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Encyclopedia > Nereus
Greek deities
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Nereus, in Greek Mythology, was the eldest son of Pontus and Gaia, the Sea and the Earth, a Titan who (with Doris) fathered the Nereids, with whom Nereus lived in the Aegean Sea.[1] In the Iliad[2] the Old Man of the Sea (άλίός γέρών) is the father of Nereids, though Nereus is not directly named. He was one of the manifestations of the Old Man of the Sea, never more so than when he was described, like Proteus, as a shapeshifter with the power of prophecy, who would aid heroes such as Heracles[3] who managed to catch him even as he changed shapes. Nereus and Proteus ("first") seem to be two manifestations of the god of the sea who was supplanted by Poseidon when Zeus overthrew Cronus. Nereus Rowing Club ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... This article is about the race of Titans in Greek mythology. ... Twelve Olympians, also known as the Dodekatheon (Greek: Δωδεκάθεον < δωδεκα, dodeka, twelve + θεον, theon, of the gods), in Greek religion, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. ... For other uses, see Chthon (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek , Mousai: perhaps from the Proto-Indo-European root *men- think[1]) are a number of goddesses or spirits who embody the arts and inspire the creation process with their graces through remembered and improvised song and stage, writing, traditional music and dance. ... Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... The ancient Greeks had a very small number of see gods. ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... Oceanus, with his wife, Tethys, ruled the seas before Poseidon. ... In Greek mythology, Ceto, or Keto (Greek: Κητος, Ketos, sea monster) was a hideous aquatic monster, a daughter of Gaia and Pontus. ... In Greek mythology, Glaucus (shiny, bright or bluish-green) was the name of several different figures, including one God. ... This article is about the Greek sea nymph. ... Mosaic from Herculaneum depicting Poseidon and Amphitrite In ancient Greek mythology, Amphitrite (not to be confused with Aphrodite) was a sea-goddess. ... In Greek mythology, Tethys was a Titaness and sea goddess who was both sister and wife of Oceanus. ... Triton is a mythological Greek god, the messenger of the deep. ... In Greek mythology, Ophion (serpent), also called Ophioneus ruled the world with Eurynome before the two of them were cast down by Cronus and Rhea, according to some sources. ... This article is about Proteus in Greek mythology. ... Phorcys and Ceto, Mosaic, Late Roman, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia In Greek mythology, Phorcys, or Phorkys was one of the names of the Old One of the Sea, the primeval sea god, who, according to Hesiod, was the son of Pontus and Gaia. ... In Greek mythology, Pontus (or Pontos, sea) was an ancient, pre-Olympian sea-god, son of Gaia and Aether, the Earth and the Air. ... In Greek and Roman mythology, the Oceanids were the three thousand children of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys. ... In Greek mythology, the Nereids (NEER-ee-eds) are blue-haired sea nymphs, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris. ... Naiad by John William Waterhouse, 1893 In Greek mythology, the Naiads (from the Greek &#957;&#940;&#949;&#953;&#957;, to flow, and &#957;&#7939;&#956;&#945;, running water) were a type of nymph who presided over fountains, wells, springs, streams, and brooks, as river gods embodied rivers, and some very... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... In Greek mythology, Pontus (or Pontos, sea) was an ancient, pre-Olympian sea-god, son of Gaia and Aether, the Earth and the Air. ... For other uses, see Gaia. ... This article is about the body of water. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... This article is about the race of Titans in Greek mythology. ... // Doris may refer to: Doris (mythology) (bountiful) was, in Greek mythology, an Oceanid, daughter of Oceanus and Tethys. ... In Greek mythology, the Nereids (NEER-ee-eds) are blue-haired sea nymphs, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris. ... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... In Greek mythology, the Old Man of the Sea was a primordial figure who could be identified by several names, Proteus or Nereus or Pontus. ... This article is about Proteus in Greek mythology. ... Tsarevna Frog by Viktor Vasnetsov: a frog metamorphoses into a princess Shapeshifting is a common theme in mythology and folklore, as well as in science fiction and fantasy. ... Hercules, a Roman bronze (Louvre Museum) “Alcides” redirects here. ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Zeús, genitive: Diós), is... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


The earliest poet to link Nereus with the labours of Heracles was Pherekydes, according to a scholion on Apollonius of Rhodes.[4] Hercules and the hydra by Antonio Pollaiuolo The Twelve Labours of Heracles (Greek: dodekathlos) are a series of archaic episodes connected by a later continuous narrative, concerning a penance carried out by Heracles, the greatest of the Greek heroes. ... Pherecydes (in Greek: Φερεχύδης) was the name of: Pherecydes of Syros, a pre-Socratic philosopher and author from the island of Syros, by some believed to have influenced Pythagoras Pherecydes of Leros, an historian and mythologic writer from the island of Leros close to Miletos Pherecydes is also a spider genus... Scholium (tr~bXtoe), the name given to a grammatical, critical and explanatory note, extracted from existing commentaries and inserted on the margin of the manuscript of an ancient author. ... Apollonius of Rhodes, also known as Apollonius Rhodius (Latin; Greek Apollōnios Rhodios), early 3rd century BC - after 246 BC, was an epic poet, scholar, and director of the Library of Alexandria. ...


During the course of the fifth century BCE, Nereus was gradually replaced by Triton, who does not appear in Homer, in the imagery of the struggle between Heracles and the sea-god who had to be restrained in order to deliver his information that was employed by the vase-painters, independent of any literary testimony.[5] Triton may be: Triton (mythology), a Greek god, the messenger of the deep, son of Poseidon, god of the sea Triton (mollusk), a marine snail of the family Ranellidae Triton (moon), the largest moon of the planet Neptune Triton (novel), a novel by Samuel R. Delany Triton (The Little Mermaid...

Nereus in a frieze of the Pergamon Altar (Berlin)
Nereus in a frieze of the Pergamon Altar (Berlin)

Nereus was known for his truthfulness and virtue: Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3488 × 2616 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3488 × 2616 pixel, file size: 2. ... The front of the Pergamon Altar, as it is reconstructed in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin. ...

"But Pontos, the great sea, was father of truthful Nereus who tells no lies, eldest of his sons. They call him the Old Gentleman because he is trustworthy, and gentle, and never forgetful of what is right, but the thoughts of his mind are mild and righteous." — Hesiod, Theogony 233

The Attic vase-painters showed the draped torso of Nereus issuing from a long coiling scaly fishlike tail[6] Bearded Nereus generally wields a staff of authority. He was also shown in scenes depicting the flight of the Nereides as Peleus wrestled their sister Thetis.


In Aelian's natural history, written in the early third century of the Common Era,[7] Nereus was also the father of a watery consort of Aphrodite named Nerites who was transformed into "a shellfish with a spiral shell, small in size but of surpassing beauty." Claudius Aelianus (c. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ...


Notes

  1. ^ Hesiod, Theogony 233-36, is unequivocal that Nereus is the Old Man of the Sea, whereas the Odyssey refers the sobriquet to Nereus (xxiv.58) to Proteus (iv.365, , 387), and to Phorkys (xiii.96, 345).
  2. ^ Iliad i.358, 538, 556; xviii.141; xx.107; xxiv.562.
  3. ^ Or, as Proteus, Menelaus.
  4. ^ On Argonautica iv.1396f, noted by Ruth Glynn,"Herakles, Nereus and Triton: A Study of Iconography in Sixth Century Athens" American Journal of Archaeology 85.2 (April 1981, pp. 121-132) p 121f.
  5. ^ Glynn 1981:121-132.
  6. ^ Theoi.com; Glynn 1981.
  7. ^ On Animals 14.28

Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived... Theogony (Greek: Θεογονία, theogonia = the birth of God(s)) is a poem by Hesiod describing the origins and genealogies of the gods of the ancient Greeks, composed circa 700 BC. The title of the work comes from the Greek words for god and seed. // Hesiods Theogony is a large-scale... This article is about the poem by Homer. ... In Greek mythology, Phorcys, or Phorkys was a primevil sea god, son of Pontus and Gaia. ... This article is about Proteus in Greek mythology. ... Menelaus regains Helen, detail of an Attic red-figure crater, ca. ...

References

One of the founders of modern studies in Greek mythology, Karl (Carl, Károly) Kerényi (January 19, 1897 - April 14, 1973) was born in Hungary but became a citizen of Switzerland in 1943. ... Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an English poet, scholar, and novelist. ...

External links

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Nereus

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