FACTOID # 29: 73.3% of America's gross operating surplus in motion picture and sound recording industries comes from California.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Nettle" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Nettle
Nettle
Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica)
Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Rosales
Family: Urticaceae
Genus: Urtica
L., 1753
Species

See text. People with the surname Nettles include: Bonnie Nettles, co-founder of the Heavens Gate cult Damien Nettles, British missing teen Graig Nettles (born 1944), baseball player Jennifer Nettles (born 1974), American singer, member of country music duo Sugarland Jim Nettles (born 1947), former baseball player Jim Nettles (football player... Kerry Michelle Nettle (born 24 December 1973) is an Australian Senator for the Australian Greens in the state of New South Wales. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1434 × 1075 pixel, file size: 188 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Description: Urtica dioica - Brennnessel: Blüten Source: selbst fotographiert Date: 4. ... Binomial name L. The stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) is a herbaceous flowering plant, also known in the United States as 7-minute-itch, native to Europe, Asia, northern Africa, and North America, and is the best known member of the nettle genus Urtica. ... Scientific classification redirects here. ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... Classes Magnoliopsida - Dicots Liliopsida - Monocots The flowering plants or angiosperms are the most widespread group of land plants. ... Magnoliopsida is the botanical name for a class of flowering plants. ... Families Barbeyaceae Cannabaceae (hemp family) Dirachmaceae Elaeagnaceae Moraceae (mulberry family) Rosaceae (rose family) Rhamnaceae (buckthorn family) Ulmaceae (elm family) Urticaceae (nettle family) For the Philippine municipality, see Rosales, Pangasinan. ... Genera See text Urticaceae, or the nettle family, is a family of flowering plants in the order Rosales. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 13, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ...

detail of flowering stinging nettle
detail of flowering stinging nettle

Nettle is the common name for any of between 30-45 species of flowering plants of the genus Urtica in the family Urticaceae, with a cosmopolitan though mainly temperate distribution. They are mostly herbaceous perennial plants, but some are annual and a few are shrubby. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 975 KB) Urtica dioica, near Bruges, Belgium File links The following pages link to this file: Nettle Stinging nettle Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 975 KB) Urtica dioica, near Bruges, Belgium File links The following pages link to this file: Nettle Stinging nettle Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Binomial name L. The stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) is a herbaceous flowering plant, also known in the United States as 7-minute-itch, native to Europe, Asia, northern Africa, and North America, and is the best known member of the nettle genus Urtica. ... Classes Magnoliopsida - Dicots Liliopsida - Monocots The flowering plants or angiosperms are the most widespread group of land plants. ... Genera See text Urticaceae, or the nettle family, is a family of flowering plants in the order Rosales. ... A cosmopolitan distribution is a term applied to a biological category of living things meaning that this category can be found anywhere around the world. ... This article is about the plants used in cooking and medicine. ... Red Valerian, a perennial plant. ... Peas are an annual plant. ... A broom shrub in flower A shrub or bush is a horticultural rather than strictly botanical category of woody plant, distinguished from a tree by its multiple stems and lower height, usually less than 6 m tall. ...


The most prominent member of the genus is the stinging nettle Urtica dioica, native to Europe, north Africa, Asia, and North America. The genus also contains a number of other species with similar properties, listed below. However, a large number of species names that will be encountered in this genus in the older literature (about 100 species have been described) are now recognised as synonyms of Urtica dioica. Some of these taxa are still recognised as subspecies. For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... Binomial name L. The stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) is a herbaceous flowering plant, also known in the United States as 7-minute-itch, native to Europe, Asia, northern Africa, and North America, and is the best known member of the nettle genus Urtica. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... North American redirects here. ... In scientific nomenclature, synonyms are different scientific names used for a single taxon. ... A taxon (plural taxa) is an element of a taxonomy, e. ...


Most of the species listed below share the property of having stinging hairs, and can be expected to have very similar medicinal uses to the stinging nettle. The stings of Urtica ferox, the ongaonga or tree nettle of New Zealand, have been known to kill horses, dogs and at least one human.[1] Ongaonga, Urtica ferox, is a nettle that is endemic to New Zealand. ...


The nature of the toxin secreted by nettles is not settled. The stinging hairs of most nettle species contain formic acid, serotonin and histamine; however recent studies of Urtica thunbergiana (Fu et al, 2006) implicate oxalic acid and tartaric acid rather than any of those substances, at least in that species. Formic acid (systematically called methanoic acid) is the simplest carboxylic acid. ... For the professional wrestling stable, see Ravens Nest#Serotonin. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Oxalic acid (IUPAC name: ethanedioic acid, formula C2H2O4) is a dicarboxylic acid with structure (HOOC)-(COOH). ... Tartaric acid is a white crystalline organic acid. ...

Contents

Species of nettle

Species in the genus Urtica, and their primary natural ranges, include:

  • Urtica angustifolia Fisch. ex Hornem. 1819. China, Japan, Korea.
  • Urtica ardens. China.
  • Urtica atrichocaulis. Himalaya, southwestern China.
  • Urtica atrovirens. Western Mediterranean region.
  • Urtica cannabina L. 1753. Western Asia from Siberia to Iran.
  • Urtica chamaedryoides (heartleaf nettle). Southeastern North America.
  • Urtica dioica L. 1753 (stinging nettle or bull nettle). Europe, Asia, North America.
  • Urtica dubia (large-leaved nettle). Canada.
  • Urtica ferox (ongaonga or tree nettle). New Zealand.
  • Urtica fissa. China.
  • Urtica galeopsifolia Wierzb. ex Opiz, 1825. Central and eastern Europe.
  • Urtica gracilenta (mountain nettle). Arizona, New Mexico, west Texas, northern Mexico.
  • Urtica hyperborea. Himalaya from Pakistan to Bhutan, Mongolia and Tibet, high altitudes.
  • Urtica incisa (scrub nettle). Australia.
  • Urtica kioviensis Rogow. 1843. Eastern Europe.
  • Urtica laetivirens Maxim. 1877. Japan, Manchuria.
  • Urtica mairei. Himalaya, southwestern China, northeastern India, Myanmar.
  • Urtica membranacea. Mediterranean region, Azores.
  • Urtica morifolia. Canary Islands (endemic).
  • Urtica parviflora. Himalaya (lower altitudes).
  • Urtica pilulifera (Roman nettle). Southern Europe.
  • Urtica platyphylla Wedd. 1856-1857. China, Japan.
  • Urtica pubescens Ledeb. 1833. Southwestern Russia east to central Asia.
  • Urtica rupestris. Sicily (endemic).
  • Urtica sondenii (Simmons) Avrorin ex Geltman, 1988. Northeastern Europe, northern Asia.
  • Urtica taiwaniana. Taiwan.
  • Urtica thunbergiana. Japan, Taiwan.
  • Urtica triangularis
  • Urtica urens L. 1753 (dwarf nettle or annual nettle). Europe, North America.

The family Urticaceae also contains some other plants called nettles that are not members of the genus Urtica. These include the wood nettle Laportea canadensis, found in eastern North America from Nova Scotia to Florida, and the false nettle Boehmeria cylindrica, found in most of the United States east of the Rockies. As its name implies, the false nettle does not sting. This article is about the Korean civilization. ... Perspective view of the Himalaya and Mount Everest as seen from space looking south-south-east from over the Tibetan Plateau. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... This article is about Siberia as a whole. ... North American redirects here. ... Binomial name Urtica dioica L. The stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) is a herbaceous flowering plant native to Europe, Asia, northern Africa, and North America, and is the best known member of the nettle genus Urtica. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Ongaonga, Urtica ferox, is a nettle that is endemic to New Zealand. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Perspective view of the Himalaya and Mount Everest as seen from space looking south-south-east from over the Tibetan Plateau. ... This article is about historical/cultural Tibet. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Anthem Kaba Ma Kyei Capital Naypyidaw Largest city Yangon Official languages Burmese Demonym Burmese Government Military junta  -  Chairman of the State Peace and Development Council Than Shwe  -  Prime Minister Soe Win  -  Acting Prime Minister Thein Sein Establishment  -  Bagan 849–1287   -  Taungoo Dynasty 1486–1752   -  Konbaung Dynasty 1752–1885   -  Colonial rule... Motto (Portuguese for Rather die free than in peace subjugated) Anthem  (national)  (local) Capital Ponta Delgada1 Angra do Heroísmo2 Horta3 Largest city Ponta Delgada Official languages Portuguese Government Autonomous region  -  President Carlos César Establishment  -  Settled 1439   -  Autonomy 1976  Area  -  Total 2,333 km² (n/a) 911 sq mi... This article is about the islands in the Atlantic Ocean. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Binomial name L. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Urtica urens Urtica urens, commonly known as Dwarf Nettle or Small Nettle, is a herbaceous annual plant species of the genus Urtica. ... North American redirects here. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 11 Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Rocky Mountain National Park (photo courtesy of NPS) View of Colorado Rockies. ...


There are many unrelated organisms called nettle, such as:

Nettles are the exclusive larval food plant for several species of butterfly, such as the Peacock Butterfly[2] or the Small Tortoiseshell, and are also eaten by the larvae of some moths including Angle Shades, Buff Ermine, Dot Moth, The Flame, The Gothic, Grey Chi, Grey Pug, Lesser Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing, Mouse Moth, Setaceous Hebrew Character and Small Angle Shades. The roots are sometimes eaten by the larva of the Ghost Moth Hepialus humuli. Species About 50 species; see text Lamium (deadnettle) is a genus of about 40-50 species of flowering plants in the family Lamiaceae, of which family it is the type genus. ... Species About 50 species; see text Lamium (deadnettle) is a genus of about 40-50 species of flowering plants in the family Lamiaceae, of which family it is the type genus. ... Species About 300 species, including: Stachys affinis Stachys alopecuros Stachys alpina Stachys annua Stachys bullata Stachys byzantina Stachys candida Stachys chrysantha Stachys ciliata Stachys citrina Stachys coccinea Stachys corsica Stachys cretica Stachys discolor Stachys ehrenbergii Stachys germanica Stachys hyssopifolia Stachys iva Stachys lavandulifolia Stachys libanotica Stachys macrantha Stachys macrostachya Stachys... Species About 300 species, including: Stachys affinis Stachys alopecuros Stachys alpina Stachys annua Stachys bullata Stachys byzantina Stachys candida Stachys chrysantha Stachys ciliata Stachys citrina Stachys coccinea Stachys corsica Stachys cretica Stachys discolor Stachys ehrenbergii Stachys germanica Stachys hyssopifolia Stachys iva Stachys lavandulifolia Stachys libanotica Stachys macrantha Stachys macrostachya Stachys... Genera Many, see text Ref: Delta 2002-07-22 Lamiaceae, or the Mint family, is a family of plants in about 180 genera and some 3,500 species. ... “Mint” redirects here. ... Binomial name Achillea millefolium L. Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) is a flowering plant in the family Asteraceae, native to the Northern Hemisphere. ... Binomial name Solanum carolinense L. Carolina horsenettle (Solanum carolinense), also known as Bull nettle, Carolina horse nettle, Horse nettle, Apple of Sodom, Radical Weed, Sand Brier and, Tread-softly, is not a true nettle, but a member of the Solanaceae, or nightshade family. ... “Nightshade” redirects here. ... Binomial name Cnidoscolus stimulosus Spurge nettle (Cnidolscolus stimulosus), also known as Tread-softly, is a perennial herb covered with stinging hairs that is native to southeastern North America. ... Genera See text Ref: Euphorbiaceae in The Families of Flowering Plants, as of 2002-07-13 The Spurge family (Euphorbiaceae) is a large family of flowering plants with 280 genera and around 6000 species. ... Binomial name Chrysaora quinquecirrha (Desor, 1848) The stinging sea nettle (Chrysaora quinquecirrha) is a species of jellyfish occurring particularly in Atlantic estuaries. ... For other uses, see Jellyfish (disambiguation). ... A larval insect A larva (Latin; plural larvae) is a juvenile form of animal with indirect development, undergoing metamorphosis (for example, insects or amphibians). ... Superfamilies and families Superfamily Hedyloidea: Hedylidae Superfamily Hesperioidea: Hesperiidae Superfamily Papilionoidea: Papilionidae Pieridae Nymphalidae Lycaenidae Riodinidae A butterfly is an insect of the order Lepidoptera. ... Binomial name Inachis io (Linnaeus, 1758) The European peacock, or simply Peacock (Inachis io) is a well-known colourful butterfly, found in temperate Europe and Asia. ... Binomial name Nymphalis urticae (Linnaeus, 1758) The Small Tortoiseshell (Nymphalis urticae) is a well-known colourful butterfly, found in temperate Europe. ... For other uses, see Moths. ... Binomial name Phlogophora meticulosa Linnaeus, 1758 The Angle Shades (Phlogophora meticulosa) is a moth of the family Noctuidae. ... Binomial name Spilosoma luteum Hufnagel, 1766 The Buff Ermine (Spilosoma luteum) is a moth of the family Arctiidae. ... Binomial name Melanchra persicariae Linnaeus, 1761 The Dot Moth (Melanchra persicariae) is a moth of the family Noctuidae. ... Binomial name Axylia putris Linnaeus, 1761 The Flame (Axylia putris) is a moth of the family Noctuidae. ... Binomial name Naenia typica Linnaeus, 1758 The Gothic (Naenia typica) is a moth of the family Noctuidae. ... Binomial name Antitype chi Linnaeus, 1758 The Grey Chi (Antitype chi) is a moth of the family Noctuidae. ... Binomial name Eupithecia subfuscata Haworth, 1809 The Grey Pug (Eupithecia subfuscata) is a moth of the family Geometridae. ... Binomial name Noctua janthina Denis & Schiffermüller, 1775 The Lesser Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing (Noctua janthina) is a moth of the family Noctuidae. ... Binomial name Amphipyra tragopoginis Clerck, 1759 The Mouse Moth (Amphipyra tragopoginis) is a moth of the family Noctuidae. ... Binomial name Xestia c-nigrum Linnaeus, 1758 The Setaceous Hebrew Character (Xestia c-nigrum) is a moth of the family Noctuidae. ... Binomial name Euplexia lucipara Linnaeus, 1758 The Small Angle Shades (Euplexia lucipara) is a moth of the family Noctuidae. ... For other uses, see Root (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Hepialus humuli (Linnaeus, 1758) The Ghost Moth (Hepialus humuli), also known as the Ghost Swift, is a moth of the family Hepialidae. ...


Uses

A clump of fresh young nettles
A clump of fresh young nettles

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 241 KB) A surprisingly uniform and fresh clump of nettles (Urtica_dioica). ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 241 KB) A surprisingly uniform and fresh clump of nettles (Urtica_dioica). ...

Culinary

The tops of growing nettles can be prepared in a variety of ways, such as cooked greens, soup, or pesto. The tops or fresh or dried nettle leaves can also be infused to make a "tea"-like beverage.[3][4][5] An infusion is a beverage made by steeping a flavoring substance in hot or boiling water. ...


Medical

Nettle is believed to be a galactagogue[6] and a clinical trial has shown that the juice is diuretic in patients with congestive heart failure. A galactagogue is a substance, typically a herb, that increases lactation. ... This illustration shows where some types of diuretics act, and what they do. ... Congestive heart failure (CHF), also called congestive cardiac failure (CCF) or just heart failure, is a condition that can result from any structural or functional cardiac disorder that impairs the ability of the heart to fill with or pump a sufficient amount of blood throughout the body. ...


Urtication, or flogging with nettles, is the process of deliberately applying stinging nettles to the skin in order to provoke inflammation. An agent thus used is known as a rubefacient (i.e. something that causes redness). This is done as a folk remedy for rheumatism, as it provides temporary relief from pain. Urtication, or flogging with nettles, is the process of deliberately applying stinging nettles to the skin in order to provoke inflammation or rash. ... Herbal rubefacients are applied externally, causing dilation of the capillaries and an increase in blood circulation. ... A home remedy is a treatment or cure for a disease or other ailment that employs certain foods or other common household items. ... Rheumatism or Rheumatic disorder is a non-specific term for medical problems affecting the heart, bones, joints, kidney, skin and lung. ...


Extracts can be used to treat arthritis, anemia, hay fever, kidney problems, and pain. Nettle is used in hair shampoos to control dandruff, and is said to make hair more glossy, which is why some farmers include a handful of nettles with cattle feed.[7] Arthritis (from Greek arthro-, joint + -itis, inflammation; plural: arthritides) is a group of conditions where there is damage caused to the joints of the body. ... This article discusses the medical condition. ... For the play, see Hay Fever. ... The kidneys are the organs that filter wastes (such as urea) from the blood and excrete them, along with water, as urine. ...


Nettle root extracts have been extensively studied in human clinical trials as a treatment for symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). These extracts have been shown to help relieve symptoms compared to placebo both by themselves and when combined with other herbal medicines.[8] For other uses of the acronym BPH, see BPH (disambiguation). ...


Because it contains 3,4-divanillyltetrahydrofuran, certain extracts of the nettle are used by bodybuilders in an effort to increase free testosterone by occupying sex-hormone binding globulin.[citation needed] Testosterone is a steroid hormone from the androgen group. ... Globulin is one of the two types of serum proteins, the other being albumin. ...


Fresh nettle, specifically Urtica Dioica, is used in folk remedies to stop all types of bleeding, due to its high Vitamin K content. Meanwhile, in dry Urtica Dioica, the Vitamin K is practically non-existent, and so is used as a blood thinner. Vitamin K1 (phylloquinone). ...


Paper

Nettle stems are a popular raw material used in small-scale papermaking. For other uses, see Paper (disambiguation). ...


Textiles

Nettle fibre has been used in textiles. This is more experimental than mass-market. Unlike cotton, nettles grow easily without pesticides. The fibres are coarser however.[9]


In recent years a little german company Stoffkontor Franz AG starts again producing nettle textiles. In 2007 they used 200 t nettle straw.[10]


As well being the fibre, Nettles were also used as a dye-stuff in the medieval period.[citation needed] Look up dye in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Safety

Close-up detail of the stinging hairs.
Close-up detail of the stinging hairs.

Though the fresh leaves can cause painful stings and acute urticaria, these are rarely seriously harmful (but see remarks in the introductory section re the U. ferox, ongaonga or tree nettle of New Zealand). Otherwise most species of nettles are extremely safe and some are even eaten as vegetables after being steamed to remove the stingers. Image File history File links Emblem-contradict. ... Nettle, both stinging and non-stinging (sometimes called dead-nettles), have many folklore traditions associated with them. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 566 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 566 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Ongaonga, Urtica ferox, is a nettle that is endemic to New Zealand. ...


Nettles can be picked painlessly by wearing a standard pair of washing-up gloves. Another common recommendation is to firmly grasp the nettle with the bare hand, crushing the stingers instead of allowing them to penetrate the skin.[citation needed] Done properly, this is effective in practice, however due to a natural hesitancy when grabbing a nettle, first time practitioners close their hand too gently and slowly and so get stung. A traditional verse goes "Tenderly you stroke a Nettle, and it stings you for your pains. Grasp it like a man of mettle, and it soft as silk remains."


The traditional remedy for nettle stings is rubbing with the crushed leaf of the dock plant, Rumex obtusifolius, which often grows beside nettles in the wild and has a milky substance which can cause dermatitis. Plantain and Mallow are other traditional remedies. The alkalinity of the sap may counteract the nettle's acids. Nettle itself will release alkaline sap when macerated.[11] While there is no scientific proof that this remedy works, searching for and using a dock leaf at least takes the mind off the stinging pain somewhat. Though unproven, some claim that dabbing mud on the affected area, allowing it to dry, and rubbing it off can remove the stingers. Another disputed claim is that the spores of certain ferns can lessen the pain by rubbing the underside of fern leaves, where the sori are located, on the affected area. Species About 200, see text. ... Dermatitis is a blanket term literally meaning inflammation of the skin. It is usually used to refer to eczema, which is also known as Dermatitis eczema. ... Subgenus There are 5 subgenera in Plantago. ... Mallow is the common name of several closely related genera of plant in the family Malvaceae: Althaea – Marsh mallow Callirhoe – Poppy mallow Kosteletzkya – Seashore mallow Lavatera – Tree mallow or rose mallow Malacothamnus – Santa Cruz Island bush-mallow Malva – Mallow Malvaviscus – Turks cap mallow Sidalcea – Greek mallow Sphaeralcea – Globemallow Plants...


See also

Species About 50 species; see text Lamium (deadnettle) is a genus of about 40-50 species of flowering plants in the family Lamiaceae, of which family it is the type genus. ... Nettle, both stinging and non-stinging (sometimes called dead-nettles), have many folklore traditions associated with them. ... This article is considered orphaned, since there are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...

Similar plants

There are further plants, showing similar effects [1]

  • Dumb cane (Dieffenbachia spp. )
  • Cowhage (Mucuna pruriens)
  • Bull Nettle (Cnidoscolus stimulosus )
  • Ciega-vista (Croton ciliato-glandulosus )
  • Stinging Spurge (Jatropha urens L.)
  • Noseburn (Tragia spp. )
  • Giant stinging tree (Dendrocnide excelsa)
  • Gympie (Dendrocnide moroides )
  • Nilgiri Nettle (Girardinia leschenaultiana )
  • Wood Nettle (Laportea canadensis )
  • Tree Nettle (Laportea spp. )
  • Nettle Tree (Urera baccifera )

Dieffenbachia is a genus of tropical monocots with patterned leaves. ... Binomial name Mucuna pruriens (L.) DC. Mucuna pruriens (syn. ... Binomial name Cnidoscolus stimulosus (Michx. ... Species About 100, see text Synonyms Agirta Baill. ... Binomial name Dendrocnide moroides (Wedd. ...

External links and references

Download high resolution version (1468x2360, 1019 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1468x2360, 1019 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

References

  1. ^ Connor, H.E. (1977). The Poisonous Plants in New Zealand. New Zealand Department of Scientific and Industrial Research Bulletin 99. ISSN 0077-916X
  2. ^ Heiko Bellmann: Der Neue Kosmos Schmetterlingsführer, Schmetterlinge, Raupen und Futterpflanzen, pg. 170, Frankh-Kosmos Verlags-GmbH & Co, Stuttgart 2003, ISBN 3-440-09330-1
  3. ^ Nettle soup
  4. ^ Gnocchi with Stinging Nettle Pesto
  5. ^ Nettle "Tea"
  6. ^ Westfall R.E., Galactagogue herbs: a qualitative study and review. Canadian Journal of Midwifery Research and Practice. 2(2):22-27. (2003)
  7. ^ Balch, Phyllis A., CNC, Balch, James F., M.D., Prescription for Nutritional Healing, Avery Press, p. 104 (2000) (ISBN 1-58333-077-1)
  8. ^ Lopatkin N, Sivkov A, Walther C, Schlafke S, Medvedev A, Avdeichuk J, Golubev G, Melnik K, Elenberger N, Engelmann U. Long-term efficacy and safety of a combination of sabal and urtica extract for lower urinary tract symptoms: a placebo-controlled, double-blind, multi-center trial. World Journal of Urology. 2005 June 1
  9. ^ BBC NEWS | UK | England | Leicestershire | Student shows off nettle knickers
  10. ^ http://www.nettleworld.com/
  11. ^ Holden, Margaret (1948). An alkali-producing mechanism in macerated leaves. Biochemical Journal 42 (3): 332–336. Retrieved on September 25, 2006. 
  • Anderberg, Kirsten (2005). Folk uses and history of medicinal uses of nettles. Nettles, Nettles, Everywhere
  • Chrubasik S, Enderlein W, Bauer R, Grabner W. (1997). Evidence for the antirheumatic effectiveness of herba Urticae dioicae in acute arthritis: A pilot study. Phytomedicine 4: 105-108.
  • Dathe G, Schmid H. (1987). Phytotherapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH): Double-blind study with extract of root of urtica (ERU). Urologe B 27: 223-226 [in German].
  • Fu H Y, Chen S J, Chen R F, Ding W H, Kuo-Huang L L, Huang R N (2006). Identification of oxalic acid and tartaric acid as major persistent pain-inducing toxins in the stinging hairs of the nettle, Urtica thunbergiana. Annals of Botany (London), 98:57-65. Abstract
  • Holden, Margaret (1948). An alkali-producing mechanism in macerated leaves. Biochemical Journal 42 (3): 332–336. Retrieved on September 25, 2006. 
  • Kirchhoff HW. (1983). Brennesselsaft als Diuretikum. Z. Phytother. 4: 621-626 [in German].
  • Krzeski T, Kazón M, Borkowski A, et al. (1993). Combined extracts of Urtica dioica and Pygeum africanum in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: double-blind comparison of two doses. Clinical Therapy 15 (6): 1011-1020.
  • Mittman, P. (1990). Randomized, double-blind study of freeze-dried Urtica dioica in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Planta Med 56: 44-47.
  • Randall C, Randall H, Dobbs F, et al. (2000). Randomized controlled trial of nettle sting for treatment of base-of-thumb pain. J. Roy. Soc. Med. 93: 305-309. reported online in British Medical Journal
  • Yarnell E. (1998). Stinging nettle: A modern view of an ancient healing plant. Alt. Compl. Therapy 4: 180-186 (review).
  • Healthy Life Magazine, Inc. (June 2007) p.78


  Results from FactBites:
 
botanical.com - A Modern Herbal | Nettles - Herb Profile and Information (5457 words)
Nettle is anti-asthmatic: the juice of the roots or leaves, mixed with honey or sugar, will relieve bronchial and asthmatic troubles and the dried leaves, burnt and inhaled, will have the same effect.
Nettles were much used as a substitute for fodder during the war, and instructions for their use were laid down by German military authorities.
Nettles are increasing all over the country, and for the benefit of those who desire their eradication, the Royal Horticultural Society, in their Diary for 1926, informed their members that if Nettles are cut down three times in three consecutive years, they will disappear.
Nettle - LoveToKnow 1911 (381 words)
Nettle tops, or the very young shoots of the nettle, may be used as a vegetable like spinach; but from the abundance of crystals (cystoliths) they contain they are apt to be gritty, though esteemed for their antiscorbutic properties, which they do not possess in any exceptional degree.
From their general presence in the neighbourhood of houses, or in spots where house refuse is deposited, it has been suggested that the nettles are not really natives, a supposition that to some extent receives countenance from the circumstance that the young shoots are very sensitive to frost.
The trailing subterranean root-stock renders the common nettle somewhat difficult of extirpation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m