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Encyclopedia > Nestorius
Nestorius - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Nestorius

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Nestorius (c.386 - c.451) was Patriarch of Constantinople (April 10, 428 - June 22, 431). He received his clerical training as a pupil of Theodore of Mopsuestia in Antioch and gained a reputation for his sermons that led to his enthronement by Theodosius II as Patriarch following the death of Sisinius I in 428 C.E.. For the processor, see Intel 80386. ... For other uses, see number 451. ... The Patriarch of Constantinople is the Ecumenical Patriarch, the first among equals in the Eastern Orthodox communion. ... April 10 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Events April 10 - Nestorius is made Patriarch of Constantinople. ... June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 192 days remaining. ... Events June - Council of Ephesus: Nestorianism is rejected, the Nicene creed is declared to be complete. ... Theodore (c. ... The city of Antioch-on-the-Orontes (modern Antakya; Greek Αντιόχεια) is located in what is now Turkey. ... Theodosius II Flavius Theodosius II (April, 401 - July 28, 450 ). The eldest son of Eudoxia and Arcadius who at the age of 7 became the Roman Emperor of the East. ... Sisinnius (d. ...


Nestorius is considered to be the originator of the Christological heresy known as Nestorianism, which emerged when he began preaching against the new title Theotokos or Mother of God, beginning to be used of the Virgin Mary. His immediate antagonist was Cyril, bishop of Alexandria. Alongside the Christological debate, other factors were to come into play in the crisis that swiftly arose. These included a political struggle between the supporters of the See of Alexandria and the See of Antioch, the influence of the Emperor over the See of Constantinople, and the patriarchal primacy of the Pope. Christology is that part of Christian theology that studies and defines who Jesus the Christ was and is. ... The term Nestorianism is eponymous, even though the person who lent his name to it always denied the associated belief. ... Russian Orthodox Icon of the Theotokos Theotokos is a Greek word that means God-bearer or Mother of God. It is a title assigned by the early Christian Church to Mary, the mother of Jesus, at the Third Ecumenical Council held at Ephesus in 431. ... The term Virgin Mary has several different meanings: For the historical and multi-denominational concept of Mary, see Mary, the mother of Jesus. ... Cyril I (376 – June 27, 444), surnamed The Pillar of Faith, was Pope of Alexandria. ... Antiquity and modernity stand cheek-by-jowl in Egypts chief Mediterranean seaport Located on the Mediterranean Sea coast, Alexandria (in Arabic, الإسكندرية, transliterated al-ʼIskandariyyah) is the chief seaport in Egypt, and that countrys second largest city, and the capital of the Al Iskandariyah governate. ...


The theological debate centered on the use of the title of "mother of God" (Theotokos) for the Virgin Mary, which Nestorius did not recognize, preferring in his sermons, "mother of Christ" (Christotokos), on the grounds that the former title compromised Jesus' divinity. His views were opposed by Cyril who argued that Nestorius was actually denying the reality of the incarnation by making Jesus Christ into two different persons, (one human, one divine), sharing one body. A fuller discussion is as Nestorianism. Russian Orthodox Icon of the Theotokos Theotokos is a Greek word that means God-bearer or Mother of God. It is a title assigned by the early Christian Church to Mary, the mother of Jesus, at the Third Ecumenical Council held at Ephesus in 431. ... Gabriel delivering the Annunciation to Mary. ... Jesus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Incarnation, which literally means enfleshment, refers to the conception, and live birth of a sentient creature (generally human) who is the material manifestation of an entity or force whose original nature is immaterial. ... The term Nestorianism is eponymous, even though the person who lent his name to it always denied the associated belief. ...


The Emperor Theodosius II (401-450), was eventually induced to convoke a general church council, sited at Ephesus, which was a special seat for the veneration of Mary, where the theotokos formula was popular. The Emperor gave his support to the Patriarch of Constantinople, while Pope Celestine I was in agreement with Cyril. Cyril took charge of the Council of Ephesus in (431), opening debate before the long-overdue contingent from Antioch could arrive. The council deposed Nestorius and labelled him a heretic. In Nestorius' own words, Theodosius II Flavius Theodosius II (April, 401 - July 28, 450 ). The eldest son of Eudoxia and Arcadius who at the age of 7 became the Roman Emperor of the East. ... // Events Pope Innocent I succeeds Pope Anastasius I. The Vandals start their westward trek from Dacia and Hungary (or 400). ... Events August 25 - Marcian proclaimed Eastern Roman Emperor by Aspar and Pulcheria. ... Saint Celestine I was pope from 422 to 432. ... The Council of Ephesus was held in Ephesus, Asia Minor in 431 under Emperor Theodosius II, grandson of Theodosius the Great. ... Events June - Council of Ephesus: Nestorianism is rejected, the Nicene creed is declared to be complete. ... Heresy, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is a theological or religious opinion or doctrine maintained in opposition, or held to be contrary, to the ‘catholic’ or orthodox doctrine of the Christian Church, or, by extension, to that of any church, creed, or religious system, considered as orthodox. ...

"When the followers of Cyril saw the vehemence of the emperor...they roused up a disturbance and discord among the people with an outcry, as though the emperor were opposed to God; they rose up against the nobles and the chiefs who acquiesced not in what had been done by them and they were running hither and thither. And...they took with them those who had been separated and removed from the monasteries by reason of their lives and their strange manners and had for this reason been expelled, and all who were of heretical sects and were possessed with fanaticism and with hatred against me. And one passion was in them all, Jews and pagans and all the sects, and they were busying themselves that they should accept without examination the things which were done without examination against me; and at the same time all of them, even those that had participated with me at table and in prayer and in thought, were agreed...against me and vowing vows one with another against me...In nothing were they divided."

In the following months, seventeen bishops who supported Nestorius's doctrine were removed from their sees, and his principal supporter, John, patriarch of Antioch succumbed to Imperial pressure around March, 433 and abandoned Nestorius. At the end, Theodosius II, who had supported Nestorius' appointment, bowed to the influence of his sister Pulcheria to issue an Imperial edict (August 3, 435) that exiled Nestorius to a monastery in the Great Oasis of Hibis (al-Khargah), in Egypt, securely within the diocese of Cyril. In East and West, Nestorius' writings were burnt wherever they could be found. Hence they survive mainly in Syriac. A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... John of Antioch was bishop of Antioch A.D. 429-441 and led a group of moderate Eastern bishops during the Nestorian controversy. ... Patriarch of Antioch is the traditional title carried by the Bishop of Antioch. ... Events Petronius Maximus becomes Roman Consul John of Antioch and Cyril of Alexandria sign the Formula of Reunion, thus ending their conflict over the Nestorian controversy and the Council of Ephesus. ... Theodosius II Flavius Theodosius II (April, 401 - July 28, 450 ). The eldest son of Eudoxia and Arcadius who at the age of 7 became the Roman Emperor of the East. ... Pulcheria (January 19, 399 - 453) was the daughter of the Eastern Roman Emperor Arcadius and Aelia Eudoxia. ... August 3 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Events August 3 - Nestorius is exiled by Imperial edict to a monastery in a Sahara oasis. ... Buddhist monastery near Tibet A monastery is the habitation of monks. ...


This led to a split within the church and to the creation of separate Nestorian churches that flourished in the Middle East and central Asia. The term Nestorianism is eponymous, even though the person who lent his name to it always denied the associated belief. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia is a vast landlocked region of Asia. ...


After 1500 years stigmatized as a heretic, a book written by Nestorius was discovered in 1895, known as the Bazaar of Heracleides, written towards the end of his life, in which he explicitly denies the heresy for which he was condemned, instead, affirming of Christ "the same one is twofold" - an expression that some consider similar to the formulation of the Council of Chalcedon. Nestorius's earlier surviving writings, however, including his letter written in response to Cyril's charges against him, contain material that seems to support charges that he held that Christ had two personhoods. So the question of whether Nestorius was actually a Nestorian is still a matter of debate. The Council of Chalcedon was an ecumenical council that took place from October 8—November 1, 451 at Chalcedon, a city of Bithynia in Asia Minor. ...


Related Topics

The term Nestorianism is eponymous, even though the person who lent his name to it always denied the associated belief. ... Christology is that part of Christian theology that studies and defines who Jesus the Christ was and is. ...

External link

  • Writing of Nestorius
  • Aramaic Bible Society website, "The lynching of Nestorius" concentrates on the political pressures around the Council of Ephesus and analyzes the rediscovered Bazaar of Nestorius.


Preceded by:
Sisinnius
Patriarch of Constantinople
April 10, 428 – June 22, 431
Succeeded by:
Maximianus


Sisinnius (d. ... Bishops of Byzantium (until 325) St. ... Maximianus (d. ...


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NESTORIUS - LoveToKnow Article on NESTORIUS (2672 words)
The Novatians and the Quartodecimans were the next objects of his orthodox zeala zeal which in the case of the former at least was reinforced, according to Socrates, by his envy of their bishop; and it led to serious and fatal disturbances at Sardis and Miletus.
The fact that Nestorius was trained at Antioch and inherited the Antiochene zeal for exact biblical exegesis and insistence upon the recognition of the full manhood of Christ, is of the first importance in understanding his position.
The manner in which this union is realized is thus stated by Nestorius: The Word also passed through Blessed Mary inasmuch as He did not receive a beginning by birth from her, as is the case with the body which was born of her.
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Nestorius himself was brought up in the cloister, and had, as Neander remarks, imbibed the tendencies to narrowness, partisanship, impatience, and ignorance of mankind which are not unfrequently found among those who have been educated apart from their fellows.
Nestorius replied, and attacked the extravagant laudation of the Virgin by Proclus, describing it as derogatory to the honour of her Son.
Nestorius declined, 756though thrice summoned, to attend the synod in the absence of his Syrian supporters, and sent a complaint to the emperor of the illegality and unfairness of Cyril's proceedings, which was supported by ten bishops and the imperial commissioner.
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