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Encyclopedia > Neutrality Acts
Congressional opposition to
U.S. wars and interventions
1812 North America
House Federalists’ Address
1917 World War I
Filibuster of the Armed Ship Bill
1935-1939 (General)
Neutrality Acts
1935-40 (General)
Ludlow Amendment
1970 Vietnam
McGovern-Hatfield Amendment
1970 Southeast Asia
Cooper-Church Amendment
1971 Vietnam
Repeal of Tonkin Gulf Resolution
1973 Southeast Asia
Case-Church Amendment
1973 (General)
War Powers Resolution
1974 Covert Ops (General)
Hughes-Ryan Amendment
1976 Angola
Clark Amendment
1982 Nicaragua
Boland Amendment
2007 Iraq
House Concurrent Resolution 63
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The Neutrality Acts were a series of laws that were passed by the United States Congress in the 1930s, in response to the growing turmoil going on in Europe and Asia that eventually led to World War II. They were spurred by the growth in isolationism in the US following its costly involvement in World War I, and sought to ensure that the US would not become entangled again in foreign conflicts, especially in Europe. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Opposition to the War of 1812 was widespread in the United States, especially in New England. ... Robert Marion La Follette, Sr. ... Louis Ludlow was a Washington correspondent for a large number of newspapers, and then served as a Democrat in the U.S. House of Representatives for the Indianapolis, Indiana district for twenty years. ... The McGovern-Hatfield amendment (alternately, Hatfield-McGovern amendment) was a proposed amendment in 1970 during the Vietnam War that, if passed, would have required the end of United States military operations in the Republic of Vietnam by December 31, 1970 and a complete withdrawal of American forces halfway through the... The Cooper-Church amendment was introduced in the United States Senate during the Vietnam War and is known as the first amendment to limit presidential powers during war time. ... The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution was a joint resolution of the U.S. Congress passed in August 1964 in direct response to a minor naval engagement known as the Gulf of Tonkin Incident. ... The Case-Church Amendment was a piece of legislation that sought to rein in President Richard Nixons conduct of the Vietnam War. ... The War Powers Act of 1973 (Public Law 93-148) is also referred to as the War Powers Resolution (Sec. ... The Hughes-Ryan Act was an amendment to the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, that forces the President of the United States to report all covert Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) operations to a Congressional committee within a set time limit. ... The Clark amendment was an amendment to the U.S. Arms Export Control Act of 1976, named for its sponsor, Senator Dick Clark (D-Idaho). ... The Boland Amendment was the name given to three U.S. legislative amendments between 1982 and 1984, all aimed at limiting US government assistance to the rebel Contras in Nicaragua. ... “The New Way Forward” redirects here. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Isolationism is a foreign policy which combines a non-interventionist military policy and a political policy of economic nationalism (protectionism). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


America's first official position of neutrality was a Presidential Proclamation of 1793 made by George Washington. In it, he declared American neutrality in the ongoing European wars, particularly between Great Britain and Revolutionary France. It came to be called the Proclamation of Neutrality, but for some reason, several books of popular history refer to it as "the Neutrality Act," which can cause great confusion. It has been suggested that Neutrality Proclamation be merged into this article or section. ...


The legacy of the Neutrality Acts in the 1930s was widely regarded as having been generally negative: they made no distinction between aggressor and victim, treating both equally as "belligerents"; and they limited the US government's ability to aid Britain against Nazi Germany, until the formal declaration of war in December 1941 rendered them irrelevant. Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ...


In each case, the acts provided for the president to invoke them by finding that a state of war existed in a particular instance. This provided a loophole that President Franklin D. Roosevelt carefully exploited to ensure that US allies overseas were not unduly penalized by the acts. FDR redirects here. ...

Contents

Neutrality Act of 1936

The Neutrality Act of 1936, passed in February of that year, sought to close the loopholes in the 1935 Act by prohibiting trade in war materials as well as loans or credits to belligerents.


Neutrality Acts of 1937

Two Neutrality Acts were passed in 1937 (in January and May) in response to the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War - this was not covered under the early legislation, as it applied only to conflicts between nations rather than within them. Sponsored by the isolationist Republican Senator Arthur H. Vandenberg, it tightened the restrictions on US businesses and private individuals assisting belligerents, even prohibiting travel by U.S. citizens on ships of belligerents. When Japan invaded China in July 1937, starting the Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945), President Roosevelt chose not to invoke the Neutrality Acts by declining to identify the fighting as a state of war. In so doing, he ensured that China's efforts to defend itself would not be hindered by the legislation. Not to be confused with the Spanish Civil War of 1820-1823. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Arthur Hendrick Vandenberg (March 22, 1884–April 18, 1951) was a Republican Senator from the state of Michigan who participated in the creation of the United Nations. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Second Sino-Japanese War was a major invasion of eastern China by Japan preceding and during World War II. It ended with the surrender of Japan in 1945. ...


Neutrality Act of 1939

The Neutrality Act of 1939 passed on November 4th amended the earlier legislation in recognition of the imminent Nazi threat to western Europe's democracies. Although the Act permitted all belligerents to be supplied on a "cash and carry" basis, this benefited the United Kingdom and France (at war with Germany since September 3), since they controlled the sea lanes. However, US vessels were forbidden to enter combat zones and US citizens continued to be barred from sailing on belligerent vessels. The act was amended in November 1941 to remove these restrictions following the passage of the Lend-Lease Act. Pearl Harbor was a tragic event and the nuetrality act was passed so that the U.S. could not enter World War II. For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... The Lend-Lease program was a program of the United States at the beginning of World War II that allowed the United States to provide the Allied Powers with war material without becoming directly involved in the war. ...


See also

Louis Ludlow was a Washington correspondent for a large number of newspapers, and then served as a Democrat in the U.S. House of Representatives for the Indianapolis, Indiana district for twenty years. ... The Eagle Squadrons were Royal Air Force fighter squadrons formed during World War II from American volunteer pilots. ... It has been suggested that Neutrality Proclamation be merged into this article or section. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Neutrality Acts - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (443 words)
The Neutrality Acts were a series of laws passed in the United States in the 1930s, in response to the growing turmoil in Europe and Asia that was to lead to the Second World War.
The legacy of the Acts is widely regarded as having been generally negative; they made no distinction between aggressor and victim, treating both equally as "belligerents", and they limited the US government's ability to aid Britain against Nazi Germany until the formal declaration of war in 1941 rendered them irrelevant.
The Neutrality Act of 1936, passed in February of that year, sought to close the loopholes in the 1935 Act by prohibiting trade in war materials as well as loans or credits to belligerents.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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