FACTOID # 9: The bookmobile capital of America is Kentucky.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > New England
New England
Political history
Chartering as Plymouth Council for New England 1620
Formation as United Colonies of New England 1643
Formation as Dominion of New England 1686
Admission to U.S.
 - Connecticut
 - Massachusetts
 - New Hampshire
 - Rhode Island
 - Vermont
 - Maine

 - January 9, 1788 (5th)
 - February 6, 1788 (6th)
 - June 21, 1788 (9th)
 - May 29, 1790 (13th)
 - March 4, 1791 (14th)
 - separated from Mass. March 15, 1820 (23rd)
Regional statistics
Largest city Boston
U.S. States Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut
Area
 - Total

71,991.8 mi² (186,458.8 km²)
Population
 - Total (2006)
 - Density

 14,269,989[1]
198.2 people/mi² (87.7 people/km²)

New England is a region of the United States located in the northeastern corner of the country, consisting of the modern states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.[2] New England is a region of the north-eastern United States of America, now regarded as comprising the states of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, and Vermont. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_New_England. ... The sea to sea grant of Plymouth Council for New England is shown in green. ... Mercator projection: New England Confederation in yellow The United Colonies of New England, commonly known as the New England Confederation, was a political and military alliance of the British colonies of Massachusetts, Plymouth, Connecticut, and New Haven. ... The Dominion of New England was the name of a short-lived administrative union of English colonies in the New England region of North America. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Boston redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Look up Region in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ...


In one of the earliest English settlements in the New World, English Pilgrims fleeing religious persecution in Europe first settled in New England in 1620, in the colony of Plymouth. In the late 18th century, the New England colonies would be among the first North American British colonies to demonstrate ambitions of independence from the British Crown, although they would later oppose the War of 1812 between the United States and Britain. Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... This article is about a particular group of seventeenth-century European colonists of North America. ... Religious is a term with both a technical definition and folk use. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Seal of Plymouth Colony Map of Plymouth Colony showing town locations Capital Plymouth Language(s) English Religion Puritan, Separatist Government Monarchy Legislature General Court History  - Established 1620  - First Thanksgiving 1621  - Pequot War 1637  - King Philips War 1675–1676  - Part of the Dominion of New England 1686–1688  - Disestablished 1691... North American redirects here. ... This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, one of 16 that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, the other Commonwealth realm monarchies, and other relevant articles, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ...


In the 19th century, it played a prominent role in the movement to abolish slavery in the United States, hosted the first pieces of American literature and philosophy, was home to the beginnings of free public education, and was the first region of the United States to be transformed by the North American Industrial Revolution.[3] This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... Slave redirects here. ... American literature refers to written or literary work produced in the area of the United States and Colonial America. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ...

Contents

History

An early flag of the Massachusetts Bay Colony
An early flag of the Massachusetts Bay Colony[4]
The Flag of New England during the Revolutionary War [1]

New England's earliest inhabitants were Algonquian-speaking Native Americans including the Abenaki, the Penobscot, and the Wampanoag. Prior to the arrival of Europeans, the Western Abenakis inhabited New Hampshire and Vermont, as well as parts of Québec and western Maine. Their principal town was Norridgewock, in present-day Maine. The Penobscot were settled along the Penobscot River in Maine. The Wampanoag occupied southeastern Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and the islands of Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket. This article presents the History of New England, the oldest clearly-defined region of the United States, unique among U.S. geographic regions in that it is also a former political entity. ... Image File history File links New_England_blank_flag. ... Image File history File links New_England_blank_flag. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on... Image File history File links New_England_pine_flag. ... Image File history File links New_England_pine_flag. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... The Algonquian (also Algonkian) languages are a subfamily of Native American languages that includes most of the languages in the Algic language family (others are Wiyot and Yurok of northwestern California). ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... The Abenaki (also Wabanuok or Wabanaki) are a tribe of Native Americans/First Nations belonging to the Algonquian peoples of northeastern North America. ... Seal of the Penobscot Indian Nation of Maine For other uses, see Penobscot (disambiguation). ... The Wampanoag (Wôpanâak in the Wampanoag language) are a Native American people. ... The Norridgewock were a People of the Dawn, an Eastern tribe of the United States. ... Panorama of the Penobscot River in Millinocket, Maine. ... The Wampanoag (Wôpanâak in the Wampanoag language) are a Native American people. ... Map of Marthas Vineyard. ... Nantucket is an island south of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, formed of glacial moraine. ...


Compared to other North American settlements, New England was sparsely populated and densely forested, leading European settlers to believe North America was a "virgin land."[5]


The Virginia Companies compete

On April 10, 1606, King James I of Britain chartered the two Virginia Companies, of London and Plymouth, respectively. These were privately-funded proprietary ventures, and the purpose of each was to claim land for England, trade, and return a profit.[6] Competition between the two companies grew to where their potential New World territory overlapped, and would be finalized based upon results. is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 27 - The trial of Guy Fawkes and other conspirators begins ending in their execution on January 31 May 17 - Supporters of Vasili Shusky invade the Kremlin and kill Premier Dmitri December 26 - Shakespeares King Lear performed in court Storm buries a village of St Ismails near... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary... The 1606 grants by James I to the London and Plymouth companies. ...


The Virginia Company of London successfully established the Jamestown Settlement in May, 1607. After a tenuous start, several strains of tobacco were developed as a profitable export by colonist John Rolfe. Virginia Company of London Seal The London Company (also called the Virginia Company of London) was an English joint stock company established by royal charter by James I on April 10, 1606 with the purpose of establishing colonial settlements in North America. ... Sketch of Jamestown c. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... This article is about the Virginia colonist. ...

Main article: Jamestown, Virginia

Contemporaneously, the Popham Colony was planted by the Virginia Company of Plymouth. Unlike the Jamestown Settlement, it was not initially successful, and was abandoned after one year, though would later be revived. The Virginia Company of Plymouth's charter included land extending as far as present-day northern Maine.[7] Captain John Smith, exploring the shores of the region in 1614, named the region "New England"[8] in his account of two voyages there, published as A Description of New England. At Jamestown Settlement, replicas of Christopher Newports 3 ships are docked in the harbour. ... The site of the 1607 Popham Colony in present-day Maine is shown by Po on the map. ... The 1606 grants by James I to the London and Plymouth companies. ... John Smith (1580-1631) was an English soldier and sailor, now chiefly remembered for his role in establishing the first permanent English colony in North America, and his brief association with the Native American princess Pocahontas. ...


Plymouth Council for New England

The first coins struck in the Colonies were the silver New England coins.
The first coins struck in the Colonies were the silver New England coins.

The name "New England" was officially sanctioned on November 3, 1620, when the charter of the Virginia Company of Plymouth was replaced by a royal charter for the Plymouth Council for New England, a joint stock company established to colonize and govern the region.[9] Shortly afterwards, in December 1620, a permanent settlement was established at present-day Plymouth, Massachusetts by the Pilgrims, English religious separatists arriving via Holland. The Massachusetts Bay Colony, which would come to dominate the area, was established in 1628 with its major city of Boston established in 1630. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1620 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ... The sea to sea grant of Plymouth Council for New England is shown in green. ... A joint stock company is a special kind of partnership. ... Nickname: Location in Plymouth County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Plymouth Settled 1620 Incorporated (town) 1670 Government [1]  - Type Representative town meeting  - Town    Manager Mark Sylvia Area  - Total 134. ... This article is about a particular group of seventeenth-century European colonists of North America. ... This article is about a region in the Netherlands. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on...


Banished from Massachusetts, Roger Williams led a group south, and founded Providence, Rhode Island in 1636. On March 3 of the same year, the Connecticut Colony was granted a charter, and established its own government. At this time, Vermont was yet unsettled, and the territories of New Hampshire and Maine were governed by Massachusetts. For other persons named Roger Williams, see Roger Williams (disambiguation). ... Providence redirects here. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


New England Confederation

In these early years, relationships between colonists and Native Americans alternated between peace and armed skirmishes. Six years after the bloodiest of these, the Pequot War, in 1643 the colonies of Massachusetts Bay, Plymouth, New Haven, and Connecticut joined together in a loose compact called the New England Confederation (officially "The United Colonies of New England"). The confederation was designed largely to coordinate mutual defense against possible wars with Native Americans, the Dutch in the New Netherland colony to the west, the Spanish in the south, and the French in New France to the north, as well as to assist in the return of runaway slaves. The confederation lost its influence when Massachusetts refused to commit itself to a war against the Dutch. Lion Gardiner in the Pequot War from a Charles Stanley Reinhart drawing circa 1890 The Pequot War was an armed conflict in 1636-1638 between an alliance of Massachusetts Bay and Plymouth colonies, with Native American allies (the Narragansett, and Mohegan tribe), against the Pequot tribe. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on... Seal of Plymouth Colony Map of Plymouth Colony showing town locations Capital Plymouth Language(s) English Religion Puritan, Separatist Government Monarchy Legislature General Court History  - Established 1620  - First Thanksgiving 1621  - Pequot War 1637  - King Philips War 1675–1676  - Part of the Dominion of New England 1686–1688  - Disestablished 1691... The New Haven Colony was an English colonial venture in Connecticut in North America from 1637 to 1662. ... A map of the Connecticut, New Haven, and Saybrook colonies. ... Mercator projection: New England Confederation in yellow The United Colonies of New England, commonly known as the New England Confederation, was a political and military alliance of the British colonies of Massachusetts, Plymouth, Connecticut, and New Haven. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... States which were part of New Netherlands Map based on Adriaen Blocks 1614 expedition to New Netherland, featuring the first use of the name. ... map of New Spain in red, with territories claimed but not controlled in orange. ... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... Wiktionary has related dictionary definitions, such as: slave Slave may refer to: Slavery, where people are owned by others, and live to serve their owners without pay Slave (BDSM), a form of sexual and consenual submission Slave clock, in technology, a clock or timer that synchrnonizes to a master clock...


The first coins struck in the Colonies, prompted by a shortage of change, were the New England coins produced by the Massachusetts Bay Colony. The first series was a simple design including "NE" on the obverse and the various denominations on the reverse. Other series included the "Willow," "Oak," and "Pine Tree." The "Pine Tree" coinage was the last type in the series, struck by coiner John Hull. Although the majority were dated 1652, it is generally acknowledged that production spanned about thirty years, despite the disapproval of King Charles II.[10] This article is about monetary coins. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ...


Dominion of New England

New England map of 1707
New England map of 1707

In 1686, King James II, concerned about the increasingly independent ways of the colonies, including their self-governing charters, open flouting of the Navigation Acts, and increasing military power, established the Dominion of New England, an administrative union comprising all of the New England colonies. Two years later, the provinces of New York and New Jersey, seized from the Dutch, were added. The union, imposed from the outside and contrary to the rooted democratic tradition of the region, was highly unpopular among the colonists. The Dominion of New England was the name of a short-lived administrative union of English colonies in the New England region of North America. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1598x1058, 458 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): New England ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1598x1058, 458 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): New England ... James II and VII (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701)[2] was King of England, King of Scots,[1] and King of Ireland from 6 February 1685 to 11 December 1688. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Navigation Acts The English Navigation Acts were a series of laws which restricted the use of foreign shipping in the trade of England (later the Kingdom of Great Britain and its colonies). ... The Dominion of New England was the name of a short-lived administrative union of English colonies in the New England region of North America. ... A map of the Province of New York. ... The Province of New Jersey was an English colony that existed within the boundaries of the current U.S. state of New Jersey prior to the American Revolution. ...


Nevertheless, those two present states are reckoned as "greater New England" in a social or cultural context, as that is where Yankee colonists expanded to, before 1776. Indeed, the identity in that era changed once one moved to Pennsylvania, as the Pennamite-Yankee War attests to. Colonists from New England proper in that era, were rather well received in the Mohawk Valley and on Long Island in New York. To this day, the cultural legacy of New England is easy to detect by the vast majority of other Americans. This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Pennamite-Yankee War (or Wars) is the name given to fighting which occurred in the last half of the eighteenth century between settlers from Connecticut who claimed to own land in the present Luzerne County, Pennsylvania and other settlers from Pennsylvania who laid claim to the same land. ... The Mohawk Valley region of the U.S. state of New York includes the industrialized cities of Utica and Rome, along with other smaller commercial centers. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ...


After the Glorious Revolution in 1689, the charters of most of the colonies were significantly modified, with the appointment of Royal Governors to nearly every colony. An uneasy tension existed between the Royal Governors, their officers, and the elected governing bodies of the colonies. The governors wanted unlimited authority, and the different layers of locally-elected officials would often resist them. In most cases, the local town governments continued operating as self-governing bodies, just as they had before the appointment of the Royal Governors. This tension culminated itself in the American Revolution, boiling over with the breakout of the American War of Independence in 1776. The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England (VII of Scotland) in 1688 by a union of Parliamentarians and the Dutch stadtholder William III of Orange-Nassau (William of Orange), who as a result ascended the English throne as William... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ...


Region of the United States

Boston College: The Old World's enduring influence over New England is evident in the architecture
Boston College: The Old World's enduring influence over New England is evident in the architecture

The colonies were now formally united as newly-formed states in a larger (but not yet federalist) union United States of America. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1203x816, 1255 KB)Sunset on the Heights - Boston College - Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts Ford Memorial Tower, Burns Library, Bapst Library and Gasson Hall on BCs historic middle campus Photo © 2005 Harvey D. Egan, SJ File history Legend: (cur) = this is the... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1203x816, 1255 KB)Sunset on the Heights - Boston College - Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts Ford Memorial Tower, Burns Library, Bapst Library and Gasson Hall on BCs historic middle campus Photo © 2005 Harvey D. Egan, SJ File history Legend: (cur) = this is the... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized...


In the 18th century and the early 19th century, New England was still considered to be a very distinct region of the colony and country, as it is today. During the War of 1812, there was a limited amount of talk of secession from the Union, as New England merchants, just getting back on their feet, opposed the war with their greatest trading partner - Great Britain.[11] This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was formed on January 1, 1801 from the merger of the Kingdom of Great Britain (itself a merger of the former Kingdoms of Scotland and England in 1707) and the Kingdom of Ireland. ...


Aside from the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, or "New Scotland," New England is the only North American region to inherit the name of a kingdom in the British Isles. New England has largely preserved its regional character, especially in its historic places. Its name is a reminder of the past, as many of the original English-Americans have migrated further west. Today, the region is more ethnically diverse, having seen waves of immigration from Ireland, Québec, Italy, Portugal, Asia, Latin America, Africa, other parts of the United States, and elsewhere. The enduring European influence can be seen in the region, from Massachusetts' use of traffic rotaries to the bilingual French and English towns of northern Vermont, Maine, and New Hampshire, as innocuous as the sprinkled use of British spelling, and as obvious as the region's heavy prevalence of English town and county names, and its unique, often non-rhotic dialect reminiscent of southeastern England. Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 11 Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... This article is about the country. ... North American redirects here. ... This article describes the archipelago in north-western Europe. ... Recently diversity has been used in a political context to justify recruiting international students or employees. ... During the 1960s, a terrorist group known as the Front de libération du Québec (FLQ) launched a decade of bombings, robberies and attacks on government offices. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... A roundabout is a type of road junction at which traffic enters a one-way stream around a central island. ... Spelling differences redirects here. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ...

See also: List of place names in New England of aboriginal origin

This is a List of place names in New England of aboriginal origin. ...

Geography and climate

New England. Geographical map, 2001
New England. Geographical map, 2001
A USGS map depicts a small piece of Maine's fjordlike coast.
A USGS map depicts a small piece of Maine's fjordlike coast.

New England's long rolling hills, mountains, and jagged coastline are a consequence of retreating ice sheets thousands of years ago. The coast of the region, extending from southwestern Connecticut to northeastern Maine, is dotted with lakes, hills, swamps, and sandy beaches. Further inland are the Appalachian Mountains, extending through Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. Among them, in the White Mountains of New Hampshire is Mount Washington, which at 1,917 m (6,288 ft), is the highest peak in the northeast United States. It is also the site of the highest recorded wind speed on Earth.[12] Vermont's Green Mountains, which become the Berkshire Hills in western Massachusetts, are smaller than the White Mountains. Valleys in the region include the Connecticut River Valley and the Merrimack Valley. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 396 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (900 × 1361 pixel, file size: 385 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Reference Map of New England, including Vermont, Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 396 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (900 × 1361 pixel, file size: 385 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Reference Map of New England, including Vermont, Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1700x2800, 1857 KB) A USGS map of a small section of the Maine coast. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1700x2800, 1857 KB) A USGS map of a small section of the Maine coast. ... The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is a scientific agency of the United States government. ... The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... Looking south on the Franconia Ridge Trail. ... The Summit Mount Washington is the highest peak in the American Northeast at 6,288 ft. ... The Green Mountains may refer to: The Green Mountains in Vermont in the United States extending into southern Quebec in Canada. ... Berkshire region of Massachusetts The Berkshires (pronounced as or ) is a region located in Western Massachusetts (with portions located in the adjacent states of Vermont, New York, and Connecticut). ... The Connecticut River Valley is a long river valley formed by the Connecticut River stretching from The New Hampshire/Quebec border to Long Island Sound on the Connecticut Coast. ... The Merrimack Valley is the region surrounding the Merrimack River in northeastern Massachusetts. ...


The longest river is the Connecticut River, which flows from northeastern New Hampshire for 655 km (407 mi), emptying into the Long Island Sound. Lake Champlain, wedged between Vermont and New York, is the largest lake in the region, followed by Moosehead Lake (Maine), Lake Winnipesaukee (New Hampshire), Quabbin Reservoir (Massachusetts), and Candlewood Lake (Connecticut). The Connecticut River as seen from the French King Bridge in western Massachusetts. ... New York City waterways: 1. ... Landsat photo Lake Champlain (French: lac Champlain) is a large lake in North America, mostly within the borders of the United States (states of Vermont and New York) but partially situated across the US-Canada border in the province of Quebec. ... Map of Moosehead Lake. ... Lake Winnipesaukee at Sunset Lake Winnipesaukee is the largest lake in New Hampshire. ... It has been suggested that Goodnough Dike be merged into this article or section. ... [1] Spring Ice Breakup Candlewood Lake, 8. ...


Weather patterns are highly variable and climate varies throughout the region. Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont have a humid continental short summer climate, with cooler summers and long, cold winters. Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island, have a humid continental long summer climate, with hot summers and cold winters. Owing to thick deciduous forests, fall in New England brings bright and colorful foliage, which comes earlier than in other regions, attracting tourism.[13] Springs are generally wet and cloudy. Average rainfall generally ranges from 1,000 to 1,500 mm (40 to 60 in) a year, although the northern parts of Vermont and Maine see slightly less, from 500 to 1,000 mm (20 to 40 in). Snowfall can often exceed 2,500 mm (100 in) annually. As a result, the mountains of Vermont and New Hampshire are popular destinations in the winter, with numerous commercial ski resorts.[14][15] For other uses, see Deciduous (disambiguation). ... “Foliage” redirects here. ...


Population

Boston is considered to be the cultural and historical capital of New England, though today New York City exerts strong influence on the region's southwest corner.
Boston is considered to be the cultural and historical capital of New England, though today New York City exerts strong influence on the region's southwest corner.

As of 2000, the total population of New England was 13,922,517, roughly twice its 1910 population of 6,552,681.[16] If New England were one state, its population would rank 5th in the nation, behind Florida. The total area, at 70,054.3756 sq mi (181,440 km²), would rank 20th, behind North Dakota. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2500x1894, 3102 KB) A view of downtown Boston, Massachusetts taken in August of 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2500x1894, 3102 KB) A view of downtown Boston, Massachusetts taken in August of 2006. ... Boston redirects here. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ...


Southern New England

Three quarters of New England's population and most of its major cities are concentrated in its three southernmost states: Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island. Their combined population density is over 600/sq mi. The most populous state is Massachusetts, and the most populous city is Massachusetts' political and cultural capital, Boston. Western Massachusetts and Northwestern Connecticut are less densely populated than the rest of Southern New England. Boston redirects here. ... Western Massachusetts is a loosely defined geographical region of the state of Massachusetts which contains the Berkshires and the Pioneer Valley. ...

Providence claims the largest contiguous area of National Register of Historic Places-listed buildings in the U.S.
Providence claims the largest contiguous area of National Register of Historic Places-listed buildings in the U.S.

Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Providence is the capital and largest city in Rhode Island, a state of the United States of America. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...

Coastal New England

The coastline is more urban than western New England, which is typically rural, even in urban states like Massachusetts. This characteristic of the region's population is due mainly to historical factors; the original colonists settled mostly on the coastline of Massachusetts Bay. The only New England state without access to the Atlantic Ocean, Vermont, is also the least populated. After nearly 400 years, the region still maintains, for the most part, its historical population layout. Map of Massachusetts Bay. ...


New England's coast is dotted with urban centers, such as Portland, Portsmouth, Boston, New Bedford, Fall River, Newport, Providence, New Haven, Bridgeport, and Stamford as well as smaller cities, like Newburyport, Gloucester, Biddeford, Bath, Rockland, and New London. Nickname: Motto: Resurgam (Latin for I will rise again) Coordinates: , Country State County Cumberland Settled 1632 Incorporated 1786 Government  - Mayor Nicholas M. Mavodones, Jr Area  - City  52. ... Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country State County Rockingham County Incorporated 1653 Government  - Mayor Steve Marchand  - City manager John P. Bohenko Area  - City  16. ... Boston redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Bristol County Settled 1640 Incorporated 1787 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Scott W. Lang (Dem)  - City Council President/Ward 6: Leo R. Pimental. ... Nickname: Motto: Well Try Location in Bristol County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Bristol Settled 1670 Incorporated 1803 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Edward M. Lambert, Jr. ... Newport, Rhode Island Newport is a city in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ... Providence redirects here. ... New Haven redirects here. ... “Bridgeport” redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Settled 1641 Incorporated (city) 1893 Consolidated 1949 Government  - Type Mayor-Board of representatives  - Mayor Dannel Malloy (Dem) Area  - City 134. ... Newburyport is a small coastal city in Essex County, Massachusetts, 38 miles (61 km) northeast of Boston. ... This article is about Gloucester, Massachusetts, U.S.A.; there are other places called Gloucester Location in Essex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Essex Settled 1623 Incorporated 1642 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor John Bell Area  - Total 41. ... Biddeford is a city in York County, Maine, United States. ... View uphill towards City Hall in Bath Bath is a city located in Sagadahoc County, Maine. ... Welcome to Rockland Rockland is a city in Knox County, Maine, in the United States. ... Nickname: Motto: MARE LIBERUM Coordinates: , NECTA Norwich-New London Region Southeastern Connecticut Settled 1646 (Pequot Plantation) Named 1658 (New London) Incorporated (city) 1784 Government  - Type Council-manager  - City council Margaret Mary Curtin, Mayor Kevin J. Cavanagh, Dep. ...


Urban New England

Southern New England forms an integral part of the BosWash megalopolis, a conglomeration of urban centers that spans from Boston to Washington, D.C.. The region includes three of the four most densely populated states in the United States; only New Jersey has a higher population density than the states of Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and Connecticut. The BosWash or Bosnywash or Boshington or Northeast Corridor or simply Northeast megalopolis is the name for a group of metropolitan areas in the northeastern United States, extending from Boston, Massachusetts, to Washington, D.C., including Providence, Rhode Island; Hartford and New Haven and Stamford, Connecticut; New York, New York... Megalopolis (Greek: large city, great city) can mean: The town of Megalópoli (Μεγαλοπολη), Megalopolis, Greece. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ...

Worcester, Massachusetts
Worcester, Massachusetts

The Boston metropolitan area, which includes parts of southern New Hampshire, has a total population of approximately 4.4 million.[17] The most populous cities are as of 2000 Census(2006 estimates in parenthesis):[18] Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Worcester (disambiguation). ... Light Blue represents the area in Massachusetts known as Greater Boston, while Dark Blue represents the Metro-Boston area and Red represents Boston proper, the City of Boston Greater Boston is the area of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts surrounding the city of Boston, Massachusetts. ... This is a list of the top 100 New England cities and towns by population based on the 2000 census. ...

  1. Boston, Massachusetts: 589,141[19] (590,763)
  2. Worcester, Massachusetts: 172,648 (175,454)
  3. Providence, Rhode Island: 173,618 (175,255)
  4. Springfield, Massachusetts: 152,082 (151,176)
  5. Bridgeport, Connecticut: 139,529 (137,912)
  6. Hartford, Connecticut: 124,558 (124,512)
  7. New Haven, Connecticut: 123,626 (124,001)
  8. Stamford, Connecticut: 117,083 (119,261)
  9. Waterbury, Connecticut: 107,271 (107,251)
  10. Manchester, New Hampshire: 107,006 (109,497)
  11. Lowell, Massachusetts: 105,167 (103,229)
  12. Cambridge, Massachusetts: 101,355 (101,365)

During the 20th century, urban expansion in regions surrounding New York City has become an important economic influence on neighboring Connecticut, parts of which belong to the New York Metropolitan Area. The US Census Bureau groups Fairfield, New Haven and Litchfield counties in western Connecticut together with New York City, and other parts of New York and New Jersey as a combined statistical area.[20] Boston redirects here. ... For other uses, see Worcester (disambiguation). ... Providence redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in Hampden County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Hampden Settled 1636 Incorporated 1852 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Charles Ryan (D) Area  - Total 33. ... “Bridgeport” redirects here. ... Hartford redirects here. ... This article is about the city in Connecticut. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Settled 1641 Incorporated (city) 1893 Consolidated 1949 Government  - Type Mayor-Board of representatives  - Mayor Dannel Malloy (Dem) Area  - City 134. ... Nickname: Motto: Quid Aere Perennius (What Is More Lasting Than Brass) Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , Country U.S. State NECTA Waterbury Region Central Naugatuck Valley Incorporated (town) 1686 Incorporated (city) 1853 Consolidated 1902 Government  - Type Mayor-board of aldermen  - Mayor Michael J. Jarjura Area  - City  28. ... Nickname: Location in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Hillsborough County Incorporated 1751 Government  - Mayor Frank Guinta (R) Area  - City  34. ... Nickname: Motto: Art is the Handmaid of Human Good Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1653 Incorporated 1826 A city 1836 Government  - Type Manager-City council  - Mayor William F. Martin, Jr. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - Total 7. ... New York–Northern New Jersey–Long Island is the most populous metropolitan area in the United States and is also one of the most populous in the world . ... Fairfield County is located in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... New Haven County is located in the south central part of the state of Connecticut. ... Litchfield County is located in the northwestern corner of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines micropolitan and metropolitan statistical areas. ...


Economy

Several factors contribute to the uniquenesses of the New England economy. The region is geographically isolated from the rest of the United States, and is relatively small. It has a climate and a supply of natural resources such as granite, lobster, and codfish, that are different from many other parts of the country. Its population is concentrated on the coast and in its southern states, and its residents have a strong regional identity. America's textile industry began along the Blackstone River with the Slater Mill at Pawtucket, Rhode Island,[21] and was duplicated at similar sources of water power such as Woonsocket, Rhode Island, Lawrence, Massachusetts. Exports consist mostly of industrial products, including specialized machines and weaponry, built by the region's educated workforce. About half of the region's exports consist of industrial and commercial machinery, such as computers and electronic and electrical equipment. This, when combined with instruments, chemicals, and transportation equipment, makes up about three-quarters of the region's exports. Granite is quarried at Barre, Vermont, guns made at Springfield, Massachusetts, boats at Groton, Connecticut and Bath, Maine, and hand tools at Turners Falls, Massachusetts. Insurance is a driving force in and around Hartford, Connecticut. The Blackstone River begins in central Massachusetts and travels through Rhode Island until emptying into Narragansett Bay which connects to the Atlantic Ocean. ... Slater Mill, located on the Blackstone River in Pawtucket, RI, is generally cited as the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution in America. ... Pawtucket is a city in Providence County, Rhode Island, United States. ... Woonsocket is a city in Providence County, Rhode Island, United States. ...   Settled: 1655 â€“ Incorporated: 1847 Zip Code(s): 01840 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ... A machine is any mechanical or electrical device that transmits or modifies energy to perform or assist in the performance of tasks. ... A weapon is a tool used to kill or incapacitate a person or animal, or destroy a military target. ... This article is about the machine. ... A chemical substance is any material substance used in or obtained by a process in chemistry: A chemical compound is a substance consisting of two or more chemical elements that are chemically combined in fixed proportions. ... Barre Town, Vermont Barre is a town in Washington County, Vermont, United States. ... Nickname: Location in Hampden County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Hampden Settled 1636 Incorporated 1852 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Charles Ryan (D) Area  - Total 33. ... Waterfront of Groton, Connecticut looking upriver Groton is a town located on the Thames River in New London County, Connecticut. ... View uphill towards City Hall in Bath Bath is a city located in Sagadahoc County, Maine. ... Turners Falls is a census-designated place and village located in the town of Montague in Franklin County, Massachusetts. ... Hartford redirects here. ...

Hartford, the "Insurance Capital of the World".
Hartford, the "Insurance Capital of the World".

New England also exports food products, ranging from fish to lobster, cranberries, Maine potatoes, and maple syrup. The service industry is also highly important, including tourism, education, financial and insurance services, plus architectural, building, and construction services. The U.S. Department of Commerce has called the New England economy a microcosm for the entire United States economy.[22] When used by itself in a sentence, the term Hartford can refer to one of several places in the United States. ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... Bottled maple syrup produced in Quebec. ... The United States Department of Commerce is a Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with promoting economic growth. ...


As of May 2006, the unemployment rate in New England was 4.5%, below the national average. Vermont, with the lowest of the six states, had a rate of 3%. The highest was Rhode Island, with 5.5%. The metropolitan statistical area (MSA) with the lowest rate, 2.5%, was Burlington-South Burlington, in Vermont; the MSA with the highest rate, 7.9%, was Lawrence-Methuen-Salem, in Massachusetts and southern New Hampshire.[23] In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas, which are organized around county boundaries. ... Burlington is the largest city in the U.S. state of Vermont and is the shire town of Chittenden County, Vermont. ...   Settled: 1655 â€“ Incorporated: 1847 Zip Code(s): 01840 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ...


New England is home to two of the ten poorest cities (by percentage living below the poverty line) in the United States: the state capital cities of Providence, Rhode Island and Hartford, Connecticut.[24] These cities have struggled as manufacturing, their traditional economic mainstay, has declined.[25] Providence redirects here. ... Hartford redirects here. ...


With its rocky soil and climate, New England is not a strong agricultural region. Some New England states, however, are ranked highly among U.S. states for particular areas of production. Maine is ranked ninth for aquaculture,[26] Vermont fifteenth for dairy products,[27] and Connecticut and Massachusetts seventh and eleventh for tobacco, respectively.[28][29] Cranberries are grown in the Cape Cod - Plymouth area, and blueberries in Maine. As of 2005, the inflation-adjusted combined GSPs of the six states of New England was $623.1 billion, with Massachusetts contributing the most, and Vermont the least.[30] Workers harvest catfish from the Delta Pride Catfish farms in Mississippi Aquaculture is the cultivation of aquatic organisms. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... Gross state product is a measurment of the economic output of a U.S. state or an Australian state. ...


Politics

The early European settlers of New England were English Protestants fleeing religious persecution. This, however, did not prevent them from establishing colonies where religion was legislated to an extreme, and where those who deviated from the established doctrine were persecuted greatly. The early history of much of New England is marked by religious intolerance and harsh laws. In the beginning, there was no separation of church and state in these places, and the activities of the individual were severely restricted.[31] This contrasts sharply with the strong separation of church and state upon which Rhode Island was founded. Providence had no public burial ground and no Common until the year 1700 (64 years after its founding) because religious and government institutions were so rigorously kept distinct.[32] For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... Constantines Conversion, depicting the conversion of Emperor Constantine the Great to Christianity, by Peter Paul Rubens. ... The North Burial Ground is a 110-acre cemetery in Providence, Rhode Island, dating to 1700. ...


Town meetings

Main article: Town meeting

A derivative of meetings held by church elders, town meetings were and are an integral part of governance of many New England towns. At such meetings, any citizen of the town may discuss issues with other members of the community and vote on them. This is the strongest example of direct democracy in the United States today, and the form of dialogue has been adopted under certain circumstances elsewhere, most strongly in the states closest to the region, such as New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Such a strong democratic tradition was even apparent in the early 19th century, when Alexis de Tocqueville wrote in Democracy in America that in A town meeting is a meeting where an entire geographic area is invited to participate in a gathering, often for a political or administrative purpose. ... A town meeting is a meeting where an entire geographic area is invited to participate in a gathering, often for a political or administrative purpose. ... The system of local government in use in New England is very different from that found throughout the rest of the United States. ... Direct democracy, classically termed pure democracy,[1] comprises a form of democracy and theory of civics wherein sovereignty is lodged in the assembly of all citizens who choose to participate. ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Tocqueville redirects here. ... De la démocratie en Amérique (published in two volumes, the first in 1835 and the second in 1840) is a classic French text by Alexis de Tocqueville on the United States in the 1830s and its strengths and weaknesses. ...

New England, where education and liberty are the daughters of morality and religion, where society has acquired age and stability enough to enable it to form principles and hold fixed habits, the common people are accustomed to respect intellectual and moral superiority and to submit to it without complaint, although they set at naught all those privileges which wealth and birth have introduced among mankind. In New England, consequently, the democracy makes a more judicious choice than it does elsewhere.

James Madison, a critic of town meetings, however, wrote in Federalist No. 55 that, regardless of the assembly, "passion never fails to wrest the scepter from reason. Had every Athenian citizen been a Socrates, every Athenian assembly would still have been a mob."[33] Today, the use and effectiveness of town meetings, as well as the possible application of the format to other regions and countries, is still discussed by scholars.[34] For other persons named James Madison, see James Madison (disambiguation). ... An advertisement for The Federalist The Federalist Papers are a series of 85 articles arguing for the ratification of the United States Constitution. ...


New England and political thought

Samuel Adams, a brewer and patriot during the revolutionary period
Samuel Adams, a brewer and patriot during the revolutionary period

During the colonial period and the early years of the American republic, New England leaders like John Hancock, John Adams, and Samuel Adams joined those in Philadelphia and Virginia to assist and lead the newly-forming country. Daniel Webster was influential in expressing the political views of many New-Englanders in the early 19th century. At the time of the American Civil War, New England, the mid-Atlantic, and the Midwest, which had long since abolished slavery, united against the Confederate States of America, ending the practice in the United States. Henry David Thoreau, iconic New England writer and philosopher, made the case for civil disobedience and individualism, and has been adopted by the anarchist tradition. Benjamin Tucker, of Massachusetts, was a proponent of individualist anarchism. A modern example of this individualist spirit is the Free State Project in New Hampshire, and The Second Vermont Republic in Vermont. Download high resolution version (598x750, 65 KB)Samuel Adams (large) The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Download high resolution version (598x750, 65 KB)Samuel Adams (large) The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... For other uses, see Samuel Adams (disambiguation). ... This article concerns Patriots in the American Revolutionary War. ... For other persons named John Hancock, see John Hancock (disambiguation). ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Samuel Adams (disambiguation). ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Government... Henry David Thoreau (July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862; born David Henry Thoreau[1]) was an American author, naturalist, transcendentalist, tax resister, development critic, and philosopher who is best known for Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay, Civil Disobedience, an argument for individual resistance... For other uses, see Civil disobedience (disambiguation). ... Individualism is a term used to describe a moral, political, or social outlook that stresses human independence and the importance of individual self-reliance and liberty. ... Anarchism is a generic term describing various political philosophies and social movements that advocate the elimination of hierarchy and imposed authority. ... Benjamin Ricketson Tucker Benjamin Ricketson Tucker (April 17, 1854 – June 22, 1939) was the leading proponent of American individualist anarchism in the 19th century. ... Theory and practice Issues History Culture By region Lists Related Anarchism Portal Politics Portal ·        Individualist anarchism (also anarchist individualism, anarcho-individualism, individualistic anarchism) refers to any of several traditions that hold that individual conscience and the pursuit of self-interest should not be constrained by any collective body or public... The Free State Project (FSP) is a plan to have 20,000 or more liberty-oriented people move to a single state of the United States, with the intent of influencing local politics and policy. ... Second Vermont Republic (SVR) is a secessionist movement within the U.S. state of Vermont to return the independent status of the Vermont Republic from 1777–91. ...


While modern New England is known for its liberal tendencies, Puritan New England was highly intolerant of any deviation from strict social norms. During the 1960s civil rights era, Boston brewed with racial tension over school busing to end de facto segregation of its public schools.[35]


Eight presidents of the United States have been born in New England, however only five are usually affiliated with the area. They are, in chronological order: John Adams (Massachusetts), John Quincy Adams (Massachusetts), Franklin Pierce (New Hampshire), Chester A. Arthur (born in Vermont, affiliated with New York), Calvin Coolidge (born in Vermont, affiliated with Massachusetts), John F. Kennedy (Massachusetts), George H. W. Bush (born in Massachusetts, affiliated with Texas) and George W. Bush (born in Connecticut, affiliated with Texas). For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and the sixth President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American politician who served as the 21st President of the United States. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Ten of the Speakers of the United States House of Representatives have been elected from New England. They are, in chronological order: Theodore Sedgwick (5th Speaker, Massachusetts), Joseph Bradley Varnum (7th Speaker, Massachuetts), Robert Charles Winthrop (22nd Speaker, Massachusetts), Nathaniel Prentice Banks (25th Speaker, Massachusetts), James G. Blaine (31st Speaker, Maine), Thomas Brackett Reed (36th and 38th, Maine), Frederick Gillett (42nd, Massachusetts), Joseph William Martin, Jr. (49th and 51st, Massachusetts), John McCormack (53rd, Massachusetts) and Tip O'Neill (55th, Massachusetts). Theodore Sedgwick (May 9, 1746-January 24, 1813), a Delegate, a Representative, and a Senator from Massachusetts and the fifth Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, was born in West Hartford, Connecticut. ... Joseph Bradley Varnum Joseph Bradley Varnum (January 29, 1751–September 21, 1821) was a U.S. politician of the Democratic-Republican Party from the state of Massachusetts. ... Robert Charles Winthrop Robert Charles Winthrop (May 12, 1809–November 16, 1894) was an American statesman who served in the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate. ... Nathaniel P. Banks, engraving from a Mathew Brady Carte de visite Nathaniel Prentice (or Prentiss)[1] Banks (January 30, 1816 – September 1, 1894), American politician and soldier, served as Governor of Massachusetts, Speaker of the House of the United States House of Representatives, and as a Union general in the... James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830 – January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. ... Thomas Brackett Reed, (October 18, 1839 – December 7, 1902), occasionally ridiculed as Czar Reed, was a U.S. Representative from Maine, and Speaker of the House from 1889–1891 and from 1895–1899. ... Frederick H. Gillett Frederick Huntington Gillett (October 16, 1851–July 31, 1935) was an American politician during the early 20th century. ... Joseph William Martin, Jr (November 3, 1884 - March 6, 1968) was an American politician from North Attleborough, Massachusetts. ... John McCormack John McCormack (14 June 1884 - 16 September 1945), was a world-famous Irish tenor in the fields of opera and popular music, and renowned for his flawless diction and superb breath control. ... Thomas Phillip ONeill, Jr. ...


Contemporary politics

Elections of 2006

The dominant party in New England is the Democratic Party. In the U.S. general elections of 2006, which determined the composition of the 110th Congress, Democrats made a number of gains in the region. The twelve U.S. Senators from New England includes six Democrats, two elected independents that caucus with the Democrats, and four Republicans. Of the twenty-two congressmen elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, there is only one Republican, Christopher Shays of Connecticut.[36] In every New England state, both legislative houses have a majority of Democratic representatives. Democrats hold half of New England's governor's positions: Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts. While the governors of Connecticut, Vermont and Rhode Island are Republicans, the legislatures have veto-overriding Democratic super-majorities in both states (as well as Massachusetts). The Republican state parties in Rhode Island, Connecticut and Massachusetts are weak.[37][38][39] Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The 2006 United States midterm elections were held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006. ... The 110th United States Congress will be in session from noon on January 3, 2007 until noon on January 3, 2009. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Shays is interviewed in a charity facility. ...


In 2006, Massachusetts elected Deval Patrick; the first Democratic governor elected since Michael Dukakis's 1986 election to a third term. Patrick is the second black elected governor in the United States. Democrats have the majority of the New Hampshire General Court and Executive Council for the first time since the 1875. New Hampshire, prior to the 2006 election, had the only Republican-controlled legislature in New England. In Rhode Island, the Republican Senator Lincoln Chafee was narrowly defeated. Four Republican members of the House of Representatives in New England were defeated; Charlie Bass and Jeb Bradley in New Hampshire and Nancy Johnson and Rob Simmons in Connecticut. Simmons lost his seat to Democrat Joe Courtney by a mere 83 votes.[40] Deval Laurdine Patrick (born July 31, 1956) is an American politician and the current Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate (upper) House of Representatives (lower) President Sylvia Larsen, Democrat since December 6, 2006 Speaker Terie Norelli, Democrat since December 6, 2006 Members Senate: 24 House of Representatives: 400 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Meeting place New Hampshire State House Web site http://www. ... Executive Council of the State of New Hampshire (commonly Governors Council) is the Executive body of the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ... Lincoln Davenport Chafee (IPA pronunciation: , [CHAY-fee]) (born March 26, 1953) is a former United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... Charles Foster Bass (born January 8, 1952) is a member of the United States House of Representatives for the second district of New Hampshire. ... Joseph E. Jeb Bradley (born October 20, 1952) is a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives for the New Hampshires 1st congressional district (map). ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Nancy Lee Johnson (born January 5, 1935, Chicago, Illinois) is an American politician. ... Rep. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Joseph (Joe) Courtney, born April 6, 1953 in Hartford, Connecticut, is a Democrat and the Congressman-elect of the United States House of Representatives in Connecticuts 2nd congressional district (map). ...


Presidential elections, 2000, 2004

In the 2000 presidential election, Democratic candidate Al Gore carried all of the New England states except for New Hampshire, and in 2004, John Kerry, a New Englander himself, won all six New England states.[41] In both the 2000 and 2004 presidential elections, every congressional district with the exception of New Hampshire's 1st district were won by Gore and Kerry respectively. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Presidential election results map. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... New Hampshires 1st district since 2003 New Hampshires first congressional district covers the south-eastern part of New Hampshire. ...


Notable laws

New England abolished the death penalty for crimes like robbery and burglary in the 19th century, before much of the rest of the United States did. New Hampshire and Connecticut are the only New England states that allow capital punishment,[42] although New Hampshire currently has no death row inmates and has not held an execution since 1939. Connecticut held an execution in 2005, the first in New England since 1960, when Connecticut last executed a prisoner.[43] Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... For information about the Record company see Death Row Records For information about the computer game see Deathrow (game) Death Row is a term that refers to the section of a prison that houses individuals awaiting execution. ...


Vermont was the first state to allow civil unions between same sex couples, and Massachusetts was the first state to allow same-sex marriage. In 2005, Connecticut also began to allow civil unions. In 2008, some form of same-sex unions will be in all New England states except Rhode Island, though the state does recognize Massachusetts marriages for its residents.[44] A civil union is one of several terms for a civil status similar to marriage, typically created for the purposes of allowing homosexual couples access to the benefits enjoyed by married heterosexuals (see also same-sex marriage); it can also be used by couples of differing sexes who do not... One of four newly wedded same-sex couples in a public wedding at Taiwan Pride 2006. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ...


In 2006, Massachusetts adopted a health care reform that requires nearly all state residents obtain health insurance.[45] Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Massachusetts 2006 Health Reform Statute was enacted as Chapter 58 of the Acts of 2006 of the Massachusetts Legislature, entitled: The law was designed to require health care coverage for nearly all of the residents of Massachusetts, U.S.A. Later in 2006, in October, a technical corrections bill to...


Education

Colleges and universities

New England is home to four of the eight Ivy League universities. Pictured here is Dartmouth Hall on the campus of Dartmouth College.
New England is home to four of the eight Ivy League universities. Pictured here is Dartmouth Hall on the campus of Dartmouth College.

New England contains some of the oldest and most renowned institutions of higher learning in the United States. The first such institution, subsequently named Harvard College, was founded at Cambridge, Massachusetts, to train preachers, in 1636. Yale University was founded in New Haven, Connecticut in 1701, and awarded the nation's first graduate (Ph.D.) degree in 1861. Brown University, the first college in the nation to accept students of all religious affiliations and third-oldest institution of higher learning, was founded in Providence, Rhode Island in 1764. Dartmouth College was founded five years later in Hanover, New Hampshire with the mission educating the local American Indian population as well as English youth. Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 870 KB)Dartmouth Hall, of Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 870 KB)Dartmouth Hall, of Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - Total 7. ... Yale redirects here. ... New Haven redirects here. ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Providence redirects here. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Hanover is a town located on the Connecticut River in Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ...


In addition to four out of eight Ivy League schools, New England also contains the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), four of the original seven sisters are in New England, the bulk of institutions identified as the Little Ivies, and is the home to the Five Colleges consortium in western Massachusetts. For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... “MIT” redirects here. ... The Seven Sisters is the name given in 1927 to seven liberal arts womens colleges in the Northern United States. ... Little Ivies is a colloquialism referring to a group of small, selective[1] American colleges and universities; however, it does not denote any official organization. ... The Five Colleges are composed of four liberal arts colleges and one university in the Connecticut River Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts, belonging to a consortium called Five Colleges, Incorporated, which was established in 1965. ...

See also: the lists of colleges for each state:
Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

The following is a list of colleges and universities in the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... See Maine state entry. ... . ... See New Hampshire state entry. ... See Rhode Island state entry. ... See Vermont state entry. ...

Private and independent secondary schools

At the pre-college level, New England is home to a number of prominent American independent schools (also known as private schools). The concept of the elite "New England prep school" (preparatory school) and the "preppy" lifestyle is an iconic part of the region's image. An independent school is a school which is not dependent upon national or local government for financing its operation and is instead operated by tuition charges, gifts, and perhaps the investment yield of an endowment. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... Look up Preppy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

See the list of private schools for each state:
Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampsire, Rhode Island, Vermont.

Public education

New England states fund their public schools well, with expenditures per student, and teacher salaries above the national median. As of 2005, the National Education Association ranked Connecticut with the highest-paid teachers in the country. Massachusetts and Rhode Island ranked eighth and ninth, respectively. Every state but New Hampshire is in the top ten for educational spending per student.[46] Boston Latin School is the oldest public high school in America. Several signers of the Declaration of Independence attended Boston Latin.[47] The National Education Association (NEA) is the largest labor union in the United States, representing many of the countrys teachers along with other school personnel. ... The Boston Latin School is a public exam school founded on April 23, 1635, in Boston, Massachusetts, making it the oldest public school in America. ...


Academic journals and press

New England is home to several prominent academic journals and publishing companies, including The New England Journal of Medicine, Harvard University Press, and Yale University Press. Also, many of its institutions lead the open access alternative to conventional academic publication, including MIT, the University of Connecticut, and the University of Maine. The Federal Reserve Bank of Boston publishes the New England Economic Review.[48] The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) is a peer-reviewed medical journal published by the Massachusetts Medical Society. ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ... Yale University Press is a book publisher founded in 1908. ... Open access (OA) means immediate, free and unrestricted online access to digital scholarly material[1], primarily peer-reviewed research articles in scholarly journals. ... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ... The University of Connecticut is the State of Connecticuts land-grant university. ... UMO redirects here, but this abbreviation is also used informally to mean the Mozilla Add-ons website, formerly Mozilla Update Should not be confused with Université du Maine, in Le Mans, France The University of Maine, established in 1865, is the flagship university of the University of Maine System. ... The Federal Reserve Bank of Boston The Federal Reserve Bank of Boston is responsible for the First District of the Federal Reserve, which covers Connecticut (excluding Fairfield County), Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont. ...


Culture

See also: Notable New Englanders

New England has a history of shared heritage and culture primarily shaped by waves of immigration from Europe. A cultural divide, however, also exists between urban New Englanders living along the densely-populated coastline and rural New Englanders in western Massachusetts, Northwestern Connecticut, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine, where population density is low.[49] All of the following people were born in New England or spent a significant portion of their life in New England, making them a well-known figure in the region. ...


Connecticut has two cultural and demographic trends: the southwestern part of the state is largely suburban, alongside the cities Bridgeport, New Haven, Waterbury, Stamford, and Danbury, and as part of the New York metropolitan area, is influenced by New York City. The remainder of the state, is culturally similar to neighboring Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Residents of this area are often referred to as "Swamp Yankees."[50] An example of Connecticut's cultural dichotomy can be found in residents' allegiance to sports teams. Western Connecticut residents tend to support New York teams, unlike the rest of the state who tend to be loyal to Boston teams.[51] Television broadcasts in Hartford and New Haven typically give equal coverage to sports teams from both Boston and New York. Bridgeport is the name of a number of places in the United States of America: Bridgeport, Alabama Bridgeport, California Bridgeport, Chicago Bridgeport, Connecticut - by far the largest city with this name Bridgeport, Illinois Bridgeport, Michigan Bridgeport, Ohio Bridgeport, New Jersey Bridgeport, Pennsylvania Bridgeport, Washington Bridgeport, West Virginia See also: Bridgeport... This article is about the city in Connecticut. ... Waterbury is the name of some places in the United States of America: Waterbury, Connecticut Waterbury, Vermont This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... There is more than one place named Stamford. ... Danbury is the name of some places in the United States of America and England: Danbury, Connecticut - by far the largest city with this name Danbury, Essex Danbury, New Hampshire Danbury, North Carolina Danbury, Texas This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise... New York–Northern New Jersey–Long Island is the most populous metropolitan area in the United States and is also one of the most populous in the world . ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The term Swamp Yankee has a variety of meanings. ... A dichotomy is a division into two non-overlapping or mutually exclusive and jointly exhaustive parts. ...


Cultural roots

The first European colonists of New England were focused on maritime affairs such as whaling and fishing, rather than more continental inclinations such as surplus farming. One of the older American regions, New England has developed a distinct cuisine, dialect, architecture, and government. New England cuisine is known for its emphasis on seafood and dairy; clam chowder, lobster, and other products of the sea are among some of the region's most popular foods, such as New Haven's famous white clam pizza. This article is about the body of water. ... The crew of the oceanographic research vessel Princesse Alice, of Albert Grimaldi (later Prince Albert I of Monaco) pose while flensing a catch. ... Fishermen in the harbor of Kochi, India. ... Continental may refer to: The adjective of continent, such as in continental Europe, continental breakfast, or continental climate, or Continental Glacier; The culture of the continental nation states of Europe, inasmuch as it contrasts with the culture of Anglo-Saxon England; The Lincoln Continental, a car made by Lincoln division... The term surplus is used in economics for several related quantities. ... Farming, ploughing rice paddy, in Indonesia Agriculture is the process of producing food, feed, fiber and other desired products by cultivation of certain plants and the raising of domesticated animals (livestock). ... New England cuisine is a type of American cuisine found in New England, the northeastern region of the United States. ... Eastern New England English (also called Boston English, New England English, or Northeastern [American] Coastal English) is a [sub-]dialect of American English generally spoken by people living in coastal Maine and New Hampshire, Eastern Massachusetts, and parts of Rhode Island. ... A Connected farm is an architectural design common in the New England Region of the United States, and England and Wales in the United Kingdom. ... New England clam chowder. ...

See also: Cuisine of New England

The American lobster, a favorite ingredient in New England cuisine. ...

Accents

The often-parodied Boston accent (see Mayor Quimby of The Simpsons) is native to the region. Many of its most stereotypical features (such as r-dropping and the so-called broad A) are believed to have originated in Boston from the influence of standard British English, which shares those features. While at one point Boston accents were most strongly associated with the so-called "Eastern Establishment" and Boston's upper class, today the accent is predominantly associated with blue-collar natives as exemplified by movies like Good Will Hunting. The Boston accent and accents closely related to it cover eastern Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine, though there is of course significant dialect variation within this area. In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... The Boston accent is found not only in the city of Boston, Massachusetts itself but also much of eastern Massachusetts. ... Mayor Diamond Joe Quimby Joseph Joe Quimby, Jr. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... The trap-bath split is a vowel split that occurs mainly in southern varieties of English English, in the Boston accent, and in the Southern Hemisphere accents (Australian English, New Zealand English, South African English), by which the Early Modern English phoneme was lengthened in certain environments and ultimately merged... British English (BrE, BE, en-GB) is the broad term used to distinguish the forms of the English language used in the United Kingdom from forms used elsewhere in the Anglophone world. ... For other uses, see Establishment. ... Boston Brahmins, also called the First Families of Boston, are the class of New Englanders who claim hereditary and cultural descent from the English Protestants who founded the city of Boston, Massachusetts and settled New England. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Also found in New England is the distinctively conservative dialect of Rhode Island (parodied by Peter Griffin and Lois Griffin of Family Guy). This particular accent resembles the Boston accent in being non-rhotic, but resembles the New York dialect in (unlike Boston) avoiding the caught-cot merger by raising the phoneme of caught to the vicinity of [oə]. For dialects of programming languages, see Programming language dialect. ... Peter Löwenbräu Griffin is the protagonist in the American animated television series Family Guy. ... Lois Griffin (nee. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... The New York dialect of the English language is spoken by most European Americans who were raised in New York City and much of its metropolitan area including the lower Hudson Valley, western Long Island, and in northeastern New Jersey. ... // The father-bother merger is a merger of the Early Modern English vowels and that occurs in almost all varieties of North American English (exceptions are accents in northeastern New England (such as the Boston accent) and New York-New Jersey English. ...


The accent family of western New England (most of Connecticut, western Massachusetts, and Vermont) differs sharply from the Boston accent to its east and the New York accent to its southwest, but is thought to be closely related to the so-called Inland North accent of the Great Lakes region due west of it, to which western New England contributed many early settlers. New York Dialect is the variety of the English language spoken by most European Americans in New York City and much of its metropolitan area including Northern New Jersey, Westchester and Rockland counties, and all of Long Island. ... The Inland North Dialect of American English was the standard Midwestern speech that was the basis for General American in the mid-20th Century, though it has been recently modified by the northern cities vowel shift. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ...


Social activities and music

Bars and pubs, especially those with Irish themes, are popular social venues. Closer to Boston, musicians from Ireland often tour pubs, playing traditional Irish folk music, usually with a singer, a fiddler, and a guitarist. This area also has thriving hardcore, punk, and indie rock music scenes. Surf rock was pioneered by Dick Dale of Quincy, Massachusetts, and the Pixies, of Boston, influenced the grunge movement of the 1990s. Dropkick Murphys, from Quincy, Massachusetts, mix hardcore and punk music with Irish music in a style known as Celtic Punk. Also, both Boston and New Haven have had a big influence on ska musicians from the Northeast. Singles bar redirects here. ... An amusingly named pub (the Old New Inn) at Bourton-on-the-Water, in the Cotswold Hills of South West England A pub in the Haymarket area of Edinburgh, Scotland A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada... “Instrumentalist” redirects here. ... A tradition is a story or a custom that is memorized and passed down from generation to generation, originally without the need for a writing system. ... Folk song redirects here. ... “Fiddler” redirects here. ... For the UK magazine, see Guitarist (magazine). ... Hardcore punk, now commonly known as hardcore, is a subgenre of punk rock that originated in North America in the late 1970s. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... In the early 1960s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was surf rock. ... This article is about the surf guitarist. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Norfolk County Settled 1625 Incorporated 1792 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor William J. Phelan Area  - City  26. ... The Pixies are an American alternative rock music group formed in Boston, Massachusetts in 1986. ... ... DKM redirects here. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Norfolk County Settled 1625 Incorporated 1792 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor William J. Phelan Area  - City  26. ... Celtic punk (also known as Paddybeat, Celtcore, Jig punk, or Rock and Reel) is a music genre typically associated with Irish punks or punks from the Irish diaspora; although other Celtic nationalities, such as Scottish, Manx and Welsh people are also represented. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... This article is about the city in Connecticut. ... For other uses, see SKA (disambiguation). ...


In much of rural New England, particularly Maine, Acadian and Quebecois culture also dominate the region's music and dance. Contra dancing and country square dancing are popular throughout New England, usually backed by live Irish, Acadian, or other folk music. Thursday night contras in Cambridge, Massachusetts Contredanse (also Contradance, Contra-dance and other variant spellings) refers to several folk dance styles in which couples dance in two facing lines. ... Square dance is a folk dance for four couples that was first described in 17th century England, but which has become associated with the United States of America due to its historic development in that country. ... The Acadians (French: Acadiens) are the descendants of the 17th-century French colonists who settled in Acadia (located on the northern portion of North Americas east coast). ...


Traditional knitting, quilting and rug hooking circles in rural New England have become less common; church, sports, and town government are more typical social activities. New Englanders of all ages also enjoy ice cream socials. These traditional gatherings are often hosted in individual homes or civic centers; larger groups regularly assemble at special-purpose ice cream parlors that dot the countryside. In fact, New England leads the country in ice cream consumption per capita.[52][53] For the record label, see Knitting Factory. ... Quilter and Quilters redirect here. ... Traditional rug hooking is a craft where rugs are made by pulling loops of yarn or fabric through a stiff woven base such as burlap, linen, or rug warp. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... A sport consists of a physical activity or skill carried out with a recreational purpose: for competition, for self-enjoyment, to attain excellence, for the development of a skill, or some combination of these. ... A town meeting is a meeting where an entire geographic area is invited to participate in a gathering, often for a political or administrative purpose. ... Missing image Ice cream is often served on a stick Boxes of ice cream are often found in stores in a display freezer. ... Ice cream (originally iced cream) is a frozen dessert made from dairy products such as cream (or equivalents), combined with flavourings and sweeteners. ...


In the United States, Candlepin bowling is essentially confined to New England, an activity invented there in the 19th century.[54] Candlepin Bowling pins are specified as 15 3/4 inches (400 mm) in height, have identical ends, and are almost 3 inches (76 mm) in diameter at the center. ...


Media

New England has several regional broadcasting companies, including New England Cable News (NECN) and the New England Sports Network (NESN) as well as the national cable sports broadcaster Entertainment and Sports Programming Network (ESPN) in Bristol, Connecticut. The former is the largest regional news network in the United States, broadcasting to more than 3.2 million homes in all of the New England states. Its studios are located in Newton, Massachusetts, outside of Boston, although it maintains bureaus in Manchester, New Hampshire; Hartford, Connecticut; Worcester, Massachusetts; Portland, Maine; and Burlington, Vermont.[55] New England Cable News, better known as NECN is a regional cable television network serving the New England region of the United States. ... The New England Sports Network, or NESN [NESS-en], is a regional cable television network that covers the six New England states. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... Nickname: Mum City Coordinates: NECTA Hartford Region Central Connecticut Incorporated (town) 1785 Incorporated (city) 1911 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor William T. Stortz Area  - City 69. ... Nickname: Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1688 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor David B. Cohen (Dem) Area  - City  18. ... Nickname: Location in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Hillsborough County Incorporated 1751 Government  - Mayor Frank Guinta (R) Area  - City  34. ... Hartford redirects here. ... For other uses, see Worcester (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: Resurgam (Latin for I will rise again) Coordinates: , Country State County Cumberland Settled 1632 Incorporated 1786 Government  - Mayor Nicholas M. Mavodones, Jr Area  - City  52. ... Burlington is the largest city in the U.S. state of Vermont and is the shire town of Chittenden County, Vermont. ...


The New England Sports Network covers New England sports teams throughout the region, save for Fairfield County, Connecticut.[56]


While most New England cities have daily newspapers, the Boston Globe and New York Times are distributed widely throughout the region. The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


Literature

Ralph Waldo Emerson was born in Boston and spent most of his literary career in Concord, Massachusetts.
Ralph Waldo Emerson was born in Boston and spent most of his literary career in Concord, Massachusetts.

New England has been the birthplace of many American authors and poets. Ralph Waldo Emerson was born near Boston. Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord, Massachusetts, where he famously lived, for some time, by Walden Pond, on Emerson's land. Nathaniel Hawthorne, romantic era writer, was born in historical Salem; later, he would live in Concord at the same time as Emerson and Thoreau. Emily Dickinson lived most of her life in Amherst, Massachusetts. Henry W. Longfellow was from Portland, Maine. Edgar Allan Poe was born in Boston. According to many reports, the famed Mother Goose, the author of fairy tales and nursery rhymes was originally a person named Elizabeth Foster Goose or Mary Goose who lived in Boston. Poets James Russell Lowell, Amy Lowell, and Robert Lowell, a Confessionalist poet and teacher of Sylvia Plath, were all New England natives. Anne Sexton, also taught by Lowell, was born and died in Massachusetts. Nobel Prize laureate Eugene O'Neill was born in New London, Connecticut, and his work is often associated with that city. Current U.S. Poet Laureate Donald Hall, a New Hampshire resident, continues the line of renowned New England poets. Noah Webster, the Father of American Scholarship and Education, was born in West Hartford, Connecticut. Pulitzer Prize winning poets Edwin Arlington Robinson, Edna St. Vincent Millay and Robert P. T. Coffin were born in Maine. Poets Stanley Kunitz and Elizabeth Bishop were both born in Worcester, Massachusetts. Pulitzer Prize winning poet Galway Kinnell was born in Providence, Rhode Island. Oliver La Farge was a New Englander of French and Narragansett descent, won the Pulitzer Prize for the Novel, the predecessor to the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, in 1930 for his book Laughing Boy. John P. Marquand grew up in Newburyport, Massachusetts. Novelist Edwin O'Connor, who was also known as a radio personality and journalist, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for his novel The Edge of Sadness. Pulitzer Prize winner John Cheever, a novelist and short story writer, was born in Quincy, Massachusetts set most of his fiction in old New England villages based on various South Shore towns around his birthcity. E. Annie Proulx was born in Norwich, Connecticut. David Lindsay-Abaire won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 2007 for his play Rabbit Hole was raised in Boston. Ralph Waldo Emerson photogravure from 19th century book This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Ralph Waldo Emerson photogravure from 19th century book This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, poet, and leader of the Transcendentalist movement in the early nineteenth century. ... Boston redirects here. ... Henry David Thoreau (July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862; born David Henry Thoreau[1]) was an American author, naturalist, transcendentalist, tax resister, development critic, and philosopher who is best known for Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay, Civil Disobedience, an argument for individual resistance... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1635 Incorporated 1635 Government  - Type Open town meeting Area  - Total 25. ... Thoreaus Cove, Concord, Mass. ... Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne; July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... Romanticism was an artistic and intellectual movement that originated in late 18th century Western Europe. ... Nickname: Location in Essex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Essex Settled 1626 Incorporated 1626 A City 1836 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kimberley Driscoll Area  - Total 18. ... From the daguerreotype taken at Mount Holyoke, December 1846 or early 1847. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Hampshire County Settled 1703 Incorporated 1775 Government  - Type Representative town meeting Area  - Town  27. ... Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) was an American poet who wrote many works that are still famous today, including My Affair with Colin B, Paul Reveres Ride, A Psalm of Life, The Song of Hiawatha and Evangeline. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... For other uses, see Mother Goose (disambiguation). ... James Russell Lowell (b. ... Amy Lowell Amy Lawrence Lowell (February 9, 1874 – May 12, 1925) was an American poet of the imagist school who posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926. ... Robert Lowell (March 1, 1917–September 12, 1977), born Robert Traill Spence Lowell, IV, was a highly regarded mid-twentieth-century American poet. ... Confessionalism is a label formally applied to a style of American poetry which emerged in the 1950s and 1960s. ... Sylvia Plath (October 27, 1932 – February 11, 1963) was an American poet, novelist, and short story writer. ... Anne Sexton, 1974 Anne Sexton (November 9, 1928, Newton, Massachusetts – October 4, 1974, Weston, Massachusetts), born Anne Gray Harvey, was an American poet and writer. ... Eugene Gladstone ONeill (October 16, 1888 – November 27, 1953) was a Nobel- and four-time Pulitzer Prize-winning American playwright. ... Nickname: Motto: MARE LIBERUM Coordinates: , NECTA Norwich-New London Region Southeastern Connecticut Settled 1646 (Pequot Plantation) Named 1658 (New London) Incorporated (city) 1784 Government  - Type Council-manager  - City council Margaret Mary Curtin, Mayor Kevin J. Cavanagh, Dep. ... A Poet Laureate is a poet officially appointed by a government and often expected to compose poems for State occasions and other government events. ... Donald Hall (born September 20, 1928) is an American poet and the U.S. Poet Laureate. ... Noah Webster Noah Webster (October 16, 1758 – April 28, 1843) was an American lexicographer, textbook author, spelling reformer, political writer, word enthusiast, and editor. ... Motto: Where City Style meets Village Charm Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated 1854 Government  - Type Council-manager  - Town manager James Francis  - Town council Scott Slifka, Mayor Art Spada, Deputy Mayor Shari Cantor Barbara Carpenter Charles Coursey Maureen K. McClay Mark C. Sinatro Carolyn Thornberry Joseph Verrengia Area  - City 58. ... The Pulitzer Prize in Poetry has been presented since 1922 for a distinguished volume of original verse by an American author. ... Edwin Arlington Robinson (December 22, 1869 – April 6, 1935) was an American poet, who won three Pulitzer Prizes for his work. ... Edna St. ... Robert Peter Tristram Coffin (March 18, 1892 – January 20, 1955) was a writer, poet and professor at Wells College (1921-1934) and Bowdoin College (1934-1955). ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Stanley Jasspon Kunitz /kju:nɪts/ (July 29, 1905 – May 14, 2006) was a noted American poet who served two years (1974–1976) as the Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress (a precursor to the modern Poet Laureate program), and served another year as United States Poet Laureate... Elizabeth Bishop (February 8, 1911 – October 6, 1979), was an American poet and writer. ... For other uses, see Worcester (disambiguation). ... Galway Kinnell (born February 1st, 1927 in Providence, Rhode Island) is one of the most influential American poets of the latter half of the 20th century. ... Providence redirects here. ... Oliver Hazard Perry La Farge (19 December 1901, New York City - 2 August 1963, Albuquerque) was an American short-story writer and anthropologist, educated at Harvard University. ... No prize was awarded in 1917. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded since 1948 for distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life. ... Laughing Boy is a 1929 novel by Oliver Lafarge about the clash between American culture and that of the southwestern Native American. ... John Phillips Marquand (November 10, 1893 - July 16, 1960 ) was a 20th-century American novelist. ... Newburyport is a small coastal city in Essex County, Massachusetts, 38 miles (61 km) northeast of Boston. ... Edwin OConnor (1918 - 1968) was an American journalist and novelist who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1962 for The Edge of Sadness (1961). ... The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded since 1948 for distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life. ... The Edge of Sadness is a novel by Edwin OConnor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Norfolk County Settled 1625 Incorporated 1792 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor William J. Phelan Area  - City  26. ... Edna Annie Proulx (pronounced ) (born August 22, 1935) is an American journalist and author. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... David Lindsay-Abaire is an American playwright who wrote Fuddy Meers, among others. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Drama was first awarded in 1918. ... Rabbit Hole is a Tony-nominated play by David Lindsay-Abaire. ...


Ethan Frome, written in 1911 by Edith Wharton, is set in turn-of-the-century New England, in the fictitious town of Starkfield, Massachusetts. Like much literature of the region, it plays off themes of isolation and hopelessness. New England is also the setting for most of the gothic horror stories of H. P. Lovecraft, who lived his life in Providence, Rhode Island. Real New England towns such as Ipswich, Newburyport, Rowley, and Marblehead are given fictional names such as Dunwich, Arkham, Innsmouth, Kingsport, and Miskatonic and then featured quite often in his stories. Lovecraft had an immense appreciation for the New England area, and when he had to re-locate to New York City, he longed to return to his beloved native land. Ethan Frome is a novel that was released in 1911 by the Pulitzer Prize-winning American author Edith Wharton. ... Edith Wharton (January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937) was an American novelist, short story writer, and designer. ... Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole The gothic novel was a literary genre that belonged to Romanticism and began in the United Kingdom with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole. ... This article is about the author. ... Providence redirects here. ... Ipswich is a coastal town in Essex County, Massachusetts, United States. ... Newburyport is a small coastal city in Essex County, Massachusetts, 38 miles (61 km) northeast of Boston. ... Settled: 1638 â€“ Incorporated: 1639 Zip Code(s): 01969 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The region has also drawn the attention of authors and poets from other parts of the United States. Mark Twain found Hartford to be the most beautiful city in the United States and made it his home, and wrote his masterpieces there. He lived directly next door to Harriett Beecher Stowe, a local whose most famous work is Uncle Tom's Cabin. John Updike, originally from Pennsylvania, eventually moved to Ipswich, Massachusetts, which served as the model for the fictional New England town of Tarbox in his 1968 novel Couples. Robert Frost was born in California, but moved to Massachusetts during his teen years and published his first poem in Lawrence; his frequent use of New England settings and themes ensured that he would be associated with the region. Arthur Miller, a New York City native, used New England as the setting for some of his works, most notably The Crucible. Herman Melville, originally for New York City, bought the house now known as Arrowhead in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and while he lived there he wrote his greatest novel Moby-Dick. Poet Maxine Kumin was born in Philadelphia, currently resides in Warner, New Hampshire. Pulitzer Prize winning poet Mary Oliver was born in Maple Heights, Ohio has lived in Provincetown, Massachusetts for the last forty years. Charles Simic who was born in Belgrade, Serbia (at that time Yugoslavia) grew up in Chicago and lives in Strafford, New Hampshire, on the shore of Bow Lake and is the professor emeritus of American literature and creative writing at the University of New Hampshire. Pulitzer Prize winning novelist and short story writer Steven Millhauser, who was born in New York City and short story Eisenheim the Illusionist was adapted into the 2006 film was raised in Connecticut. Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humanist,[2] humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... Hartford redirects here. ... Harriet Beecher Stowe Harriet Beecher Stowe Harriet Elizabeth Beecher Stowe (June 14, 1811 – July 1, 1896) was an American abolitionist and novelist, Her Uncle Toms Cabin (1852) attacked the cruelty of slavery; it reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential as well in Britain. ... Uncle Toms Cabin, or Life Among the Lowly, is American author Harriet Beecher Stowes fictional anti-slavery novel. ... John Hoyer Updike (born March 18, 1932 in Shillington, Pennsylvania) is an American novelist, poet, short story writer and literary critic. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Ipswich is a coastal town in Essex County, Massachusetts, United States. ... Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...   Settled: 1655 â€“ Incorporated: 1847 Zip Code(s): 01840 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ... Arthur Bob Miller (October 17, 1915 – February 10, 2005) was an American playwright and essayist. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Crucible (disambiguation). ... Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet. ... Arrowhead (1780) was the home of American author Herman Melville during his most productive years from 1850-1863. ... Pittsfield redirects here. ... Moby-Dick book cover Moby-Dick - the official title of the first edition - is a novel by Herman Melville. ... Maxine Kumin (b. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... Warner is a town located in Merrimack County, New Hampshire. ... Mary Oliver (b. ... Maple Heights is a city in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, United States. ... Nickname: Location in Barnstable County in Massachusetts U.S. Census Map Coordinates: , Country State County Barnstable Settled 1700 Incorporated 1727 Government  - Type Open town meeting  - Town    Manager Sharon Lynn Area  - Total 17. ... Charles Simic (born DuÅ¡an Simić, May 9, 1938 in Belgrade, Serbia) is a Serbian-American poet and the 15th Poet Laureate of the United States. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Republika Srpska. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Strafford is a town located in Strafford County, New Hampshire. ... Bow Lake is a 1,160-acre water body located in Strafford and Rockingham counties in eastern New Hampshire, United States, in the towns of Strafford and Northwood. ... A professor is a senior teacher and researcher, usually in a college or university. ... American literature refers to written or literary work produced in the area of the United States and Colonial America. ... Creative writing is a term used to distinguish certain imaginative or different types of writing from technical writing. ... University of New Hampshire (UNH) is a public university in the University System of New Hampshire (USNH). ... Steven Millhauser (born 3 August 1943 in New York City) is perhaps one of modern American fictions most elusive characters. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For the Scar Symmetry song see The Illusionist (song). ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ...


More recently, Stephen King, born in Portland, Maine, has used the small towns of his home state as the setting for much of his horror fiction, with several of his stories taking place in or near the fictional town of Castle Rock. Just to the south, Exeter, New Hampshire was the birthplace of best-selling novelist John Irving and Dan Brown, author of The Da Vinci Code. Rick Moody has set many of his works in southern New England, focusing on wealthy families of suburban Connecticut's Gold Coast and their battles with addiction and anomie. Derek Walcott, a playwright and poet, who won Nobel Prize for Literature in 1992, teaches poetry at Boston University. Pulitzer Prize winner Cormac McCarthy was born in Providence, although he moved to Tennessee when he was a boy, whose novel No Country for Old Men was made into the Academy Award for Best Picture winning film in 2007. For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: Resurgam (Latin for I will rise again) Coordinates: , Country State County Cumberland Settled 1632 Incorporated 1786 Government  - Mayor Nicholas M. Mavodones, Jr Area  - City  52. ... Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Rockingham County Incorporated 1638  - Board of Selectmen Paul Binette, Chairman Robert Eastman Joe Pace William Campbell Lionel Ingram Area    - Town 51. ... John Winslow Irving (born March 2, 1942 as John Wallace Blunt, Jr. ... This article is about the writer. ... The Da Vinci Code is a mystery/detective novel by American author Dan Brown, published in 2003 by Doubleday. ... Rick Moody (born Hiram Frederick Moody III October 18, 1961 in New York City), is an American novelist and short story writer best known for The Ice Storm (1994), a chronicle of the dissolution of two suburban Connecticut families over Thanksgiving weekend in 1973. ... The Gold Coast is a region of the state of Connecticut roughly contiguous with the boundaries of Fairfield County; it derives its regional nickname from Fairfield County being ranked as one of the wealthiest counties in the United States and being the headquarters to most of the hedge funds in... Derek Walcott, courtesy of the Nobel Foundation Derek Alton Walcott (born January 23, 1930) is a West-Indian poet, playwright, writer and visual artist who writes mainly in English. ... The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes... For the similarly named institution in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ... For the musician, see Cormac McCarthy (musician). ... Providence redirects here. ... No Country for Old Men is a 2005 novel by American author Cormac McCarthy. ... ©A.M.P.A.S.® The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to artists working in the motion picture industry. ... No Country for Old Men is a 2007 film adaptation of the novel of the same name by Cormac McCarthy. ...


Largely on the strength of its local writers, Boston was for some years the center of the U.S. publishing industry, before being overtaken by New York in the middle of the nineteenth century. Boston remains the home of publishers Houghton Mifflin and Pearson Education, and was the longtime home of literary magazine The Atlantic Monthly. Merriam-Webster is based in Springfield, Massachusetts. Yankee, a magazine for New Englanders, is based in Dublin, New Hampshire. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Pearson Education is one of leading publishers of educational textbooks and other educational material, such as multimedia learning tools. ... The Atlantic redirects here; for the ocean, see Atlantic Ocean. ... Merriam-Webster, originally known as the G. & C. Merriam Company of Springfield, Massachusetts, is a United States company that publishes reference books, especially dictionaries that are descendants of Noah Websters An American Dictionary of the English Language (1828). ... Nickname: Location in Hampden County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Hampden Settled 1636 Incorporated 1852 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Charles Ryan (D) Area  - Total 33. ... Yankee (ISSN 0044-0191) is a magazine published by Yankee Publishing Inc. ... Dublin is a town located in Cheshire County, New Hampshire. ...


Sports

Main article: Sports in New England

Two popular American sports were invented in New England. Basketball was invented by James Naismith in Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1891.[57] Volleyball was invented by William G. Morgan in Holyoke, Massachusetts, in 1895.[58] The earliest known written reference to the sport of baseball is a 1791 Pittsfield, Massachusetts by-law banning the playing of the game within 80 yards of the town's new meeting house.[59]
Two popular American sports were invented in New England. ... This article is about the sport. ... James Naismith James A. Naismith (November 6, 1861 – November 28, 1939) was the inventor of the sport of basketball and the first to introduce the use of a helmet in American football. ... Nickname: Location in Hampden County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Hampden Settled 1636 Incorporated 1852 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Charles Ryan (D) Area  - Total 33. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... William G. Morgan (1870-1942) was the inventor of volleyball, originally called Mintonette. William G.Morgan was born in Lockport, NY. Willamm was born in1870 and dided in 1942. ... See Holyoke, Colorado for the city in Colorado. ... Pittsfield redirects here. ...


Professional and semi-professional sports teams in New England

Most New Englanders tend towards support of the local professional sports teams: the Boston Red Sox, the New England Patriots (based in Foxborough, Massachusetts), the Boston Celtics, the Boston Bruins and the New England Revolution (also based in Foxborough). In the southwestern part of the state, many Connecticut residents support the New York Yankees and other New York based professional sports teams, both due to geographical proximity and the high rate of southwestern Connecticut residents with business or employment ties to New York City. Hartford had a professional NHL hockey team from 1972 through 1997 called the Hartford Whalers (more affectionately known locally as "The Whale"). However, in 1997, the owner moved the team to North Carolina (changing the name to the Carolina Hurricanes) for financial reasons. There are also numerous minor league baseball and hockey teams based in larger cities such as the Pawtucket Red Sox (baseball), the Worcester Tornadoes (baseball) and the Worcester Sharks (hockey), the Lowell Spinners (baseball) and the Lowell Devils (hockey), the Nashua Pride (baseball) and others. Two popular American sports were invented in New England. ... This article is about the sport. ... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... The International League (IL) is a minor league baseball league which operates in the eastern United States and Canada. ... Class-Level Triple-A (1973-Present) Double-A (1970-1972) Minor League affiliations International League North Division Eastern League (1970-1972) Major League affiliation Boston Red Sox (1970-Present) Current uniform Name Pawtucket Red Sox (1970-Present) Ballpark McCoy Stadium (1970-Present) Minor League titles League titles 1973, 1984 Division... The Eastern League is a minor league baseball league which operates primarily in the northeastern United States, although it has had a team in Ohio since 1989. ... League Eastern League Division Northern Division Year founded 1995 Major League affiliation San Francisco Giants Home ballpark Thomas J. Dodd Memorial Stadium Previous home ballparks City Norwich, Connecticut Current uniform colors black, blue, silver Previous uniform colors black, orange Logo design the wordmark Defenders superimposed over a black ring and... League Eastern League Division Northern Division Year founded 1995 Major League affiliation Minnesota Twins Home ballpark New Britain Stadium Previous home ballparks Beehive Field City New Britain, Connecticut Current uniform colors red, black Previous uniform colors {{{previous colors}}} Logo design The wordmark Rock Cats in red outlined in black with... The New Hampshire Fisher Cats are a minor league baseball team based in Manchester, New Hampshire. ... Class-Level AA Minor League affiliations Eastern League Northern Division Major League affiliations Boston Red Sox (2003-present) Florida Marlins (1994-2002) Name Portland Sea Dogs (1994-present) Ballpark Hadlock Field Minor League titles League titles Division titles 1995, 1996, 1997, 2005 Owner(s)/Operated by: Dan Burke Manager: Arnie... The New York - Penn League is a minor league baseball league which operates in the northeastern United States. ... League New York-Penn League Division Stedler Division Year founded 1996 Major League affiliation Boston Red Sox Home ballpark Edward A. LeLacheur Park Previous home ballparks Alumni Field City Lowell, Massachusetts Current uniform colors red, navy blue Previous uniform colors Logo design A thread-wrapped a baseball bat spinning inside... The logo of the Vermont Lake Monsters is Champ, the legendary sea monster of Vermonts Lake Champlain. ... The Atlantic League of Professional Baseball, based in Camden, New Jersey, is a professional, independent baseball organization located in the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic United States, especially the greater metropolitan areas of New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Maryland and Washington, D.C. It operates in cities not served by Major or... The Bridgeport Bluefish are an Atlantic League team based in Bridgeport, Connecticut. ... The Canadian-American Association of Professional Baseball, based in Durham, North Carolina, is a professional, independent baseball league located in the Northeastern United States and the Canadian province of Quebec. ... League affiliations Can-Am League (2002-present) Name Brockton Rox (2002-present) Team Colors Jade, Brown Ballpark Campanelli Stadium Championships League titles: (1) 2003 Division titles: (1) 2003  Owner(s)/Operated By: Van Schley General Manager: Andy Crossley Manager: Chris Miyake Media: The Enterprise, Patriot Ledger Website: www. ... The Nashua Pride are a minor league baseball team which plays in Nashua, New Hampshire. ... League affiliations Can-Am League Name Worcester Tornadoes (2005-present) Team Colors Black, Orange Ballpark Hanover Insurance Park at Fitton Field Championships League titles: (1) 2005 Owner(s)/Operated By: Perfect Game LLC General Manager: R.C. Reuteman Manager: Rich Gedman Media: Worcester Telegram & Gazette Website: www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3264x2448, 1487 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Fenway Park Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Gillette_Stadium. ... This article is about the sport. ... NBA redirects here. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) is an organization governing a professional basketball league for women in the United States. ... The Connecticut Sun are a Womens National Basketball Association team based in Uncasville, Connecticut. ... For information on the original league that lasted until 1976, see American Basketball Association (1967-1977). ... The Boston Blizzard are a team of the ABA scheduled to begin play in 2007-08. ... The Manchester Millrats are a 2007 expansion team in the American Basketball Association based in Manchester, New Hampshire. ... The Vermont Frost Heaves are Vermonts professional basketball team. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... NFL redirects here. ... City Foxborough, Massachusetts Other nicknames The Pats Team colors Nautical Blue, New Century Silver, Red, and White Head Coach Bill Belichick Owner Robert Kraft General manager Bill Belichick (de facto) Mascot Pat Patriot League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–69) Eastern Division (1960–69) National Football League (1970–present... af2 (short for arenafootball2) is the name of the Arena Football Leagues minor league, which started play in 2000. ... The Manchester Wolves are a professional arena football team, based at the Verizon Wireless Arena in Manchester, New Hampshire. ... The CIFLs 2007 game ball The Continental Indoor Football League (CIFL) is a new indoor football league based along the Northeastern United States region. ... Crickey! ... The National Womens Football Association (NWFA) is a full-contact American football league for women. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... NHL redirects here. ... The Boston Bruins are a professional mens ice hockey team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The American Hockey League (AHL) is a professional ice hockey league in North America, that serves as the primary developmental circuit for the National Hockey League (NHL). ... The Bridgeport Sound Tigers are an ice hockey team in the American Hockey League. ... The Hartford Wolf Pack are an ice hockey team in the American Hockey League. ... The Lowell Devils are an ice hockey team in the American Hockey League. ... The Manchester Monarchs are an ice hockey team in the American Hockey League. ... The Portland Pirates are the American Hockey League affiliate of the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, based in Portland, Maine. ... The Providence Bruins are an ice hockey team in the American Hockey League. ... The Springfield Falcons are an ice hockey team in the American Hockey League. ... The Worcester Sharks are a professional ice hockey team in the American Hockey League. ... The Quebec Major Junior Hockey League (French: la Ligue de hockey junior majeur du Québec, abbreviated QMJHL in English, LHJMQ in French) is one of the three Major Junior A Tier I hockey leagues which constitute the Canadian Hockey League. ... The Lewiston MAINEiacs are a major junior ice hockey team of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Major League Soccer (MLS) is a professional soccer league sanctioned by FIFA as the top flight of the American Soccer Pyramid. ... Year founded 1995 League Major League Soccer Nickname Revolution, Revs Stadium Gillette Stadium Foxborough, MA Coach Steve Nicol, 2002— Owner Robert Kraft First Game Tampa Bay Mutiny 3–2 New England Revolution (Tampa Stadium; April 13, 1996) Largest Win New England Revolution 6–1 Colorado Rapids (Gillette Stadium; September 18... The United Soccer Leagues Second Division (often referred to as simply, USL-2) is a professional mens soccer league in North America, part of the United Soccer Leagues (USL) league pyramid. ... Western Mass Pioneers are an American soccer team, founded in 1998. ... The USL Premier Development League (PDL) is the amateur league of the United Soccer Leagues in the United States and Canada, forming part of the American Soccer Pyramid. ... Cape Cod Crusaders are an American soccer team, founded in 1994. ... The New Hampshire Phantoms are a minor league soccer team based in Manchester, New Hampshire. ... The Rhode Island Stingrays are a PDL team based in Providence, Rhode Island. ... The Vermont Voltage are a USL Premier Development League, club that play in St. ... The National Premier Soccer League (NPSL) is an American soccer league recognized by the USSF and FIFA as a Division III league. ... Boston Aztec is part of the Aztec Soccer Club, a full-scale developmental soccer organization located on the North Shore of Massachusetts. ... The W-League is the first modern womens soccer league in the United States pyramid. ... The Boston Renegades are a W-League, club that plays at Bowditch Field in Framingham, a suburb of Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Vermont Voltage are a USL Premier Development League, club that play in St. ... The Western Mass. ... For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... Major League Lacrosse is a professional outdoor Lacrosse league that is made up of teams within the United States. ... The Boston Cannons are a professional lacrosse team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... NLL redirects here. ... The Boston Blazers were a member of the Major Indoor Lacrosse League from 1989 to 1997. ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport popular around the world but especially in the United States. ... National Pro Fastpitch (NPF), formerly the Womens Pro Softball League (WPSL), is the only professional womens softball league in the world. ... The New England Riptide is a womens softball team based in Lowell, Massachusetts. ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... The American National Rugby League (sometimes referred to as the AMNRL) is the major rugby league tournament for semi-professional clubs in the United States; currently there are eleven teams predominantly based on the north-east coast competing annually in this competition. ... The Connecticut Wildcats is an American semi-professional rugby league football team based in Norwalk, Connecticut. ... The New Haven Warriors (also often known as simply The Warriors) are a semi-professional rugby league club located in New Haven, Connecticut in the United States. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... For other articles with similar names, see Super League. ... The Boston Irish Wolfhounds (BIWRFC) are a USA Rugby Division 1 mens rugby union club based out of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Boston Rugby Football Club (also known as BRFC) is a rugby union team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... World TeamTennis is a league of team tennis in the United States. ... The Boston Lobsters are a World TeamTennis team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Boston Terriers Logo The Boston University Terriers are the ten mens and eleven womens varsity athletic teams representing Boston University in NCAA Division I competition. ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... The Bryant Bulldogs are the athletic teams representing Bryant University in North Smithfield, Rhode Island. ... 2006 NEC CHAMPS BABY! GO CCSU BLUE DEVILS WHOOO!!! Central Connecticut State University is a state university in New Britain, Connecticut. ... The Connecticut Huskies, also known as the UConn Huskies, are the athletic teams of the University of Connecticut. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... // Fairfield University is a member of the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference (MAAC) and is classified as Division I-AA in the National Collegiate Athletic Association for its athletic programs. ... The University of Hartford, often called UHA or UHart, was founded in 1877, and is a private, independent, and nonsectarian coeducational university located in West Hartford, Connecticut. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Not to be confused with Holy Cross College (Indiana) or other similarly named Holy Cross Colleges. ... The Maine Black Bears are the athletic teams which represent the University of Maine. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Wildcats logo The New Hampshire Wildcats, or Cats, are the athletic teams of the University of New Hampshire. ... The Northeastern University Huskies are the athletic teams representing Northeastern University. ... This page refers to a college in Rhode Island. ... ... Quinnipiac University is a private four-year university in Hamden, Connecticut, located on about 500 acres (2 km²), just north of New Haven. ... Sacred Heart University, the second-largest Catholic university in New England, offers more than 50 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs. ... UVM redirects here. ... Yale redirects here. ... Gaelic games are the native sports of Ireland: principally Hurling, Gaelic Football and Camogie. ... The Northeast Divisional Board of the North American GAA is the governing body of hurling, camogie, and gaelic football in the Boston metropolitan area. ... For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ... Gaelic Football (Irish: Peil, Peil Gaelach or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, or Gaelic , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... City Foxborough, Massachusetts Other nicknames The Pats Team colors Nautical Blue, New Century Silver, Red, and White Head Coach Bill Belichick Owner Robert Kraft General manager Bill Belichick (de facto) Mascot Pat Patriot League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–69) Eastern Division (1960–69) National Football League (1970–present... Location in Norfolk County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Norfolk Settled 1704 Incorporated 1778 Government  - Type Open town meeting Area  - Town  20. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Boston Bruins are a professional mens ice hockey team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Year founded 1995 League Major League Soccer Nickname Revolution, Revs Stadium Gillette Stadium Foxborough, MA Coach Steve Nicol, 2002— Owner Robert Kraft First Game Tampa Bay Mutiny 3–2 New England Revolution (Tampa Stadium; April 13, 1996) Largest Win New England Revolution 6–1 Colorado Rapids (Gillette Stadium; September 18... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... When used by itself in a sentence, the term Hartford can refer to one of several places in the United States. ... The Hartford Whalers were an American professional ice hockey team based in Hartford, Connecticut. ... The Carolina Hurricanes are a professional ice hockey team based in Raleigh, North Carolina. ...


The region also has a rich heritage in high school and college athletics. Thanksgiving day high school football rivalries date back to the 19th century, and the Harvard-Yale rivalry ("The Game") is the oldest active rivalry in college football. The Boston Marathon, run on Patriot's Day every year, is a New England cultural institution and the oldest annual marathon in the world. While the race offers far less prize money than many other marathons, and the infamous Newton hills have helped ensure that no world record has been set on the course since 1947, the race's difficulty and long history make it one of the world's most prestigious marathons.[60] Half-time festivities at The Game, Yale Bowl The Game (always capitalized) is a title given to several U.S. college football rivalry games, but most particularly the annual contest between Harvard and Yale. ... The 100th running of the Boston Marathon, 1996 The Boston Marathon is an annual marathon sporting event hosted by the city of Boston, Massachusetts, on Patriots Day, the third Monday of April. ... Patriots Grave in the Old Burying Ground, Arlington, Massachusetts. ... Nickname: Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1688 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor David B. Cohen (Dem) Area  - City  18. ...


Notable places

Boats on the Kennebunk River between Kennebunk and Kennebunkport, Maine.
Boats on the Kennebunk River between Kennebunk and Kennebunkport, Maine.

Boats on the Kennebunk River at Kennebunkport, Maine (taken Sept. ... Boats on the Kennebunk River at Kennebunkport, Maine (taken Sept. ... Categories: US geography stubs | Maine rivers ...

Historic

New England features many of the oldest cities and towns in the country. The following places are replete with historic buildings, parks, and streetscapes (following the coast from New Haven):

The New Haven Green was created in 1638 and remains preserved today as the heart of what could be considered to be the first planned city in America.
The New Haven Green was created in 1638 and remains preserved today as the heart of what could be considered to be the first planned city in America.[61]

New Haven redirects here. ... Hartford redirects here. ... Providence redirects here. ... Newport, Rhode Island Newport is a city in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ... Nickname: Location in Plymouth County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Plymouth Settled 1620 Incorporated (town) 1670 Government [1]  - Type Representative town meeting  - Town    Manager Mark Sylvia Area  - Total 134. ... Boston redirects here. ... Light Blue represents the area in Massachusetts known as Greater Boston, while Dark Blue represents the Metro-Boston area and Red represents Boston proper, the City of Boston Greater Boston is the area of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts surrounding the city of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Nickname: Location in Essex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Essex Settled 1626 Incorporated 1626 A City 1836 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kimberley Driscoll Area  - Total 18. ... This article is about Gloucester, Massachusetts, U.S.A.; there are other places called Gloucester Location in Essex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Essex Settled 1623 Incorporated 1642 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor John Bell Area  - Total 41. ... Newburyport is a small coastal city in Essex County, Massachusetts, 38 miles (61 km) northeast of Boston. ... Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country State County Rockingham County Incorporated 1653 Government  - Mayor Steve Marchand  - City manager John P. Bohenko Area  - City  16. ... Nickname: Motto: Resurgam (Latin for I will rise again) Coordinates: , Country State County Cumberland Settled 1632 Incorporated 1786 Government  - Mayor Nicholas M. Mavodones, Jr Area  - City  52. ... Image File history File links Festival. ... Image File history File links Festival. ... The New Haven Green is a public park and recreation area located in the downtown district of the city of New Haven, Connecticut. ...

Recreational

The Appalachian Mountains run through northern New England which make for excellent skiing. Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine are home to various ski resorts. The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ...


Cape Cod, Nantucket, and Martha's Vineyard in Massachusetts are popular tourist destinations for their small town charm and beaches. All have restrictive zoning laws to prevent sprawl and overdevelopment. This article is about the area of Massachusetts known as Cape Cod. For other uses, see Cape Cod (disambiguation). ... Nantucket is an island south of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, formed of glacial moraine. ... Map of Marthas Vineyard. ...


Acadia National Park, off the coast of Maine, preserves most of Mount Desert Island and includes mountains, an ocean shoreline, woodlands, and lakes. Acadia National Park preserves much of Mount Desert Island, and associated smaller islands, off the Atlantic coast of Maine. ... Mount Desert Island, in Hancock County, Maine, is one of the larger islands in the United States, being the third largest in the East after Long Island and Marthas Vineyard. ...


Additionally, the coastal New England states are home to many oceanfront beaches.


The financial magazine Money, in a 2006 survey entitled "Best Places to Live," ranked several New England towns and cities in the top one hundred. In Connecticut, Fairfield was ranked ninth, while Stamford was ranked forty-sixth. In Maine, Portland ranked eighty-ninth. In Massachusetts, Newton was ranked twenty-second. In New Hampshire, Nashua, a past number one, was ranked eighty-seventh. In Rhode Island, Cranston was ranked seventy-eighth, while Warwick was ranked eighty-third.[62] Money is a Time Warner financial magazine. ... Fairfield is a town located in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Settled 1641 Incorporated (city) 1893 Consolidated 1949 Government  - Type Mayor-Board of representatives  - Mayor Dannel Malloy (Dem) Area  - City 134. ... Nickname: Motto: Resurgam (Latin for I will rise again) Coordinates: , Country State County Cumberland Settled 1632 Incorporated 1786 Government  - Mayor Nicholas M. Mavodones, Jr Area  - City  52. ... Nickname: Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1688 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor David B. Cohen (Dem) Area  - City  18. ... Nickname: Gate City Location in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Hillsborough Incorporated 1746 Government  - Mayor Bernard A. Streeter Area  - City  31. ... Location within the state of Rhode Island Coordinates: , Country State County Providence Government  - Mayor Michael Napolitano Area  - Total 29. ... Warwick is a city in Kent County, Rhode Island, United States. ...

See also: Beaches of New England


// Connecticut Andover Ansonia Ashford Avon Barkhamsted Beacon Falls Berlin Bethany Bethel Bethlehem Bloomfield Bolton Bozrah Branford Bridgeport Bridgewater Bristol Brookfield Brooklyn Burlington Canaan Canterbury Canton Chaplin Cheshire Chester Clinton Colchester Colebrook Columbia Cornwall Coventry Cromwell Danbury Darien Deep River Derby Durham East Granby East Haddam East Hampton East Hartford East...


See also

The New England Planters were settlers from the New England colonies who responded to requests by the lieutenant governor and, subsequently, governor of Nova Scotia, Charles Lawrence, to settle lands left vacant by the Acadian Expulsion of 1755. ... This is a list of extreme points of New England, which are points that extend farther north, south, east or west than any other part of New England. ... This category is to contain articles on amusement and water parks in the American region of New England. ... // Connecticut Andover Ansonia Ashford Avon Barkhamsted Beacon Falls Berlin Bethany Bethel Bethlehem Bloomfield Bolton Bozrah Branford Bridgeport Bridgewater Bristol Brookfield Brooklyn Burlington Canaan Canterbury Canton Chaplin Cheshire Chester Clinton Colchester Colebrook Columbia Cornwall Coventry Cromwell Danbury Darien Deep River Derby Durham East Granby East Haddam East Hampton East Hartford East... The Boston accent is found not only in the city of Boston, Massachusetts itself but also much of eastern Massachusetts. ... The system of local government in use in New England is very different from that found throughout the rest of the United States. ... For the Major League Baseball team, see New York Yankees. ... Swamp Yankee is a colloquialism that has a variety of meanings. ... New England states are indicated in red. ... The Maritime provinces. ...

Notes

  1. ^ U.S. Census QuickFacts Page
  2. ^ New England - Britannica Online Encyclopedia
  3. ^ "New England," Microsoft® Encarta® Online Encyclopedia 2006 http://encarta.msn.com © 1997–2006 Microsoft Corporation. All Rights Reserved.
  4. ^ The Flag of New England Page
  5. ^ An Earth Without People. Scientific American, Inc.. Retrieved on 2007-08-13.
  6. ^ "In addition to claiming land for England and bringing the faith of the Church of England to the native peoples, each of the Virginia Companies was also enjoined both by the crown and its members to make a tidy profit by whatever means it found expedient." http://www.nps.gov/colo/Jthanout/TobaccoHistory.html
  7. ^ The Virginia Company: Lecture Transcript One
  8. ^ New England. (2006). In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved June 20, 2006, from Encyclopædia Britannica Premium Service: http://www.britannica.com/eb/article?tocId=9055457
  9. ^ "...joint stock company organized in 1620 by a charter from the British crown with authority to colonize and govern the area now known as New England." New England, Council for. (2006). In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved July 13, 2006, from Encyclopædia Britannica Premium Service: http://www.britannica.com/eb/article?tocId=9055458
  10. ^ Charles French and Scott Mitchell. American Guide To U.S. Coins: The Most Up-to-Date Coin Prices Available. Available at: http://www.coin-collecting.info/American/early.html (Accessed 14 August 2006).
  11. ^ James Schouler, History of the United States vol 1 (New York: Dodd, Mead & Company. 1891; copyright expired).
  12. ^ The Story of the World Record Wind. Mount Washington Observatory. Retrieved on 2007-08-13.
  13. ^ New England's Fall Foliage. Discover New England. Retrieved on 2007-08-13.
  14. ^ "New England," Microsoft® Encarta® Online Encyclopedia 2006 http://encarta.msn.com © 1997–2006 Microsoft Corporation. All Rights Reserved.
  15. ^ New England Climate Initiative. Available at: http://www.neci.sr.unh.edu/neccwaq.html#4 (Accessed 26 July 2006).
  16. ^ http://www.planning.state.ri.us/census/pdf%20files/pdf/NE1800-2000.PDFPDF (5.62 KiB)
  17. ^ U.S. Census Bureau - Metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area population and estimated components of change: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006
  18. ^ (Population Estimates for Places over 100,000: 2000 to 2006. US Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-06-29.)
  19. ^ All population information for Massachusetts cities is as of 2000 and comes from the web site of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, available here. Last accessed: 11 August 2006.
  20. ^ Population Division, U.S. Census Bureau. Combined Statistical Areas and Component Core Based Statistical Areas, December 2005. Retrieved on 2006-06-15.
  21. ^ Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor - History & Culture (U.S. National Park Service)
  22. ^ "Background on the New England Economy." U.S. Department of Commerce. Available at: http://www.buyusa.gov/newengland/background.html (Accessed 19 July 2006)
  23. ^ New England - Labor Force Statistics
  24. ^ http://www.census.gov/prod/2003pubs/c2kbr-19.pdfPDF (850 KiB)
  25. ^ New England has the Highest Increase in Income Disparity in the Nation. The Carsey Institute: University of New Hampshire. Retrieved on 2007-06-06.
  26. ^ U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, and has abundant potato fields in its northeast part. Available at: http://www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_by_State/Ag_Overview/AgOverview_ME.pdfPDF (34.3 KiB)
  27. ^ U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Available at: http://www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_by_State/Ag_Overview/AgOverview_VT.pdfPDF (34.1 KiB)
  28. ^ U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Available at: http://www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_by_State/Ag_Overview/AgOverview_CT.pdfPDF (34.3 KiB)
  29. ^ U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Available at: http://www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_by_State/Ag_Overview/AgOverview_MA.pdfPDF (34.5 KiB)
  30. ^ Bureau of Economic Analysis. Available at: http://www.bea.gov/bea/newsrel/gspnewsrelease.htm (Accessed 19 July 2005).
  31. ^ History of the United States of America, by Henry William Elson, The MacMillan Company, New York, 1904. Chapter VI p. 127–130. Available at: http://www.usgennet.org/usa/topic/colonial/book/chap6_3.html (Accessed 19 July 2006).
  32. ^ Woodward, Wm McKenzie. Guide to Providence Architecture. 1st ed. 2003: United States. p135.
  33. ^ Madison, James. Federalist No. 55. Quotation attributed at http://www.ilsr.org/newrules/gov/townmtg.html (Accessed 19 July 2006).
  34. ^ See Harvard lecturer Robert I. Rotberg review REAL DEMOCRACY: THE NEW ENGLAND TOWN MEETING AND HOW IT WORKS at http://democraciaparticipativa.net/mambo/content/view/79/36/ (Accessed 19 July 2006).
  35. ^ "School Integration in Boston: Introduction." Available at: http://www.watson.org/~lisa/blackhistory/school-integration/boston/index.html (Accessed 19 July 2006)
  36. ^ "Election 2006" (map) 'New York Times; retrieved November 15, 2007
  37. ^ Christopher Keating. "State Democrats Have Veto-Proof Majorities" Hartford Courant, November 9, 2006; retrieved November 15, 2007.
  38. ^ StateVote 2006 State Legislatures Magazine National Conference of State Legislatures; retrieved November 15, 2006.
  39. ^ "Connecticut: The Slow Death of the State G.O.P." New York Times," November 12, 2006; retrieved November 15, 2007.
  40. ^ Jennifer Medina, "Democrat Wins House Seat After Recount in Connecticut," New York Times, November 16, 2006.
  41. ^ "2006 Political Party Breakdown by State."; accessed 19 July 2006.
  42. ^ "Death Penalty Information Center." Available at: http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/state/ (Accessed 19 July 2006).
  43. ^ "New Hampshire has not executed anyone since 1939 and has no one on death row. Seven inmates are waiting to die in Connecticut, which conducted New England's last execution in 1960." FOXNews.com. "Supreme Court Lifts Order Blocking Connecticut Execution." Available at: http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,145681,00.html (Accessed 19 July 2006).
  44. ^ Marrying in Massachusetts: A Guide for Same-Sex Couples. glad.org. Retrieved on 2007-06-11.
  45. ^ Fahrenthold, David A. "Mass. Bill Requires Health Coverage, " The Washington Post April 5, 2006; Page A01. Retrieved December 6, 2006. See also Massachusetts 2006 Health Reform Statute.
  46. ^ NEA: National Education Association: Rankings of the States, Estimates of School Statistics 2003
  47. ^ "She graduated from the elite Boston Latin School, the oldest high school in America, in 1999." Taken from the New York Post, available at: http://www.nypost.com/news/regionalnews/64304.htm (Accessed 19 July 2006).
  48. ^ FRBB: New England Economic Review
  49. ^ New England Population History
  50. ^ Ruth Schell, "Swamp Yankee," American Speech, 1963, Volume 38, No.2 (The American Dialect Society, Published by Duke University Press), pg. 121–123. accessed through JSTOR
  51. ^ Does a Connecticut Yankee Wear Red Sox? | BaseballLibrary.com
  52. ^ New England's best ice cream. The Boston Globe. Retrieved on 2008-01-14.
  53. ^ Surviving the New England Winter: You Scream, I Scream, Ice Cream!. The Harvard Harbus. Retrieved on 2008-01-14.
  54. ^ History of Candlepin Bowling. Massachusetts Bowling Association. Retrieved on 2007-08-23.
  55. ^ New England Cable News. Available at: http://www.boston.com/news/necn/About/ (Accessed 19 July 2006).
  56. ^ New England Sports Network. Available at: http://www.boston.com/sports/nesn/aboutus/FAQ/ (Accessed 19 July 2006).
  57. ^ History of Basketball - James Naismith
  58. ^ History Of Volleyball
  59. ^ BBC NEWS | Americas | Baseball dated back to 1791
  60. ^ "In marathoning, it has a foothold - History means Boston can give any race in the world a run for its money" by John Powers, The Boston Globe, April 10, 2005
  61. ^ New Haven Travel Guide. wcities. Retrieved on 2007-12-04.
  62. ^ MONEY Magazine: Best places to live 2006: Top 100 1-25

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Massachusetts 2006 Health Reform Statute was enacted as Chapter 58 of the Acts of 2006 of the Massachusetts Legislature, entitled: The law was designed to require health care coverage for nearly all of the residents of Massachusetts, U.S.A. Later in 2006, in October, a technical corrections bill to... According to its web site, the American Dialect Society, founded in 1889, is dedicated to the study of the English language in North America, and of other languages, or dialects of other languages, influencing it or influenced by it. ... JSTOR®, begun in 1995, is an online system for archiving academic journals. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Adams, James Truslow. The Founding of New England (1921)
  • Adams, James Truslow. Revolutionary New England, 1691–1776 (1923)
  • Adams, James Truslow. New England in the Republic, 1776–1850 (1926)
  • Andrews, Charles M. The Fathers of New England: A Chronicle of the Puritan Commonwealths (1919), short survey.
  • Axtell, James, ed. The American People in Colonial New England (1973), new social history
  • Black, John D. The rural economy of New England: a regional study (1950
  • Brewer, Daniel Chauncey. Conquest of New England by the Immigrant (1926).
  • Conforti, Joseph A. Imagining New England: Explorations of Regional Identity from the Pilgrims to the Mid-Twentieth Century (2001)
  • Dwight, Timothy. Travels Through New England and New York (circa 1800) 4 vol. (1969) Online at: vol 1; vol 2; vol 3; vol 4
  • Hall, Donald, foreword, Feintuch, Burt and Watters, David H., editors, Encyclopedia of New England (2005)
  • Karlsen, Carol F. The Devil in the Shape of a Woman: Witchcraft in Colonial New England (1998)
  • Lilly, Lamberth. History of New England (1847)
  • Lockridge, Kenneth A. A New England Town: The First Hundred Years: Dedham, Massachusetts, 1636–1736 (1985), new social history
  • McPhetres, S. A. A political manual for the campaign of 1868, for use in the New England states, containing the population and latest election returns of every town (1868)
  • Palfrey, John Gorham. History of New England (5 vol 1859–90)
  • Zimmerman, Joseph F. The New England Town Meeting: Democracy in Action (1999)
  • NEW YORK: Atlas of Historical County Boundaries; John H. Long, Editor; Compiled by Kathryn Ford Thorne; A Project of the Dr. William M. Scholl Center for Family and Community History; The new Berry Library; Simon & Schuster; 1993.
  • Contributors: U.S. Census Bureau. "Census Regions and Divisions of the United States"PDF (1.06 MiB). Retrieved May 11, 2005
  • The Washington Post, Mass. Bill Requires Health Coverage
  • The Guardian, Movers and Shakers

Timothy Dwight is the name of two presidents of Yale University Timothy Dwight IV (1752-1817) -- President of Yale University from 1795-1817. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... MiB redirects here. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

The United States is a nation in the Western Hemisphere. ... This list of regions of the United States includes official (governmental) and non-official areas within the borders of the United States, not including U.S. states, the federal district of Washington, D.C. or standard subentities such as cities or counties. ... Regional definitions vary The Northeastern United States is a region of the United States. ... It has been suggested that Middle Atlantic States be merged into this article or section. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... The East North Central States form one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States which are officially recognized by the United States Census Bureau. ... The West North Central States form one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The Great Lakes states of the U.S. are colored red in this map. ... For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... Historic Southern United States. ... The South Atlantic States form one of the nine divisions within the United States that are formally recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... The East South Central States constitute one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... The West South Central States form one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by the United States Census Bureau. ... Red states show the core of the South Central, states shown as pink may or may not be included in the South Central, and thus their inclusion or exclusion varies from source to source. ... The US Southeast is the eastern portion of the Southern United States, but the Census Bureau does not provide a standard definition of a Southeast region of the United States, and organizations that need to subdivide the US are free to define a Southeast region to fit their needs. ... The Upland South does not correspond well to state lines, although the term Upper South is sometimes defined by states. ... The states in dark red comprise the Deep South. ... States that border the Gulf of Mexico are shown in red The Gulf Coast region of the United States comprises the coasts of states which border the Gulf of Mexico. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The Pacific Northwest from space The Pacific Northwest, abbreviated PNW, or PacNW is a region in the northwest of North America. ... Drainage map showing the Great Basin in orange Various Definitions of the Great Basin (NPS) Wheeler Peak in Great Basin National Park, Nevada. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Red shows states east of the Mississippi River, pink shows states not fully eastern or western The U.S. Eastern states are the states east of the Mississippi River. ... The Central United States is a bridge region between the Eastern United States and Western United States. ... States that have an Ocean/Gulf of Mexico coastline are shown in red, and states that have a Great Lake coastline are shown in pink. ... International Border states are shown in red on this map International Border states are states in the United States that share an international border with another country. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... American history redirects here. ... This is a timeline of United States history. ... The pre-Columbian era incorporates all period subdivisions in the history and prehistory of the Americas before the appearance of significant European influences on the American continents. ... For colonies not part of the 13 colonies see European colonization of the Americas or British colonization of the Americas. ... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... A government map, probably created in the mid-20th century, that depicts a simplified history of territorial acquisitions within the continental United States. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden Communist: Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Peoples Republic of China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Prominent figures of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. ... This article is about U.S. actions, and those of other states, after September 11 2001. ... For a history, see Timeline of United States diplomatic history For the published diplomatic papers, see The Foreign Relations of the United States For Foreign relations under George W. Bush, see Foreign policy of the George W. Bush administration. ... // 2000 282,338,631 2010 309,162,581 2020 336,031,546 2030 363,811,435 2040 392,172,658 2050 420,080,587 2060 450,505,985 2070 480,568,004 2080 511,442,859 2090 540,405,985 2100 571,440,474 The US population in 1900 was... 48-star flag, 1957 This is a survey of the postage stamps and postal history of the United States. ... The United States Constitution, the supreme law of the United States The United States Reports, the official reporter of the Supreme Court of the United States The law of the United States was originally largely derived from the common law of the system of English law, which was in force... The United States Bill of Rights consists of the first 10 amendments to the United States Constitution. ... theSeparation of powers is a political doctrine under which the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government are kept distinct, to prevent abuse of power. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Cabinet meets in the Cabinet Room on May 16, 2001. ... This is an incomplete list of federal agencies, which are either departmental agencies within the executive branch of the United States government or are Independent Agencies of the United States Government (including regulatory agencies and government corporations). ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... The United States courts of appeals (or circuit courts) are the mid-level appellate courts of the United States federal court system. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building in Washington, D.C. “Justice Department” redirects here. ... F.B.I. and FBI redirect here. ... Logo used on the Intelligence Community web site. ... CIA redirects here. ... The Defense Intelligence Agency, or DIA, is a major producer and manager of military intelligence for the United States Department of Defense. ... “NSA” redirects here. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... USN redirects here. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... Union Jack. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      Politics of the United States takes place in a framework of a presidential... Political parties in the United States lists political parties in the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      The United States has a federal government, with elected officials at federal (national), state and... Electoral votes by state/federal district, for the elections of 2004 and 2008 The United States Electoral College is a term used to describe the 538 President Electors who meet every 4 years to cast the electoral votes for President and Vice President of the United States; their votes represent... Political Compass. ... This article provides a list of major political scandals of the United States. ... Map of results by state of the 2004 U.S. presidential election, representing states won by the Democrats as blue and those won by the Republican Party as red. ... This article is about the national personification of the USA. For other uses, see Uncle Sam (disambiguation). ... Flag of Puerto Rico The political movement for Puerto Rican Independence (Lucha por la Independencia Puertorriqueña) has existed since the mid-19th century and has advocated independence of the island of Puerto Rico, in varying degrees, from Spain (in the 19th century) or the United States (from 1898 to... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... United States territory is any extent of region under the jurisdiction of the federal government of the United States,[1] including all waters[2] (around islands or continental tracts). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This is a list of the cities, towns, and villages of the United States. ... United States of America, showing states, divided into counties. ... This list of regions of the United States includes official (governmental) and non-official areas within the borders of the United States, not including U.S. states, the federal district of Washington, D.C. or standard subentities such as cities or counties. ... It has been suggested that Middle Atlantic States be merged into this article or section. ... Historic Southern United States. ... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The list of mountains of the United States shows the location of mountains in a given state. ... The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ... Rivers in the United States is a list of rivers in the United States. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... The Colorado River from the bottom of Marble Canyon, in the Upper Grand Canyon Colorado River in the Grand Canyon from Desert View The Colorado River from Laughlin Horseshoe Bend is a horseshoe-shaped meander of the Colorado River located near the town of Page, Arizona The Colorado River is... This is a list of the extreme points of the United States, the points that are farther north, south, east, or west than any other location in the country. ... The National Park System of the United States is the collection of physical properties owned or administered by the National Park Service. ... Water supply and sanitation in the United States is provided by towns and cities, public utilities that span several jurisdictions and rural cooperatives. ... USD redirects here. ... This is a list of companies from the United States: #Current companies #Former companies, including acquired and merged ones #By industry #By location #See also Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... The Fed redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The standard of living in the United States is one of the highest in the world by almost any measure. ... For information on household income, see Household income in the United States. ... For information on the income of individuals, see Personal income in the United States. ... This graph shows the household income of the given percentiles from 1967 to 2003, in 2003 dollars. ... Single family homes such as this are indicative of the American middle class. ... The primary regulator of communications in the United States is the Federal Communications Commission. ... This article adopts the US Department of Transportation definition of passenger vehicle The United States is home to the largest passenger vehicle market of any country,[1] which is a consequence of the fact that it has the largest Gross Domestic Product of any country in the world. ... Current U.S. Route shield Current U.S. Route shield in California The system of United States Numbered Highways (often called U.S. Routes or U.S. Highways) is an integrated system of roads and highways in the United States numbered within a nationwide grid. ... There arergwertwertert[1] Kyle Railroad (KYLE) [2] Missouri and Northern Arkansas Railroad (MNA) [3] Montana Rail Link (MRL) [4] Montreal, Maine and Atlantic Railway (MMA) [5] Nebraska, Kansas and Colorado RailNet (NKCR) New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway (NYSW) [6] Northern Plains Railroad Paducah and Louisville Railway (PAL) [7] Palouse... The United States of America has a large and lucrative tourism industry serving millions of international and domestic tourists. ... This article is about the high culture and popular culture of the United States. ... Population of the United States, 1790 to 2000 The demographics of the United States depict a largely urban nation, with 57 percent of its population living in places more than 100 miles away from the ocean (2003). ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens of thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... For other uses, see American Dream (disambiguation). ... The percentage of households and individuals over the age of 25 with incomes exceeding $100,000 in the US.[1][2] Affluence in the United States refers to an individuals or households state of being in an economically favorable position in contrast to a given reference group. ... A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens-of-thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... Percent below each countrys official poverty line, according to the CIA factbook. ... This graph shows the educational attainment since 1947. ... Violent conforntation between working class union members and law enforecement such as the one between teamsters and Minneapolis police above were commonly frowned upon by professional middle class. ... Holidays of the United States vary with local observance. ... Health care in the United States is provided by many separate legal entities. ... This article is about the high culture and popular culture of the United States. ... The United States is home to a wide array of regional styles and scenes. ... American classical music refers to music written in the United States but in the European classical music tradition. ... American folk music, also known as Americana, is a broad category of music including Native American music, Bluegrass, country music, gospel, old time music, jug bands, Appalachian folk, blues, Tejano and Cajun. ... The first major American popular songwriter, Stephen Foster Even before the birth of recorded music, American popular music had a profound effect on music across the world. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... American cinema has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. ... This article is about television in the United States, specifically its history, art, business and government regulation. ... Hollywood redirects here. ... American literature refers to written or literary work produced in the area of the United States and Colonial America. ... The folklore of the United States, or American folklore, is one of the folk traditions which has evolved on the North American continent since Europeans arrived in the 16th century. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Transcendentalism was a group of new ideas in literature, religion, culture, and philosophy that emerged in New England in the early-to mid-19th century. ... The Harlem Renaissance was also known as the New Negro Movement, named after the anthology The New Negro, edited by Alain Locke in 1925. ... Beats redirects here. ... The Rocky Mountains, Landers Peak, 1863 by Albert Bierstadt, one of the Hudson River School painters Visual arts of the United States refers to the history of painting and visual art in the United States. ... Jackson Pollock, No. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Closely related to the development of American music in the early 20th century was the emergence of a new, and distinctively American, art form -- modern dance. ... The United States has a history of architecture that includes a wide variety of styles. ... Social issues are matters which directly or indirectly affect many or all members of a society and are considered to be problems, controversies related to moral values, or both. ... Affirmative action is a policy or a program of giving preferential treatment to certain designated groups allegedly seeking to redress discrimination or bias through active measures, as in education and employment. ... Progress of America, 1875, by Domenico Tojetti American exceptionalism (cf. ... Anti-Americanism, often Anti-American sentiment, is defined as being opposed or hostile to the United States of America, its people, its principles, or its policies. ... Capital punishment in the United States is officially sanctioned by 37 of the 50 states of the United States, as well as by the federal government and the military. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Detroit police inspecting equipment found in a clandestine underground brewery during the prohibition era. ... 1970s US postage stamp block In the United States today, the organized environmental movement is represented by a wide range of organizations sometimes called non-governmental organizations or NGOs. ... The Statue of Liberty. ... - Fence barrier on the international bridge near McAllen, TX . ... Pornography may use any of a variety of media — written and spoken text, photos, movies, etc. ... Racial profiling, also known as ethnic profiling, is the inclusion of racial or ethnic characteristics in determining whether a person is considered likely to commit a particular type of crime (see Offender Profiling). ... International recognition Civil unions and domestic partnerships Recognized in some regions Unregistered co-habitation Recognition debated Civil unions legal, same-sex marriage debated See also Same-sex marriage Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      Same-sex marriage, also called gay... Main articles: Adolescent sexuality and Adolescent sexual behavior Adolescent sexuality in the United States relates to the sexuality of American adolescents and its place in American society, both in terms of their feelings, behaviors and development and in terms of the response of the government, educators and interested groups. ... Gun Politics in the United States, incorporating the political aspects of gun politics, and firearms rights, has long been among the most controversial and intractable issues in American politics. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Southern New England States - A Friendly Travel Site (642 words)
Before you set your sails for the New England seashore, be sure to visit our New England Trip page for suggestions, and helpful tips if you are traveling with children.
In New England, you can enjoy the winding roads through the hills and forests, and view old stone walls and waterfalls that still surround the homesteads and fields since the 18th century.
New England Trip - This is our suggestion for a 10 day "All you can see" New England trip.
New England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5401 words)
New England abolished the death penalty for crimes like robbery and burglary in the 19th century, before much of the rest of the United States did.
New Hampshire, which has the smallest coastline of all of the coastal New England states, is home to Hampton Beach, also frequented by visitors to the region.
Conquest of New England by the Immigrant (1926).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m