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Encyclopedia > Nephilim

Nephilim are beings who appear in the Hebrew Bible, in the Book of Genesis, and are also mentioned in other biblical texts and in some non-canonical Jewish writings. Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Nephilim were a race mentioned in the Bible. ... 11th century manuscript of the Hebrew Bible with Targum Hebrew Bible is a term that refers to the common portions of the Jewish canon and the Christian canons. ... Genesis (Greek: Γένεσις, having the meanings of birth, creation, cause, beginning, source and origin) is the first book of the Torah (five books of Moses) and hence the first book of the Tanakh, part of the Hebrew Bible; it is also the first book of the Christian Old Testament. ...

Contents

In the Bible

Genesis 6:1–4 describes the origin of the Nephilim: Genesis (Greek: Γένεσις, having the meanings of birth, creation, cause, beginning, source and origin) is the first book of the Torah (five books of Moses) and hence the first book of the Tanakh, part of the Hebrew Bible; it is also the first book of the Christian Old Testament. ...

When men began to multiply on earth and daughters were born to them, the sons of heaven saw how beautiful the daughters of man were, and so they took for their wives as many of them as they chose. Then the LORD said: “My spirit shall not remain in man forever, since he is but flesh. His days shall comprise one hundred and twenty years.” At that time the Nephilim appeared on earth (as well as later), after the sons of heaven had intercourse with the daughters of man, who bore them sons. They were heroes of old, men of renown.[1]

Bible Commentary

According to the New American Bible, the Nephilim appear as part of the “increasing wickedness of mankind”. In this view, their appearance was likely incorporated not only to account for the prehistoric “giants” of Canaan, whom the Israelites called the Nephilim, but additionally to introduce the story of the flood with a moral orientation[2]: In 1970, the New American Bible (NAB) was first published. ...


Also, the commentary suggests that the phrase “(as well as later)” stated above is a reference to the Book of Numbers 13:33, how the Israelites likened the tall (“Anakim”) to the Nephilim, possibly due to seeing the very tall structures of Canaan that appeared to have been built by a race of giants.[3] The Book of Numbers is the fourth of the books of the Pentateuch, called in the Hebrew ba-midbar במדבר, i. ...


The New American Bible commentary draws a parallel to the Letter of Jude and the statements set forth in Genesis, suggesting that the Epistle refers implicitly to the paternity of Nephilim as heavenly beings who came to earth and had sexual intercourse with women:[4]: In 1970, the New American Bible (NAB) was first published. ... The brief Epistle of Jude is a book in the Christian New Testament canon. ...

The angels too, who did not keep to their own domain but deserted their proper dwelling, he has kept in eternal chains, in gloom, for the judgement of the great day. Likewise, Sodom, Gomorrah, and the surrounding towns, which, in the same manner as they, indulged in sexual promiscuity and practiced unnatural vice, serve as an example by undergoing a punishment of eternal fire.[5]

In Biblical criticism

Etymology

The Hebrew of “nephilim” is נפלים, which may mean “those causing others to fall”. Abraham Ibn Ezra says they were called this because men's hearts would fail at the sight of them. Some have compared it to the usage in Job 1:15 "And the Sabeans fell upon them" in which Naphal means to take in battle, describing the warlike nature of the Nephilim (Jean le Clerc and Aquilas). Alternatively, Shadal understands it as deriving from the Hebrew word פלא Pela which means wonderous[6]. Rabbi Abraham Ben Meir Ibn Ezra (also known as Ibn Ezra, or Abenezra) (1092 or 1093-1167), was one of the most distinguished Jewish men of letters and writers of the Middle Ages. ... Jean Leclerc (March 19, 1657 in Geneva - January 8, 1736 in Amsterdam) was a Swiss theologian and biblical scholar. ... Samuel David Luzzatto (Hebrew: שמואל דוד לוצאטו) was an Italian Jewish scholar and a member of the Wissenschaft des Judentums movement. ...


The nephilim come from a union between “sons of God” (בני האלהים “b’nei ha-'elohim” Lit. "Sons of the powers" [7]) and “daughters of man”. In Aramaic culture, the term Nephila specifically referred to the constellation of Orion, and thus Nephilim to Orion's semi-divine descendants (cf. Anakim from Anak);[8] the implication being that this also is the origin of the Biblical Nephilim. Some commentators[citation needed] have suggested that the Nephilim were believed to have been fathered by members of a proto-Hebrew pantheon (which causes much controversy among Jewish peoples[9]) and are a brief glimpse of early Hebrew religion, most of the details of which were later edited out from the Torah (or at least would have been edited out when, as some claim, it was redacted together), and that this passage may have offered monotheistic Hebrews a way to fit semi-divine pagan heroes into their cosmogony. The term Aram can refer to: Aram (אֲרָם or ), the son of Shem, according to the Table of nations of Genesis 10 in the Hebrew Bible. ... Orion (IPA: ), a constellation often referred to as The Hunter, is a prominent constellation, one of the largest and perhaps the best-known and most conspicuous in the sky[1]. Its brilliant stars are found on the celestial equator and are visible throughout the world, making this constellation globally recognized. ... Not to be confused with Arion. ... During the conquest of Canaan by the Israelites, Anak was a well known figure, and a forefather of the Anakites (aka. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A pantheon (from Greek Πάνθειον, temple of all gods, from πᾶν, all + θεός, god) is a set of all the gods of a particular religion or mythology, such as the gods of Hinduism, Norse, Egyptian, Shintoism, Greek, vodun, Yoruba Mythology and Roman mythology. ... Template:Jews and Jewdaism Template:The Holy Book Named TorRah The Torah () is the most valuable Holy Doctrine within Judaism,(and for muslims) revered as the first relenting Word of Ulllah, traditionally thought to have been revealed to Blessed Moosah, An Apostle of Ulllah. ... A relational diagram describing the various versions postulated by the biblical documentary hypothesis. ...


The idea that the Torah was somehow changed is not in keeping with traditional Hebrew practice, in which if even a single character is out of place in a parchment translation of the original Hebrew Torah, the entire parchment must be destroyed and replaced anew. However, there are several variations, some of great significance, between ancient manuscripts of the Torah, between Septuagint, Syriac Peshitta, Dead Sea Scrolls, masoretic text, Samaritan Pentateuch, and the versions in the Hexapla, as well as between various manuscripts within each of these groups. The Septuagint: A column of uncial text from 1 Esdras in the Codex Vaticanus, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brentons Greek edition and English translation. ... The Peshitta is the standard version of the Bible in the Syriac language. ... The Dead Sea Scrolls comprise roughly 900 documents, including texts from the Hebrew Bible, discovered between 1947 and 1956 in eleven caves in and around the Wadi Qumran (near the ruins of the ancient settlement of Khirbet Qumran, on the northwest shore of the Dead Sea) in the West Bank. ... The Masoretic Text (MT) is the Hebrew text of the Tanakh approved for general use in Judaism. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... Hexapla (Gr. ...


In the Hebrew Bible, there are a number of other words that, like "Nephilim", are sometimes translated as "giants":

  • Emim ("the fearful ones")
  • Rephaim ("the dead ones")
  • Anakim ("the [long]-necked ones")

This has led to a great deal of confusion, even to the point of medieval legends recounted in the Talmud of a giant stowing away on Noah's Ark. It is possible that these names in the Torah were not meant to signify any antediluvian race that survived the Great Flood, but were simply denotations for particular groups of Canaanites, or other ordinary ethnicities. The Talmud (Hebrew: תַּלְמוּד) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs and history. ... This article is about the vessel described in the Hebrew scriptures. ... // [[Image:]] Map of Canaan For other uses, see Canaan (disambiguation). ...


Rephaim

See also: Valley of Rephaim

"Rephaim" is a general title that the Book of Joshua states was given to the aborigines who were afterwards conquered and dispossessed by the Canaanite tribes.[10] The text states that a few Rephaim had survived, one of them being Og, the king of Bashan. Og of Bashan is recorded as having a 13-ft long bed. This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... The Book of Joshua is the sixth book in both the Hebrew Tanakh and the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ... The term indigenous people has no universal, standard or fixed definition, but can be used about any ethnic group who inhabit the geographic region with which they have the earliest historical connection. ... // [[Image:]] Map of Canaan For other uses, see Canaan (disambiguation). ... According to several books of the Old Testament, Og (pronounced , , or ; meaning gigantic) was an ancient Amorite king of Bashan who, along with his sons and army, was slain by Moses and his men at the battle of Edrei (probably modern day Dara, Syria). ... Bashan (meaning light soil) is a biblical place first mentioned in Genesis 14:5, where it is said that Chedorlaomer and his confederates smote the Rephaim in Ashteroth, where Og the king of Bashan had his residence. ...

Only Og king of Bashan was left of the remnant of the Rephaites. His bed was made of iron and was more than thirteen feet long and six feet wide. It is still in Rabbah of the Ammonites.[11]

The Rephaim may have been the same Canaanite group known to the Moabites as Emim,[12] i.e., fearful, and to the Ammonites as Zamzummim. The second of the Books of Samuel states that some of them found refuge among the Philistines, and were still existing in the days of David. Nothing is known of their origin, nor of anything specifically connecting them with Nephilim, though the connection is made by Jewish tradition. This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... The Moabite language is an extinct Hebrew Canaanite dialect, spoken in Moab (modern-day northwestern Jordan) in the early first millennium BC. Most of our knowledge about Moabite comes from the Mesha Stele, as well as the El-Kerak Stela; this is sufficient to show that it was extremely similar... The Emim were a race of giants in mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. ... For the extinct mollusc see Ammonite. ... The Zamzummim were a race of giants in Hebrew mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. ... The Books of Samuel (Hebrew: Sefer Shmuel ספר שמואל), are part of the Tanakh (part of Judaisms Hebrew Bible) and also of the Old Testament (of Christianity). ... The historic Philistines (see note Philistines below) were a people that inhabited the southern coast of Canaan around the time of the arrival of the Israelites, their territory being named Philistia in later contexts. ... This article is about the Biblical king of Israel. ...


Anakim

Anakim are the descendants of Anak, and dwelt in the south of Canaan, in the neighbourhood of Hebron. In the days of Abraham, they inhabited the region afterwards known as Edom and Moab, east of the Jordan river. They are mentioned during the report of the spies about the inhabitants of the land of Canaan. The book of Joshua states that Joshua finally expelled them from the land, excepting a remnant that found a refuge in the cities of Gaza, Gath, and Ashdod. The Philistine giant Goliath, whom David, or Elhanan,[13] later encountered, was supposedly a descendant of the Anakim. During the conquest of Canaan by the Israelites, Anak was a well known figure, and a forefather of the Anakites (aka. ... Arabic الخليل Government City Also Spelled al-Khalil (officially) al-Halil (unofficially) Governorate Hebron Population 166,000 (2006) Jurisdiction  dunams Head of Municipality Mustafa Abdel Nabi Hebron (Arabic:   al-ḪalÄ«l or al KhalÄ«l; Hebrew:  , Standard Hebrew: Ḥevron, Tiberian Hebrew: Ḥeḇrôn) is a city in the southern Judea... For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... Edomite redirects here. ... Moab (Hebrew: מוֹאָב, Standard Tiberian  ; Greek Μωάβ ; Arabic مؤاب, Assyrian Muaba, Maba, Maab ; Egyptian Muab) is the historical name for a mountainous strip of land in modern-day Jordan running along the eastern shore of the Dead Sea. ... The Jordan River runs along the border between the West Bank and the Kingdom of Jordan Northern part of the Great Rift Valley as seen from space (NASA) The Jordan River Road sign In spring The Jordan River (Hebrew: נהר הירדן nehar hayarden, Arabic: نهر الأردن nahr al-urdun) is a river in Southwest... Not to be confused with the Spanish name Garza or the Egyptian town of Giza. ... Gath (גת Hebrew: winepress), a common place name in ancient Israel and the surrounding regions. ... Hebrew Founded in 1956 Government City (from 1968) District South Population 204,400 (2005) Jurisdiction 60,000 dunams (60 km²) Mayor Zvi Zilker Ashdod (Hebrew: ‎; Arabic: , Isdud), located in the Southern District of Israel towards the south of the Israeli Coastal Plain, is a city of over 200,000 people... The historic Philistines (see note Philistines below) were a people that inhabited the southern coast of Canaan around the time of the arrival of the Israelites, their territory being named Philistia in later contexts. ... This article is about the biblical warrior. ... This article is about the Biblical king of Israel. ... The biblical Elhanan was the son of Jaareoregim. ...

The land, through which we have gone to spy it out, is a land that devours its inhabitants, and all the people that we saw in it are of great height. And there we saw the Nephilim (the sons of Anak, who come from the Nephilim), and we seemed to ourselves like grasshoppers, and so we seemed to them.[14]

The Sumerians called their gods the Anunaki; according to a Midrash [2], Abraham was the son of an idol manufacturer in the Sumerian city of Ur, and so could reasonably be expected to have known about these gods [citation needed]. Whether via the knowledge of a historical Abraham, or via folk memory that passed down to the Yahwist, the words Anak and its plural (Anakim) could simply be corrupted versions of Anunaki; this would equate the Nephilim with the Sumerian demigods such as Gilgamesh. The Anunaki, from Anu = Heaven/Sky, na = and, Ki = Earth, was the name given to the Sumerian, and later Babylonian pantheon. ... Midrash (Hebrew: מדרש; plural midrashim) is a Hebrew word referring to a method of exegesis of a Biblical text. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Ur (disambiguation). ... Folk memory is a term often used to describe stories, folklore or myths about past events that are passed orally from generation to generation. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... The Anunaki, from Anu = Heaven/Sky, na = and, Ki = Earth, was the name given to the Sumerian, and later Babylonian pantheon. ... For other uses, see Gilgamesh (disambiguation). ...


Note that it is more commonly suggested by traditional Jewish sources (such as the Midrash) that the spies saw large and powerful inhabitants in Canaan and because of their own fears, cowardice, and inadequate faith in Yahweh, saw themselves as grasshoppers in the eyes of the Canaanites, whether they were actual 'giants' or not. Midrash (Hebrew: מדרש; plural midrashim) is a Hebrew word referring to a method of exegesis of a Biblical text. ... For other uses, see Yahweh (disambiguation). ...


In other texts

In the texts of Ugarit, there were 70 sons of God, each one being the special deity of a particular people from whom they were descended. Some memory of this is found in Biblical texts which speak of Baal Melkart of Tyre or Chemosh of Moab. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Book of Jubilees expands and reworks material found in Genesis to Exodus 15. ... The Grigori are a group of fallen angels told of in Biblical apocrypha who mated with mortal women, giving rise to a race of hybrids known as the Nephilim, who are described as giants in Genesis 6:4. ... Excavated ruins at Ras Shamra. ... For other uses, see Baal (disambiguation). ... Melqart (less accurately Melkart, Melkarth or Melgart (greek disposed of the letter Q (Qoppa) replacing it with additional use of K (Kappa) and G (Gamma)), Akkadian Milqartu, was the tutelary god of the Phoenician city of Tyre, as Eshmun protected Sidon. ... Tyre (Arabic , Phoenician , Hebrew Tzor, Tiberian Hebrew , Akkadian , Greek Týros) is a city in the South Governorate of Lebanon. ... For other uses, see Chemosh (disambiguation). ... Moab (Hebrew: מוֹאָב, Standard Tiberian  ; Greek Μωάβ ; Arabic مؤاب, Assyrian Muaba, Maba, Maab ; Egyptian Muab) is the historical name for a mountainous strip of land in modern-day Jordan running along the eastern shore of the Dead Sea. ...


The story of the Nephilim is chronicled more fully in the Book of Enoch (part of Ethiopian biblical canon). Enoch, as well as Jubilees, connects the origin of the Nephilim with the fallen angels, and in particular with the Grigori (watchers). Samyaza, an angel of high rank, is described as leading a rebel sect of angels in a descent to earth to instruct humans in righteousness. The tutelage went on for a few centuries, but soon the angels pined for the human females and began to instruct the women in magic and conjuring. The angels consummated their lust, and as a result produced hybrid offspring: the Nephilim. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A biblical canon is a list of Biblical books which establishes the set of books which are considered to be authoritative as scripture by a particular Jewish or Christian community. ... The Book of Jubilees (ספר היובלים), sometimes called the Lesser Genesis (Leptogenesis), is an ancient Jewish religious work. ... Fallen Angels (1991) (ISBN 0743435826) is a Prometheus Award-winning novel by science fiction authors Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle, and Michael Flynn. ... The Grigori are a group of fallen angels told of in Biblical apocrypha who mated with mortal women, giving rise to a race of hybrids known as the Nephilim, who are described as giants in Genesis 6:4. ... Samyaza (Aramaic: שמיחזה, Greek: Σεμιαζά) also Shemyazaz, Sêmîazâz, Semjâzâ, Shemyaza, Samyaza, Shemhazai, and Amezarak (Ethiopic corruption) is a fallen angel of Christian tradition that ranked in the heavenly hierarchy as one of the Grigori (meaning Watchers in Greek). ... This article is about the supernatural being. ... It has been suggested that Duration of sexual intercourse be merged into this article or section. ...


According to these texts, the fallen angels who begat the Nephilim were cast into Tartarus/Gehenna, a place of 'total darkness'. However, Jubilees also states that God granted ten percent of the disembodied spirits of the Nephilim to remain after the flood, as demons, to try to lead the human race astray (through idolatry, the occult, etc.) until the final Judgement. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into sex organ. ... This article is about the deity and the place in Greek mythology. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


In addition to Enoch, the Book of Jubilees (7:21-25) also states that ridding the Earth of these Nephilim was one of God's purposes for flooding the Earth in Noah's time. The Biblical reference to Noah being "perfect in his generations" may have referred to his having a clean, Nephilim-free bloodline, although it may be inferred that there was more diversity among his three daughters-in law. The Book of Jubilees expands and reworks material found in Genesis to Exodus 15. ... Although Genesis tells us next to nothing about the four women aboard the Ark, who had witnessed the days before the Flood, there exist substantial extra-biblical traditions regarding these women and their names. ...


These works describe the Nephilim as being giants who did bad deeds.


There are also allusions to these descendants in the deuterocanonical books of Judith, Sirach, Baruch, 3 Maccabees, and Wisdom of Solomon. Deuterocanonical books is a term used since the sixteenth century in the Roman Catholic Church and Eastern Christianity to describe certain books and passages of the Christian Bible, in contrast to the protocanonical books which are contained in the Hebrew Bible. ... Judith with the Head of Holophernes, by Christophano Allori, 1613 (Pitti Palace, Florence) The Book of Judith is a deuterocanonical book, included in the Septuagint and in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Christian Old Testament of the Bible, but excluded by Jews and Protestants. ... The Wisdom of Ben Sirach, (or The Wisdom of Joshua Ben Sirach or merely Sirach), called Ecclesiasticus by Christians, is a book written circa 180 BCE in Hebrew. ... It has been suggested that Epistle of Jeremy be merged into this article or section. ... The Biblical book 3 Maccabees is found in most Orthodox Bibles as a part of the deuterocanonical books. ... Wisdom or the Wisdom of Solomon is one of the deuterocanonical books of the Bible. ...


Nephilim in popular culture

Books

Zecharia Sitchin[15] and Erich Von Daniken[citation needed] both claim that the Nephilim are our creators. In Sitchin's voluminous works he uses Semitic language etymology and translations of Sumerian cuneiform tablets to equate the ancient mesopotamian gods with the fallen angels (the "sons of Elohim" in Genesis). The chief Sumerian deity was known as Enlil, and a group of these Anunnaki were sent down to the Earth from their home planet Nibiru. The leader of this mission was Enlil's half-brother (known first as Ea and then given the title Enki, or Lord of the Earth). His symbol was the snake or two snakes wrapped around a pole. This symbol, called the cadeuseus (alt. spelling caduseus and cadeuceus), was used to denote the Egyptian god Thoth, the Greek god Hermes, and the Roman god Mercury among others. All of these deities were given titles such as "God of Knowledge," "Bringer of Wisdom," and "Messenger of the Gods." The Hebrew word for angel is Malakh, and means messenger while the word "angel" itself derives from the Greek "angelos" which means also messenger. The Sumerian gods (also worshiped by the Babylonians, Assyrians, Hittites and others) were nearly always depicted with wings as well. Zecharia Sitchins photograph from The 12th Planet Zecharia Sitchin (born 1922)[1] is a best-selling author of books promoting the ancient astronaut theory for human origins. ... Erich von Däniken (born April 14, 1935 in Zofingen, Switzerland) is a controversial Swiss author who is best known for his theories about extraterrestrial influence on human culture since prehistoric times, known as paleocontact and ancient astronaut theory. ... In linguistics and ethnology, Semitic (from the Biblical Shem, Hebrew: שם, translated as name, Arabic: سام) was first used to refer to a language family of largely Middle Eastern origin, now called the Semitic languages. ... Sumer (or Shumer, Sumeria, Shinar, native ki-en-gir) formed the southern part of Mesopotamia from the time of settlement by the Sumerians until the time of Babylonia. ... Look up Cuneiform in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Fallen Angels (1991) (ISBN 0743435826) is a Prometheus Award-winning novel by science fiction authors Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle, and Michael Flynn. ... For other uses, see Genesis (disambiguation). ... For the fictional Anunnaki from Demon: The Fallen, see Annunaki (White Wolf), the Outlanders series by Mark Ellis, and The Empire Chronicles Ancient Sumerian cylinder seal impression depicting the Annunaki. ... Thoth (Ramesseum, Luxor) Thoth (his Greek name derived from the Egyptian *, written by Egyptians as ) was considered one of the most important deities of the Egyptian pantheon, often depicted with the head of an ibis. ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ... A sculpture of the Roman god Mercury by 17th-century Flemish artist Artus Quellinus. ... Babylonia was an ancient state in Iraq), combining the territories of Sumer and Akkad. ... It has been suggested that Assyrian people be merged into this article or section. ... Relief of Suppiluliuma II, last known king of the Hittite Empire The Hittites were an ancient people from KaneÅ¡ who spoke an Indo-European language, and established a kingdom centered at Hattusa (Hittite URU) in north-central Anatolia from the 18th century BC. In the 14th century BC, the Hittite...


The Nephilim, as well as the angel Shemyaza, feature heavily in Storm Constantine's Grigori trilogy. Samyaza (Aramaic: שמיחזה, Greek: Σεμιαζά) also Shemyazaz, Sêmîazâz, Semjâzâ, Shemyaza, Samyaza, Shemhazai, and Amezarak (Ethiopic corruption) is a fallen angel of Christian tradition that ranked in the heavenly hierarchy as one of the Grigori (meaning Watchers in Greek). ... Storm Constantine is a British science fiction and fantasy author, primarily known for her Wraeththu series. ... The Grigori are a group of fallen angels told of in Biblical apocrypha who mated with mortal women, giving rise to a race of hybrids known as the Nephilim, who are described as giants in Genesis 6:4. ...


Nephilim play an important part in Madeleine L'Engle's novel Many Waters and Tess Gerritsen's novel The Mephisto Club. Many Waters is a 1986 novel by Madeleine LEngle, part of the authors Time Quartet. ... Tess Gerritsen is a physician as well as an international and New York Times-bestselling thriller writer. ... The Mephisto Club is a novel that written by Tess Gerritsen. ...


Most of the major characters of the Mortal Instruments Trilogy by Cassandra Clare features the Nephilim. Cassandra Clare is the pseudonym of the author of the YA trilogy, The Mortal Instruments. ...


As in the made-for-tv movie of the same name, The Fallen and it's counterparts by Tom Sniegoski center around one Nephilim The Fallen may refer to: The Fallen / L. Wells, songs by the Scottish alternative rock band Franz Ferdinand. ... Promotional photograph of Sniegoski and his dog. ...


Ryu Kum Chul, author and artists of the Korean manga Ares, has recently begun working on a new series titled Nephilim.


Television and Movies

The BBC television series Hex, contained many references to Nephilim, though the beings referred to as "Nephilim" are actually fallen angels, like their fathers the Grigori. Hex is a British television programme developed by Shine Limited and aired on the Sky One satellite channel. ... The Grigori are a group of fallen angels told of in Biblical apocrypha who mated with mortal women, giving rise to a race of hybrids known as the Nephilim, who are described as giants in Genesis 6:4. ...


ABC Family Channel aired a movie in the Summer of 2006 about a modern day Nephilim discovering his powers called Fallen. Further episodes are due to air during 2007. ABC Family is an American cable television network currently owned by Disney-ABC Television Group, a division of The Walt Disney Company. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the horror film, see Fallen. ...


The X-Files season 5 episode "All Souls" features four congenitally deformed girls who may be Nephilim, and the fight between the Seraphim and the Devil to "claim" them. The X-Files is an American Peabody and Emmy Award-winning science fiction television series created by Chris Carter, which first aired on September 10, 1993, and ended on May 19, 2002. ... 六翼天使 Seraphim(六翼天使) is a Taiwanese symphonic metal band similar to Nightwish and Therion. ... This is an overview of the Devil. ...


An Israeli show is called The Nephilim, and is about people who possess various abilities from escaped alien criminals, back in the time when the world was created.


'The Prophecy 3: The Ascent' movie featured Nephilim as its central storyline.


'The Fallen' a series of 3 episodes featuring a Nephilim called 'The Redeemer' which can absolve fallen angels from their sins and give them back their wings and sends them back to heaven. The Fallen may refer to: The Fallen / L. Wells, songs by the Scottish alternative rock band Franz Ferdinand. ...


Music

Fields of the Nephilim is a gothic rock/gothic metal band formed in Stevenage, Hertfordshire in 1984 Fields of the Nephilim is a gothic rock/industrial band formed in Stevenage, Hertfordshire in 1984. ...


The Blackened Death Metal band Behemoth featured a song on their album Demigod named "The Nephilim Rising." It has been suggested that Bahamut be merged into this article or section. ... The term demigod, meaning half-god, is a modern distinction, often misapplied in Greek mythology. ...


The greek death metal band Septic Flesh wrote a song called "Nephilim Sons" in "Revolution DNA" album. Septic Flesh are a gothic-influenced death metal band from Athens, Greece with dark and macabre synth atmospherics very similar to famed countrymates Rotting Christ. ...


The Punk Rock band AFI wrote a song on their 5th album, The Art of Drowning, called "The Nephilim". Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... AFI, in recent years short for A Fire Inside, is an American band from Ukiah, California. ... The Art of Drowning is an album by AFI, released in 2000. ...


Nephilim is a metal band from Southern California, formed in 2006.


Japanese rock group abingdon boys school's third single is called "Nephilim". For the school in Oxfordshire, see Abingdon School. ... Nephilim is the third single released by the Japanese rock band, abingdon boys school. ...


The band, Wolfmother, has a song called colossal that may be referring to Nephilim.


The music artist, The J.Hexx Project refers to himself as a Annunaki or Nephilite. www.the.jhexxproject.com


The Technical Death Metal band Behemoth (band) wrote a song on one of their albums, Demigod (album), called "The Nephilim Rising" Technical death metal, or tech death for short, is a term used to describe bands in the subgenre death metal. ... Behemoth ( ) is a Polish death metal band. ... Demigod is an album released in 2004 by Polish blackened death metal band Behemoth. ...


Computer games

The Playstation 2, Personal computer and Macintosh game Tomb Raider: The Angel of Darkness has a plot centered around a secret cult, hell bent on reviving one of the last remaining Nephilim that was discovered in Cappadocia - Turkey. PS2 redirects here. ... For other uses, see Macintosh (disambiguation) and Mac. ...


In Blue Stinger, there is a creature called Nephilim. Blue Stinger is an survival horror game released in 1999 for the Dreamcast game console. ...


In the computer game Wing Commander: Prophecy, Nephilim is the given codename of an alien race that begins a conquest expanding from near the remains of the Kilrathi homeworld. Similarly in the game Freespace and its sequel Freespace 2 it is the given codename for a Shivan bomber craft. The Kilrathi are a race of warlike, felinoid aliens in the popular computer game series Wing Commander by Origin Systems. ... Descent: Freespace Screenshot Freespace 2 Screenshot Descent: FreeSpace is a space simulation computer game series developed by Volition Inc. ... FreeSpace 2 is a space simulation computer game developed by Volition, Inc. ... For other uses, see Siva (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bomber (disambiguation). ...


In the computer game Shadowbane, the Nephilim are one of the playable races, introduced by the Rise of Chaos expansion on December 9, 2003. Shadowbane is a free player-driven fantasy computer role-playing game (MMORPG) created by Wolfpack Studios and published on March 25, 2003 by Ubisoft for Windows and Mac platforms. ...


In the computer game Lineage II, various Nephilim populate the necropolises and catacombs. Lineage II: The Chaotic Throne (Korean:리니지 2) is a fantasy massive multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) for the PC, and a prequel to Lineage. ...


In the Exile and Avernum computer game series by Spiderweb Software, the Nephilim are a race of cat-people native to the surface. They live by a tribal system. Some tribes are friendly; others are hostile to humans. The Empire, the human government that rules the surface, works to eradicate the Nephilim or banish them to Avernum, a series of caves beneath the surface. Avernum is a series of computer-based role-playing games by Spiderweb Software available for Macintosh and Windows_based computers. ... Spiderweb Software is a small video game developer founded in 1994, concentrating on shareware games for the Apple Macintosh and Microsoft Windows. ...


In the Xenosaga Trilogy, a character named Nephilim was the test subject for the first Zohar Link Experiment on Earth in the 21st century. 4000 years later, Joachim Mizrahi built a device called the Song of Nephilim that served as an ignition key for the Original Zohar. It broadcasts a wavelength similar to music that causes human consciousness to link with U-DO.


In Act Five of the Diablo II: Lord of Destruction expansion pack, the player has to defeat the Ancients in order to fight Baal. The Ancients call themselves 'spirits of the Nephilim'. For other uses, see Baal (disambiguation). ...


In EvE Online, a pirate gang known as the Angels uses various biblical names for their ships, among them the Machariel-class battleships, the "Angel Nephilim".


Roleplaying Games

A role-playing game named "Nephilim" explores the secret world of Nephilim who are reincarnated in living human hosts. The game is seemingly steeped in a wealth of so-called occult knowledge. Whether this is just background for the game, or an attempt to share knowledge is difficult to discern.


In the backstory of the table-top wargame Warhammer 40,000, there are two types of servitors (see Adeptus Mechanicus) called Cherubim and Nephilim that are used by the Imperial Church. Cherubim are vat-grown servitors that appear as babies with wings implanted in their backs (these are sometimes accompanied by other implants, depending on what function the Cherubim is intended to perform), while Nephilim are the same, except they are normal children who have been mind-scrubbed (all memory erased) and dosed with numerous chemicals to retard the aging process and the same Cherubim wings are implanted into their backs. Warhammer 40,000 (informally known as Warhammer 40K, WH40K, W40K or just 40K) is a science fantasy game produced by Games Workshop. ... In the fictional Warhammer 40,000 universe, the Adeptus Mechanicus is an institution of the Imperium dedicated to the preservation and restoration of science and technology. ...


In the Guildpact expansion of Magic: The Gathering, there are five bizarre creatures with the type Nephilim: Dune-Brood Nephilim, Glint-Eye Nephilim, Ink-Treader Nephilim, Witch-Maw Nephilim and Yore-Tiller Nephilim. They are, by now, the only four-colored creatures in the history of the game. There are also two cards, Blessing of the Nephilim and Might of the Nephilim, which reward creatures for having multiple colors. In the novel, they were supposedly massive, unkillable monstrosities, but all but one were killed during the novel's storyline. Guildpact is a Magic: The Gathering set, second in the Ravnica Block. ... Magic: The Gathering (colloq. ...


See also

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... // Paintings from Val Camonica, Italy, c. ... The Grigori are a group of fallen angels told of in Biblical apocrypha who mated with mortal women, giving rise to a race of hybrids known as the Nephilim, who are described as giants in Genesis 6:4. ... Edom (אֱדוֹם, Standard Hebrew Edom, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĔḏôm) sounds like the Biblical Hebrew word for red and is a vividly apposite designation for the red sandstones of Edom. ... The Kenites or Kainites (in Hebrew, Kainim) were a tribe of the ancient Levant, possibly a branch of the Midianite nation. ... Serpent seed is a term for the belief that Satan had sexual intercourse with Eve, and that Cain was the offspring of the union. ... Zecharia Sitchins photograph from The 12th Planet Zecharia Sitchin (born 1922)[1] is a best-selling author of books promoting the ancient astronaut theory for human origins. ... David Icke David Vaughan Icke (pronounced IKE //) (born April 29, 1952 in Leicester, England) is a British writer and public speaker who has devoted himself since 1990 to researching who and what is really controlling the world. ... Michael S. Heiser is a scholar in Near-Eastern Semitic Languages, Koine Greek, and Sumerian, as well as ancient Near-Eastern religions, biblical studies, and Second Temple Jewish monotheism. ... Categories: Judaism-related stubs | Jewish texts ... Charles Chuck Missler is an author, conservative Bible teacher, and founder of the Koinonia House ministry based out of Coeur dAlene, Idaho. ... Sir Laurence Gardner, historian, Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, Professional Member of the Institute of Nanotechnology, Chevalier de St. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Genesis 6:1–4, New American Bible.
  2. ^ New American Bible, footnotes page 12, referring to 6:1–4.
  3. ^ Book of Numbers, New American Bible.
  4. ^ New American Bible, footnotes page 1370, referring to verse 6.
  5. ^ Jude 1:6–7, New American Bible.
  6. ^ Hamishtadel (his Bible commentary ad. loc.)
  7. ^ However see Genesis Rabbah (26,8) that explicitly states that this is not the correct interpretation and that it should be understood simply as a title for a judge (cf. Exodus 22:8) or a mighty warrior.
  8. ^ Peake's commentary on the Bible
  9. ^ Targum Yonathan, [1]
  10. ^ Genesis 14:5
  11. ^ Deuteronomy 3:11 of New International Version
  12. ^ Deuteronomy 2:11
  13. ^ 2 Samuel 21:19, some translations have brother of Goliath rather than just Goliath, though the latter is more accurate to the masoretic text
  14. ^ Numbers 13:32-33, English Standard Version
  15. ^ Sitchin, Zecharia (1995). Genesis Revisited: Is Modern Science Catching Up with Ancient Knowledge?. Avon Books. ISBN 978-0380761593. 

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Masoretic Text (MT) is the Hebrew text of the Tanakh approved for general use in Judaism. ... Zecharia Sitchins photograph from The 12th Planet Zecharia Sitchin (born 1922)[1] is a best-selling author of books promoting the ancient astronaut theory for human origins. ... Avon is a paperback imprint of HarperCollins. ...

External links

This entry incorporates text from the public domain Easton's Bible Dictionary, originally published in 1897. Adobe Acrobat is a family of application software by Adobe Systems. ... Adobe Acrobat is a family of application software by Adobe Systems. ... Eastons Bible Dictionary generally refers to the Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition, by Matthew George Easton M.A., D.D. (1823-1894), published three years after Eastons death in 1897 by Thomas Nelson. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Nephilim - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2624 words)
In the Torah, the Anakim are the descendants of Anak, and dwelt in the south of Palestine, in the neighbourhood of Hebron.
Nephilim is a role-playing game by Chaosium, in which the players take on the roles of ancient spirits that can move from one human incarnation to another.
The Nephilim are a race of beings from a parallel plane that interact with humans in Gregory Keyes's tetralogy, The Age of Unreason.
Nephilim at AllExperts (1634 words)
In the Hebrew Bible and several non-canonical Jewish and early Christian writings, nephilim (in Hebrew הנּפלים; means the fallen [ones]) are a people created by the cross-breeding of the "sons of God" (beney ha'elohim, בני האלהים) and the "daughters of men".
Some commentators suggest the nephilim were believed to have been fathered by members of a proto-Hebrew pantheon, and are a brief glimpse of early Hebrew religion, most of the details of which was later edited out from the torah.
While we were there, we saw the nephilim, they were sons of anak, who descended from the nephilim, and we saw ourselves as tiny grasshoppers and that's what we were in their eyes...
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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