an American poet and the U.S. Poet Laureate. ... John Winslow Irving (born March 2, 1942 as John Wallace Blunt, Jr. ... Dean Kamen on one of his inventions, the Segway PT. President Clinton and Kamen in the White House, Kamen riding his innovative invention, the iBOT Mobility System. ... Maxine Kumin (b. ... Sharon Christa Corrigan McAuliffe (September 2, 1948 – January 28, 1986) was an American teacher from Concord, New Hampshire who was selected from among more than 11,000 applicants to be the first teacher in space. ... Richard Dick J. McDonald (February 16, 1909 – July 14, 1998) and Maurice Mac McDonald (November 26, 1902 – December 11, 1971) were two early American fast food pioneers, originally from Manchester, New Hampshire, who established the first McDonalds restaurant in 1940. ... Grace Metalious (1924 - 1964) was an American author, best known for the controversial novel Peyton Place. ... Seth Adam Meyers (born December 28, 1973 in Bedford, New Hampshire) is an American actor and comedian best known as a cast member of Saturday Night Live (SNL). ... Samuel Bode Miller (born October 12, 1977), best known as Bode Miller (pronounced Bo-dee, in IPA ), is an American alpine skier. ... Patrick Jake ORourke (born November 14, 1947) is an American political satirist, journalist, and writer. ... The Dinky Bird, by Maxfield Parrish, an illustration from Poems of Childhood by Eugene Field, 1904. ... Jodi Picoult Jodi Picoult (IPA pronunciation: [1]) (born 1966) is an American author. ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... John Sargent Pillsbury (July 29, 1828, Sutton, New Hampshire – October 18, 1901, Minneapolis, Minnesota) was an American politician and businessman. ... Penny Pitou (8 Oct. ... Charles Haskell Revson (October 11, 1906 – August, 1975) was a pioneering cosmetics industry executive who created and managed Revlon Cosmetics through five decades. ... Augustus Saint Gaudens, 1905 Augustus Saint-Gaudens (Dublin, March 1, 1848 - Cornish, New Hampshire, August 3, 1907), was the Irish-born American sculptor of the Beaux-Arts generation who most embodied the ideals of the American Renaissance. ... Jerome David Salinger (born January 1, 1919) is an American author best known for The Catcher in the Rye, a classic coming-of-age story that has enjoyed enduring popularity since its publication in 1951. ... Adam Richard Sandler (born September 9, 1966) is an American comedian, actor, musician, screenwriter, and film producer. ... Alan Bartlett Shepard, Jr. ... Sarah Kate Silverman (born December 1, 1970) is an American comedian, writer and actress. ... David Hackett Souter (born September 17, 1939) has been a US Supreme Court Associate Justice since 1990. ... For other persons named John Stark, see John Stark (disambiguation). ... Robert Alan Tewksbury (born November 30, 1960 in Concord, New Hampshire) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. ... Stephen Victor Tallarico (born March 26, 1948 in Yonkers, New York[1]), better known as Steven Tyler (and often nicknamed The Demon of Screamin) is an American musician and songwriter. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... John Wentworth (1671-1730), colonial Lt. ...

Granite State firsts

See List of New Hampshire-related topics Contents: Top - A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 1-9 45th Parallel A B Belknap County C Carroll County Cheshire County Cohos Trail Concord Connecticut Lakes Coos County Counties (list...

  • On January 5, 1776 at Exeter, the Provincial Congress of New Hampshire ratified the first independent state constitution, free of British rule. Having done this six months before co-founding the United States of America, New Hampshire was the first post-colonial sovereign country in the Americas.
  • On June 12, 1800, Fernald's Island in the Piscataqua River became the first government-sanctioned US Navy shipyard.
  • Started in 1822, Dublin's Juvenile Library was the first free public library.
  • In 1828, the first women's strike in the nation took place at Dover's Cocheco Mills.
  • In 1845, the machine shop of Nashuan John H. Gage was considered the first shop devoted to the manufacture of machinists' tools.
  • On August 29, 1866, Sylvester Marsh demonstrated the first mountain-climbing "cog" railway.
  • Finished on June 27, 1874, the first trans-Atlantic telecommunications cable between Europe and America stretched from Balinskelligs Bay, Ireland, to Rye Beach, New Hampshire.
  • On February 6, 1901, a group of nine conservationists founded the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests, the first forest conservation advocacy group in the US.
  • In 1908, Monsignor Pierre Hevey organized the nation's first credit union, in Manchester, to help mill workers save and borrow money.
  • In 1933 the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen held the first crafts fair in the nation.[20]
  • In 1934, the current record for the highest recorded surface wind gust (231 mph) was set on Mount Washington.[21]
  • In 1937 The Belknap Recreation Area installed the first chairlift for skiing in the East.
  • In 1938 Earl Tupper, of Berlin, invented Tupperware and founded Tupper Plastics Company.
  • In July 1944, the Bretton Woods Agreement, the first fully-negotiated system intended to govern monetary relations among independent nation-states, was signed at the Mount Washington Hotel.
  • On May 5, 1961, Alan Shepard of Derry rode a Mercury spacecraft and became the first American in space.
  • In 1963, New Hampshire's legislature approved the nation's first modern state lottery, which began play in 1964.
  • In 1966, Ralph Baer of Sanders Associates, Inc., Nashua, recruited engineers to develop the first home video game.
  • Christa McAuliffe of Concord became the first private citizen selected to venture into space. She perished with her six space shuttle Challenger crewmates on January 28, 1986.
  • On May 17, 1996 New Hampshire became the first state in the country to install a green LED traffic light. NH was selected because they were the first to start installing the red and yellow ones statewide.[22]
  • On May 31, 2007 New Hampshire became "...the first state to embrace same-sex unions without a court order or the threat of one."[23][24]

is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: New Hampshire Constitution The New Hampshire State Constitution is the primary governing document of the State of New Hampshire ratified on June 2, 1784. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas in an equal-area projection The Americas are the lands of New World, consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... Dublin is a town located in Cheshire County, New Hampshire. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... The Mount Washington Cog Railway The Mount Washington Cog Railway was the worlds first mountain climbing cog railway (rack-and-pinion railway) with a Marsh rack system. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A credit union is a cooperative financial institution that is owned and controlled by its members. ... The Summit Mount Washington is the highest peak in the American Northeast at 6,288 ft. ... Earl Silas Tupper (July 28, 1907–October 5, 1983) was the inventor of Tupperware, an airtight plastic container for storing food. ... Tupperware logo A Tupperware storage container. ... Tupperware Brands Corporation, formerly Tupperware Corporation, is a multinational direct marketing company. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Mount Washington hotel is situated near Mount Washington, in the town of Carroll. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named Alan Shepard, see Alan Shepard (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ralph H. Baer (born 1922) is a German-born American inventor, noted for his many contributions to games and the video game industry. ... Sharon Christa Corrigan McAuliffe (September 2, 1948 – January 28, 1986) was an American teacher from Concord, New Hampshire who was selected from among more than 11,000 applicants to be the first teacher in space. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... “LED” redirects here. ... This article is about a traffic control device. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

See also

New Hampshire Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... The Free State Project (FSP) is a plan to have 20,000 or more liberty-oriented people move to a single state of the United States, with the intent of influencing local politics and policy. ... LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Persecution Violence This box:      LGBT rights in New Hampshire refers to the rights accorded to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals in the US state of New Hampshire. ... Map of the ten counties of the State of New Hampshire The United States Census Bureau has defined two Combined Statistical Areas (CSAs),[1] two Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs),[2] and six Micropolitan Statistical Areas (μSAs)[3] in the State of New Hampshire. ... The New Hampshire State Police is the state police agency for New Hampshire, which has jurisdiction anywhere in the state. ... // Early history (1910-1950) Recent history (1950-1990) Scouting in New Hampshire today There are two Boy Scouts of America local councils in New Hampshire. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Elevations and Distances in the United States. U.S Geological Survey (29 April 2005). Retrieved on November 6, 2006.
  2. ^ In the event of a vacancy in the office of Governor, the President of the State Senate is first in line for succession.
  3. ^ NH has a room and meals sales tax and a business profits income tax. Alaska does not have a statewide sales or income tax, but many Alaska towns have a sales tax. No New Hampshire towns have a sales tax.
  4. ^ NH Department of Resources and Economic Development - State Facts
  5. ^ VERMONT v. NEW HAMPSHIRE, 289 U.S. 593 (1933)
  6. ^ Dellinger, Dan (2004-06-23). Snowfall - Average Total In Inches. NOAA. Retrieved on 2007-05-25.
  7. ^ Annual average number of tornadoes 1953-2004. NOAA. Retrieved on 2007-05-25.
  8. ^ 2006 arborday.org Hardiness Zone Map. National Arbor Day Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-05-25.
  9. ^ "What is your religion...if any?". USA Today. Retrieved on 2008-01-03.
  10. ^ State at a Glance - New Hampshire. U.S. Department of Labor (2007-10-12). Retrieved on 2007-10-14.
  11. ^ The Tax Foundation - New Hampshire's State and Local Tax Burden, 1970–2006
  12. ^ "House Fast Fact", New Hampshire House of Representatives
  13. ^ State of New Hampshire Department of Administrative Services - Monthly Revenue Focus (FY 2005)
  14. ^ National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism - SURVEILLANCE REPORT #73: APPARENT PER CAPITA ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION: NATIONAL, STATE, AND REGIONAL TRENDS, 1977–2003
  15. ^ Office of the Governor of the State of New Hampshire (2007-05-31). "Governor Signs Law Establishing Civil Unions in New Hampshire". Press release. Retrieved on 2007-07-14.
  16. ^ "State Vote 2006: Partisan Composition of State Legislatures: New Hampshire" National Conference of State Legislatures, retrieved November 17, 2006.
  17. ^ "Free State Project: State Vote Results"
  18. ^ It's Time for Winter Fun
  19. ^ Susan Morse, "Last of the Yankees", Portsmouth Herald, July 4, 2004.
  20. ^ [http://www.nhcrafts.org/annualfair.htm League of New Hampshire Craftsmen's Fair] Accessed 9 November 2007
  21. ^ The Story of the World Record Wind
  22. ^ Sending a bright signal, Concord Monitor pg B-6, May 18, 1996
  23. ^ Wang, Beverley. (26 April 2007) State Senate approves civil unions for same-sex couples Concord Monitor. Accessed 26 April 2007.
  24. ^ NH Firsts & Bests Accessed 9 November 2007

is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The General Court meets in the New Hampshire State House The New Hampshire General Court is the state legislature of the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ... Look up article in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a scientific agency of the United States Department of Commerce focused on the conditions of the oceans and the atmosphere. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a scientific agency of the United States Department of Commerce focused on the conditions of the oceans and the atmosphere. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Arbor Day is an American holiday that encourages the planting and care of trees. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Michael Sletcher. New England. Westport, CT, 2004.

External links

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Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ...

Preceded by
South Carolina
List of U.S. states by date of statehood
Ratified Constitution on June 21, 1788 (9th)
Succeeded by
Virginia

Coordinates: 44° N 71.5° W Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Federal districts are subdivisions of a federal system of government. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... Motto Samoa, Muamua Le Atua(Samoan) Samoa, Let God Be First Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner, Amerika Samoa Capital Pago Pago; Fagatogo (seat of government) Official languages English, Samoan Government  -  Governor Togiola Tulafono United States unincorporated territory  -  Treaty of Berlin 1899   -  Deed of Cession of Tutuila 1900   -  Deed of Cession... Anthem: Gi Talo Gi Halom Tasi(Chamorro) Satil Matawal Pacifiko(Carolinian) Capital Saipan Official languages English, Chamorro, Carolinian Government Presidential representative democracy  -  Governor Benigno R. Fitial  -  Lt. ... For the board game, see Puerto Rico (board game). ... Motto United in Pride and Hope Anthem Virgin Islands March Capital (and largest city) Charlotte Amalie Official languages English Government  -  Head of State George W. Bush  -  Governor John de Jongh Organized, unincorporated territory  -  Revised Organic Act 22 July 1954  Area  -  Total 346. ... The flag of the United States is used for all of the United States Minor Outlying Islands The United States Minor Outlying Islands, a statistical designation defined by ISO 3166-1, consists of nine insular United States possessions: All of these islands are in the Pacific Ocean except Navassa Island... Bajo Nuevo Bank, also called the Petrel Islands, is located in the western United States and Jamaica. ... Baker Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°13′N 176°31′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Howland Island Howland Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°48′N 176°38′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Jarvis Island (formerly also known as Bunker Island[1]) is an uninhabited 4. ... Johnston Atoll is a 130 km² atoll in the North Pacific Ocean at 16°45′N 169°30′W, about one-third of the way from Hawaii to the Marshall Islands. ... The flag of the US is used for Kingman Reef Kingman Reef Kingman Reef—NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Kingman Reef is a one-square-kilometer tropical coral reef located in the North Pacific Ocean, roughly half way between Hawaiian Islands and American Samoa at 6°24... Orthographic projection centred over Midway. ... Navassa Island map from The World Factbook Navassa Island - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Navassa Island (La Navase in French, Lanavaz in Haitian Kreyòl) is a small, uninhabited island in the Caribbean Sea. ... Palmyra Atoll - Landsat Image N-03-05_2000 (1:50,000) Palmyra Atoll - Marplot Map (1:50,000) Orthographic projection over Palmyra Atoll Palmyra Atoll, is an incorporated atoll administered by the United States government. ... Serranilla Bank is a western Caribbean island located about 210 miles north-northeast of Nicaragua. ... USGS Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite image of Wake Island. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America and is... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
New Hampshire Vacations - State Of New Hampshire - New Hampshire Hotels (564 words)
The state capital of New Hampshire is Concord and it also have several attractions worth visiting.
New Hampshire’s largest developed state park is located in the southeast of the city, the Bear Brook State Park.
An excellent place to stay while in New Hampshire is the bed and breakfast Adair which is in Bethlehem.
Concord, New Hampshire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1485 words)
Concord is the capital of New Hampshire, a state of the United States of America.
New Hampshire State House, designed by architect Stuart Park and constructed between 1815 and 1818, is the oldest state house in which the legislature meets in its original chambers.
Lewis Downing was a Republican and served in the legislature in 1865-1866 and was one of the founders of the Unitarian Society in Concord.
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