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Encyclopedia > Neuschwanstein
Neuschwanstein seen from the Marienbrücke.
Neuschwanstein seen from the Marienbrücke.

Neuschwanstein Castle (German: Schloß/Schloss Neuschwanstein, lit. New Swan Stone palace; pronounced [nɔɪˈʃvaːnʃtaɪ̯n]) is a 19th century Bavarian palace. Located in Germany, near Hohenschwangau and Füssen in southwest Bavaria, the castle was built by Ludwig II of Bavaria as a retreat and as a homage to Richard Wagner, the King's inspiring muse. Although photography of the interior is not permitted,[1] it is the most photographed building in Germany[2] and is one of Germany's most popular tourist destinations. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2970x1944, 4341 KB) Castle Neuschwanstein at Schwangau, Bavaria, Germany Picture taken by: de:Benutzer:Softeis File links The following pages link to this file: Neuschwanstein ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2970x1944, 4341 KB) Castle Neuschwanstein at Schwangau, Bavaria, Germany Picture taken by: de:Benutzer:Softeis File links The following pages link to this file: Neuschwanstein ... The German spelling reform of 1996 (Rechtschreibreform) is based on an international agreement signed in Vienna in July 1996 by the governments of the German-speaking countries Germany, Austria, Liechtenstein and Switzerland, a quadrilingual country. ... Species 6-7 living, see text. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... Village on left, Schloss Hohenschwangau on right, as wiewed from the Neuschwanstein Hohenschwangau is a district of Schwangau. ... Füssen is a town in Bavaria, Germany, in the district Ostallgäu. ... For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ... Ludwig Friedrich Wilhelm II, King of Bavaria (August 25, 1845 – June 13, 1886) was king of Bavaria from 1864 until shortly before his death. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ...

Contents

History

An 1890s photochrom print of the castle.
An 1890s photochrom print of the castle.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 583 pixelsFull resolution‎ (3,502 × 2,554 pixels, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 583 pixelsFull resolution‎ (3,502 × 2,554 pixels, file size: 3. ... The 1890s were sometimes referred to as the Mauve Decade, because William Henry Perkins aniline dye allowed the widespread use of that colour in fashion, and also as the Gay Nineties, under the then-current usage of the word gay which referred simply to merriment and frivolity, with no... This photochrom illustrates Hildesheim town hall in the 1890s, and shows the evocative coloration characteristic of the process. ...

Conception

The conception of the castle was outlined by Ludwig II in a letter to Richard Wagner, dated May 13, 1868; Ludwig (Louis) II, King of Bavaria, Ludwig Friedrich Wilhelm, also known as Ludwig the Mad, and Mad King Ludwig (August 25, 1845 - June 13, 1886) was king of Bavaria from 1864 until his death. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

"It is my intention to rebuild the old castle ruin at Hohenschwangau near the Pollat Gorge in the authentic style of the old German knights' castles...the location is the most beautiful one could find, holy and unapproachable, a worthy temple for the divine friend who has brought salvation and true blessing to the world."
The coat of arms of Ludwig over the entrance to the castle.

The foundation stone of the building was laid September 5, 1869. Neuschwanstein was designed by Christian Jank, a theatrical set designer, rather than an architect, which says much regarding Ludwig's intentions and explains much of the fantastical nature of the resulting building. The architectural expertise, vital to such a perilously-sited building, was provided first by the Munich court architect, Eduard Riedel, and latterly by Georg Dollmann, son-in-law of Leo von Klenze. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2411x1671, 844 KB) Summary The coat of arms of Ludwig II of Bavaria as carved over the entrance to Neuschwanstein Castle. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2411x1671, 844 KB) Summary The coat of arms of Ludwig II of Bavaria as carved over the entrance to Neuschwanstein Castle. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


The castle was originally called "New Hohenschwangau Castle" until the king's death, when it was re-named Neuschwanstein, the castle of the Swan Knight, Lohengrin, of Wagner's opera of the same name. In origin, the castle has been the Schwanstein, the seat of the knights of Schwangau, whose emblem had been the swan. Schloss Hohenschwangau was the childhood residence of King Ludwig II of Bavaria and was built by his father. ... In some German Arthurian literature, Lohengrin is the son of Parzival (Percival). ... Lohengrin is a romantic opera (or music drama) in three acts by Richard Wagner. ...


Scope of the castle

The castle comprises a gatehouse, a Bower, the Knight's House with a square tower, and a Palas, or citadel, with two towers to the Western end. The effect of the whole is highly theatrical, both externally and within.[citation needed] The king's influence is apparent throughout and he took a keen personal interest in the design and decoration. An example can be seen in his comments, or commands, regarding a mural depicting Lohengrin in the Palas; "His Majesty wishes that .. the ship be placed further from the shore, that Lohengrin's neck be less tilted, that the chain from the ship to the swan be of gold and not of roses, and finally that the style of the castle shall be kept medieval."[citation needed]

View of the upper courtyard.
View of the upper courtyard.

The suite of rooms within the Palas contains the Throne Room followed by Ludwig's suite, followed by the Singers' Hall and by the Grotto. Throughout, the design pays homage to the German legends of Lohengrin, the Swan Knight. Hohenschwangau, where Ludwig spent much of his youth, had decorations of these sagas. These themes were taken up in the operas of Richard Wagner. However, many of the interior rooms remain undecorated; only 14 rooms were finished before Ludwig's death.[3] With the castle still under construction at the Kings death, one of the major features of the castle remained unbuilt. A massive keep was planned for the middle of the upper court yard and was never built at the decision of the Kings remaining family. The foundation for the keep can still be seen in the upper courtyard today. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (768 × 1,024 pixels, file size: 185 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (768 × 1,024 pixels, file size: 185 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ...


Some of the many finished rooms include the throne room, which features a gem encrusted chandelier, all twelve apostles painted on the wall that surrounds the pedestal for the throne (the actual throne was never finished) and Jesus behind the pedestal. The King's master suite includes a four post bed hand carved out of wood, the canopy of the bed is carved as the cathedral towers from every cathedral in Bavaria, a secret flushing toilet (The toilet flushes with water collected from an aqueduct.) and a running sink in the shape of a swan. The castle also includes a oratory, accessible from the dressing room and the master suite, that features an ivory crucifix, a room made to look like a cavern, a full kitchen equipped with hot and cold running water and heated cupboards, servants quarters, a study, a dining room and the Singers' Hall. The Singers' hall is a place for musicians and playwrights to come and perform. The King built it for Wagner as a place to write and perform plays. The King died before being able to watch a performance in the Singers' Hall, but it has been used since the King's death.


Despite its medieval look, the construction of Neuschwanstein required the modern technology of the day, and the castle is a marvel of technological structural achievements. Steam engines and electricity, modern venting, and heating pipes are all part of the structure. Electricity (from New Latin Ä“lectricus, amberlike) is a general term for a variety of phenomena resulting from the presence and flow of electric charge. ...


It is now almost forgotten that Ludwig II was a patron of modern inventions and that he pioneered the introduction of electricity into public life in Bavaria. His new castles were the first to use electricity (i.e. the Venus Grotto at Linderhof) and other modern conveniences. Through his building activities Ludwig kept many particular crafts alive the knowledge and expertise of which would have died out otherwise, and he provided work and income to a large number of artisans, builders, plasterers, decorators, etc.


Ludwig II declared insane

Neuschwanstein was close to completion when, in 1886, the King was declared insane by a State Commission under Dr. von Gudden and arrested at the castle. The King could hardly control himself as he asked von Gudden, "How can you declare me insane? You have not yet examined me!"[4] Taken to Schloss Berg, he was found on June 13, 1886, in shallow water in Lake Starnberg, drowned, along with von Gudden, the psychiatrist who certified him. The exact circumstances of his death remain unexplained. Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Lake Starnberg (German: Starnberger See) in southern Bavaria is Germanys fourth largest lake and a popular recreation area for the nearby city of Munich. ...

See also: Ludwig II of Bavaria#Deposition and death
painting of the Throne Room, looking from the throne.
painting of the Throne Room, looking from the throne.

Ludwig Friedrich Wilhelm II, King of Bavaria (August 25, 1845 – June 13, 1886) was king of Bavaria from 1864 until shortly before his death. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Legacy

The castle is owned by the state of Bavaria, unlike Hohenschwangau which is owned by Franz, Duke of Bavaria. His Royal Highness the Duke of Bavaria Franz Bonaventura Adalbert Maria Herzog von Bayern (born July 14, 1933), styled as His Royal Highness The Duke of Bavaria, is head of the Wittelsbach family, the former ruling family of the Kingdom of Bavaria. ...


It inspired the building of another Wittelsbach castle, Schloss Ringberg. Neuschwanstein is a contemporary of the slightly older Portuguese Pena Palace in Sintra, sometimes referred to as 'the Portuguese Neuschwanstein' (ca. 1840). Finally, it has served as the inspiration for the Sleeping Beauty Castle at Disneyland. [5] Schloss Ringberg (Ringberg Castle) is located in the Bavarian Alps, 50 km south of Munich, on a foothill overlooking the Tegernsee. ... The Pena National Palace constitutes one of the major expressions of 19th century Romanticism in Portugal. ... Location    - Country Portugal    - Region Lisboa  - Subregion Greater Lisbon  - District or A.R. Lisbon Mayor Fernando Seara  - Party PSD-CDS-PPM-MPT Area 319. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... This is an article about a structure at Disneyland and Hong Kong Disneyland. ... For other uses, see Disneyland (disambiguation). ...


The nearby Marienbrücke (Mary's Bridge) over Pöllat Gorge, named after Marie of Prussia, provides a view of one of Neuschwanstein's façades (above). Marie Friederike Franziska Hedwig von Preußen (October 15, 1825 - May 17, 1889) was Queen of Bavaria, and the mother of Ludwig II. She was the daughter of Prince Wilhelm of Prussia and his wife Marie Anna of Hesse-Homburg. ...


Neuschwanstein is to appear on a €2 commemorative coin for the German Bundesländer series in 2012. The new reverse side of all €2 coins from 2007 onwards. ... 2012 (MMXII) will be a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2007, it was a finalist in the selection of the New Seven Wonders of the World. Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Location of the New Seven Wonders winners. ...


References

  1. ^ Neuschwanstein Castle: Admission Charges and Tickets: Visitor Information. Retrieved on 2007-03-10.
  2. ^ Dummies::Neuschwanstein and Hohenschwangau: Castles in the Air. Adapted From: Germany For Dummies, 2nd Edition. Retrieved on 2006-06-09.
  3. ^ Desing, Julius (1998). in Bonny Schmid-Burleson (trans.): The Royal Castle of Neuschwanstein. Lechbruck, Germany: Verlag Wilhelm Kienberger. 
  4. ^ Sailer, Anton, Castles, Mystery, and Music, the Legend of Ludwig II, Munich, 1983 reprint: 136, ISBN 3-7654-1898-6
  5. ^ http://www.hiddenmickeys.org/Disneyland/Secrets/Fantasy/Castle.html
  • Blunt, Wilfred, The Dream King - Ludwig II of Bavaria, Hamish Hamilton, London, 1970, ISBN 241-01899-4
  • Neuschwanstein Castle - the Official Guide, Bayerische Schlosseverwaltung, undated.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... The Hamish Hamilton logo Hamish Hamilton is a British book publisher, founded eponymously by the half-Scot half-American Jamie Hamilton (Hamish is the Celtic form). ...

External links

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  • Maps and aerial photos for 47°33′27″N 10°45′00″E / 47.5575, 10.75Coordinates: 47°33′27″N 10°45′00″E / 47.5575, 10.75
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Ludwig II of Bavaria's buildings
Falkenstein | Herrenchiemsee | Königshaus am Schachen | Linderhof | Neuschwanstein

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