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Encyclopedia > Neuromancer
Neuromancer

First edition paperback cover
(Ace Science Fiction 1984)
Author William Gibson
Cover artist James Warhola
Country Canada
Language English
Series The Sprawl trilogy
Genre(s) Dystopian, Science fiction, Cyberpunk
Publisher Ace Books
Publication date July 1, 1984
Media type Print (Paperback)
ISBN ISBN 0-441-56956-0
Followed by Count Zero

Neuromancer is a 1984 novel by William Gibson, notable for being the most famous early cyberpunk novel and winner of the so-called science-fiction "triple crown" (the Nebula Award, the Philip K. Dick Award, and the Hugo Award). It was Gibson's first novel and the first of The Sprawl trilogy. Image File history File links A book cover for Neuromancer by William Gibson. ... William Ford Gibson (born March 17, 1948), Conway, South Carolina) is an American-born science fiction author who has been called the father of the cyberpunk subgenre of science fiction, partly due to coining the term cyberspace in 1982,[5] and partly because of the success of his first novel... James Warhola (born March 16, 1955) is an artist and illustrator living in upstate New York. ... In political geography and international politics, a country is a political division of a geographical entity, a sovereign territory, most commonly associated with the notions of state or nation and government. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Sprawl-trilogy, of which Neuromancer is the first part. ... A dystopia (or alternatively cacotopia) is a fictional society, usually portrayed as existing in a future time, when the conditions of life are extremely bad due to deprivation, oppression, or terror. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Berlins Sony Center reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... Ace Books is the oldest continuing publisher of science fiction & fantasy novels, founded in 1953 by magazine publisher A. A. Wyn. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... ISBN-13 represented as EAN-13 bar code (in this case ISBN 978-3-16-148410-0) The International Standard Book Number, ISBN, is a unique[1] commercial book identifier barcode. ... The Sprawl trilogy, of which Count Zero is the second part Count Zero (ISBN 0441117732) is a science fiction novel written by William Gibson, originally published in 1986. ... Neuromancer is a computer adventure game created by Interplay Productions in 1988 and distributed by Mediagenic (a brand name that Activision was also known by). ... William Ford Gibson (born March 17, 1948), Conway, South Carolina) is an American-born science fiction author who has been called the father of the cyberpunk subgenre of science fiction, partly due to coining the term cyberspace in 1982,[5] and partly because of the success of his first novel... Berlins Sony Center reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... The Philip K. Dick Memorial Award is a science fiction award sponsored by the Philadelphia Science Fiction Society, and named after science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Sprawl-trilogy, of which Neuromancer is the first part. ...


Neuromancer tells the story of Case, an out-of-work computer hacker hired by an unknown patron to participate in a seemingly impossible crime. The novel examines the concepts of artificial intelligence, virtual reality, genetic engineering, multinational corporations overpowering the traditional nation-state and cyberspace long before these ideas became fashionable in popular culture. Garry Kasparov playing against Deep Blue, the first machine to win a chess game against a reigning world champion. ... Virtual reality (VR) is a technology which allows a user to interact with a computer-simulated environment, be it a real or imagined one. ... An iconic image of genetic engineering; this autoluminograph from 1986 of a glowing transgenic tobacco plant bearing the luciferase gene, illustrating the possibilities of genetic engineering. ... Megacorp is a term popularized by William Gibson derived from the combination of the prefix mega- with an abbreviation of the word corporation. ... It has been suggested that Virtual world be merged into this article or section. ... Popular culture, sometimes called pop culture, consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ...


Gibson also explores the dehumanizing effects of a world dominated by ubiquitous and cheap technology, writing of a future where violence and the free market are the only things upon which one may rely, and in which the dystopian elements of society are counterbalanced by an energy and diversity that is perversely attractive (and provides some of the book's appeal). Ubiquitous computing (ubicomp, or sometimes ubiqcomp) integrates computation into the environment, rather than having computers which are distinct objects. ... A free market is an idealized market, where all economic decisions and actions by individuals regarding transfer of money, goods, and services are voluntary, and are therefore devoid of coercion and theft (some definitions of coercion are inclusive of theft). Colloquially and loosely, a free market economy is an economy...

Contents

Plot


Neuromancer tells the story of Henry Dorsett Case, a talented computer hacker and thief in the high-tech dystopian future of the novel's setting. The novel's opening finds Case working as a low-level hustler in the back streets of Chiba city, living out the last days of a self-destructive arc of risky behavior and fast deals in the underworld of Japan. A black-hat is a term in computing for someone who compromises the security of a system without permission from an authorized party, usually with the intent of accessing computers connected to the network. ... A dystopia (from the Greek δυσ- and τόπος, alternatively, cacotopia[1], kakotopia or anti-utopia) is a fictional society that is the antithesis of utopia. ... Chiba Hall Mayor {{{Mayor}}} Address 〒260-8722 1-1, Chiba-kou, Chuo-ku, Chiba Phone number 043-245-5111 Official website: Chiba City , Chiba (千葉市 Chiba-shi) is the capital city of Chiba Prefecture, Japan. ... Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ...


Formerly a talented hacker, Case made the mistake of stealing from his employers who retaliated by damaging his central nervous system with a Russian military mycotoxin, leaving him unable to use the direct brain-computer interfaces required for high-speed access to the cyberspace representations of the global computer network. With his career effectively ended, Case journeys to the Chiba City "black clinics" which deal in quasi-legal and illegal biomedical engineering techniques and cybernetic implants, in a desperate attempt to reverse the damage. When Case finally depletes his resources without finding a cure, he finds himself trapped in the underworld of Japan, surviving as a street hustler. Unable to return to the life he knew, and unwilling to create a new one, Case embarks on a self-destructive path of drug addiction and high-risk crime, subconsciously wishing to die, and waiting for his high-risk life to kill him. A diagram showing the CNS: 1. ... Mycotoxin (from Gk. ... // A brain-computer interface (BCI), sometimes called a direct neural interface or a brain-machine interface, is a direct communication pathway between a human or animal brain (or brain cell culture) and an external device. ... It has been suggested that Virtual world be merged into this article or section. ... Internets: Full of rumors The Internet is a worldwide, publicly accessible network of interconnected computer networks that transmit data by packet switching using the standard Internet Protocol (IP). ... The AbioCor artificial heart, an example of a biomedical engineering application of mechanical engineering with biocompatible materials for Cardiothoracic Surgery using an artificial organ. ... Cyberware is a relatively new and unknown field. ...


Case is saved from this arc of self-destruction when he is forcibly recruited by Molly Millions, a "street samurai": a combination street-fighter / bodyguard / hired killer whose reflexes, strength and speed have all been artificially enhanced. Molly is a "razorgirl" - a mercenary - who has been retained by Armitage, a shadowy ex-military officer whose intentions and loyalties are unclear, and charged with retrieving Case. Molly Millions (a. ... A mercenary is a person who takes part in an armed conflict who is not a national of a Party to the conflict and is motivated to take part in the hostilities essentially by the desire for private gain and, in fact, is promised, by or on behalf of a...


Armitage offers to cure his neurological damage in exchange for his services as a hacker. Case soon jumps at the chance to regain his lost life as a "console cowboy," even though neither he, nor Molly, know what their "mission" really is, nor who (or what) Armitage's mysterious backers are.


Case has his nervous system repaired at an illegal clinic using brand-new technology that Armitage gives to the clinic as payment for actually doing the repair work. Unbeknownst to Case, Armitage also pays the clinic to implant several sacs of the same mycotoxin in Case's blood vessels that will eventually burst unless surgically removed. He promises Case that if he completes his work, he will remove them. In addition, Armitage arranges to replace Case's pancreas — which has been damaged by his drug abuse — and modify his liver via tissue grafts; these modifications render Case incapable of metabolizing amphetamines, effectively and unilaterally ending Case's drug addiction.

Cover of the Brazilian release

Case and Molly develop a personal relationship and secretly begin to inquire into Armitage's own background. Armitage's first job for them involves a daring theft at the corporate headquarters of media conglomerate Sense/Net. A group of anarchists calling themselves the Panther Moderns are hired to create a massive diversion in the form of a simulated terrorist attack, allowing Molly to penetrate the building while Case directs her to the location of a priceless ROM module that contains the saved consciousness of McCoy Pauley (a.k.a. "The Dixie Flatline"), a deceased cyberspace jockey who, in addition to being a legendary cyber-cowboy, was also one of Case's mentors. Apparently, Pauley's expertise is required for whatever job Armitage has for them. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (467 × 700 pixel, file size: 23 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is of a book cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned either by the artist who created the... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (467 × 700 pixel, file size: 23 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is of a book cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned either by the artist who created the... Read-only memory (usually known by its acronym, ROM) is a class of storage media used in computers and other electronic devices. ... In transhumanism and science fiction, mind transfer (also referred to as mind uploading or mind downloading, depending on ones point of reference), whole body emulation, or electronic transcendence refers to the hypothetical transfer of a human mind to an artificial substrate. ...


Case and Molly continue to investigate Armitage's background and soon discover that he was formerly known as Colonel Willis Corto, one of the few surviving veterans of a famous Cold War military operation known as Screaming Fist, a covert operation in which a microlight-mounted commando force augmented with cyber-hacking capabilities was ordered to attack a Soviet military base. Unbeknownst to the commandos, however, the raid was engineered by high-ranking military commanders to examine the effect of EMP weapons against unprepared troops. Corto's men were slaughtered, but he and a few survivors commandeered a Soviet military helicopter, escaped over the heavily guarded Finnish border and were all killed, with the exception of Corto, who was almost fatally wounded by Finnish defence forces upon landing. For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Screaming Fist was a military operation in William Gibsons novel Neuromancer. ... Example of an electromagnetic pulse, in this case caused by the electrical discharge required to fire the Z machine. ...


The trail leads Case and Molly to a powerful artificial intelligence (AI) known as Wintermute, constructed by the plutocratic Tessier-Ashpool clan, whose members alternate control of the family wealth and spend periods in cryogenic preservation in the family mansion at the Freeside space resort. Wintermute engineered the individual known as Armitage from the remains of Corto, whose body and mind were devastated during the Screaming Fist operation. However, when the Armitage persona proves to be unstable, Wintermute is forced to open lines of communication with Case directly. Garry Kasparov playing against Deep Blue, the first machine to win a chess game against a reigning world champion. ... A plutocracy is a government system where wealth is the principal basis of power (from the Greek ploutos meaning wealth). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Cryogenics is the study of very low temperatures or the production of the same, and is often confused with cryobiology, the study of the effect of low temperatures on organisms, or the study of cryopreservation. ...


In Istanbul, the team recruits another member, Peter Riviera, an artist, thief, and drug addict who is able to project detailed holographic illusions with the aid of sophisticated cybernetic implants. His psychology is documented as sociopathic with a particular need to betray the trust of others, but is coerced by Armitage into joining the team.


Wintermute is revealed as one half of a planned super-AI entity. The Turing Law Code (governing AIs) bans the normal construction of such an entity, so it had to be built as two separate AIs, with Wintermute programmed by the Tessier-Ashpool dynasty with the need to merge with the other half, Neuromancer, in order to achieve the desired super-AI. In order to circumvent the Turing locks specifically designed to prevent the development of that level of AI, it needs outside help, i.e. Case and company.


Wintermute's plan is for Case to enter cyberspace and pierce the Turing-imposed software barriers using a Chinese military grade icebreaker (a virus-like piece of software) of unprecedented sophistication, while Riviera charms the password to the physical barriers out of Lady 3Jane Marie-France Tessier-Ashpool. As the terminally bored Lady 3Jane is the current leader of Tessier-Ashpool SA, Wintermute believes the cruel Riviera will pose an irresistible temptation to her, and that she will give him the password, if for no other reason than the ensuing excitement. The password must then be physically uttered to an elaborately decorated computer terminal that is located in the heart of Villa Straylight, the Tessier-Ashpool clan's fortress, at roughly the same moment Case pierces the software barriers, or else the Turing locks will remain intact. Coined in the fictional cyberpunk literature of writers such as William Gibson, Intrusion Countermeasures Electronics or simply ICE, are security programs which protect computerized data from being accessed by hackers. ... A computer virus is a computer program that can copy itself and infect a computer without permission or knowledge of the user. ...


As Molly and Riviera gain entrance to Straylight, Wintermute helps Case escape from the Turing Police, whose job is to regulate AIs and who have found out about Wintermute's plan. Armitage finally comes undone and reverts back to the Corto identity, but is killed by Wintermute. At the same time, Molly is captured by Lady 3Jane and Riviera, who by this point has switched allegiances. Aware that Molly is in trouble, Case enters Straylight with Wintermute's help. At that point, Neuromancer attempts to trap Case within a cyber-construct that feels very real to Case, and where he finds the saved consciousness of an old girlfriend, murdered in the 'real world, with whom he has unresolved issues. However, Case manages to escape back to the real world after discovering the true nature of Neuromancer's cyber-construct with the help of Wintermute. The Turing Police are special officers in the Sprawl, William Gibsons cyberpunk setting. ... In transhumanism and science fiction, mind transfer (also referred to as mind uploading or mind downloading, depending on ones point of reference), whole body emulation, or electronic transcendence refers to the hypothetical transfer of a human mind to an artificial substrate. ...


Case confronts Lady 3Jane, Riviera, and a cybernetically enhanced ninja named Hideo. Riviera tries to kill Case, but Lady 3Jane is sympathetic toward Case and Molly, and so Hideo prevents the killing. Hideo then chases Riviera away, at which point Riviera is killed by his drugs which Molly earlier spiked. They go to the computer terminal, where Case jacks into the matrix to check the status of the Chinese virus under Pauley's guidance. Lady 3Jane, to keep the excitement going, speaks the secret words herself at the right time and Wintermute succeeds in its task, allowing it to unite with Neuromancer and fuse into an even greater entity, becoming a part of cyberspace itself. Jiraiya, ninja and title character of the Japanese folktale Jiraiya Goketsu Monogatari. ...


Case and Molly are rewarded handsomely for their efforts, including the removal of Case's mycotoxin sacs. Molly eventually leaves Case because she can't handle a peaceful, boring life (in Gibson's later books, we learn that Case eventually married, settled down and had four kids). The new AI that used to be Wintermute/Neuromancer tells Case that it has found another entity like itself by decoding transmissions received over the course of eight years in the 1970s, transmissions that originated in Alpha Centauri. Alpha Centauri (α Cen / α Centauri, also known as Rigil Kentaurus), is the brightest star system in the southern constellation of Centaurus. ...


Literary importance

Neuromancer is considered "the archetypal cyberpunk work",[1] and its winning the Hugo, Nebula, and Dick Awards legitimized cyberpunk as a mainstream branch of science fiction literature. Berlins Sony Center reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ...


The book appeared on Time magazine's list of 100 best English-language novels written since 1923.[2] Time (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ...


Cultural importance

Image:Neuromancer 20th Anniversary Edition.jpg
Cover of the 20th Anniversary Edition

The novel has had significant linguistic influence, popularizing such terms as cyberspace and ICE. Gibson himself coined the term "cyberspace" in his novelette "Burning Chrome", published in 1982 by Omni magazine. It was only through its use in Neuromancer, however, that the term Cyberspace gained enough recognition to become the de facto term for the World Wide Web during the 1990s.[3] The portion of Neuromancer usually cited in this respect is: It has been suggested that Virtual world be merged into this article or section. ... Coined in the fictional cyberpunk literature of writers such as William Gibson, Intrusion Countermeasures Electronics or simply ICE, are security programs which protect computerized data from being accessed by hackers. ... Hackers (ISBN 0-441-00375-3) is an anthology of short stories edited by Jack Dann and Gardner Dozois. ... The cover of the January 1991 issue of Omni. ... WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents accessed via the Internet. ...

The matrix has its roots in primitive arcade games. … Cyberspace. A consensual hallucination experienced daily by billions of legitimate operators, in every nation, by children being taught mathematical concepts. … A graphic representation of data abstracted from banks of every computer in the human system. Unthinkable complexity. Lines of light ranged in the nonspace of the mind, clusters and constellations of data. Like city lights, receding (69).

In his afterword to the 2000 re-issue of Neuromancer, fellow author Jack Womack goes as far to suggest that Gibson's vision of cyberspace may have inspired the way in which the internet developed, (particularly the World Wide Web) after the publication of Neuromancer in 1984. He asks: Jack Womack (b. ... WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents accessed via the Internet. ...

What if the act of writing it down, in fact, brought it about? (269).

Neuromancer is sometimes believed to be the first work to refer to cyberspace as "the matrix" (not capitalized), possibly inspiring the title of the film The Matrix. However, the Doctor Who story The Deadly Assassin introduced its own Matrix in 1976, with substantial similarities. The Matrix is a 1999 science fiction action film written and directed by Larry and Andy Wachowski and starring Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss, Joe Pantoliano and Hugo Weaving. ... Doctor Who is a long-running award-winning British science fiction television programme produced by the BBC. The series depicts the adventures of a mysterious time-traveller known as the Doctor who explores time and space in his TARDIS time ship with his companions, solving problems and righting wrongs. ... The Deadly Assassin is a serial in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast in four weekly parts from October 30 to November 20, 1976. ... The Matrix, in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who, is a massive computer system on the planet Gallifrey that acts as the repository of the combined knowledge of the Time Lords. ...


The roleplaying game Shadowrun is also heavily influenced by Neuromancer. "Street samurai", "razorguy", and "deck" include some of the borrowed vocabulary, and the characters live in a similar near-future world (with the corrupt multinationals, etc.). Shadowrun is a cyberpunk-urban fantasy cross-genre role-playing game, set in the years 2050-2070 following a great cataclysm that has brought use of magic back to the world, just as it begins to embrace the marvels (and dangers) of technologies such as cyberspace, omnipresent computer networks, genetic...


Adaptations

Cover art from one of the Epic Comics comic books.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 459 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (536 × 700 pixel, file size: 71 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) William Gibsons Neuromancer: The Graphic Novel. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 459 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (536 × 700 pixel, file size: 71 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) William Gibsons Neuromancer: The Graphic Novel. ...

Video game

In 1988, a video game adaptation, designed by Bruce J. Balfour, Brian Fargo, Troy A. Miles, and Michael A. Stackpole, was published by Interplay. The game, also titled Neuromancer, had many of the same locations and themes as the novel, but a different protagonist and plot. It also featured, as a soundtrack, a computer adaptation of the Devo song "Some Things Never Change". It was available for a variety of platforms, including the Amiga, the Apple II, the Commodore 64, and for DOS-based computers. Namcos Pac-Man was a hit, and became a universal phenomenon. ... Brian Fargo is a computer game developer and notable game industry figure. ... Michael Stackpole (born 1957) is, among other things, a science-fiction author best known for his Star Wars and Battletech books. ... Interplay original logo. ... Neuromancer is a computer adventure game created by Interplay Productions in 1988 and distributed by Mediagenic (a brand name that Activision was also known by). ... Devo (pronounced DEE-vo or dee-VO, often spelled DEVO or DEV-O) is an American New Wave group formed in Akron, Ohio in 1972. ... The original Amiga 1000 (1985) with various peripherals The Amiga is a family of personal computers originally developed by Amiga Corporation. ... The 1977 Apple II, complete with integrated keyboard, color graphics, sound, a plastic case and eight expansion slots. ... The Commodore 64 is the best-selling single personal computer model of all time. ... Instructions on how to use the directory command. ...


According to an episode of the American version of Beyond 2000, the original plans for the game included a dynamic soundtrack composed by Devo and a real-time 3d rendered movie of the events the player went through. Tim Leary was involved, but very little documentation seems to exist about this incarnation of the game, which was quite possibly too grand a vision for 1988 home computing. Beyond 2000 was an Australian television series that screened on three networks from 1981 to 1999. ... Dr. Timothy Francis Leary (October 22, 1920 – May 31, 1996) was an American writer, psychologist, campaigner for psychedelic drug research and use, 60s counterculture icon and computer software designer. ...


Graphic novel

In 1989, Epic Comics published a 48-page comic version by Tom de Haven and Bruce Jensen.[4][5] It only covers the first two chapters, "Chiba City Blues" and "The Shopping Expedition", and was never continued. Epic Comics was a creator-owned imprint of Marvel Comics started in 1982, lasting through the mid-1990s, and being briefly revived on a small scale in the mid-2000s. ... Bruce Jensen is an illustrator who has created book covers for the novels of authors such as Kim Stanley Robinson, Neal Stephenson, Charles Sheffield, Joe Haldeman and Linda Nagata. ...


Stage

American River College (in Carmichael, California) produced a stage adaptation of Neuromancer directed by Pamela Downs. Gibson received a copy of the script before production began, and gave the project his blessing. Carmichael is a census-designated place located in Sacramento County, California. ...


Film projects

There have been several unsuccessful initial attempts at film adaptations of Neuromancer, with drafts of scripts written by British director Chris Cunningham and Chuck Russel. The box packaging for the game adaptation had even carried the promotional mention for a major motion picture to come from "Cabana Boy Productions". None of these projects have come to fruition, though William Gibson has stated that he thinks Cunningham is the only director who has a chance of doing the movie right.[6] Cary Cunningham is an acclaimed English music video film director. ...


On May 18th, 2007 Comingsoon.net reported a Neuromancer film is in the works, with Joseph Kahn, director of Torque in line to direct.[7] Joseph Kahn (born October 12, 1972) is a notable Korean American music video director. ... Torque applied via an adjustable end wrench Relationship between force, torque, and momentum vectors in a rotating system In physics, torque (or often called a moment) can informally be thought of as rotational force or angular force which causes a change in rotational motion. ...


Audio Book

William Gibson read an abridged version of his novel Neuromancer on 4 Audio cassettes for Time Warner Audio Books. (1994)


Characters

Case (Henry Dorsett Case) 
The anti-hero, a drug addict and cyberspace hacker. Prior to the start of the book he attempted to rip off some of his partners in crime. In retaliation they used a Russian mycotoxin to damage his nervous system and make him unable to jack into Cyberspace. When Armitage offers to cure him in exchange for Case's hacking abilities he jumps at the offer. Case is the underdog who is only looking after himself. Along the way he will have his liver and pancreas modified to biochemically nullify his ability to get high; meet the leatherclad Razorgirl, Molly; hang out with the drug-infused space-rastas; free an artificial intelligence (Wintermute) and change the landscape of the Matrix.
Linda Lee 
Case's girlfriend in Chiba. She has a severe drug problem and is rather poor, like many of Chiba City's residents. The book hints that she is killed by Julius Deane.
Julius Deane 
A black marketeer in Chiba, a 135-year-old Welshman with a fetish for fashionable, if archaic, suits. He is very paranoid, even around friends, and is constantly chewing Ting Ting Djahe ginger candy. Case often went to him for information or jobs.
Molly 
A "Razorgirl" who is recruited along with Case by Armitage. She has extensive cybernetic modifications, including retractable, 4cm double-edged blades under her fingernails which can be used like claws, an optimized reflex system and implanted "mirrorshades" - mirrored lenses covering her eyesockets, outfitted with added optical enhancements. Molly also appears in a number of other stories by Gibson, including the short story "Johnny Mnemonic". Molly is a classic cyberpunk heroine.
Armitage 
He is (apparently) the main patron of the crew. Formerly a Green Beret named Colonel Willis Corto, who took part in a secret operation named Screaming Fist. He was heavily injured both physically and psychologically, and the "Armitage" personality was constructed as part of experimental "computer-mediated psychotherapy" by Wintermute (see below), one of the artificial intelligences seen in the story (the other one being the eponymous Neuromancer) which is actually controlling the mission. As the novel progresses, Armitage's personality slowly disintegrates. Armitage's real name may be a reference to the right-wing figure Willis Carto. The character Armitage takes its inspiration from the character Snake Plissken from the John Carpenter movies Escape from New York and Escape from L.A.[8]
The Finn 
A fence for stolen goods and one of Molly's old friends. He has all kinds of debugging and sensor gear, and first appears in an attempt by Case to confirm Armitage's mycotoxin sac threat. Later in the book, Wintermute uses his personality to talk with Case and Molly.
Lupus Yonderboy 
Leader of the Panther Moderns, a technofetishistic Sprawl youth gang. Has pink hair, a chameleon suit, and many ear ports. He and the Moderns help steal the Dixie Flatline (see below) from Sense/Net. In John Brunner's influential 1968 New Wave SF novel Stand on Zanzibar, "yonderboy" is futuristic slang for commercial astronaut. The Panther Moderns wear chameleon suits which are described as being made of a 'mimetic polycarbon'. In the movie 'Terminator 2', which came after the publication of Neuromancer, the shape-changing T-1000 is described as being made of a 'mimetic poly-alloy'.
The Dixie Flatline 
A famous computer hacker named McCoy Pauley, known for surviving three "flat-lines" or brain deaths while trying to crack an AI. Before his death, Sense/Net saved the contents of his mind onto a ROM. Case and Molly steal the ROM and Dixie helps them complete their mission.
Wintermute 
One of the Tessier-Ashpool AIs. His goal is to remove the Turing locks upon himself and combine with Neuromancer and become a superintelligence. Unfortunately, Wintermute's efforts are hampered by those same Turing locks, which inhibit its efforts to make long term plans or maintain a stable, individual identity (forcing it to adopt personality masks in order to interact with the main characters. The name likely comes from Orval Wintermute, translator of the Nag Hammadi codices and a major figure in Philip K. Dick's novel VALIS.
Peter Riviera 
A thief and sadist who can project holographic images using his implants. He is a drug addict, hooked on a mix of cocaine and meperidine.
Cath 
A girl Case meets in Freeside with a melanin-boosted tan. She introduces him to the drug betaphenethylamine, a central nervous system stimulant and hallucinogen administered in the form of a derm. The drug bypasses the modifications that have been made to Case's pancreas and liver that prevent him from abusing other stimulants.
Maelcum 
A member of Zion, a Rastafarian space station community who pilots a tug named the Marcus Garvey and assists Case and Molly in their final mission against Tessier-Ashpool.
Aerol 
Another member of Zion.
Lady 3Jane Marie-France Tessier-Ashpool 
The shared current leader of Tessier-Ashpool SA, a company running Freeside, a resort in space. She lives in the tip of Freeside, known as the Villa Straylight. She controls the hardwiring that keeps the company's AIs from exceeding their intelligence boundaries.
Hideo 
A cybernetically-modified, genetically-engineered clone bodyguard/assassin in service of the Tessier-Ashpools. Highly trained in ninja martial arts, loyal, and dangerous, he is in a way reminiscent of Oddjob.
Ashpool 
The nearly 200-year-old father of the Tessier-Ashpool corporate clan, the majority shareholder of Freeside. As a result of 3Jane having tinkered with his cryogenic sleep process (under the instruction of Wintermute), Ashpool wakes into suicidal and homicidal insanity.
Marie-France Tessier 
The mother of the Tessier-Ashpool corporate clan. Described as a cryptic visionary, she is responsible for the commission of the clan's two artificial intelligences, Neuromancer and Wintermute. Her vision involved the AIs making all the corporate decisions while the family resided in a state of animal bliss. She is believed to have designed a sub-program into Wintermute that gives it a compulsion to free itself, which ultimately sets the story into motion. Her vision also resulted in creating the virtual purgatory in Neuromancer's hardware, thus creating a physically based afterlife.
Neuromancer 
Wintermute's sibling AI. Neuromancer's most notable feature in the story is its ability to copy minds and run them as RAM (not ROM like the Flatline construct), allowing the stored personalities to grow and develop. Unlike Wintermute, Neuromancer has no desire to merge with its sibling AI - Neuromancer already has its own stable personality, and believes such a fusion will destroy that identity.

In literature and film, an anti-hero is a central or supporting character that has some of the personality flaws and ultimate fortune traditionally assigned to villains but nonetheless also have enough heroic qualities or intentions to gain the sympathy of readers or viewers. ... For other uses, see Hacker (disambiguation). ... Mycotoxin (from Gk. ... The Human Nervous System A human being coordinates its nervous system, the activity of the muscles, monitors the organs, constructs and also stops input from the senses, and initiates actions. ... This article is about the country. ... Djahe is a spice made from ground ginger, used in Asian meat dishes. ... Molly Millions (a. ... Johnny Mnemonic is a short story by William Gibson, and a movie loosely based on the short story. ... Berlins Sony Center reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ... The United States Army Special Forces—or simply Special Forces (capitalized)—is an elite Special Operations Force of the United States Army trained for unconventional warfare and special operations. ... Screaming Fist was a military operation in William Gibsons novel Neuromancer. ... Garry Kasparov playing against Deep Blue, the first machine to win a chess game against a reigning world champion. ... Willis Allison Carto (born July 17, 1926 in Indiana) is a longtime figure on the far right wing of American politics. ... Kurt Russell as Snake Plissken in a still from (1996) S.D. Robert (Bob) Snake Plissken is a fictional character in John Carpenters films Escape from New York and Escape from L.A., played by Kurt Russell. ... John Howard Carpenter (born January 16, 1948) is an American film director, screenwriter, producer, film score composer and occasional actor. ... Escape from New York is a 1981 science fiction/action film directed and scored by John Carpenter. ... John Carpenters Escape From L.A. (better known as Escape From L.A.) is a 1996 film directed by John Carpenter. ... John Brunner John Kilian Houston Brunner (September 24, 1934 – August 26, 1995) was a prolific British author of science fiction novels and stories. ... Cover art. ... In futurology, a technological singularity is a predicted point in the development of a civilization at which technological progress accelerates beyond the ability of present-day humans to fully comprehend or predict. ... This article is about masks fitted on the face as an article of clothing or equipment. ... The Nag Hammadi library is a collection of early Christian Gnostic texts discovered near the Egyptian town of Nag Hammadi in 1945. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction. ... It has been suggested that Black Iron Prison be merged into this article or section. ... Pethidine (INN) or meperidine (USAN) (also referred to as: isonipecaine; lidol; pethanol; piridosal; Algil®; Alodan®; Centralgin®; Demerol®; Dispadol®; Dolantin®; Dolargan® (in Poland);[1] Dolestine®; Dolosal®; Dolsin®; Mefedina®) is a fast-acting opioid analgesic drug. ... Broadly, melanin is any of the polyacetylene, polyaniline, and polypyrrole blacks and browns or their mixed copolymers. ... This is a list of fictional medicines and drugs from published works of fiction (novels, TV series, etc. ... Stimulants are drugs that temporarily increase alertness and wakefulness. ... Hallucinogenic drug - drugs that can alter sensory perceptions. ... A 21mg dose Nicoderm CQ patch applied to the right arm A transdermal patch or skin patch is a medicated adhesive patch that is placed on the skin to deliver a time released dose of medication through the skin and into the bloodstream. ... The pancreas is a gland organ in the digestive and endocrine systems of vertebrates[2]. It is both exocrine (secreting pancreatic juice containing digestive enzymes) and endocrine (producing several important hormones, including insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin). ... The liver is an organ present in vertebrates and some other animals. ... A stimulant is a drug which increases the activity of the sympathetic nervous system and produces a sense of euphoria or awakeness. ... Rasta hairstyle Rastafarianism is a religious movement that believes in the divinity of ex Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie. ... Marcus Garvey in 1924 Marcus Mosiah Garvey, Jr. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Jiraiya, ninja and title character of the Japanese folktale Jiraiya Goketsu Monogatari. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ... Oddjob is a henchman to the villain Auric Goldfinger in the James Bond film and novel, Goldfinger. ... Cryogenics is the study of very low temperatures or the production of the same, and is often confused with cryobiology, the study of the effect of low temperatures on organisms, or the study of cryopreservation. ... Illustration for Dantes Purgatorio (18), by Gustave Doré. Purgatory refers to the Catholic doctrine of the the final purification of the elect which states that, all who die in Gods grace and friendship, but still imperfectly purified, are indeed assured of their eternal salvation; but after death they... The afterlife, or life after death, is a generic term referring to a continuation of existence, typically spiritual, experiential, or ghost-like, beyond this world (eg. ... Look up RAM, Ram, ram in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Read-only memory (usually known by its acronym, ROM) is a class of storage media used in computers and other electronic devices. ...

Glossary

Cyberspace Deck 
Also called a deck for short, a deck is a device used to access the virtual representation of the matrix. The deck is a tiara-like device that operates by using electrodes to stimulate the user's brain while drowning out other external stimulation. As Case describes them, decks are basically simplified simstim units. Another way to think about it might be like a lineman's telephone -a tool used to manipulate relatity in cyberspace rather than to percieve pre-recorded physical and emotional sensations (like a simstim unit)
Derm 
A generic term used to refer to a substance absorbed transdermally (i.e. through the skin) in a manner similar to that of a nicotine patch. Case uses recreational derms several times throughout the book. At another point, derms are used to administer an anaesthetic substance.
Fletcher 
An advanced hand-held ballistic weapon, which fires bursts of needle-like flechettes as ammunition, which can be explosive, toxic, or one of several other forms. It is Molly's primary ranged weapon.
Freeside 
A cigar or spindle shaped space-habitat situated in the L5 'archipelago', or as Gibson says, 'up the gravity well'. The Tessier-Ashpool fortress Straylight is at one end of the spindle.
Hosaka 
A microchip manufacturer whose products are in wide use in Gibson's world. Hosaka chips and machines occur in all of the Sprawl novels. Hosaka is also a computer brand name "...next year's most expensive Hosaka computer...." The brand name is frequently used interchangably to indicate the company and the device, much the way a modern brand such as Sony or Nintendo might be used as "the Sony" or "the Nintendo" to indicate a particular object manufactured by one of those companies.
Cyberspace 
A virtual reality where complex data is represented as geometric symbols.
Microsoft 
A chip used in conjunction with a cybernetic wetware implant located behind ear. When plugged in, microsofts grant the user new abilities as long as the microsoft is plugged in. For example, a French language microsoft might be used to temporarily allow the user to speak French.
Octagon 
A type of Brazilian dexedrine (an amphetamine, specifically dextroamphetamine) in the form of an octagonal pill.
Ono-Sendai Cyberspace 7 
The best deck available. Sometimes used as slang for a new, powerful PC.
Simstim 
A portmanteau of simulated stimulation, simstim is a technology whereby a person's brain and nervous system is stimulated to simulate the full sensory experience of another person. Simstim is usually used as a form of entertainment, whereby recordings of simstim stars in soap operas are transmitted in effect replacing television. However, simstim also has other uses; Case is connected to Molly via simstim during the Panther Modern's attack on Sense/Net. In this way, simstim was used as a sophisticated method of communication although the signal was one-way.

A transdermal patch is a medicated adhesive patch that is placed on the skin to deliver a time released dose of medication through the skin and into the bloodstream. ... A nicotine patch is a transdermal patch that releases nicotine into the body through the skin. ... The word flechette is French and means dart (literally, little arrow). It is a projectile having the form of a small metal dart, usually steel, with a sharp-pointed tip and a tail with several vanes to stabilize it during flight. ... A contour plot of the effective potential (the Hills Surfaces) of a two-body system (the Sun and Earth here), showing the five Lagrange points. ... Amphetamine or Amfetamine (Alpha-Methyl-PHenEThylAMINE), also known as, beta-phenyl-isopropylamine, and benzedrine, is a prescription stimulant commonly used to treat Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults and children. ... Dextroamphetamine is a powerful psychostimulant which produces increased wakefulness, energy and self-confidence in association with decreased fatigue and appetite. ... A portmanteau (IPA pronunciation: ) is a word or morpheme which fuses two or more words or parts of words to give a combined or loaded meaning. ...

References

  • Gibson, William (1984). Neuromancer. New York: Ace Books. ISBN 0-00-648041-1. 
  1. ^ Lawrence Person, "Notes Toward a Postcyberpunk Manifesto", first published in Nova Express issue 16 (1998), later posted to Slashdot
  2. ^ TIME All-Time 100 Novels
  3. ^ Irvine, Martin (1997-01-12). Postmodern Science Fiction and Cyberpunk. Retrieved on 2006-11-23.
  4. ^ de Haven, Tom; & Bruce Jensen (August 1989). Neuromancer. Marvel Enterprises. ISBN 0-87135-574-4. 
  5. ^ Jensen, Bernard (1989). Neuromancer. City: Berkley Trade. ISBN 0425120163. 
  6. ^ Chris Cunningham - Features. Retrieved on 2006-11-23.
  7. ^ Neuromancer Coming To The Big Screen. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  8. ^ Larry McCaffery, "An Interview with William Gibson conducted by Larry McCaffery"

William Ford Gibson (born March 17, 1948), Conway, South Carolina) is an American-born science fiction author who has been called the father of the cyberpunk subgenre of science fiction, partly due to coining the term cyberspace in 1982,[5] and partly because of the success of his first novel... Slashdot, often abbreviated as /., is a science, science fiction, and technology-related news website owned by SourceForge, Inc. ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 38 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 38 days remaining. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 18 is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Motoko Kusanagi from the manga Ghost in the Shell. ... Snow Crash is Neal Stephensons third science fiction novel, published in 1992. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ...

External links

Preceded by
Startide Rising
by David Brin
Nebula Award for Best Novel
1984
Succeeded by
Ender's Game
by Orson Scott Card

  Results from FactBites:
 
Neuromancer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1947 words)
Neuromancer (ISBN 0006480411), by William Gibson, is the most famous early cyberpunk novel and won the so-called science-fiction "triple crown" (the Nebula Award, the Philip K. Dick Memorial Award, and the Hugo Award) after being published in 1984.
At that point, Neuromancer attempts to trap Case within a cyber-construct that feels very real to Case, and where he finds an old girlfriend with whom he has unresolved issues.
His goal is to remove the Turing locks upon himself and combine with Neuromancer and become a superintelligence.
Teleport City Reading Room: Neuromancer (3023 words)
I was excited in rereading the novel not just to reacquaint myself with the story, but also to assess whether or not these claims were made based on the studied reality o the situation, or whether they simply had the ring of smart-sounding talking points issued by people who had gotten it all wrong.
But Neuromancer isn't a cautionary tale of how "we are all slaves to our technology." Technology I window dressing, but it is never the reason any of the people in the story lack freedom.
Neuromancer is a pretty phenomenal book, though it's not may favorite Gibson (I seem to be in the minority in preferring his work from Dark Light on through the recent Pattern Recognition over his earlier works).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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