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Encyclopedia > New Britain, Connecticut
New Britain, Connecticut
Official seal of New Britain, Connecticut
Seal
Nickname: Hardware City
Location within the state of Connecticut
Location within the state of Connecticut
Coordinates: 41°40′30″N 72°47′14″W / 41.675, -72.78722
NECTA Hartford
Region Central Connecticut
Incorporated (town) 1850
Incorporated (city) 1870
Consolidated 1905
Government
 - Type Mayor-council
 - Mayor Timothy T. Stewart
Area
 - Total 34.7 km² (13.4 sq mi)
 - Land 34.4 km² (13.3 sq mi)
 - Water 0.2 km² (0.1 sq mi)
Elevation 51 m (167 ft)
Population (2005)[1]
 - Total 71,254
 - Density 2,069/km² (5,358.7/sq mi)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 06050, 06051, 06052, 06053
Area code(s) 860
FIPS code 09-50370
GNIS feature ID 0209217
Website: http://www.new-britain.net/

New Britain is a city in Hartford County, Connecticut, 9 miles (14 km) southwest of Hartford. According to 2006 Census Bureau estimates, the population of the city is 71,254.[1] Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... Image File history File links Connecticut map with a dot on New Britain Adapted from http://commons. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... A New England City and Town Area or NECTA is a geographic entity in the New England region of the United States. ... Mayor-Council government is one of two variations of government most commonly used in modern representative municipal governments. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 1,000 km² and 10,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... Area code 860 is a telephone area code that covers the eastern and northwestern parts of Connecticut. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Hartford County is located in the north central part of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Hartford redirects here. ...


The city's official nickname is the "Hardware City" because of its history as a manufacturing center and as the headquarters of Stanley Works. Because of its large Polish population, the city is sometimes playfully referred to as "New Britski." It is also often referred to as "Hard Hittin' New Britain" - affectionately by its residents because of its popular high school football team. The Stanley Works NYSE: SWK, headquartered in New Britain, CT is a household durable goods manufacturer of tools and hardware. ...

Contents

History

New Britain was settled in 1687 and was incorporated as a parish under the name New Britain Society in 1754. Chartered in 1850 as a township and in 1871 as a city, New Britain was separated from the nearby town of Berlin, Connecticut. A consolidation charter was adopted in 1905. Events March 19 - The men under explorer Robert Cavelier de La Salle murder him while searching for the mouth of the Mississippi River. ... 1754 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Berlin is a town located in Hartford County, Connecticut. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ...


During the early part of the 20th century, New Britain was known as the "Hardware Capital of the World," as well as "Hardware City." Major manufacturers, such as The Stanley Works, Corbin Locks and North & Judd, were headquartered in the city. The Stanley Works NYSE: SWK, headquartered in New Britain, CT is a household durable goods manufacturer of tools and hardware. ...

Postcard: West Main Street, pre-1907
Postcard: West Main Street, pre-1907

In 1843 Frederick Trent Stanley established Stanley's Bolt Manufactory in New Britain to make door bolts and other wrought-iron hardware. In 1857 his cousin Henry Stanley and founded The Stanley Rule and Level Company in the city. Planes invented by Leonard Bailey and manufactured by the Stanley Rule and Level Company, known as "Stanley/Bailey" planes, were prized by woodworkers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries and remain popular among wood craftsmen today. The two companies merged in 1920, and the Stanley Rule and Level Company became the Hand Tools Division of Stanley Works. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Frederick Trent Stanley (?-?) was an American industrialist. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Leonard Bailey (b. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the history of the clothes hanger, this city ranks prominently as the place where today's most used hanger, the wire hanger, was inspired by a coat hook that was invented in 1869 by O. A. North of New Britain, Connecticut. However, no monuments to either North or the wire hanger have been erected within the city limits (or the Stanley/Bailey plane, for that matter). Wire (top) and wooden (bottom) clothes hangers Clothes hanger with Clamps A clothes hanger, or coat hanger, is a device in the shape of: Human shoulders designed to facilitate the hanging of a coat, jacket, sweater, shirt, blouse or dress in a manner that prevents wrinkles, with a lower bar...


In 1895 the basketball technique of dribbling was developed at the New Britain YMCA. 1954 saw the development of racquetball also at the YMCA.[2] This article is about the sport. ... In sports such as football (soccer), basketball, bandy and water polo, dribbling refers to the maneuvering of a ball around a defender through short skillful taps or kicks with either the legs (football/soccer), hands (basketball), stick (bandy) or swimming strokes (water polo). ... Not to be confused with YWCA. This article is about the association. ... Racquetball racquet and ball Racquetball is a sport played with racquets and a hollow rubber ball on an indoor or outdoor court. ...


Geography & Topography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 13.4 square miles (34.7 km²), of which, 13.3 square miles (34.6 km²) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.2 km²) of it (0.52%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ...


New Britain's terrain is mostly made up of soft, rolling hills and young Connecticut forest. The many parks are populated with trees, and in small, undeveloped areas, there is also brushy woods. New Britain's streets also have very many trees lining the sides of the roads. Many front yards in the northern half of the city have at least one tree. One or two streams flow through New Britain, undisturbed by the development.


Demographics

Historical
population of
New Britain
[3]
1850 3,029
1860 5,212
1870 9,480
1880 13,979
1890 19,007
1900 28,202
1910 43,916
1920 59,316
1930 68,128
1940 68,685
1950 73,726
1960 82,201
1970 83,441
1980 73,840
1990 75,491
2000 71,538
2002 71,589
(est.)[4]

In 1900, 25,998 people lived in New Britain, Connecticut; in 1910, 43,916; in 1915, 52,203; in 1920, 59,316; and in 1940, 68,685. For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


As of the census² of 2000, there were 71,538 people, 28,558 households, and 16,934 families residing in the city. The population density was 5,364.0 people per square mile (2,070.5/km²). There were 31,164 housing units at an average density of 2,336.7/sq mi (902.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 69.38% White, 10.89% African American, 0.37% Native American, 2.36% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 13.12% from other races, and 3.81% from two or more races. 26.75% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The following is a list of sources used in the creation of encyclopedia articles on various geographic topics and locations, such as cities, counties, states, and countries. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... For the Brazilian pop singer, see Latino (singer). ...


There were 28,558 households out of which 28.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.6% were married couples living together, 17.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.7% were non-families. 33.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 3.08. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 24.2% under the age of 18, 12.5% from 18 to 24, 28.9% from 25 to 44, 18.6% from 45 to 64, and 15.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 91.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.6 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $34,185, and the median income for a family was $41,056. Males had a median income of $34,848 versus $26,873 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,404. About 13.3% of families and 16.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.9% of those under age 18 and 8.9% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Ancestries: Polish (19.9%), Italian (12.9%), Irish (7.8%), French (5.6%), German (4.3%), English (3.7%).

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of October 25, 2005[5]
Party Active Voters Inactive Voters Total Voters Percentage
  Democratic 16,116 1,176 17,292 54.50%
  Republican 3,862 324 4,186 13.19%
  Unaffiliated 10,200 27 10,227 32.23%
  Minor Parties 19 4 23 0.07%
Total 30,197 1,531 31,728 100%

is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... GOP redirects here. ...

Polish community

New Britain has the largest Polish population of any city in Connecticut with many residents considering the city's Broad Street community as its heart. Affectionately referred to as "Little Poland", the vibrant neighborhood has been home to an exceedingly large number of Polish businesses and families since 1890. In recent years, the Polish community has been credited with revitalizing the area both culturally and economically.


Whether it be shopping, getting a haircut, seeking legal advice or setting up an IRA account, visitors to New Britain's Broad Street neighborhood can conduct their entire day's business completely in Polish. Within the span of a few blocks, the Polish District boasts its own contracted U.S. Post office, a Polish Mall, both national and regional banks, real estate agents,accountants, several travel agencies, European day spas, hair salons, restaurants, delis, European cafes, grocery stores, jewelers, three Polish language newspapers, a television station, and one of a distinictively small number of New England law firms that offers legal consultations entirely in Polish. In 2006, the Hartford based litigation firm of Podorowsky, Thompson & Baron opened a regional office in the heart of the Polish district at the behest of local business leaders. Founded in 1940, the firm's legal staff includes attorney David L. Thompson, son of former Wisconsin Attorney General George Thompson (R. 1963-1965) and attorney Adrian Baron, a former aide to Robert F. Kennedy Jr.

Postcard of "Bird's Eye View" of downtown New Britain, before 1907
Postcard of "Bird's Eye View" of downtown New Britain, before 1907

Notable visitors to the Polish district have included Rin Tin Tin, former President Richard Nixon, Senator Joseph Lieberman, and Pope John Paul II. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ...


In 1969, as then Cardinal Karol Wojtyla, the future Pope gave mass at Broad Street's Sacred Heart Church. A statute was erected in his honor in 2007. Staunch and devout Catholics, the Polish community also produces its own Polish Catholic newspaper through editor Andrej Szterbowski. New Britain has also been a tour stop for many internationally acclaimed Polish recording artists including Doda, Natalia Kukulska, Ich Troje, and Budka Suflera. Ich Troje is a Polish pop group made up of Michał Wiśniewski, Jacek Łągwa, Magdalena Pokora (aka Magda Femme, 1996-2000), Justyna Majkowska (2000-2003) and Ania Świątczak (2003-2005). ... Budka Suflera (English: Prompters Box) is a Polish rock band which was started in 1969 in Lublin by Romuald Lipko, and, after disbanding soon thereafter, resurrected by Cugowski and Romuald Lipko in 1974 and active to this day. ...


In 2006, Hollywood came calling when Broad Street's Nozewski's Meat Market and Staropolska Restaurant were profiled by the Discovery Channel's Taste of America program. "Little Poland" is also a mandatory whistle stop on the campaign trails of various politicos. During the heated 2006 election season, senate hopefuls Joseph Lieberman, Nancy Johnson and Christopher Murphy were seen seeking votes among the Polish cafes and restaurants of Broad Street.


Connecticut Poles can be seen discussing world politics, sports, or local gossip over coffee and pastries at various local eateries including Fatherland Restaurant, Baltyk, Staropolska, Sezam, Kuchnia Helenki,Varsovita or the European Cafe. At night, many dance the night away at Arkadia Nightclub, or catch a jazz band at the Stadion Cafe.

State Armory (1906 postcard)
State Armory (1906 postcard)

Every year, on All Souls’ Day, the Polish community honors the memory of the dead by decorating the graves at Sacred Heart Cemetery. That same day, an open-air Mass is held at the cemetery. The city is also home to the only order of Polish nuns in New England as well as the only Polish-only orphanage, formerly Rose Hill Orphanage Image File history File links Size of this preview: 384 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (902 × 1408 pixel, file size: 433 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Postcard: Armory, New Britain, Connecticut, postmarked 1906 Description: Postcard that is showing The State Armory C.N.G. in New Britain picture of opposite side of... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 384 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (902 × 1408 pixel, file size: 433 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Postcard: Armory, New Britain, Connecticut, postmarked 1906 Description: Postcard that is showing The State Armory C.N.G. in New Britain picture of opposite side of...


In the summertime, Poles and non-Poles alike flock to "Polanka" field (in back of Pulaski Middle School) to enjoy weekly Sunday picnics featuring live Polish music. At the annual Dożynki harvest festival, visitors can find buttermilk, yellow and brown amber jewelry from the Baltic Sea, traditional hand carved Polish boxes and traditional foods such as smoked kielbasa, pierogi and gołąbki. Polanka also serves as home for the Polish Falcon Club's venerable Polonia Soccer Team, which competes on the regulation-size soccer field. In 2007, the Club celebrated its centennial anniversary. Along with the Haller Post, (named after Polish General Jozef Haller) the Polish Falcons Club, serve as a second home to many of New Britain's settled families as a social venue.


The Polish community is known for fruitious gardens, immaculate flowers, and (most likely) a Catholic figure in the front yard (not unlike Mexican-Americans and Mary de Guadalupe). Many New Britain Poles cherish Our Lady of Częstochowa and preserve their Eastern European heritage with pride. The Polish Falcons of America offer an annual bus trip to Doylestown, Pa. each September, where the American Our Lady of Czestochowa Shrine is located. Peering into backyards, visitors may observe wood burning stoves where residents smoke kielbasa.

Main Street, about 1916
Main Street, about 1916

Education and culture remain an important aspect to the lives of local New Britain Poles. Broad Street's Sacred Heart Church boasts an award winning K-8 private school and New Britain High School offers the Polish language as an elective. Local residents often attend free Polish monthly legal seminars at the law offices of Podorowsky, Thompson & Baron. Affectionately referred to as Herbata u Adwokata (Tea with the Attorney) the seminars have proven to be a great learning resource for immigrants unsure of their legal rights. Residents can also take courses in the English language through a progam offered through the Polish American Foundation. College bound students can find an extensive offering of Polish studies at Central Connecticut State University. It bears noting that Central's Science Hall is named after the Polish born Copernicus. For those with artistic wants, the Polish American Foundation sponsors orchestral works of Chopin and recurring art exhibits at the Sloper Wesoly House. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 501 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,325 × 830 pixels, file size: 184 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Postcard: Main Street, New Britain, Connecticut, 1912 postmark Description: Caption on picture side (upper lefthand corner): Main Street, New Britain, Conn. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 501 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,325 × 830 pixels, file size: 184 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Postcard: Main Street, New Britain, Connecticut, 1912 postmark Description: Caption on picture side (upper lefthand corner): Main Street, New Britain, Conn. ...


The Polish influence is credited with a unique feature of the New Britain accent, possibly the only variety of English in North America to feature the glottal stop to replace 't'.[6] This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Sites of interest

  • New Britain Museum of American Art – the oldest art museum in the United States devoted to American Art. It contains a famous and comprehensive art collection from the 18th century to the present.
  • New Britain Industrial Museum
  • Walnut Hill Park
  • Hole in the Wall Theatre
  • New Britain Youth Museum
  • Capitol Lunch – a hot dog institution in New England. The "Cappie Dog" is well known to New Britain visitors for its unique and secret chili sauce.
  • East Side Restaurant-A well known German restaurant serving traditional food and a wide variety of beers
  • Stag Arms, a firearms manufacturer is located in New Britain.
  • The Polish District or "Little Poland": Located primarily in the vicinity of Broad Street, visitors can find unique amber jewelry, handcrafted items, blown glass, Christmas ornaments carved chess sets, as well as eat their fill of Polish food.
  • Avery's Beverages

The New Britain Museum of American Art is an art gallery in New Britain, Connecticut. ... Stag Arms is a firearms manufacturer founded in May 2003 and located in New Britain, Connecticut. ... Firearms redirects here. ... Manufacturing is the transformation of raw materials into finished goods for sale, or intermediate processes involving the production or finishing of semi-manufactures. ...

Sports

New Britain is also home to Walicki - A.W. Stanley Little League, a youth baseball and softball organization that serves the children of New Britain who are between the ages of 5 and 16.Walicki - A.W. Stanley Little League plays at A.W. Stanley Park and Stanley Quarter Park, and serves over 500 children annually. League Eastern League Division Northern Division Year founded 1995 Major League affiliation Minnesota Twins Home ballpark New Britain Stadium Previous home ballparks Beehive Field City New Britain, Connecticut Current uniform colors red, black Previous uniform colors {{{previous colors}}} Logo design The wordmark Rock Cats in red outlined in black with... It is the home of the New Britain Rock Cats, the AA affiliate of the Minnesota Twins major league baseball team. ...


Education

The city is home to Central Connecticut State University and Charter Oak State College. The city is served by The Hospital of Central Connecticut at New Britain General (Formerly New Britain General Hospital). 2006 NEC CHAMPS BABY! GO CCSU BLUE DEVILS WHOOO!!! Central Connecticut State University is a state university in New Britain, Connecticut. ... Charter Oak State College is a college in New Britain, Connecticut. ...


New Britain is also home to H.A.L.S. Academy (House of Arts, Letters, and Sciences), a middle school for gifted students. Fifth graders with high scores on mastery tests are given the SAGES test. Those with good scores on both SAGES and CMTs will be accpted into H.A.L.S. H.A.L.S. Academy is currently in the former St. Francis school building.


New Britain is also home to the Mountain Laurel Sudbury School, which is entering its 6th year of operation (as of July, 2007). The Sudbury model of democratic education is named after the school that pioneered it — Sudbury Valley School. ...


New Britain High School (the only functional high school in the city) now has a freshly built wing called Freshman Academy, starting its first year of operation as of September 2007. Except for language classes and electives, all freshmen have their classes in the wing.


Transportation

Connecticut Route 9 is the city's main expressway connecting traffic between Hartford (via I-84 and I-91) and Old Saybrook and Middletown. Public transportation is provided by Connecticut Transit. Route 9 is a 40. ... When used by itself in a sentence, the term Hartford can refer to one of several places in the United States. ... Interstate 84 runs from Scranton, Pennsylvania at an intersection with Interstate 81 to Sturbridge, Massachusetts at an intersection with the Massachusetts Turnpike (Interstate 90). ... Interstate 91 is an interstate highway in the New England section of the United States. ... Old Saybrook is a town located in Middlesex County, Connecticut. ... Nickname: Forest City Coordinates: NECTA Hartford Region Midstate Region Incorporated (town) 1651 Incorporated (city) 1784 Consolidated 1923 Government type Mayor-council Mayor Sebastian N. Giuliano Area    - City 42. ... Connecticut Transit (CT Transit) is a bus system serving much of the U.S. state of Connecticut and is a division of that states Department of Transportation[1]. CT Transit provides bus service via contract providers for seven different metropolitan areas in the state, mostly concentrated in Hartford and...


New Britain may also serve as the terminus of the proposed Hartford-New Britain busway. A 9 mile long dedicated BRT system with 11 stations starting from downtown New Britain, and terminating at Union Station in Hartford. This will be constructed along an existing/abandoned Right of Way which links the 2 cities. Bus rapid transit (BRT) is a relatively new umbrella term for urban mass transportation services utilizing buses to perform premium services on existing roadways or dedicated rights-of-way. ...


Notable New Britain residents

  • Jack Arute, American broadcaster most notably with ABC Sports.
  • Charles T. Avedisian, former NB Athletic Director, played for NY Giants 1942-44, in Providence College and NB Halls of Fame, developed the unbalanced T formation
  • Paul Bogdanski, Founder of the Bogdanski Polish Soda Pop Company and dedicated philanthropist.
  • Ricky Bottalico, major league pitcher in the 1990s and 2000s, most notably with the Philadelphia Phillies.
  • Elihu Burritt (1810–1879), was a philanthropist, linguist, and social activist born in the city.
  • Walter Camp, 1859-1935, Inventor of American Football. Was born in New Britain.
  • Steve Dalkowski, legendary minor league fastball pitcher.
  • Anna Eshoo, U.S. Congresswoman representing California's 14th District, was born in the city.
  • April Forrest, Motown Records recording artist and member of Jada.
  • Rod Foster, St. Thomas Aquinas High School graduate who went on to become an All-American guard at UCLA, and later played for the NBA's Phoenix Suns.
  • Mauro Gozzo, MLB pitcher was born in the city.
  • Willie Hall - Pulaski High School, USC, Oakland Raiders Linebacker for the Super Bowl XI Champion Raiders[7]
  • Tebucky Jones, FS for the New England Patriots, member of Super Bowl XXXVI Champion Patriots and former New Britain High School standout; Class of 1993, New Britain High School
  • Thomas Meskill (born 1928), a senior member of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, a former Republican Governor of the state (1971-1974), Congressman (1967-1970), and Mayor of New Britain (1965-1966), was born in the city.
  • Tommy Myers, Pro Bowl defensive back with the New Orleans Saints. Also a member of the Syracuse Hall of Fame.
  • Lamar Odom, basketball forward for the LA Clippers, Miami Heat, and Los Angeles Lakers, a 1998 graduate of St. Thomas Aquinas High School.
  • Abraham Ribicoff (1910–1998), Connecticut Democratic Governor, U.S. Senator, and U.S. Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare in the Kennedy administration, was born in the city.
  • Luanne Rice (born 1955), novelist. Born and raised in New Britain.
  • Earl Snyder. Baseball player, Cleveland Indians and Boston Red Sox, was born in 1976 in the city.
  • Douglas Swan (born 1930), painter. Born in New Britain.
  • Teddy Wilson, jazz pianist (1912-1986), died in the city.
  • Gene Pitney (1940-2006), born in Hartford
  • Zaid Shakir, scholar-in-residence and lecturer at Zaytuna Institute was raised in the city.

Jack Arute is an auto racing pit reporter and college football sideline reporter for ABC Sports. ... Ricky Paul Bottalico (born on August 26, 1969 in New Britain, Connecticut) is a former relief pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Elihu Burritt (1811-79) was an American philanthropist, linguist, and social activist born in the town of New Britain, Connecticut in 1811. ... Walter Chauncey Camp (April 7, 1859 – March 14, 1925) was a sports writer and football coach known as the Father of American Football. Along with John Heisman, Amos Alonzo Stagg, Glenn Scobey Warner, and George Halas, Camp was one of the most significant people in the history of American football. ... Steve Dalkowski. ... Anna Georges Eshoo (born December 13, 1942) is an American politician who has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1993, representing the 14th District of California, the heart of Silicon Valley (see map). ... Motown Records, also known as Tamla-Motown outside of the United States, is a record label originally based out of Detroit, Michigan (Motor City, hence mo(tor)town), from where it achieved widespread international success. ... Jada is an American girl group from Boston, Massachusetts. ... Roderick Allen Foster (born October 10, 1960 in Birmingham, Alabama) is a retired American professional basketball player (6-1, 160) who played for the Phoenix Suns of the NBA. He was drafted out of UCLA in 1983 in the second round of the NBA Draft (28th pick overall). ... Date January 9, 1977 Stadium Rose Bowl Stadium City Pasadena, California MVP Fred Biletnikoff, Wide Receiver Favorite Raiders by 4 1/2 National anthem Vikki Carr (America the Beautiful) Coin toss Jim Tunney Referee Jim Tunney Halftime show Disney presents Its A Small World with the Los Angeles Unified... Tebucky Shermai Jones (born October 6, 1974 in New Britain, CT) is a safety in his eighth year. ... City Foxborough, Massachusetts Other nicknames The Pats Team colors Nautical Blue, New Century Silver, Red, and White Head Coach Bill Belichick Owner Robert Kraft General manager Bill Belichick (de facto) Mascot Pat Patriot League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–69) Eastern Division (1960–69) National Football League (1970–present... Date February 3, 2002 Stadium Louisiana Superdome City New Orleans, Louisiana MVP Tom Brady, Quarterback (New England) Favorite Rams by 14 National anthem Mariah Carey Coin toss George H. W. Bush and Roger Staubach Referee Bernie Kukar Halftime show U2 Attendance 72,922 TV in the United States Network FOX... New Britain High School is a public high school in New Britain, Connecticut. ... Thomas Joseph Meskill (Born January 30, 1928). ... Senior status is a form of semi-retirement for U.S. federal judges. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts: District of Connecticut Northern, Southern, Eastern, and Western Districts of New York District of Vermont The Second Circuit hears argument at the Thurgood Marshall U... Thomas Patrick Myers (born October 24, 1950] was an American football safety who played ten seasons in the National Football League for the New Orleans Saints. ... City New Orleans, Louisiana Team colors Gold and black Head Coach Sean Payton Owner Tom Benson and Rita Benson LeBlanc General manager Mickey Loomis Mascot Gumbo the dog League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1967–present) Eastern Conference (1967-1969) Capitol Division (1967; 1969) Century Division (1968) National Football Conference... Lamar Joseph Odom (born November 6, 1979, in South Jamaica, Queens, New York) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays power forward (also plays both forward spots and is a point-forward) for the National Basketball Associations Los Angeles Lakers. ... Abraham Ribicoff Abraham Alexander Ribicoff (April 9, 1910–February 22, 1998) was an American politician. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline for Biographies. ... Earl Snyder is a baseball player who has played for the Boston Red Sox, the Cleveland Indians, the Pawtucket Red Sox, the Norfolk Tides, the Durham Bulls, and the Buffalo Bisons, among other teams. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 5, 14, 18, 19, 21, 42, 455 Name Cleveland Indians (1915–present) Cleveland Naps (1905-1914) Cleveland Bronchos (1902-1904) Cleveland Blues (1901) Other nicknames The Tribe, The Wahoos Ballpark Jacobs Field (1994–present... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... Theodore Shaw Teddy Wilson (born November 24, 1912 in Austin, Texas-died July 31, 1986 in New Britain, Connecticut) was a United States jazz pianist. ... Gene Francis Alan Pitney (February 17, 1940 – April 5, 2006) was an American singer and songwriter. ... Imam Zaid Shakir giving a lecture Imam Zaid Shakir is amongst the most respected and influential Muslim scholars in the West, and an emerging public intellectual in America. ... Lecturer is a term of academic rank. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

Sister Cities

East Main St., ca 1911
East Main St., ca 1911

New Britain has five sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International, Inc. (SCI): Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Atsugi (Japanese: 厚木市; -shi) is a city located in Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... City hall PuÅ‚tusk is a town in Poland by the river Narew, 70 km north of Warsaw. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Map of Germany showing Rastatt Rastatt is a city in the District of Rastatt, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Giannitsa or Yannitsa (Greek: Γιαννιτσά, Turkish: Yenice) is a city in Greece in the Pella Prefecture. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Solarino is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Syracuse in the Italian region Sicily, located about 190 km southeast of Palermo and about 15 km west of Syracuse. ...

References

Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church, before 1907
Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church, before 1907
  1. ^ a b Annual Estimates of the Population for All Incorporated Places in Connecticut (CSV). 2005 Population Estimates. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division (June 21, 2006). Retrieved on November 17, 2006.
  2. ^ Mission. Website. New Britain-Berlin YMCA. Retrieved on [[2008-02-01]].
  3. ^ Section VII: Local Government. Interactive Connecticut State Register & Manual. Connecticut Secretary of the State. Retrieved on 2007-03-14.
  4. ^ Table 4. Connecticut Incorporated Places with Population over 10,000, Ranked by July 1, 2002 Population: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2002 (PDF). Population Estimates. United States Census Bureau (2003-07-10). Retrieved on 2007-03-14.
  5. ^ Registration and Party Enrollment Statistics as of October 25, 2005 (PDF). Connecticut Secretary of State. Retrieved on 2006-10-02.
  6. ^ GARY SANTANIELLO, 'Accent? What Accent?', The New York Times September 5, 2004 Sunday
  7. ^ Raiders Capture First Super Bowl with 32-14 Drubbing of Vikings. Official website of the Oakland Raiers— History— Greatest moments. The Oakland Raiders. Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  • History of New Britain by Camp, (New Britain, 1889) is a valuable source of information.
  • A Walk Around Walnut Hill, 1975, written by the late Kenneth Larson, an artist and historian and vocal opponent of the city's redevelopment program. This illustrated book was part of an effort to make the city aware of its rich architectural history.
  • New Britain, by Alfred Andrews, 1867. The Andrews history predates Camp's work and has an especially strong focus on the city's early religious and family histories.
  • A History of New Britain, by Herbert E. Fowler, 1960. This work was commissioned by the New Britain Historical Society. It's a comprehensive study. Dr. Fowler, a professor at Central Connecticut State University, died in 1963 at the age of 80.
  • The Story of New Britain, by Lillian Hart Tryon, 1925, and published by the Esther Stanley Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. It includes richly detailed sketches by Mortimer Warren of old New Britain scenes.
  • Images of America, New Britain, by Arlene Palmer, 1995. A former curator of the New Britain Public Library's Local History Room, Ms. Palmer prepared a series of books that document, in photographs, the city.
  • New Britain, The City of Invention, by Patrick Thibodeau and Arlene Palmer. Thibodeau is a former reporter and editor at The Herald.

Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The comma-separated values (or CSV; also known as a comma-separated list or comma-separated variables) file format is a file type that stores tabular data. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Public Library, ca. 1910
Public Library, ca. 1910
  • New Britain, Connecticut is at coordinates 41°39′40″N 72°46′48″W / 41.66111, -72.78 (New Britain, Connecticut)Coordinates: 41°39′40″N 72°46′48″W / 41.66111, -72.78 (New Britain, Connecticut)

  Results from FactBites:
 
New Britain, Connecticut - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1042 words)
New Britain's official nickname is the "Beehive City." new Britain-ites are well-known for their unique pronunciation of their town, a fast "New Britun." New Britain is also known as "Hardware City" because of its history as a manufacturing center and as the headquarters of Stanley Works.
New Britain was settled in 1687 and was incorporated as a parish under the name New Britain Society in 1754.
Chartered in 1850 as a township and in 1871 as a city, New Britain was separated from the nearby town of Berlin, Connecticut.
NationMaster.com - Encyclopedia: New Britain, Connecticut (3291 words)
The Gold Coast is a region of the state of Connecticut roughly contiguous with the boundaries of Fairfield County; it derives its regional nickname from Fairfield County being ranked as one of the wealthiest counties in the United States and being the headquarters to most of the hedge funds in...
New Britain also is served by interstate, intercity and local bus service from the center of the city, as well as freight train service, completing a well-rounded transportation system that links New Britain to the whole northeast market.
New Britain was born in 1754 when a group of settlers broke away from the Town of Berlin and built their own meetinghouse.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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