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Encyclopedia > New Brunswick, New Jersey
City of New Brunswick

Seal
Nickname: Hub City
The Healthcare City
Location of New Brunswick in Middlesex County
Coordinates: 40°29′18″N 74°26′52″W / 40.48833, -74.44778
Country United States of America
State New Jersey
County Middlesex
Established December 30, 1730
Incorporated September 1, 1784
Government
 - Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 - Mayor James Cahill
Area
 - City  5.8 sq mi (14.9 km²)
 - Water  0.5 sq mi (1.3 km²)
Elevation [2]  69 ft (21 m)
Population (2006)[1]
 - City 50,172
 - Density 9,293.5/sq mi (3,585.9/km²)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-5)
ZIP codes 08901, 08902, 08903
Area code(s) 732
Website: www.cityofnewbrunswick.org

New Brunswick, also known as "the Healthcare City"[3] or "Hub City",[4] is a city and the county seat of the County of Middlesex, New Jersey. It is 31 miles (50 km) southwest of New York City on the southern bank of the Raritan River about fifteen miles (24 km) from its mouth. As of the 2000 Federal Census, the population of New Brunswick is 48,573. Image File history File links New_Brunswick,_New_Jersey_-_City_Seal. ... This article or section seems to contain too many examples (or of a poor quality) for an encyclopedia entry. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... 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Events Pope Clement XII elected September 17 - Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed III (1703-1730) to Mahmud I (1730-1754) Anna Ivanova (Anna I of Russia) became czarina Births April 16 - Henry Clinton, British general (d. ... A Municipal Corporation is a legal defintion for a local governing body, including (but not necessarily limited to) cities, counties, and towns. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Modern forms of municipal government Walsh Act/Commission 1923 Municipal Manager Faulkner Act forms of municipal government Mayor-Council Council-Manager Small Municipality Mayor-Council-Administrator The Faulkner Act, or Optional Municipal Charter Law, provides for New Jersey municipalities to adopt a Mayor-Council government. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... “Eastern Daylight Time” redirects here. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Area code 732 was created on 1 June 1997, as the result of a split in New Jersey area code 908, and became mandatory on 6 December of that year. ... Modern forms of municipal government Walsh Act/Commission 1923 Municipal Manager Faulkner Act forms of municipal government Mayor-Council Council-Manager Small Municipality Mayor-Council-Administrator A City in the context of New Jersey local government refers to one of five types and one of eleven forms of municipal government. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Middlesex County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... -1... The Raritan River is a major river of central New Jersey in the United States. ... The United States Census of year 2000, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


New Brunswick was formed by Royal Charter on December 30, 1730, within other townships in Middlesex County and Somerset County and was reformed by Royal Charter with the same boundaries on February 12, 1763, at which time it was divided into north and south wards. New Brunswick was incorporated as a city by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on September 1, 1784.[5] A Royal Charter is a charter given by a monarch to legitimize an incorporated body, such as a city, company, university or such. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Pope Clement XII elected September 17 - Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed III (1703-1730) to Mahmud I (1730-1754) Anna Ivanova (Anna I of Russia) became czarina Births April 16 - Henry Clinton, British general (d. ... Somerset County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The New Jersey Legislature convene at the State House building in Trenton. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


New Brunswick is the county seat of Middlesex CountyGR6, hosting many of the county's government offices and facilities. It is also home to the largest campuses of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (known also as Rutgers University) and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ). It is nicknamed Hub City and The Healthcare City, the former reflecting its status as a major urban center of Central Jersey, serviced by many railroads during the nineteenth century, and the latter due to the concentration of medical facilities (both UMDNJ's Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital and Saint Peter's University Hospital) as well as the corporate offices or production facilities of several large pharmaceutical companies (e.g., Johnson & Johnson, Bristol-Myers Squibb). A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Middlesex County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... “Rutgers” redirects here. ... The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, an umbrella designation used to refer to one of eight New Jersey state institutions of higher education in medicine. ... Metropolitan statistical areas and divisions of New Jersey; counties shaded in blue hues are in the New York City metro; counties shaded in green hues are in the Philadelphia metro. ... One of the nation’s leading academic medical centers, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital provides state-of-the-art care across the full range of health care services. ... Saint Peters University Hospital is a hospital in New Brunswick, NJ. Categories: | | ... Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) is a global American pharmaceutical, medical devices and consumer packaged goods manufacturer founded in 1886. ... Bristol-Myers Squibb (NYSE: BMY), colloquially referred to as BMS, is a pharmaceutical corporation, formed by a 1989 merger between pharmaceutical companies Bristol-Myers Company, founded in 1887 by William McLaren Bristol and John Ripley Myers in Clinton, NY (both were graduates of Hamilton College), and Squibb Corporation. ...


New Brunswick is noted for its rich ethnic heritage. At one time, one quarter of the Hungarian population in New Jersey resided in the city. Today, much of that Hungarian community continues to thrive.

Contents

History

Origins of the name

Originally inhabited by the Lenape Native Americans, the first white settlement at the site of New Brunswick was made in 1681. The settlement here was first called Prigmore's Swamp (1681-97), then Inian's Ferry (1691-1714). In 1714, the young village was given the name New Brunswick after the city of Braunschweig, in state of Lower Saxony, in Germany. Braunschweig was an influential and powerful city in the Hanseatic League, later in the Holy Roman Empire, and was an administrative seat for the Duchy (and later Principality) of Hanover. Shortly after the first settlement of New Brunswick in colonial New Jersey, George, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and Elector of Hanover, of the House of Hanover (also known as the House of Brunswick), became King George I of Great Britain (1660-1727). This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Chief Quanah Parker of the Quahadi Comanche Native Americans in the United States (also Indians, American Indians, First Americans, Indigenous Peoples, Aboriginal Peoples, Aboriginal Americans, Amerindians, Amerinds, or Original Americans) are those indigenous peoples within the territory which is now encompassed by the continental United States, and their descendants in... Coordinates: Time zone: CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country: Germany State: Lower Saxony District: Urban district City subdivisions: 20 Boroughs Lord Mayor: Gert Hoffmann (CDU) Governing parties: CDU / FDP Basic Statistics Area: 192. ... With an area of 47,618 km and nearly eight million inhabitants, Lower Saxony (German Niedersachsen) lies in north-western Germany and is second in area and fourth in population among the countrys sixteen Bundesl nder (federal states). ... Carta marina of the Baltic Sea region (1539). ... The extent of the Holy Roman Empire around 1630, superimposed over modern European state borders Capital None Language(s) Latin, German, many others Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy Emperor  - 962–967 Otto I  - 973–983 Otto II  - 996–1002 Otto III  - 1014– 1024 Henry II  - 1027–1039 Conrad II  - 1046... The House of Hanover (the Hanoverians) is a German royal dynasty which has ruled the Duchy of Braunschweig-Lüneburg, the Kingdom of Hanover and the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... George I (George Louis; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727)[1] was King of Great Britain and Ireland, from 1 August 1714 until his death. ...


During the Colonial and Early American periods

Centrally located between New York City and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania along an early thoroughfare known as the King's Highway and situated along the Raritan River, New Brunswick became an important hub for Colonial travelers and traders. New Brunswick was incorporated as a town in 1736 and chartered as a city in 1784. It was occupied by the British in the winter of 1776-1777 during the Revolutionary War. In 1900, 20,006 people lived in New Brunswick; 23,388 in 1910, 32,779 in 1920 and 33,180 in 1940. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... The Raritan River is a major river of central New Jersey in the United States. ... This article is about military actions only. ...


The Declaration of Independence (1776) received its third public reading in New Brunswick, after it was publicly read in Philadelphia following its promulgation by the Continental Congress. A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ... Nickname: Motto: Philadelphia maneto - Let brotherly love endure Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: , Country Commonwealth County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Government  - Mayor John F. Street (D) Area  - City 369. ... POOP HS;JHGF;JADHGJHASGHASJHGJSAHGJWJITHADHSGJHDASJLGFNKRA The Continental Congress was the first national government of the United States. ...

Early nineteenth century drawing of Old Queen's
Early nineteenth century drawing of Old Queen's

The Trustees of Queen's College (now Rutgers University), founded in 1766, voted to locate the young college in New Brunswick, selecting this city over Hackensack, in Bergen County, New Jersey. Classes began in 1771 with one instructor, one sophomore, Matthew Leydt, and several freshmen at a tavern called "The Sign of the Red Lion" on the corner of Albany and Neilson Streets (now the grounds of the Johnson & Johnson corporate headquarters). Classes were held through the American Revolution in various taverns and boarding houses, and at a building known as College Hall on George Street, until Old Queens was erected in 1808. It remains the oldest building on the Rutgers University campus. The Queen's College Grammar School (now Rutgers Preparatory School) was established also in 1766, and shared facilities with the College until 1830, when it located in a building (now known as Alexander Johnston Hall) across College Avenue from Old Queens. After Rutgers University became the state university of New Jersey in 1956, the Trustees of Rutgers divested it of the Rutgers Preparatory School, which relocated in 1957 to an estate purchased from the Colgate-Palmolive Company in Franklin Township in neighboring Somerset County. Old Drawing of Old Queens, Rutgers University File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Old Drawing of Old Queens, Rutgers University File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... “Rutgers” redirects here. ... Hackensack is a city in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States and the county seat of Bergen County. ... Bergen County is the most populous county of the state of New Jersey, United States. ... Matthew Leydt was the first graduate of Rutgers University, then Queens College. ... Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) is a global American pharmaceutical, medical devices and consumer packaged goods manufacturer founded in 1886. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Winter at Old Queens, the oldest building at Rutgers, built between 1809-1825. ... Rutgers Preparatory School (also known as Rutgers Prep or RPS) is a private, co-educational day school located in the Somerset section of Franklin Township, New Jersey. ... Rutgers Preparatory School (also known as Rutgers Prep or RPS) is a private, co-educational day school located in the Somerset section of Franklin Township, New Jersey. ... Colgate redirects here. ... Map of Franklin Township in Somerset County Blackwells Mills Canal House in the Somerset section of Franklin Township Franklin Township is a Township in Somerset County, New Jersey, United States. ... Somerset County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ...


The New Brunswick Theological Seminary, founded in 1784, moved to New Brunswick in 1810 sharing its quarters with the fledgling Queen's College (Queens would close from 1810 to 1825 due to financial problems, and reopen in 1825 under the name Rutgers College). The Seminary, due to overcrowding and differences over the mission of Rutgers College as a secular institution, moved to a seven acre (28,000 m²) tract of land less than one-half mile (800 m) west, which it still occupies although the land is now in the middle of Rutgers University's College Avenue campus. New Brunswick Theological Seminary is a professional and graduate school founded in 1784, in New York City, to educate ministers for the congregations of the Reformed Church in America. ...


Early commerce and industry

Hungarian community

New Brunswick began attracting a Hungarian immigrant population around the turn of the century. Hungarians were primarily attracted to the city by employment at Johnson & Johnson factories located in the city. Hungarians settled mainly in what today is the second ward. Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) is a global American pharmaceutical, medical devices and consumer packaged goods manufacturer founded in 1886. ...


The immigrant population grew until the end of the early century immigration boom. During the Cold War, the community was revitalized by the decision to house refugees from the failed 1956 Hungarian Revolution at Camp Kilmer, in nearby Edison. Even though the Hungarian population has been largely supplanted by newer immigrants, there continues to be a Hungarian Festival in the city held on Somerset Street on the first Saturday of June each year. Many Hungarian institutions set up by the community remain and active in the neighborhood, including: Magyar Reformed Church, St. Ladislaus Roman Catholic Church, St. Joseph Byzantine Catholic Church, Hungarian American Athletic Club, Aprokfalva Magyar Óvoda, Széchenyi Hungarian Community School & Kindergarten (Széchenyi Magyar Iskola és Óvoda), Teleki Pál Scout Home, Hungarian American Foundation, Vers Hangja, Hungarian Poetry Group, Bolyai Lecture Series on Arts and Sciences (Bolyai Kör), Hungarian Alumni Association (Magyar Öregdiák Szövetség - Bessenyei György Kör), Hungarian Radio Program, Hungarian Civic Association, Committee of Hungarian Churches and Organizations of New Brunswick, Csűrdöngölő Folk Dance Ensemble For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Combatants Soviet Union ÁVH Hungarian government, various nationalist militias Commanders Yuri Andropov Pál Maléter, Béla Király, Gergely Pongrátz, József Dudás Strength 150,000 troops, 6,000 tanks 100,000+ demonstrators (some later armed), unknown number of soldiers Casualties 720 killed according to official... Camp Kilmer was activated in June 1942 as a staging area and part of an installation of the New York Port of Embarkation. ... The Edison Memorial Tower, one of Edison Townships notable landmarks. ...


Revitalization and redevelopment

The neutrality of this section is disputed.
Please see the discussion on the talk page.
Much of Downtown New Brunswick's built environment is a result of urban renewal projects.
Much of Downtown New Brunswick's built environment is a result of urban renewal projects.

New Brunswick contains a number of important examples of urban renewal in the United States. In the mid to late 20th century, the downtown area became blighted as middle class residents moved to newer suburbs surrounding the city, an example of the phenomenon known as "white flight". Beginning in 1975, Rutgers University, Johnson & Johnson, and the local government collaborated through the New Jersey Economic Development Authority to form the New Brunswick Development Company (DevCo), spending 1.6 billion dollars with the goal of revitalizing the city center and redeveloping neighborhoods considered to be blighted and dangerous[6] The Hiram Market area, a historic district which by the 1970s had become a mostly Puerto Rican and Dominican-American neighborhood, was demolished to build a Hyatt hotel, conference center, and upscale housing. [7] This process has been controversial, and continues to draw ire from both historic preservationists, those opposing gentrification[8], and those concerned with eminent domain abuses.[9] Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 331 KB) Modern Architectural Developments. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 331 KB) Modern Architectural Developments. ... 1999 photograph looking northeast on Chicagos now demolished Cabrini-Green housing project, one of many urban renewal efforts. ... 1999 photograph looking northeast on Chicagos now demolished Cabrini-Green housing project, one of many urban renewal efforts. ... Blight is a condition of property or the uses of property in parts of a city, town, or neighborhood that are detrimental to the physical, social, and/or economic well-being of a community. ... White flight is a term for the demographic trend where working- and middle-class white people move away from increasingly racially mixed inner-city neighborhoods to predominantly white suburbs and exurbs. ... “Rutgers” redirects here. ... Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) is a global American pharmaceutical, medical devices and consumer packaged goods manufacturer founded in 1886. ... A Dominican American or Dominican-York [1] is an immigrant or descendant of immigrants from the Dominican Republic to the United States. ... Looking up inside the 32-story atrium of the Shanghai Grand Hyatt, part of the Jin Mao Building. ... Historic preservation, heritage management, or heritage conservation is the theory and practice of creatively maintaining the historic built environment and controlling the landscape component of which it is an integral part. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Eminent domain (U.S.), compulsory purchase (United Kingdom, New Zealand, Ireland), resumption/compulsory acquisition (Australia) or expropriation (Canada, South Africa) in common law legal systems is the inherent power of the state to seize a citizens private property, expropriate private property, or rights in private property, without the owner...


New Brunswick's process of urban renewal continues, as new luxury housing is built throughout downtown in an attempt to attract commuters to major employment centers such as Newark and New York City to take up residence. Nickname: Map of Newark in Essex County County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Government  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]  - City 67. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Geography

New Brunswick is located at 40°29′18″N, 74°26′52″W (40.488304, -74.447751)GR1. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 14.9 km² (5.8 mi²), including 1.3 km² (0.5 mi²) covered by water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


New Brunswick is bordered by Piscataway, Highland Park, and Edison across the Raritan River to the north, and also by North Brunswick to the southwest, East Brunswick to the southeast, and Franklin Township in Somerset County. Piscataway Township is a township located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. ... Highland Park highlighted in Middlesex County Highland Park is a Borough in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. ... The Edison Memorial Tower, one of Edison Townships notable landmarks. ... North Brunswick Township is a census-designated place and township located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. ... East Brunswick is an suburban township located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. ... Map of Franklin Township in Somerset County Blackwells Mills Canal House in the Somerset section of Franklin Township Franklin Township is a Township in Somerset County, New Jersey, United States. ... Somerset County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ...


Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1850 10,019
1860 11,256 12.3%
1870 15,058 33.8%
1880 17,166 14.0%
1890 18,603 8.4%
1900 20,005 7.5%
1910 23,388 16.9%
1920 32,779 40.2%
1930 34,555 5.4%
1940 33,180 -4.0%
1950 38,811 17.0%
1960 40,139 3.4%
1970 41,885 4.3%
1980 41,442 -1.1%
1990 41,711 0.6%
2000 48,573 16.5%
Est. 2006 50,172 [1] 3.3%
historical data sources: [10][11][12]

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 48,573 people, 13,057 households, and 7,207 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,585.9/km² (9,293.5/mi²). There were 13,893 housing units at an average density of 1,025.6/km² (2,658.1/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 48.79% White, 23.03% African American, 0.46% Native American, 5.32% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 18.08% from other races, and 4.24% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 39.01% of the population. The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twetieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,542,199, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...

Corner of Somerset Street and Easton Avenue, looking southeast
Corner of Somerset Street and Easton Avenue, looking southeast

There were 13,057 households out of which 29.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 29.6% were married couples living together, 18.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.8% were non-families. 24.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.23 and the average family size was 3.69. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 500 KB) Usual street scene in New Brunswick I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 500 KB) Usual street scene in New Brunswick I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 20.1% under the age of 18, 34.0% from 18 to 24, 28.1% from 25 to 44, 11.3% from 45 to 64, and 6.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 24 years. For every 100 females there were 98.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.8 males. The presence of the university inflates the proportion of the 18-24 population.


The median income for a household in the city was $36,080, and the median income for a family was $38,222. Males had a median income of $25,657 versus $23,604 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,308. About 16.9% of families and 27.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.9% of those under age 18 and 13.8% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Government

Local government

The City of New Brunswick is governed under the Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council) system of municipal government. Modern forms of municipal government Walsh Act/Commission 1923 Municipal Manager Faulkner Act forms of municipal government Mayor-Council Council-Manager Small Municipality Mayor-Council-Administrator The Faulkner Act, or Optional Municipal Charter Law, provides for New Jersey municipalities to adopt a Mayor-Council government. ...


As the legislative body of New Brunswick's municipal government, the City Council is responsible for approving the annual budget, ordinances and resolutions, contracts, and appointments to boards and commissions. The City Council has five members elected at large to staggered four-year terms. The Council President, elected to a 2-year term by the Council, presides over all meetings.


Jim Cahill is the 62nd Mayor of New Brunswick. He was sworn in as Mayor on January 1, 1991. Mayors of New Brunswick, New Jersey: 1991 to present James Cahill 62nd mayor John A. Lynch II 61st mayor 1953 to 1954 John A. Lynch I (1908-1978) 1867 to 1869 Miles Ross (1827-1903) 1846 to 1847 John Van Dyke (1807-1878) 1841 Littleton Kirkpatrick (1787-1859) 1790 John... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ...


The City Council is composed of President Robert Recine, Vice President Elizabeth Sheehan Garlatti, Jimmie L. Cook, Jr., Joseph V. Egan and Blanquita Valenti.[13]


All elected officials in New Brunswick are members of the Democratic Party, which has been the case since the 1970s.


Federal, state and county representation

Corner of George and Bayard, looking east
Corner of George and Bayard, looking east

New Brunswick is in the Sixth Congressional District and is part of New Jersey's 17th Legislative District.[14] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (768x1024, 546 KB) The most centeral streets of New Brunswick, NJ are most favorable walk places I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (768x1024, 546 KB) The most centeral streets of New Brunswick, NJ are most favorable walk places I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free...


New Jersey's Sixth Congressional District, covering portions of Middlesex County and Monmouth County, is represented by Frank Pallone (D). New Jersey is represented in the Senate by Frank Lautenberg (D, Cliffside Park) and Bob Menendez (D, Hoboken). New Jerseys Sixth Congressional District is currently represented by Democrat Frank Pallone. ... Middlesex County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Monmouth County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey, within the New York metropolitan area. ... Frank Pallone Jr. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Frank Raleigh Lautenberg (born January 23, 1924) is a businessman and Democratic Party politician. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Map highlighting Cliffside Parks location within Bergen County. ... Robert Bob Menendez (born January 1, 1954) is a Democratic Senator from New Jersey. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Map of New Jersey highlighting Hoboken Image of Hoboken taken by NASA (red line shows where Hoboken is). ...


The 17th legislative district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Bob Smith (D, Piscataway) and in the Assembly by Upendra J. Chivukula (D, Somerset) and Joseph V. Egan (D, New Brunswick). The Governor of New Jersey is Jon Corzine (D, Hoboken). The New Jersey Legislature convene at the State House building in Trenton. ... The New Jersey Legislature convene at the State House building in Trenton. ... The New Jersey Senate is the upper house of the New Jersey Legislature. ... Sen. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Piscataway Township is a township located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. ... The New Jersey General Assembly is the lower house of the New Jersey Legislature. ... Assemblyman Upendra J. Chivukula Upendra J. Chivukula (born October 8, 1950) has served in the New Jersey General Assembly since 2002 and represents the 17th legislative district. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Somerset is a census-designated place located in Somerset County, New Jersey. ... Assemblyman Joseph V. Egan Joseph V. Egan (born February 27, 1938) has served in the New Jersey General Assembly since 2002 and represents the 17th Legislative District. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Jon Corzine 54th Governor of New Jersey; Incumbent Christine Christie Todd Whitman, the first female governor of New Jersey The Governor of New Jersey is the chief executive of the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Jon Stevens Corzine (born January 1, 1947) is the Governor of New Jersey. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Map of New Jersey highlighting Hoboken Image of Hoboken taken by NASA (red line shows where Hoboken is). ...


Middlesex County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders. Middlesex County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director David B. Crabiel (Milltown), Freeholder Deputy Director Stephen J. "Pete" Dalina (Fords), Camille Fernicola (Piscataway), H. James Polos (Highland Park), John Pulomena (South Plainfield), Christopher D. Rafano (South River) and Blanquita B. Valenti (New Brunswick). Middlesex County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... The Board of Chosen Freeholders is the legislative body in each of the 21 counties in New Jersey. ... Milltown is a Borough in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. ... Map of Fords CDP in Middlesex County Fords is a census-designated place and unincorporated area within Woodbridge Township, located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. ... Piscataway Township is a township located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. ... Highland Park highlighted in Middlesex County Highland Park is a Borough in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. ... South Plainfield is a Borough in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. ... South River is a Borough located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. ...


Education

Public Schools

The New Brunswick Public Schools serve students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district include elementary schools (Lincoln, Lincoln Annex, Livingston, McKinleyl, A. Chester Redshaw, Paul Robeson, Paul Robeson Annex, Roosevelt, Lord Stirling and Woodrow Wilson), New Brunswick Middle School, as well as New Brunswick High School, New Brunswick Alternative School[1] and New Brunswick Health Sciences Technology High School for grades 9-12. New Brunswick Public Schools is a comprehensive community public school district that is based in New Brunswick, New Jersey. ... New Brunswick High School (NBHS) is a four-year comprehensive public high school located in New Brunswick, in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States, as part of the New Brunswick Public Schools. ...


The community is also served by the Greater Brunswick Charter School.


Higher education

Looking east from the corner of Hamilton Street and College Ave
Looking east from the corner of Hamilton Street and College Ave

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 286 KB) Rutgers University Campuses are set throughout the town of New Brunswick I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 286 KB) Rutgers University Campuses are set throughout the town of New Brunswick I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License... “Rutgers” redirects here. ... Piscataway Township is a township located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. ... New Brunswick Theological Seminary is a professional and graduate school founded in 1784, in New York City, to educate ministers for the congregations of the Reformed Church in America. ... The Reformed Church in America (RCA) is a mainline Reformed Protestant denomination that was formerly known as the Dutch Reformed Church. ... RWJMS Basic Science Buidling (1966), Piscataway, NJ Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (often abbreviated RWJMS) is one of eight schools that comprise the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ). ... The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, an umbrella designation used to refer to one of eight New Jersey state institutions of higher education in medicine. ...

Health Care

City Hall has promoted the nickname "The Health Care City" to reflect the importance of the healthcare industry to its economy.[15] The city is home to the world headquarters of Johnson & Johnson, along with several medical teaching and research institutions including Saint Peter's University Hospital, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital and the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, the Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers University's School of Pharmacy, and the Bristol-Myers Squibb Children's Hospital.[16] A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ... Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) is a global American pharmaceutical, medical devices and consumer packaged goods manufacturer founded in 1886. ... Saint Peters University Hospital is a hospital in New Brunswick, NJ. Categories: | | ... One of the nation’s leading academic medical centers, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital provides state-of-the-art care across the full range of health care services. ... RWJMS Basic Science Buidling (1966), Piscataway, NJ Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (often abbreviated RWJMS) is one of eight schools that comprise the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ). ... The Cancer Institute of New Jersey (CINJ) is a research institution based in New Brunswick, New Jersey, aimed at addressing the devastating effects of cancer. ... “Rutgers” redirects here. ...


Transportation

New Brunswick's NJ Transit train station
New Brunswick's NJ Transit train station

New Brunswick is served by Amtrak's Regional and Keystone Service trains along the Northeast Corridor. New Jersey Transit trains on the Northeast Corridor Line provide frequent service north to Pennsylvania Station, in Midtown Manhattan, and south to Trenton. Both Amtrak and New Jersey Transit trains stop at the New Brunswick railway station. The Jersey Avenue station is also served by Northeast Corridor trains. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 222 KB) New Brunswick station, where NJ Transit and Amtrak trains stop. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 222 KB) New Brunswick station, where NJ Transit and Amtrak trains stop. ... Acela Express in West Windsor, NJ Amtrak Cascades service with tilting Talgo trainsets in Seattle, Washington Amtrak train in downtown Orlando, Florida For other uses, see Amtrak (disambiguation). ... Regional is Amtraks service between Newport News, Virginia and Boston, Massachusetts. ... Amtraks 195-mile (314 km) Keystone Service provides frequent passenger train service along the Amtrak-owned Keystone Corridor and Northeast Corridor between Harrisburg, Pennsylvania and New York City via Philadelphia. ... Most of the NEC (those sections shown in red, except Boston to the Rhode Island state line) is owned by Amtrak. ... The New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ Transit) is a statewide public transportation system serving the state of New Jersey, and Orange and Rockland counties in New York. ... For the agglomeration of metropolitan areas, see article on BosWash megalopolis The Northeast Corridor (NEC) is an electrified railway line with overhead wires running from Washington, DC to Boston, Massachusetts, passing through Baltimore, Maryland, Wilmington, Delaware, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, New York, New York, New Haven, Connecticut and Providence, Rhode Island. ... Pennsylvania Station (commonly known as Penn Station) is the major intercity rail station and a major commuter rail hub in New York City. ... Main article: New York City Midtown Manhattan viewed from the Brooklyn Bridge. ... New Jersey Transit: SEPTA: Other service Greyhound Lines Other information Passengers (2006) 436,058[1] 52% Code TRE Owned by New Jersey Transit Trenton Rail Station is the main passenger train station in Trenton, New Jersey. ... The New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ Transit) is a statewide public transportation system serving the state of New Jersey, and Orange and Rockland counties in New York. ... New Brunswick is a railroad station on the New Jersey Transit Northeast Corridor Line and the Amtrak Northeast Corridor in New Brunswick, New Jersey. ... Jersey Avenue is a New Jersey Transit station on the Northeast Corridor Line, in New Brunswick, New Jersey. ...


New Brunswick also lies at the crossroads of the New Jersey Turnpike, U.S. Route 1, Route 18 and Route 27. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: New Jersey Turnpike The New Jersey Turnpike, or simply The Turnpike as its known to NJ residents, is a toll road in New Jersey and is one of the most heavily traveled highways in the United States. ... U.S. Route 1 in New Jersey is a portion of the United States highway which parallels the East Coast of the United States, running 2,390 miles (3,846 km) from Key West, Florida in the south, to Fort Kent, Maine at the Canadian border in the north, 66. ... Route 18 is a state highway in New Jersey, United States. ... New Jersey State Highway 27 runs on an original alignment for United States Highway 1. ...


Local bus service is provided by New Jersey Transit, with Rutgers University campus busing provided by Academy Bus. Academy Bus Lines is a transportation service provider that offers scheduled bus service, sightseeing tours, convention transportation, corporate transfers, sports teams, parades, major sporting events and private charters. ...


Also noteworthy is New Brunswick's bicycle community, which includes a bicycle co-op and tool collective.


Culture

Theatre

Three neighboring professional venues, Crossroads Theatre designed by Parsons+Fernandez-Casteleiro Architects from New York, the George Street Playhouse, and the State Theater, comprise the heart of the local theatre scene. The State Theatre is also home to the American Repertory Ballet and the Princeton Ballet School. Rutgers University has a number of student companies that perform everything from cabaret acts to Shakespear and musical productions. George Street Playhouse is a theater in New Brunswick, NJ. George Street Playhouse is one of New Jerseys preeminent professional theatres committed to the production of new and established plays. ... The State Theatre, a premier nonprofit venue for the performing arts and entertainment, is located in New Brunswick, New Jersey. ...


Museums

New Brunswick is home to the Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University, Albus Cavus, the Rutgers University Geology Museum and the New Jersey Agricultural Museum at Cook College. The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum is located on the Voorhees Mall of the campus of Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. ... Albus Cavus is a major art gallery, presentation space and artists collective in New Brunswick, New Jersey, United States. ... One of Cook College Fields Cook College was founded as the College of Agriculture at Rutgers University. ...


Restaurants

New Brunswick has a diverse restaurant market including Nouvelle American, Italian, Indian, Ethiopian, Thai and Chinese cuisine. Popular upscale establishments include Stage Left, Old Man Rafferty's, The Frog and The Peach, Clydz, Makeda's, Verdigre, Catherine Lombardi, Delta's, Panico's, Nova Terra, The Old Bay, Hokote, and Soho on George. While many of the downtown fast-food establishments close after about 6 to 8 pm, those on Easton Avenue are open well into the night. The main pubs are McCormick's Pub, Dolls Place, Tumulty's Pub, Olde Queens Tavern, Stuff Yer Face, Marita's Cantina and Harvest Moon Brew Pub. A vigorous local music scene is also present with live bands appearing at the Court Tavern, Old Bay, Nova Terra, Tumulty's and other locations. The Frog and the Peach is a restaurant in New Brunswick, New Jersey that was AOLs City Guides Best All-Around Restaurant in North Jersey in 2005-2006 and won Americas Top Tables Award from Gourmet (magazine). ... Dolls Place is a restaurant located in New Brunswick, New Jersey. ...


Music

Looking north from the corner of New and George Street
Looking north from the corner of New and George Street

In addition to live bands at bars, New Brunswick has been a center of local punk rock and underground music, a scene that thrives on quasi-legal live shows in residential basements such as Hamilton Street and the former Handy Street. Many bands who developed their fan base through such shows have gone on to national and even international acclaim. Even the seminal 1990's indie rock band Pavement made their live debut at the Court Tavern on August 9, 1990. Early influential bands of the New Brunswick basement punk scene include The Bouncing Souls, Midtown, Lifetime, Thursday, and Sticks & Stones. Many of these bands were either stridently socio-political in their messages or at least independently minded, bound together by the "Do It Yourself Punk ethic" nature of the scene. The Bouncing Souls' song "Party at 174" refers to the band's old house at 174 Commercial Avenue, and Lifetime's "Theme Song for a New Brunswick Basement Show" memorializes their humble beginnings. Although the New Brunswick Police Department deters residents from holding basement shows by issuing heavy noise violation tickets, basement shows still thrive in the city. These shows host not only local bands but bands from across the country and the world. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Pavement was an influential American indie rock band in the 1990s. ... The Bouncing Souls are a punk rock band from New Brunswick, New Jersey formed in 1987. ... Midtown Midtown are a pop-punk and an emo-punk band from New Brunswick, NJ. Formed in November, 1998 by three Rutgers students, Midtown soon became a quartet. ... For the jazz-rock fusion band led by Tony Williams, see The Tony Williams Lifetime Lifetime is an influential melodic hardcore band from New Jersey. ... Thursday is an American rock band from New Brunswick, New Jersey that has released four full-length albums. ... A largely influential east coast punk rock band from New Jersey. ... The DIY ethic (do it yourself ethic) refers to the ethic of being self-reliant and doing things yourself as opposed to paying others to do it. ...


Popular culture

  • In the movie "Harold & Kumar Go To White Castle," the main characters try to go to the White Castle in New Brunswick but find it has changed to a different burger joint. In reality, the New Brunswick White Castle is open 24 hours a day at 680 Somerset Street.
  • New Brunswick also is referenced in the movie The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension directed by W. D. Richter.
  • On April 18, 1872, at New Brunswick, William Cameron Coup developed the system of loading circus equipment and animals on railroad cars from one end and through the train, rather than from the sides. This system would be adopted by other railroad circuses and used through the golden age of railroad circuses and even by the Ringling shows today.

Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle (released in some countries as Harold and Kumar get the Munchies or American High, due to few international White Castle locations) is a comedy movie released in 2004. ... A White Castle Cheeseburger box. ... The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension! (sometimes just Buckaroo Banzai) is a science fiction film that has reached cult film status. ... W. D. Richter (born December 7, 1945) is a screenwriter and has occasionally directed and produced. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... William Cameron Coup (1837 – March 4, 1895) was a Wisconsin businessman who partnered with P.T. Barnum and Dan Castello in 1871 to form the P.T. Barnum’s Museum, Menagerie and Circus. Previously Barnum had a museum at a fixed location in New York City and the traveling circus...

Points of interest

The Albany Street Bridge is a bridge on Route 27 in the U.S. state of New Jersey spanning the Raritan River. ... Highland Park highlighted in Middlesex County Highland Park is a Borough in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. ... Winter at Old Queens, the oldest building at Rutgers, built between 1809-1825. ... Buccleuch Mansion is located in Buccleuch Park in New Brunswick in Middlesex County, New Jersey along the Raritan River. ... Christ Church Episcopal Christ Church is in New Brunswick, New Jersey and was organized in 1742 by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. ... The Henry Guest House is in New Brunswick, New Jersey at Livingston Avenue and Morris Street. ... According to tradition, Peter was crucified upside-down, as shown in this painting by Caravaggio. ... The Delaware and Raritan Canal (D&R Canal) was a canal in central New Jersey that served to connect the Delaware River to the Raritan River. ... Winter at Old Queens, the oldest building at Rutgers, built between 1809-1825. ... Statue of Prince William the Silent on the Voorhees Mall Voorhees Mall is a grassy area of about 28 acres (0. ... “Rutgers” redirects here. ... Alfred Joyce Kilmer (6 December 1886 – 30 July 1918) was an American journalist, poet, literary critic, lecturer and editor. ... Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) is a global American pharmaceutical, medical devices and consumer packaged goods manufacturer founded in 1886. ... Rutgers Gardens (50 acres) are horticultural, display, and botanical gardens, including arboretums, located at on the campus of Cook College, Rutgers University, 112 Ryders Lane, New Brunswick in Middlesex County, New Jersey. ... The Willow Grove Cemetery in New Brunswick, New Jersey is located behind the New Brunswick Public Library and the Henry Guest House. ... Grave of Mary Ellis (1750-1827) in 2003 The Loews Cemetery is in New Brunswick, New Jersey in the parking lot of the Loews Movie Theatre. ... U.S. Route 1 in New Jersey is a portion of the United States highway which parallels the East Coast of the United States, running 2,390 miles (3,846 km) from Key West, Florida in the south, to Fort Kent, Maine at the Canadian border in the north, 66. ... Assata Shakur[1] (born July 16, 1947) under the name Joanne Deborah Byron Chesimard, is an African-American activist who was a member of the Black Panther Party and Black Liberation Army. ... Lawrence Brook is a tributary of the Raritan River in Middlesex County, New Jersey in the United States. ... The Raritan River is a major river of central New Jersey in the United States. ...

Notable residents

Notable current and former residents of the City of New Brunswick include:

There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Garnett Bowditch Adrain (December 15, 1815 in New York City – August 17, 1878 in New Brunswick, New Jersey) was an American Democratic Party politician, who was a two-term member of the United States House of Representatives from New Jersey. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Charles Morgan Herbert Atherton (November 19, 1874 in New Brunswick, NJ - December 19, 1934 in Vienna, Austria) is a former Major League Baseball third baseman. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... Jim Axelrod is the chief White House correspondent for CBS News, and reports for the CBS Evening News and other CBS News programs. ... The Press corps is the press gallery in the United States Congress. ... CBS News is the news division of American television and radio network CBS. Its current president is Sean McManus who is also head of CBS Sports. ... CBS Evening News is the flagship nightly television news program of the American television network CBS. The network has broadcast this program since 1948, and has used the CBS Evening News title since 1963. ... James Berardinelli (born September 1967, New Brunswick, New Jersey) is an online film critic. ... James Bishop (May 11, 1816 in New Brunswick, New Jersey – May 10, 1895 in Morristown, New Jersey) was an American Opposition Party politician, who represented New Jerseys 3rd congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1855-1857. ... New Jerseys Third Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Jim Saxton. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Ron Bumblefoot Thal (Born September 25, 1969 in Brooklyn New York City, NY), is an American guitarist, songwriter and producer. ... Wheeler Winston Dixon in 1969 Wheeler Winston Dixon was born March 12, 1950 in New Brunswick, New Jersey, and is best known as a writer of film history, theory and criticism. ... For other people bearing this name, see Michael Douglas (disambiguation). ... Anthony Walton White Evans (October 31, 1817 – November 28, 1886) was an engineer. ... Eleanor Reinhardt (1888-1922) wife of James Mills, and murder victim Frances Noel Stevens (1874-1942) wife of Edward Wheeler Hall (1881-1922) and murder suspect The bodies as discovered on September 16, 1922 Henry Hewgill Stevens (1869-1939) murder suspect Henry de la Bruyere Carpender (1882-1934) was a... Augustus Albert Hardenbergh (May 18, 1830, New Brunswick, New Jersey - October 5, 1889, Jersey City, New Jersey) was an American Democratic Party politician who represented New Jerseys 7th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1875 to 1879, and again from 1881 to 1883. ... New Jerseys Seventh Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Mike Ferguson. ... Mark Helias (b. ... Adam Hyler (1735-1782), was a Privateer and whaleboat captain during the American War for Independence. ... A privateer was a private ship (or its captain) authorized by a countrys government by letters of marque to attack foreign shipping. ... This article is about military actions only. ... Jaheim on the cover of his 2006 album Ghetto Classics Jaheim Hoagland (also known simply as Jaheim) is an American R&B singer. ... Dwayne Jarrett (born September 11, 1986 in New Brunswick, New Jersey) is a wide receiver for the University of Southern California Trojans. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... City Charlotte, North Carolina Other nicknames The Cardiac Cats Team colors Black, Carolina Blue, and Silver Head Coach John Fox Owner Jerry Richardson General manager Marty Hurney Mascot Sir Purr League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1995–present) National Football Conference (1995-present) NFC West (1995-2001) NFC South (2002... James Price Johnson (February 1, 1894 - November 17, 1955) was a pianist and composer. ... Stride is a pioneering jazz piano style. ... Robert Wood Johnson I (1845-1910) Robert Wood Johnson I (February 15, 1845 – February 7, 1910) was an American entrepreneur and Industrialist. ... Robert Wood Johnson II (April 4, 1893 – January 30, 1968) was a U.S. businessman. ... Alfred Joyce Kilmer (6 December 1886 – 30 July 1918) was an American journalist, poet, literary critic, lecturer and editor. ... Littleton Kirkpatrick (October 19, 1797 in New Brunswick, New Jersey – August 15, 1859 in Saratoga Springs, New York) was an American Whig Party politician, who represented New Jerseys 4th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1853 to 1855. ... New Jerseys Fourth Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Chris Smith. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Robert Pastorelli (June 21, 1954 – March 8, 2004) was an American actor from New Brunswick, New Jersey. ... Murphy Brown was an Emmy Award-winning American situation comedy which aired on CBS from November 14, 1988 to May 18, 1998, for a total of 247 episodes. ... Franke Previte is an Academy Award winning composer who was born in New Brunswick, New Jersey. ... Miles Ross (April 30, 1827 – February 22, 1903) was a nineteenth century politician and businessman from New Jersey. ... George Sebastian Silzer (April 14, 1870 – October 16, 1940) was a Governor of New Jersey. ... This is a list of governors of New Jersey. ... Jon Corzine 54th Governor of New Jersey; Incumbent Christine Christie Todd Whitman, the first female governor of New Jersey The Governor of New Jersey is the chief executive of the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... James H. Simpson, circa 1878. ... Larry Stark (born August 4, 1932 in New Brunswick, New Jersey) is an American journalist and reviewer best known for his in-depth coverage of the Boston theater scene at his website, Theater Mirror. ... Joseph Robert Theismann (born September 9, 1949 in New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA), is a former American football quarterback in the NFL. He was born to an Austrian father, Joseph John Theismann and a Hungarian mother, Olga Tobias and was raised in South River, New Jersey. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... Monday Night Football (MNF) is a live television broadcast of the National Football League. ... William H. Vanderbilt (May 8, 1821 – December 8, 1885) was a businessman and a member of the prominent United States Vanderbilt family. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... New Jerseys Fourth Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Chris Smith. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Eric Orlando Young (born May 18, 1967 in New Brunswick, New Jersey) was a second baseman and left fielder in Major League Baseball. ... Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1972–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 26, 34, 42 Name Texas Rangers (1972–present) Washington Senators (1961-1971) Other nicknames None in common use Ballpark Rangers Ballpark in Arlington (1994–present) a. ...

Sister cities

New Brunswick has four sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International, Inc. (SCI): Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... This article is about the city of Fukui. ... This article is about the city of Fukui. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Tsuruoka (鶴岡市; -shi) is a city located in the Shonai region of Yamagata, Japan. ... Yamagata is the name of several places: Yamagata Prefecture Yamagata City, Yamagata Prefecture, Japan Yamagata City, Gifu Prefecture, Japan Yamagata, a village located in Higashichikuma District, Nagano, Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... Debrecen , (approximate pronounciation, Deb-ret-sen), (Romanian: , German: ) is the second largest city in Hungary after Budapest. ... Hajdú-Bihar is the name of an administrative county (comitatus or megye) in eastern Hungary, on the border with Romania. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference R574572 Statistics Province: Munster County: Area: 20. ... Statistics Province: Munster County Town: Limerick Code: LK Area: 2,686 km² Population (2006) 183,863 (including Limerick City); 131,303 (without Limerick City) Website: www. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Census data for New Brunswick city, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 31, 2007.
  2. ^ USGS GNIS: City if New Brunswick, Geographic Names Information System, accessed April 15, 2007.
  3. ^ 7:30 a.m. -- Filling cracks in the HealthCare City, from the Home News Tribune, September 23, 1999. "With two major hospitals and a medical school, New Brunswick proclaims itself The HealthCare City."
  4. ^ A wet day in the Hub City, from the Home News Tribune, September 23, 1999: "A few days short of 60 years, on Wednesday, Sept. 16, a dreary, drizzly day just ahead of the deluge of Hurricane Floyd, the Home News Tribune sent 24 reporters, 9 photographers and one artist into the Hub City, as it is known, to take a peek into life in New Brunswick as it is in 1999."
  5. ^ "The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968", John P. Snyder, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 171.
  6. ^ Devco spends $1.6 billion since 1970s, The Daily Targum, January 25, 2006.
  7. ^ Raids by Housing Inspectors Anger Jersey Neighborhood , The New York Times, March 12, 1988.
  8. ^ Students protest DevCo redevelopment, The Daily Targum, September 15, 1999.
  9. ^ Tenants' place is uncertain, The Daily Targum, November 9, 1999.
  10. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990. Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  11. ^ Campbell Gibson (June 1998). Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in The United States: 1790 TO 1990. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-03-06.
  12. ^ Wm. C. Hunt, Chief Statistician for Population. Fourteenth Census of The United States: 1920; Population: New Jersey; Number of inhabitants, by counties and minor civil divisions (ZIP). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  13. ^ New Brunswick Municipal Government, City of New Brunswick. Accessed July 25, 2006.
  14. ^ 2006 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, New Jersey League of Women Voters, p. 61. Accessed August 30, 2006.
  15. ^ Dore Carroll, New Brunswick: Medical field at hub of this transformation, The Star-Ledger, August 29, 2004.
  16. ^ Id.; see also Health Care, City of New Brunswick website.
  17. ^ a b (1967) Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 
  18. ^ [1969] (1979) in Reichler, Joseph L.: The Baseball Encyclopedia, 4th edition, New York: Macmillan Publishing. ISBN 0-02-578970-8. 
  19. ^ Jim Axelrod: CBS Chief White House Correspondent, CBS News. Accessed August 12, 2007.
  20. ^ James Berardinelli profile, Rotten Tomatoes, accessed March 17, 2007. "I was born in September 1967 in the town of New Brunswick, New Jersey (USA)."
  21. ^ James Bishop, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed September 1, 2007.
  22. ^ 'Acting 'Runs In The Family', CBS News, April 15, 203. "Born Michael Kirk Douglas in New Brunswick, N.J., Sept. 25, 1944"
  23. ^ A. Walton White Evans Family Papers, 1709-1891, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, accessed April 23, 2007. "Anthony Walton White Evans was born in New Brunswick, NJ October 31, 1817, the son of Thomas M. Evans and Eliza M. White."
  24. ^ Augustus Albert Hardenbergh, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 13, 2007.
  25. ^ Raritan River Environmental Festival 2006 Musical Performances, accessed April 23, 2007. "Composer and bassist Mark Helias was born and raised in New Brunswick."
  26. ^ "Lossing's Field Book of the Revolution, Vol. II., Supplement I.", accessed April 23, 2007. "On the arrival of the British the following summer, Captains Adam Hyler and Wm. Marriner, of New Brunswick, New Jersey, annoyed them so much, that an armed force was sent to destroy their boats."
  27. ^ "Jaheim returns with new CD, 'Ghetto Classics' and talks about his musical heroes", Jet (magazine), April 10, 2006, accessed April 23, 2007. "Born Jaheim Hoagland in the housing projects of New Brunswick, NJ, he was inspired to sing by his grandfather."
  28. ^ USC star WR Jarrett to enter NFL draft, NFL, press release dated January 10, 2007, accessed April 29, 2007. "Jarrett, a 6-foot-5, 215-pounder from New Brunswick, N.J., ends his college career with 216 catches for 3,138 yards and a Pac 10-record 41 touchdowns in 38 games."
  29. ^ IJS Receives Archives of Composer/Pianist James P. Johnson, press release date July 29, 2004, accessed April 23, 2007. Renowned worldwide as the "Father of Stride Piano," Johnson was born in New Brunswick in 1894."
  30. ^ New Brunswick Historic Sites: Joyce Kilmer House, accessed December 7, 2006.
  31. ^ Littleton Kirkpatrick, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed September 1, 2007.
  32. ^ 'Murphy Brown' Housepainter Dies: Actor Robert Pastorelli Dead At 49, May Have Been Drug Overdose, CBS News, March 9, 2004.
  33. ^ New Jersey Governor George Sebastian Silzer, National Governors Association. Accessed August 5, 2007.
  34. ^ John Van Dyke, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed September 1, 2007.
  35. ^ "Young signs with Rangers", The Star-Ledger, August 12, 2006. "Young, out of Rutgers and New Brunswick, has played in 15 major- league seasons, including 2004 for the Rangers when they were in contention for the AL West title until the final week of the regular season."

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This article is about the year. ... Home News Tribune is a newspaper of New Jersey, serving the Middlesex County and Somerset County area of Central Jersey. ... Lowest pressure 921 mbar (hPa; 27. ... The Daily Targum is the official student newspaper of Rutgers University, the State University of New Jersey. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... The Daily Targum is the official student newspaper of Rutgers University, the State University of New Jersey. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The Daily Targum is the official student newspaper of Rutgers University, the State University of New Jersey. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The League of Women Voters is a United States non-partisan political organization founded in 1920 by Carrie Chapman Catt during a meeting of the National American Woman Suffrage Association. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Star-Ledger is the leading newspaper in New Jersey. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... CBS News is the news division of American television and radio network CBS. Its current president is Sean McManus who is also head of CBS Sports. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... CBS News is the news division of American television and radio network CBS. Its current president is Sean McManus who is also head of CBS Sports. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Roman Emperor Septimius Severus rebuilds Byzantium. ... Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, or RPI, is a nonsectarian, coeducational private research university in Troy, New York, a city lying just outside the state capital of Albany. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Jet magazine is a popular African-American publication founded in Chicago, Illinois in 1951 by John H. Johnson of Johnson Publishing Company. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... CBS News is the news division of American television and radio network CBS. Its current president is Sean McManus who is also head of CBS Sports. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Governors Association (NGA) is an organization of the governors of the fifty U.S. states and five U.S. territories (American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The Star-Ledger is the leading newspaper in New Jersey. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
New Brunswick, New Jersey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1512 words)
The 17th legislative district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Bob Smith (D, Piscataway) and in the Assembly by Upendra J. Chivukula (D, Somerset) and Joseph V. Egan (D, New Brunswick).
New Brunswick is home to several fine museums including the Zimmerli Museum of Fine Art at Rutgers University, the Rutgers University Geology Museum and the New Jersey Agricultural Museum at the Cook College campus of Rutgers University.
New Brunswick is the home to the New Brunswick Theological Seminary, a seminary of the Reformed Church in America, founded in 1784.
New Brunswick New Brunswick, New Jersey (Cities) (131 words)
The city of New Brunswick is the county seat of Middlesex County.
It is southwest of Newark, between Edison and North Brunswick, along Highway 27 and the Amtak and New Jersey Transit, on the banks of the Raritan River.
New Brunswick is part of the Middlesex-Somerset-Hunterdon, New Jersey metro area.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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