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Encyclopedia > Netscape Navigator
Netscape Navigator

Netscape Navigator 4.08 under Windows
Maintainer: Netscape Communications Corporation
Stable release: 4.08  (November 9, 1998) [+/-]
Preview release: none  (n/a) [+/-]
OS: Cross-platform
Use: Web browser
Website: No longer available

Netscape Navigator, also known as Netscape, was a proprietary web browser that was popular during the 1990s. Once the flagship product of Netscape Communications Corporation and the dominant browser in usage share, its user base had almost completely evaporated by 2002, partly due to the inclusion of Microsoft's Internet Explorer web browser with the Windows operating system, but also due to lack of significant innovation after the late 1990s. Netscape's demise was a central component of Microsoft's antitrust trial, where the court ruled that (among other things) bundling Internet Explorer with Windows was an illegal monopolistic business practice. The classic Netscape logo This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... screenshot of Netscape Navigator 4 This is a screenshot of copyrighted computer software. ... In software engineering, software maintenance is the process of enhancing and optimizing deployed software (software release), as well as remedying defects. ... Netscape Communications Corporation was the publisher of the Netscape Navigator web browser as well as many other internet and intranet client and server software products. ... A software release refers to the creation and availability of a new version of a computer software product. ... November 9 is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... A software release refers to the creation and availability of a new version of a computer software product. ... An operating system (OS) is a set of computer programs that manage the hardware and software resources of a computer. ... A cross-platform (or platform independent) programming language, software application or hardware device works on more than one system platform (e. ... An example of a web browser (Internet Explorer), displaying the English Wikipedia main page. ... A website (alternatively, Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on a Web server, usually accessible via the Internet or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML, that is almost always accessible via HTTP, a... Proprietary software is software with restrictions on using, copying and modifying as enforced by the proprietor. ... An example of a web browser (Internet Explorer), displaying the English Wikipedia main page. ... A flagship is the ship used by the commanding officer of a group of naval ships. ... Netscape Communications Corporation was the publisher of the Netscape Navigator web browser as well as many other internet and intranet client and server software products. ... A rough estimation of usage share of layout engines/web browsers Usage share, in web browser statistics, is the percentage of visitors to a group of web sites that use a particular browser. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... Windows Internet Explorer (formerly Microsoft Internet Explorer), and commonly abbreviated to IE, is a series of proprietary graphical web browsers developed by Microsoft and included as part of the Microsoft Windows line of operating systems starting in 1995. ... Microsoft Windows is the name of several families of proprietary software operating systems by Microsoft. ... An operating system (OS) is a set of computer programs that manage the hardware and software resources of a computer. ... United States v. ... A monopoly (from the Greek language monos, one + polein, to sell) is defined as a persistent market situation where there is only one provider of a product or service, in other words a firm that has no competitors in its industry. ...


The Navigator browser was superseded by the Netscape Communicator internet suite, followed by later releases Netscape 6, Netscape 7 and the most recent, Netscape Browser 8. Netscape Communicator was a proprietary Internet suite produced by Netscape Communications Corporation. ... Internet suite - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Netscape 6 was the name of Netscape Communications Corporations proprietary cross-platform internet suite from versions 6. ... The logo of Netscape Navigator, as well as of Netscape Communications Corporation. ... Netscape Browser is the name of a proprietary Windows web browser published by AOL, but developed by Mercurial Communications. ...


However it was confirmed on 1 May 2007 the Netscape Navigator name would once again be re-generated in the next release of Netscape's browser, to be known as Netscape Navigator 9. [1] May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Also see Netscape (web browser) Netscape Navigator 9 is an upcoming release of the Netscape series of browsers produced by Netscape and published by its parent, AOL, first announced on 23 January 2007. ...

Contents

History and development

The Creation

One of the central figures in the Netscape story is Marc Andreessen, cofounder of Netscape Communications Corporation and co-author of Mosaic at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. Plaque commemorating the creation of Mosaic web browser by Bina and Andreessen, new NCSA building, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. ... Netscape Communications Corporation was the publisher of the Netscape Navigator web browser as well as many other internet and intranet client and server software products. ... Mosaic was the first popular World Wide Web browser and Gopher client. ... National Center for Supercomputing Applications NCSA Building, 1205 W. Clark St. ...


After his graduation from Illinois in 1993, Andreessen moved to California to work at Enterprise Integration Technologies. Andreessen then met with Jim Clark, the recently-departed founder of Silicon Graphics. Clark believed that the Mosaic browser had great commercial possibilities and provided the seed money. Soon Mosaic Communications Corporation was in business in Mountain View, California, with Andreessen appointed as a vice-president. The University of Illinois was unhappy with the company's use of the Mosaic name, so "Mosaic Communications Corporation" changed its name to Netscape Communications (thought up by sales representative Greg Sands) and its flagship web browser was the Netscape Navigator. Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Dr. James H. Clark (born 1944) is a prolific entrepreneur and former computer scientist. ... Silicon Graphics, Inc. ... Netscape Communications Corporation was the publisher of the Netscape Navigator web browser as well as many other internet and intranet client and server software products. ... For the community near Martinez, California, see Mountain View, Contra Costa County, California. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), is the largest campus in the University of Illinois system. ...

Mosaic Netscape 0.9, a pre-1.0 version, running on Windows. Note the image of the Mozilla mascot, and the Mosaic logo in the top-right corner.

Beta versions of the web browser were freely downloadable in mid- to late-1994, and version 1.0 of the browser was released by the end of the year. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x742, 103 KB)Mosaic NetScape 0. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x742, 103 KB)Mosaic NetScape 0. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ...


The first few releases of the product were made available in "commercial" and "evaluation" versions; for example, version "1.0" and version "1.0N". The "N" evaluation versions were completely identical to the commercial versions; the letter was there to remind people to pay for the browser once they felt they had tried it long enough and were satisfied with it. This distinction was formally dropped within a year of the initial release, and the full version of the browser continued to be made available for free online, with boxed versions available on floppy disks (and later CDs) in stores along with a period of phone support. Email support was initially free, and remained so for a year or two until the volume of support requests grew too high.


During development, the Netscape browser was known by the code name Mozilla, which became the name of a Godzilla-like cartoon dragon mascot used prominently on the company's web site. The Mozilla name was also used as the User-Agent in HTTP requests by the browser. Other web browsers claimed to be compatible with Netscape's extensions to HTML, and therefore used the same name in their User-Agent identifiers so that web servers would send them the same pages as were sent to Netscape browsers. A competitor's unauthorized use of a trademarked name could have been grounds for a lawsuit, but that possibility was left unexplored. Mozilla is now a generic name for matters related to the open source successor to Netscape Communicator. Mozilla was the mascot of the now disbanded Netscape Communications Corporation. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A user agent is the client application used with a particular network protocol; the phrase is most commonly used in reference to those which access the World Wide Web. ... HTTP (for HyperText Transfer Protocol) is the primary method used to convey information on the World Wide Web. ... Mozilla was the official, public, original name of Mozilla Application Suite by the Mozilla Foundation, nowadays called SeaMonkey suite. ... Open source refers to projects that are open to the public and which draw on other projects that are freely available to the general public. ...


The Rise of Netscape

Netscape Navigator 1.22
Netscape Navigator 1.22

When the consumer Internet revolution arrived in the mid-to-late 1990s, Netscape was well positioned to take advantage of it. With a good mix of features and an attractive licensing scheme that allowed free use for non-commercial purposes, the Netscape browser soon became the de facto standard, particularly on the Windows platform. Internet service providers and computer magazine publishers helped make Navigator readily available. Netscape navigator 1. ... Netscape navigator 1. ... A software license is a legal agreement which may take the form of a proprietary or gratuitous license as well as a memorandum of contract between a producer and a user of computer software. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... Microsoft Windows is the name of several families of proprietary software operating systems by Microsoft. ... “ISP” redirects here. ...


An important innovation that Netscape introduced in 1994 was the on-the-fly display of webpages, where text and graphics appeared on the screen as the web page downloaded. Earlier web browsers would not display a page until all graphics on it had been loaded over the network connection; this made a user often have to stare at a blank page for as long as several minutes. With Netscape, people using dial-up connections could begin reading the text of a webpage within seconds of entering a web address, even before the rest of the text and graphics had finished downloading. This made the web much more tolerable to the average user. 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Dial-up access is a form of Internet access through which the client uses a modem connected to a computer and a telephone line to dial into an Internet service providers (ISP) node to establish a modem-to-modem link, which is then routed to the Internet. ...

Netscape Navigator 2.02
Netscape Navigator 2.02

Through the late 1990s, Netscape made sure that Navigator remained the technical leader among web browsers. Important new features included cookies, frames, and JavaScript (in version 2.0). Although those and other innovations eventually became open standards of the W3C and ECMA and were emulated by other browsers, they were often viewed as controversial. Netscape, according to critics, was more interested in bending the web to its own de facto "standards" (bypassing standards committees and thus marginalizing the commercial competition) than it was in fixing bugs in its products. Consumer rights advocates were particularly critical of cookies and of commercial web sites using them to invade individual privacy. Image File history File links Netscape_2. ... Image File history File links Netscape_2. ... HTTP cookies, sometimes known as web cookies or just cookies, are parcels of text sent by a server to a web browser and then sent back unchanged by the browser each time it accesses that server. ... This article is about HTML elements. ... JavaScript is a scripting language most often used for client-side web development. ... The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is a consortium that produces standards—recommendations, as they call them—for the World Wide Web. ... Ecma International - European association for standardising information and communication systems came into existence in 1994, when the European Computer Manufacturers Association (ECMA) changed its name in order to reflect the international activities of the organisation (the long form of ECMA was dropped then, and capitalization changed to reflect this). ... WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (or the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents accessed via the Internet. ...


In the marketplace, however, these concerns made little difference. Netscape Navigator remained the market leader with more than 50% usage share. The browser software was available for a wide range of operating systems, including Windows (3.1, 95, 98, NT), Macintosh, Linux, OS/2, and many versions of Unix including DEC, Sun Solaris, BSDI, IRIX, AIX, and HP-UX, and looked and worked nearly identically on every one of them. Netscape began to experiment with prototypes of a web-based system, known internally as "Constellation", which would allow a user to access and edit his files anywhere across a network no matter what computer or operating system he happened to be using. A rough estimation of usage share of layout engines/web browsers The article aims to be an unbiased historial record for the usage share of web browsers (but ideally layout engines, as it is what matters), based on statistics and articles published by well-known websites. ... An operating system (OS) is a set of computer programs that manage the hardware and software resources of a computer. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Windows 95 is a consumer-oriented graphical user interface-based operating system. ... Windows 98 (codenamed Memphis) is a graphical operating system released on June 25, 1998 by Microsoft and the successor to Windows 95. ... Windows NT is a family of operating systems produced by Microsoft, the first version of which was released in July 1993. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ... It has been suggested that Criticism of Linux be merged into this article or section. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The DEC logo Digital Equipment Corporation was a pioneering American company in the computer industry. ... Solaris is a computer operating system developed by Sun Microsystems. ... Berkely Software Design Inc. ... IRIX is a computer operating system developed by Silicon Graphics, Inc. ... AIX (Advanced Interactive eXecutive) is a proprietary operating system developed by IBM based on UNIX System V. Before the product was ever marketed, the acronym AIX originally stood for Advanced IBM UNIX. The scalable AIX 5L 5. ... HP-UX (Hewlett Packard UniX) is Hewlett-Packards proprietary implementation of the Unix operating system, based on System V (initially System III). ...


Industry observers confidently forecast the dawn of a new era of connected computing. The underlying operating system, it was believed, would become an unimportant consideration; future applications would run within a web browser. This was seen by Netscape as a clear opportunity to entrench Navigator at the heart of the next generation of computing, and thus gain the opportunity to expand into all manner of other software and service markets. An operating system (OS) is a set of computer programs that manage the hardware and software resources of a computer. ...


Fall of Netscape

Usage share of Netscape Navigator, 1994–2007
Usage share of Netscape Navigator, 19942007

Microsoft saw Netscape's success as a clear threat to the dominant status of the Microsoft Windows operating system. It began a wide-reaching campaign to establish control over the browser market. Browser market share, it was reasoned, leads to control over internet standards, and that in turn would provide the opportunity to sell software and services. Microsoft licensed the Mosaic source code from Spyglass, Inc., an offshoot of the University of Illinois, and turned it into Internet Explorer. Image File history File links Netscape-navigator-usage-data. ... Image File history File links Netscape-navigator-usage-data. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Windows Internet Explorer (formerly Microsoft Internet Explorer), and commonly abbreviated to IE, is a series of proprietary graphical web browsers developed by Microsoft and included as part of the Microsoft Windows line of operating systems starting in 1995. ...


The resulting battle between the two companies became known as the browser wars. Versions 1.0 and 2.0 of IE were vastly inferior in almost every way to contemporary versions of Netscape Navigator; IE 3.0 (1996) began to catch up to its competition; IE 4.0 (1997) was the first version that looked to have Netscape beaten, and IE 5.0 (1998) with many bug fixes and stability improvements saw Navigator's marketshare plummet below IE for the first time. A rough estimation of the usage share of major web browsers by layout engines over time. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...

Netscape 3.04 under Windows XP

Netscape Navigator 3.0 came in two versions, Standard Edition and Gold Edition. The latter consisted of the Navigator browser with mail and news readers and a web page WYSIWYG composition tool integrated into it. The extra functionality only made the software program larger, slower, and more prone to crashes, and the decision to integrate all these features together was widely criticized. But this integrated version became the only version when it was renamed Netscape Communicator in version 4.0; the product's name change (Netscape CEO Jim Barksdale insisted that Communicator was a general-purpose client application which contained the Navigator browser) diluted its name recognition and confused users. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 578 pixelsFull resolution (1021 × 738 pixel, file size: 103 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Netscape 3 viewing Wikipedias home page, running under Windows XP. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 578 pixelsFull resolution (1021 × 738 pixel, file size: 103 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Netscape 3 viewing Wikipedias home page, running under Windows XP. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev... WYSIWYG (IPA Pronunciation [] or []), is an acronym for What You See Is What You Get, used in computing to describe a system in which content during editing appears very similar to the final product. ... Jim Barksdale was the president and CEO of Netscape Communications Corporation from January 1995 until the company merged with AOL in March 1999. ...

Netscape Navigator 4.77 under Mac OS

The ageing Communicator 4.x code could not keep up with Internet Explorer 5.0. Typical web pages had become graphics-heavy, often JavaScript-intensive, and were constructed with increasingly complex HTML code that used features designed for specific narrow purposes but redeployed them as global layout tools (in particular this applied to HTML tables, which Communicator struggled to render). The Netscape browser, once regarded as a reasonably solid product, came to be seen as crash-prone and buggy. It didn't help that some versions of it tended to re-download an entire web page to re-render it when the browser window was resized, a considerable nuisance to dial-up users, and would usually crash when the page contained anything but the most simple Cascading Style Sheets. In addition, the browser's somewhat dated-looking interface didn't have the modern appearance of Internet Explorer. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (982x768, 70 KB)Main page in Netscape 4. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (982x768, 70 KB)Main page in Netscape 4. ... JavaScript is a scripting language most often used for client-side web development. ... A crash in computing is a condition where a program (either an application or part of the operating system) stops performing its expected function and also stops responding to other parts of the system. ... A computer bug is an error, flaw, mistake, failure, or fault in a computer program that prevents it from working as intended, or produces an incorrect result. ... In computing, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), sometimes pronounced kiss, is a stylesheet language used to describe the presentation of a document written in a markup language. ...


By the end of the decade, Netscape's web browser had unquestionably lost its former dominance on the Windows platform. Even on other platforms it was threatened, both by the gradual rise of open source browsers and by the August 1997 agreement that resulted in an investment of $150,000,000 by Microsoft in Apple, which included a requirement that Apple switch the default browser in new installations of Mac OS from Netscape to Internet Explorer. Of greatest significance, though, was Microsoft's massive and ultimately successful campaign to get ISPs and PC vendors to distribute Internet Explorer to their customers instead of Netscape. This was helped in part by Microsoft's investment in making IE brandable, such that it was a quick operation to create a customized version of IE. Also, web developers increasingly used proprietary, browser-specific extensions in the web pages they wrote. Both Microsoft and Netscape were guilty of this behavior, having added substantial proprietary HTML tags of their own into their browsers, the result of which was that users were forced to choose between two competing, almost entirely incompatible web browsers. 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Apple Inc. ... “ISP” redirects here. ... Brandable software is typically software created by one company for the purpose of allowing other companies to obtain resell rights to the software, change the Brand associated with it, and sell it as if it were their own. ... Proprietary software is software with restrictions on using, copying and modifying as enforced by the proprietor. ...


In March 1998, Netscape released most of the code base for Communicator under an open source license. The product named Netscape 5, which was intended to be the result, was never released, as managers decided that the poor quality of Netscape's code made a complete rewrite their only viable option. This product, taking growing contributions from the open-source community, was dubbed Mozilla, once the codename of the original Netscape Navigator. Netscape programmers gave Mozilla a different GUI and released it as Netscape 6 and later Netscape 7. After a lengthy public beta, Mozilla 1.0 was released on June 5, 2002. The same code base, most notably the Gecko layout engine, became the basis of several standalone applications, including Firefox and Thunderbird. Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The code base of a computer program is the source code that implements a programs core functionality. ... An open-source license is a copyright license for computer software that makes the source code available under terms that allow for modification and royalty-free redistribution. ... The Mozilla Application Suite (originally known as Mozilla, marketed as the Mozilla Suite, and code named Seamonkey) is a free, cross-platform internet suite, whose components include a web browser, an e-mail and news client, an HTML editor, and an IRC client. ... June 5 is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Epiphany using Gecko to render the Wikipedia main page Gecko is the open source, free software web browser layout engine used in all Mozilla-branded software and its derivatives, including later Netscape releases. ... A layout engine, or rendering engine, is a software that takes web content (such as HTML, XML, image files, etc) and formatting information (such as CSS, XSL, etc) and displays the formatted content on the screen. ... Mozilla Firefox is a graphical web browser developed by the Mozilla Corporation and a large community of external contributors. ... Mozilla Thunderbird is a free, cross-platform e-mail and news client developed by the Mozilla Foundation. ...


These products, however, suffered from a protracted development process that took several years to provide results, in the meantime America Online had bought out Netscape and released Netscape 6 off of a pre-beta quality build of the open source Mozilla browser, as a result, many users continued to migrate to Internet Explorer, and the Netscape browser itself has largely been abandoned. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...


Alternate Theories on the Fall of Netscape

Some believe that the fall of Netscape had nothing to do with IE. Rather, it was caused by the decision to completely rewrite Navigator from the ground up. This took them roughly three years, during which time they were unable to make any enhancements to the product. When Navigator 6 was finally released, it was so buggy that many users refused to switch from the older version 4.


In response to an article challenging Netscape's decision to rewrite Navigator, Lou Montulli, one of the founding engineers of Netscape, wrote:

I agree completely, it's one of the major reasons I resigned from Netscape. In 1998, after wasting a year working, a group of new but experienced programmers, and one of our misguided founders, decided it was a good idea to rewrite everything. I had alot of vested interest since I had done most of the original design work on Navigator, but I was unable to supply enough visions of doom to divert the effort. The original design had degenerated substantially due to the integration of Java and the rapid pace of zig zag development that went on over the course of 4 years. There was good reason for a large change, but rewriting everything was a bit overboard to say the least. I laughed heartily as I got questions from one of my former employees about FTP code that he was rewriting. It had taken 3 years of tuning to get code that could read the 60 different types of FTP servers, those 5000 lines of code may have looked ugly, but at least they worked.

Release history

Netscape Navigator version 2.0
  • Mosaic Netscape 0.9 – October 13, 1994
  • Netscape Navigator 1.0 – December 15, 1994
  • Netscape Navigator 1.1 – March 1995
  • Netscape Navigator 1.22 – August 1995
  • Netscape Navigator 2.0 – March 1996 [1], [2]
  • Netscape Navigator 2.01
  • Netscape Navigator 2.02
  • Netscape Navigator 3.0 – August 19, 1996
  • Netscape Navigator 3.01
  • Netscape Navigator 3.02
  • Netscape Navigator 3.03
  • Netscape Navigator 3.04 – October 4, 1997
  • Netscape Navigator 4.0 – June 1997
  • Netscape Navigator 4.01
  • Netscape Navigator 4.02
  • Netscape Navigator 4.03
  • Netscape Navigator 4.04
  • Netscape Navigator 4.05
  • Netscape Navigator 4.06 – August 17, 1998
  • Netscape Navigator 4.07
  • Netscape Navigator 4.08 – November 9, 1998 (Last release for 16-bit Windows and 68k Macintoshes)

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1640x2048, 2936 KB) Description The Netscape Navigator version 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1640x2048, 2936 KB) Description The Netscape Navigator version 2. ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 17 is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... November 9 is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Windows 3. ...

Criticism

Netscape Navigator has mostly been criticized for implementing non-standard HTML markup extensions such as the BLINK tag, which is sometimes referred to as a symbol for Netscape's urge to develop extensions not standardized by the W3C, and even mentioned in the fictional Book of Mozilla. Netscape has also been criticized for following actual web standards poorly, often lagging behind or supporting them very poorly or even incorrectly. This criticism wasn't very loud during the days of its popularity as web designers then often simply developed for Netscape Navigator, but came to be an increasing annoyance to web designers who wish to provide backward compatibility, most often with Netscape Navigator 4 and Netscape Communicator, to their web sites. Today, many web masters simply do not choose to support these old versions, due to their poor and invalid web standard implementations. The Blink tag is a non-standard HTML markup element type, whose function serves to cause text onscreen to blink. ... The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is a consortium that produces standards—recommendations, as they call them—for the World Wide Web. ... The Book of Mozilla is a well-known computer Easter egg found in the Netscape and Mozilla series of web browsers. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


However, Netscape's own contributions to the web of this sort hasn't always been of frustration to web developers. JavaScript (which has little to do with Java) was for example submitted as a new standard to Ecma International, resulting in the ECMAScript specification. This move allowed it to be more easily supported by multiple web browsers and is today an established cross-browser scripting language, long after Netscape Navigator itself has dropped in popularity. Another example is the FRAME tag, that is also widely supported today, and even ended up becoming incorporated into official web standards such as the "HTML 4.01 Frameset" specification. JavaScript is a scripting language most often used for client-side web development. ... Java is an object-oriented applications programming language developed by Sun Microsystems in the early 1990s. ... Ecma International is an international membership-based standards organization for information and communication systems. ... ECMAScript is a scripting programming language, standardized by Ecma International in the ECMA-262 specification. ...


See also

Netscape Communications Corporation (commonly known as Netscape), was an American computer services company, best known for its web browser. ... Mosaic was the first popular World Wide Web browser and Gopher client. ... Mozilla was the official, public, original name of Mozilla Application Suite by the Mozilla Foundation, nowadays called SeaMonkey suite. ... The following is a list of web browsers. ... The following tables compare general and technical information for a number of web browsers. ... The following table chronicles the major relase dates for the most popular browsers. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Netscape Navigator - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1943 words)
Netscape Navigator, also known as Netscape, was a proprietary web browser that was popular during the 1990s.
Netscape, according to critics, was more interested in bending the web to its own de facto "standards" (bypassing standards committees and thus marginalizing the commercial competition) than it was in fixing bugs in its products.
Netscape Navigator has mostly been criticized for implementing non-standard HTML markup extensions such as the BLINK tag, which is sometimes referred to as a symbol for Netscape's urge to develop extensions not standardized by the W3C, and even mentioned in the fictional Book of Mozilla.
Netscape - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1532 words)
The first beta release versions of the browser were released in 1994 and known as Mosaic and then Mosaic Netscape until a legal challenge from the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (makers of NCSA Mosaic), which many of Netscape's founders used to develop, led to the name change to Netscape Navigator.
Netscape 4 addressed the problem of Netscape Navigator being used as both the name of the suite and the browser contained within it by renaming the suite to Netscape Communicator.
Netscape 7.0 (based on Mozilla 1.0.1) was released in August 2002 was a direct continuation of Netscape 6 with very similar components.
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