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Encyclopedia > Nerva
Nerva
Emperor of the Roman Empire
Bust of Nerva
Reign September 18, 96-
27 January 98
Full name Marcus Cocceius Nerva
Born November 8, 30
 ?Narni
Died 27 January 98
Rome (?Gardens of Sallust)
Buried Mausoleum of Augustus, Rome
Predecessor Domitian
Successor Trajan
Issue Trajan (adoptive)
Dynasty Nervan-Antonine
Roman imperial dynasties
Nervo-Trajanic Dynasty

Nerva
Children
   Natural - (none)
   Adoptive - Trajan
Trajan
Children
   Natural - (none)
   Adoptive - Hadrian
Hadrian
Children
   Natural - (none)
   Adoptive - Lucius Aelius
   Adoptive - Antoninus Pius

Marcus Cocceius Nerva (November 8, 30[1]January 27, 98) was a Roman Emperor (96-98). He was the first emperor to select his successor by their capabilities and potential, rather than paternal relations (through adoption). This practice led to a line of Emperors that is known as the "Five Good Emperors". This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Roman Empire is the name given to the city-state of Rome and also the corresponding phase of that civilization, characterized by an autocratic form of government. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1550x2350, 1818 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nerva Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... September 18 is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years). ... For other uses, see number 96. ... January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Roman emperor Nerva succeeded by Trajan Tacitus finished his Germania (approximate date) Births Deaths January 27: Nerva, Roman emperor Apollonius of Tyana, Greek/Roman philosopher and mathematician (b. ... November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 53 days remaining. ... Events The Sermon on the Mount (according to proponents of the 33 theory) April 7 - Crucifixion of Jesus (suggested date, but it is also suggested that he died on April 3, AD 33) Births Quintus Petillius Cerialis, brother-in-law of Vespasian Deaths April 7 - Judas Iscariot, disciple of Jesus... Bridge of Narni over the Nera River, Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot, 1826. ... January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Roman emperor Nerva succeeded by Trajan Tacitus finished his Germania (approximate date) Births Deaths January 27: Nerva, Roman emperor Apollonius of Tyana, Greek/Roman philosopher and mathematician (b. ... The Gardens of Sallust (Latin: Horti Sallustiani) were Roman gardens developed by the Roman historian Sallust in the 1st century BC using his wealth extorted as governor of the province of Africa Nova (newly conquered Numidia). ... The entryway to the Mausoleum of Augustus. ... Domitian bust in the Louvre Titus Flavius Domitianus (24 October 51 – 18 September 96), commonly known as Domitian, was a Roman emperor of the gens Flavia. ... This article is about the Roman Emperor. ... This article is about the Roman Emperor. ... The Five Good Emperors. ... Also known as the Nervan dynasty, the Ulpian dynasty (after their common gens nomen Ulpius), or combined with the subsequent Antonine dynasty to form the Nervan-Antonian Dynasty. ... Image File history File links Nerva_Bust. ... This article is about the Roman Emperor. ... This article is about the Roman Emperor. ... Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus (January 24, 76 – July 10, 138), known as Hadrian in English, was Roman emperor from 117 – 138, and a member of the gens Aelia. ... Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus (January 24, 76 – July 10, 138), known as Hadrian in English, was Roman emperor from 117 – 138, and a member of the gens Aelia. ... Lucius Aelius as Caesar. ... Titus Aurelius Fulvus Boionius Arrius Antoninus Pius (September 19, 86–March 7, 161) was Roman emperor from 138 to 161. ... Nerva may refer to: Marcus Cocceius Nerva—Roman emperor (96-98 CE) Nerva, Huelva— municipality in Huelva province, Spain NERVA— acronym for Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application, part of a NASA project to produce a nuclear thermal rocket engine This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated... November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 53 days remaining. ... Events The Sermon on the Mount (according to proponents of the 33 theory) April 7 - Crucifixion of Jesus (suggested date, but it is also suggested that he died on April 3, AD 33) Births Quintus Petillius Cerialis, brother-in-law of Vespasian Deaths April 7 - Judas Iscariot, disciple of Jesus... January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Roman emperor Nerva succeeded by Trajan Tacitus finished his Germania (approximate date) Births Deaths January 27: Nerva, Roman emperor Apollonius of Tyana, Greek/Roman philosopher and mathematician (b. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see number 96. ... The Five Good Emperors (sometimes erroneously called the Nervan-Antonian Dynasty, which is actually a conflation of the Nervo-Trajanic and Antonine dynasties, including Commodus) were a series of five emperors of the Roman Empire who ruled from 96 to 180. ...

Contents

Life

Early life

Marcus Cocceius Nerva was a member of the Italian nobility rather than one of the elite of Rome; in this he was like Vespasian, the founder of the Flavian dynasty. Nerva was born in Narni, Umbria, 50 miles north of Rome, on November 8, 35 AD. Imperator Caesar Vespasianus Augustus (November 17, 9–June 23, 79), known originally as Titus Flavius Vespasianus and usually referred to in English as Vespasian, was emperor of Rome from 69 to 79. ... The Flavian dynasty was a series of three Roman Emperors who ruled from 69, the Year of the Four Emperors, to 96, when the last member was assassinated. ... Bridge of Narni over the Nera River, Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot, 1826. ...


Members of his family had held high office; his great-grandfather was consul in 36 BC, and his grandfather was in the imperial entourage at the time of Nerva's birth. Nerva was connected with the Julio-Claudian dynasty, as his uncle Octavius Laenas had married Rubellia Bassa, the great-granddaughter of Tiberius. It has been suggested that Fall of the Julio-Claudian be merged into this article or section. ... Born sometime between 33, when her parents married and 38 when her father died. ... Tiberius Caesar Augustus, born Tiberius Claudius Nero (November 16, 42 BC – March 16 AD 37), was the second Roman Emperor, from the death of Augustus in AD 14 until his own death in 37. ...


Nerva was the first of the Five Good Emperors, and the last emperor who was Italian both by family and by birth. He had not pursued the usual administrative career, although he had been consul with Vespasian in 71 and with Domitian in 90. Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s - 70s - 80s 90s 100s 110s 120s Years: 66 67 68 69 70 - 71 - 72 73 74 75 76 Events The Romans establish a fortress at York (Eboracum), as a base for their northern forces. ... Domitian bust in the Louvre Titus Flavius Domitianus (24 October 51 – 18 September 96), commonly known as Domitian, was a Roman emperor of the gens Flavia. ... For other uses, see number 90. ...


Emperor

After Domitian's assassination in 96 following his reign of terror, Nerva was elevated to emperor on September 18, 96. The Fasti Ostienses, the Ostian Calendar, records "Fourteenth day before Kalends of October: Domitian killed. On the same day, Marcus Cocceius Nerva proclaimed emperor." According to Cassius Dio he was approached by the conspirators against Domitian because he was elderly (61) and childless - that is, a safe pair of hands. This also had the effect of saving his own life, which was under threat from Domitian. September 18 is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years). ... For other uses, see number 96. ... Dio Cassius Cocceianus (155–after 229), known in English as Dio Cassius or Cassius Dio, was a noted Roman historian and public servant. ...


After his accession, Nerva went to set a new tone: he released those imprisoned for treason, banned future prosecutions for treason, granted amnesty to many whom Domitian had exiled, restored much confiscated property, and involved the Roman Senate in his rule. He probably did so as a means to remain relatively popular (and therefore alive), but this did not completely aid him. Support for Domitian in the army remained strong, and in October 97 the Praetorian Guard laid siege to the Imperial Palace on the Palatine Hill and took Nerva hostage. He was forced to submit to their demands, agreeing to hand over those responsible for Domitian's death and even giving a speech thanking the rebellious Praetorians. Petronius and Parthenius, blamed by the Praetorians for Domitian's death, were killed. Nerva was unharmed in this assault, but his authority was damaged beyond repair. He had no natural children, but found salvation in the idea of adopting someone who would have the support of both the army and the people. He adopted Trajan, a commander of the armies on the German frontier, as his successor shortly thereafter in order to bolster his own rule. Casperius Aelianus, the Guard Prefect responsible for the mutiny against Nerva, was later executed under Trajan. Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 0s BC - 0s - 10s - 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s - 90s - 100s Years: 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 Events Pope Evaristus succeeds Pope Clement I Tacitus advanced to consulship. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 17th century aviaries on the hill, built by Rainaldi for Odoardo Cardinal Farnese: once wirework cages surmounted them. ... This article is about the Roman Emperor. ... Map of Upper Germanic Limes The Limes Germanicus (Latin for German frontier) was a remarkable line of frontier forts (limes) that bounded the ancient Roman provinces of Germania Superior and Raetia, and divided the Roman Empire and the unsubdued Germanic tribes, from the years 83 to 260. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ...


The Epitome de Caesaribus reports that Nerva was struck by a fever and chills and died shortly afterwards; Jerome places his death in the Gardens of Sallust in Rome (originally developed by the historian Sallust). He was deified by the Senate shortly afterwards, and his ashes were laid to rest in the Mausoleum of Augustus. On the day of his burial there was a solar eclipse. Saint Jerome redirects here. ... The Gardens of Sallust (Latin: Horti Sallustiani) were Roman gardens developed by the Roman historian Sallust in the 1st century BC using his wealth extorted as governor of the province of Africa Nova (newly conquered Numidia). ... The entryway to the Mausoleum of Augustus. ... Photo taken during the 1999 eclipse. ...


He was responsible for the construction a small Imperial Forum, situated immediately adjacent to the Forum of Augustus. Little remains, partly because the Via dei Fori Imperiali cuts across it. Archeological excavation started on this forum in 1999, and continues to the present (2006) The Imperial Forums consist of a series of monumental fora (public squares), constructed in Rome over a period of one and half centuries, between 46 BC and 113 AD. The forums were the heart of the late Roman Republic and of the Roman Empire. ... Forum built by Augustus in Rome, including Temple of Mars Ultor. ... The Via dei Fori Imperiale is a road in the centre of the city of Rome that runs in a straight line from the Piazza Venezia to the Colosseum, which is itself situated in the Piazza Colosseo. ...


Statues

  • An ancient bronze equestrian statue of Domitian, now on display at Misenum, had its face reworked into that of Nerva. This change was fairly common. The Senate issued a damnatio memoriae on Domitian to obliterate him from all public record. Thus many of the images of Nerva used converted statues that had been made for his predecessor.
  • There is an equestrian statue of Nerva astride a horse at Gloucester, England at the entrance to Southgate Street.
  • There is a statue of Nerva also at Narni town in Italy at Cocceio Nerva street.

Damnatio memoriae is the Latin phrase literally meaning damnation of memory, in the sense of removed from the remembrance. ... Bridge of Narni over the Nera River, Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot, 1826. ...

References

External links

  • "Nerva (96-98 A.D.) born in Narnia Town Italy ", De Imperatorbus Romanis

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

Notes

  1. ^ "Aurelius Victor records the year as 35 (Caes. 12.11), Dio (68.4.4) as 30. The latter has been more widely accepted." (Wend, n. 2)
Preceded by
Vespasian and Titus
Consul of the Roman Empire with Vespasian
71
Succeeded by
Vespasian and Titus
Preceded by
Titus Aurelius Fulvus and Marcus Asinius Atratinus
Consul of the Roman Empire with Domitian
90
Succeeded by
Manius Acilius Glabrio and Trajan
Preceded by
Five Good Emperors
96 –180
Succeeded by
Trajan
Nervan-Antonian Dynasty
96 –192
Nervo-Trajanic Dynasty
96 –138
Preceded by
Domitian
Roman Emperor
9698
Succeeded by
Trajan
Preceded by
Gaius Manlius Valens and Gaius Antistius Vetus
Consul of the Roman Empire
97-98
Succeeded by
Aulus Cornelius Palma Frontonianus and Quintus Sosius Senecio

  Results from FactBites:
 
Roman Emperors - DIR Nerva (0 words)
Nerva was born on 8 November, 30 A.D. Little is known of his upbringing beyond the fact that he belonged to a senatorial family and pursued neither a military nor a public speaking career.
In the military realm, Nerva established veterans' colonies in Africa, a practice that was continued by the emperor Trajan.
Nerva's reign was more concerned with the continuation of an existing political system than with the birth of a new age.
Nerva (1126 words)
Nerva was born into the household of a wealthy lawyer whose family was well accustomed to holding high office.
Nerva had made the mistake of replacing the praetorian prefects Secundus and Norbanus, who it was thought could not be kept in their positions after their part in the assassination of Domitian.
Nerva was imprisoned in the palace and it was demanded that Petronius and Parthenius (as well as the previous prefect Secundus) be handed over to the praetorians for execution, due to their role in the murder of Domitian.
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