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Encyclopedia > Neolithic religion

The Neolithic religion is the hypothetical religion attributed to the people of the Neolithic period in the Levant and Europe, and probably related to the Indoeuropean and Semitic religions. The Neolithic (or New Stone Age) was a period in the development of human technology that is traditionally the last part of the Stone Age. ... The Levant Levant is an imprecise geographical term historically referring to a large area in the Middle East south of the Taurus Mountains, bounded by the Mediterranean Sea on the west, and by the northern Arabian Desert and Upper Mesopotamia to the east. ... Map showing the Neolithic expansions from the 7th to the 5th millennium BC Europe in ca. ... Ancient anthropomorphic Ukrainian stone stela (Kernosovka stela), possibly depicting a late Proto-Indo-European god, most likely Dyeus, the thunderer. ... Semitic gods refers to the gods or deities of peoples generally classified as speaking a Semitic language. ...

Contents


Origins

The Neolithic religion probably originated in the Paleolithic religion, which appeared to worship a Mother Goddess. The Paleolithic or Palaeolithic (Greek παλαιός paleos=old and λίθος lithos=stone or the Old Stone Age) was the first period in the development of human technology of the Stone Age. ... The Venus of Berekhet Ram is a small venus figurine that was found on the Golan Heights in Israel. ... Goddess worship is a general description for the veneration of a female Goddess or goddesses. ...


Deities and Spirits

These are the possible Deities, Spirits and other characters from Neolithic Mythology. The Mother Goddess seems to be the Supreme Being. It has been suggested that Great Mother be merged into this article or section. ... A deity or a god, is a postulated preternatural being, usually, but not always, of significant power, worshipped, thought holy, divine, or sacred, held in high regard, or respected by human beings. ...


Deities

It has been suggested that Great Mother be merged into this article or section. ... Astarte on a car with four branches protruding from roof. ... Map showing the Neolithic expansions from the 7th to the 5th millennium BC Europe in ca. ... External links Venus figures from the Stone Age Images of women in ancient art http://perso. ... The sky father is a recurring theme in pagan and neopagan mythology. ... *Dyēus is the reconstructed chief god of the Proto-Indo-European pantheon. ... Ēl is a northwest Semitic word and name translated into English as either god or God or left untranslated as El, depending on the context. ... Haddad - בעל הדד - حداد (in Ugaritic Haddu) was a very important northwest Semitic storm god and rain god, cognate in name and origin with the Akkadian god Adad. ... Baal is a Semitic title and honorific meaning lord that is used for various gods, spirits and demons particularly of the Levant. ... Many cultures have incorporated a deity of death into their mythology or religion. ... Tibetan Dharmapala at the Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois Yama (Sanskrit: यम) is the lord of death, whose first recorded appearance is in the Vedas. ... Yam, Yamm, or Yaw (jaʊ) is the name of the Levantine god of chaos and mass-destruction, and in some myths he is one of the ilhm (Els) or sons of El. ... The Trundholm sun chariot pulled by a horse is believed to be a sculpture illustrating an important part of Nordic Bronze Age mythology. ... A Sun chariot is a mythological representation of the Sun riding in a chariot. ... Ra in his Solar barge A Solar barge (also Solar bark, Solar boat, Sun boat) is a mythological representation of the Sun riding in a boat. ... Map showing the Neolithic expansions from the 7th to the 5th millennium BC Europe in ca. ... Stonehenge Stonehenge is a Neolithic and Bronze Age megalithic monument located near Amesbury in the English county of Wiltshire, about 8 miles (13 km) northwest of Salisbury. ... In the study of mythology, a lunar deity is a god or goddess associated with or symbolizing the moon: see moon (mythology). ... Map showing the Neolithic expansions from the 7th to the 5th millennium BC Europe in ca. ... Stonehenge Stonehenge is a Neolithic and Bronze Age megalithic monument located near Amesbury in the English county of Wiltshire, about 8 miles (13 km) northwest of Salisbury. ...

Lesser Spirits

This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Marble sculpture of Pan copulating with a goat, recovered from Herculaneum Pan (Greek , genitive ) is the Greek god who watches over shepherds and their flocks. ... The Green Man is a symbol of uncertain origin and meaning, commonly employed as a decorative architectural device in the British Isles and many parts of continental Europe. ... Depiction of Cernunnos from the Pilier des nautes, Paris Cernunnos in Celtic polytheism is the deified spirit of horned male animals, especially of stags, a nature god associated with produce and fertility. ... In Roman mythology, every man had a genius and every woman a juno (Juno was also the name for the queen of the gods). ... Hylas and the Nymphs by John William Waterhouse In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, sometimes bound to a particular location or landform. ... In mythology and in fiction, Faerie (see also fairy) is an otherworldly realm, home to the Fae or fairies, though many believe this place to be neither mythical nor fictional, but quite real. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Ancient Assyrian stone relief of a genie Genie is the English term for the Arabic jinni | جن. In pre-Islamic Arabian mythology and in Islam, a jinni (also djinni or djini) is a member of the jinn (or djinn), a race of creatures. ... Teraphim is a Hebrew word, found only in the plural, of uncertain etymology. ... Statue of Tawaret In Egyptian mythology, Tawaret (also spelt Taurt, Tuat, Taueret, Tuart, Ta-weret, Taweret, and Taueret, and in Greek, Thoeris and Toeris) was originally the demon-wife of Apep, the original god of evil. ... The god Bes. ... Altaic is a putative language family which would include 60 languages spoken by about 250 million people, mostly in and around central Asia. ... -1... Serpent is a word of Latin origin (serpens, serpentis) that is normally substituted for snake in a specifically mythic or religious context, in order to distinguish such creatures from the field of biology. ... Thor goes fishing for the Midgard Serpent in this picture from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... Typhon (Typhaon, Typhoeus, Typhus), in Greek mythology, was the final son of Gaia, this time with Tartarus, the offspring of the Earth and the cavernous void beneath: But when Zeus had driven the Titans from heaven, huge Earth bare her youngest child Typhoeus of the love of —Hesiod, Theogony 820... In Hinduism, Vritra (Sanskrit वृत्र Vṛtra, the enveloper) was a serpent or dragon, the personification of drought and enemy of Indra. ... This article is about the god Veles, for the city in Macedonia see Veles, Macedonia Veles (Volos, Weles, Voloh) is a Slavic god, thought to be the deity of: cattle, commerce, music, the underworld. ... In Hittite mythology, Illuyanka was a dragon slain by Teshub. ... Tiamat is a primeval monster/goddess in Babylonian and Sumerian mythology, and a central figure in the Enûma Elish creation epic. ... This page is about the biblical creature; for other uses, see Leviathan (disambiguation). ... In Jewish folklore Tannin is the name of a demon associated either with a dragon or a serpent. ... Map showing the Neolithic expansions from the 7th to the 5th millennium BC Europe in ca. ... Ley lines are alignments of a number of places of geographical interest, such as ancient megaliths. ... The worship of the Sacred Bull throughout the ancient world is most familiar in the episode of the idol of the Golden Calf made by Aaron and worshipped by the Hebrews in the wilderness of Sinai (Exodus). ... In Greek mythology, the Cretan Bull was either the bull that carried away Europa or the bull Pasiphae fell in love with. ... Adoration of the Golden Calf by Nicolas Poussin: imagery influenced by the Greco-Roman bacchanal In the Hebrew Bible the golden calf was an idol made by Aaron for the Israelites during Mosess unexpectedly long absence. ... Apis can refer to the following: Apis — An Egyptian god Apis — A Bee genus Apis — In Greek mythology a prophet. ... Map showing the Neolithic expansions from the 7th to the 5th millennium BC Europe in ca. ... Lascaux Lascaux is a complex of caves in southwestern France famous for its cave paintings. ...

Others

Various creation stories have a first man, the first human being. ... Manu has several meanings: *Manu in Indo-European mythology was the first man, hero and first Holy King to rule this earth, see Manu (Hinduism), Germanic Mannus, Mannaz. ... Adapa was an Ancient Sumerian king. ... According to the Book of Genesis in Judaisms Torah and the Christian Bible, and Islams Quran, Adam was the first man created by God. ... Mount Kailash, depicting the holy family of Shiva and Ganesha The axis mundi (world axis), in religion or mythology, is the center of the world and/or the connection between heaven and earth. ... In certain Indo-European religions there was a belief in a world tree, such as Yggdrasil, in Norse mythology, an Oak in Slavic mythology and in Hinduism, a banyan tree. ... Mytikas Summit, Mt Olympus Mount Olympus (also transliterated as Mount Ólympos, and on modern maps, Óros Ólimbos) is the highest mountain in Greece, at 2,919 (according to new measurements [1]) meters high and one of the highest, in real absolute altitude from base to top, of Europe since its... The Fall of Man by Lucas Cranach, a 16th century German depiction of Eden The Garden of Eden (from Hebrew Gan Eden, גַּן עֵדֶן) is described by the Book of Genesis as being the place where the first man - Adam - and woman - Eve - lived after they were created by God. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about the Biblical book. ... Babylon is the Greek variant of Akkadian Babilu, ܒܒܠ in Assyrian, an ancient city in Mesopotamia (Location: , , modern Al Hillah, Iraq). ...

Motifs in Neolithic Mythology

The Twins

These are two twins, one is sacrificed (Remus, Tuisto, Abel) and becomes the God of Death, the other sacrifced his twin (Romulus, Mannus, Cain) and starts mankind. They are the sons of the supreme god. In virtually all the mythology of the world, the Twin represents some other aspect of the Self, a doppelganger in some way. ...


Indo-European mythologies have Yemnos and Manu - Romulus and Remus (Roman), Castor and Pollux / Amphion and Zethus (Greek), Tuisto and Mannus (Germanic). Ancient anthropomorphic Ukrainian stone stela (Kernosovka stela), possibly depicting a late Proto-Indo-European god, most likely Dyeus, the thunderer. ... Romulus and Remus, (771 BC¹- July 5, 717 BC Romulus) (771 BC- April 21, 753 BC Remus), the traditional founders of Rome, appeared in Roman mythology as the twin sons of the priestess Rhea Silvia, fathered by the god of war Mars. ... Religion in ancient Rome combined several different cult practices and embraced more than a single set of beliefs. ... In Greek mythology, Castor (or Kastor) and Pollux (sometimes called Polydeuces) were the twin sons of Leda and the brothers of Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra. ... Amphion (native of two lands) and Zethus, in ancient Greek mythology, were the twin sons of Zeus by Antiope. ... Tuisto or Tuisco was according to Tacitus (Germania, ch. ... Mannus or rather Manno, son of Tuisto was a mythological character from whom a number of Germanic tribes were descended. ...


Semitic mythologies have Cain and Abel (Hebrew) , Lahmu and Lahamu (Mesopotamian). In Egyptian mythology Set and Osiris may be related. Semitic gods refers to the gods or deities of peoples generally classified as speaking a Semitic language. ... The story of Cain and Abel, mentioned in the Torah and the Bible at Genesis 4, and Quran at 5:27-32, tells of the somewhat unexplained murder of Abel by his brother, Cain. ... Mythology is the study of myths: stories of a particular culture that it believes to be true and that feature a specific religious or belief system. ... Lahmu is a deity from Akkadian mythology, first-born son of Apsu and Tiamat. ... Lahamu was the first-born daughter of Tiamat and Apsu in Akkadian mythology. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Egyptian mythology or Egyptian religion is the succession of tentative beliefs held by the people of Egypt for over three thousand years, prior to major exposure to Christianity and Islam. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Osiris (Greek language, also Usiris; the Egyptian language name is variously transliterated Asar, Aser, Ausar, or Ausare) is the Egyptian God of the dead and the underworld. ...


The Thunder God's Epithet

In Neolithic mythology, the Thunder god is probably the (if not one of few) gods that have an epithet to their name. In Indo-European, *Perkwunos had the epithet *Tarun, so Perkwunos Tarun meant The thundering Striker. In Semitic, *Haddu had the epithet *Ba'lu, so Haddu Ba'lu meant The Thunder lord. A deity or a god, is a postulated preternatural being, usually, but not always, of significant power, worshipped, thought holy, divine, or sacred, held in high regard, or respected by human beings. ... An epithet (Greek - επιθετον and Latin - epitheton; literally meaning imposed) is a descriptive word or phrase. ... The name of an Indo-European thunder god may be reconstructed as *Perkwunos or *Perkunos. ... Thor carries his hammer and wears his belt of strength in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... Haddad - בעל הדד - حداد (in Ugaritic Haddu) was a very important northwest Semitic storm god and rain god, cognate in name and origin with the Akkadian god Adad. ... Baal is a Semitic title and honorific meaning lord that is used for various gods, spirits and demons particularly of the Levant. ...


Sources

  • The Sun And The Serpent (Paul Broadhurst & Hamish Miller) (Mythos) (2003)

Deities of the Proto-Indo-Europeans 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On Wikipedia

Linear Pottery culture#Religion
Proto-Indo-European religion#Mythology
Semitic gods#Proto-Semitic Gods
The Linear Pottery culture or (German) Linearbandkeramik (abbr. ... Ancient anthropomorphic Ukrainian stone stela (Kernosovka stela), possibly depicting a late Proto-Indo-European god, most likely Dyeus, the thunderer. ... Semitic gods refers to the gods or deities of peoples generally classified as speaking a Semitic language. ...


 
 

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