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Encyclopedia > Nenagh
Nenagh
An tAonach
Location
WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates:
52°51′58″N 8°11′54″W / 52.866228, -8.198204
Irish Grid Reference
R865787
Statistics
Province: Munster
County: County Tipperary
Elevation: 72 m (236 ft)
Population (2002)
 - Town:
 - Rural:
 
6,121 
333
Website: www.nenaghtc.ie

Nenagh (An tAonach in Irish) is the largest town in North Tipperary, Ireland, with a population in 2006 of 7,424.[1] It lies on the Nenagh River, which empties into Lough Derg at Dromineer, 9 km to the north-west, a popular centre for sailing and other water sports. Bullet for locations in Ireland, displays location and not area. ... Image File history File links Ireland Map with County Tipperary Magnified. ... The Global Positioning System (GPS) is the only fully functional Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). ... The Irish national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Ireland. ... When under Gaelic rule, Ireland was divided into provinces to replace the earlier system of the túatha. ... Statistics Area: 24,607. ... For much of its history, the island of Ireland was divided into 32 counties (Irish language contae or condae, pronounced IPA: ). Two historical counties, County Desmond and County Coleraine, no longer exist, while several county names have changed. ... Statistics Province: Munster County Town: North: Nenagh South: Clonmel Code: North: TN South: TS Area: 4,303 km² Population (2006) 149,040[[1]] County Tipperary (Contae Thiobraid Árann in Irish) is a county in the Republic of Ireland, and situated in the province of Munster. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... North Tipperary (Tiobraid Árann Thuaidh in Irish), known until 2002 as Tipperary North Riding, is a local government area in Ireland, consisting of the northern part of County Tipperary. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Looking out towards County Clare from County Tipperary across the southern part of Lough Derg. ... Categories: Ireland-place stubs ...


The Silvermines mountains lie to the south of the town, with the highest peak being Keeper Hill (Sliabh Ciamalta in Irish) at 694m. The Silvermines Mountains have witnessed mining for silver and base metals on and off over seven hundred years. Traces of 19th century mine workings remain. Silvermines are both a mountain range, a town in that mountain range, and a defunct mining site in the Republic of Ireland. ... Slievekimalta, also known as Keeper Hill, is a mountain in County Tipperary, Ireland. ... General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5, d Appearance lustrous white metal Standard atomic weight 107. ...


Nenagh was originally a market town, and its name in Irish, An tAonach means Ormonde (East Munster) Fair. Nenagh is today a busy commercial town. Statistics Area: 24,607. ...


Chief amongst the town's attractions is Nenagh Castle, constructed by the Fitzwalter (also known as Butler) family in the 13th Century, [2] and one of the finest of its kind in Ireland. (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ...


Also worth a visit is the ruined Franciscan abbey, which was built in 1212 in the reign of Henry III and was one of the richest religious houses in Ireland.[3] It was in use for six hundred years, Fr. Patrick Harty, who died in 1817, being its last inhabitant. The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... Events The first Great Fire of London burns most of the city to the ground Battle of Navas de Tolosa Childrens crusade Crusaders push the Muslims out of northern Spain In Japan, Kamo no Chōmei writes the Hōjōki, one of the great works of classical Japanese... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John Lackland as King of England, reigning for fifty-six years from 1216 to his death. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


The town is governed by Nenagh Town Council.

Contents

History

The town was one of the ancient manors of the Butlers who received the grant of a fair from Henry VIII. In 1550 the town and friary were burned by O'Carroll. In 1641 the town was captured by Owen Roe O'Neill, but shortly afterwards it was recaptured by Lord Inchiquin. It surrendered to Ireton in 1651 during the Cromwellian period and was burned by Sarsfield in 1688 during the Williamite Wars. Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Events February 7 - Julius III becomes Pope. ... Events The Long Parliament passes a series of legislation designed to contain Charles Is absolutist tendencies. ... Eoghan Rua Ó Néill, anglicised as Owen Roe ONeill (c. ... Henry Ireton Henry Ireton (1611 - November 26, 1651), was an English general in the army of Parliament during the English Civil War. ... // Events January 1 - Charles II crowned King of Scotland in Scone. ... Unfinished portrait miniature of Oliver Cromwell by Samuel Cooper, 1657. ... Patrick Sarsfield (d. ... // Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. ... For the context of this war see Jacobitism and Glorious Revolution. ...


Daniel O'Connell held one of his Monster meetings for Repeal of the Act of Union at Grange outside of Nenagh. Daniel OConnell Daniel OConnell (6 August 1775 – 15 May 1847) (Irish: Dónal Ó Conaill), known as The Liberator or The Emancipator, was Irelands predominant political leader in the first half of the nineteenth century who championed the cause of the down-trodden Catholic population. ... For other persons named Daniel OConnell, see Daniel OConnell (disambiguation). ... Repeal was a demand by Irish nationalist leader Daniel OConnell for the repeal of the 1801 Act of Union which had merged the Kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland to form the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... The Act of Union 1800 merged the Kingdom of Ireland and the Kingdom of Great Britain (itself a merger of England and Wales and Scotland under the Act of Union 1707) to create the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on 1 January 1801. ...


Major Buildings

Nenagh Castle

Nenagh Castle

This fine Norman Keep was built c1200 by Theobald Fitzwalter the first Butler and completed by his son also Theobald c1220. [2] The Butlers later became Earls of Ormonde and Nenagh remained their principal seat until 1391 when the seat was moved to Kilkenny Castle where it remains to this day. A project is currently under way to develop the castle and its surrounds. This project will position the castle as the main tourist attraction in the area. The keep is over thirty metres high, and has a base of sixteen metres. Nenagh Castle, Ireland File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Nenagh Castle, Ireland File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Events University of Paris receives charter from Philip II of France The Kanem-Bornu Empire was established in northern Africa around the year 1200 Mongol victory over Northern China — 30,000,000 killed Births Al-Abhari, Persian philosopher and mathematician (died 1265) Ulrich von Liechtenstein, German nobleman and poet (died... // The world in 1220 Middle Ages in Europe Fifth Crusade (1217-1221) Events Mongols first invade Abbasid caliphate - Bukhara and Samarkand taken End of the Kara-Khitan Khanate, destroyed by Genghis Khans Mongolian cavalry Dominican Order approved by Pope Honorius III Frederick II crowned Holy Roman Emperor by Pope... The peerage titles Earl, Marquess and Duke of Ormonde have a long and complex history. ... Kilkenny Castle Kilkenny Castle is a castle in Kilkenny, Ireland. ...


The crown of mock crenellations and ring of clerestory windows were added at the instigation of Rev. William Flannery in 1861. The intention was that the keep would become the bell-tower of a Pugin-designed cathedral which was never built. [2] Though not true to historic character these additions have ensured the iconic status of the keep which ensures that it features on the logos of many local clubs and businesses. Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... (Image) Edward Welby Pugin (1834-1875)was the eldest son of Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin, a famous architect & designer of Gothic architecture. ...


St Mary's of the Rosary Catholic Church

This neo-gothic church was built in 1895 to a design by architect Walter G Doolin. [4] It was constructed by John Sisk using Lahorna stone and Portroe slate with the Portland stone of the arches being the only imported material.[4] Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


St Marys Church of Ireland Church

The adjacent Church of Ireland church was built in 1862 to a design by the architect Joseph Welland.[3] It is striking in its simplicity in contrast to its larger and more ornate neighbour. 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Courthouse

Nenagh Courthouse
Nenagh Courthouse

Nenagh Courthouse was built in 1843 to the design of Architect John B Keane.[3] The design was similar to his previous courthouse in Tullamore which in turn followed William Morrison's designs for Carlow and Tralee.[3] The courthouse has recently been refurbished following the moving of the County Council offices to the new Civic Offices. The grounds of the refurbished courthouse nearby have recently become the site of bronze sculptures of three Olympic gold medallists with Nenagh links. Image File history File linksMetadata Nenagh_Courthouse. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Nenagh_Courthouse. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 52. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference Q828141 Statistics Province: Munster County: Elevation: 37 m Population (2006)  - Town:  - Rural:   20,258  1,932 Website: www. ... Image File history File links Nenagh_olympic. ...


Gaol and Governors House

The old gaol, with its beautiful octagonal governor's residence, has been happily reduced to the status of an historic monument. Only one Gaol block remains intact. The Governor's Residence and Gaol Gatehouse currently house Nenagh & District Heritage Centre.


New Civic Offices

New Civic Offices have recently opened on the Limerick Road housing both North Tipperary County Council and Nenagh Town Council. Designed by Ahrends Burton & Koralek, they have won international recognition for their striking modern design. [5] WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference R574572 Statistics Province: Munster County: Area: 20. ... North Tipperary (Tiobraid Árann Thuaidh in Irish), known until 2002 as Tipperary North Riding, is a local government area in Ireland, consisting of the northern part of County Tipperary. ...


Town Hall

The Town Hall in Banba Square
The Town Hall in Banba Square

This distinctive building, which until 2005 housed the offices of Nenagh Town Council and up until the 1980s Nenagh Public Library, was built in 1895 and designed by the then Town Engineer Robert Gill (father of Tomás Mac Giolla).[3] Image File history File linksMetadata Banba_Square. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Banba_Square. ... Tomás Mac Giolla (1924- ) is a former Irish politician. ...


Transport

Road

Nenagh is situated on the R445 Regional Road, which links it to the N7 National Primary Route (which bypasses the town to the south) between Limerick and Dublin, as well as the N52 National Secondary Route to Birr (and through the Midlands to Dundalk). A Regional Road in the Republic of Ireland is a class of road not forming a major route (such as a National Primary Route, or National Secondary Route), but nevertheless forming a link in the national road network. ... A Regional Road in the Republic of Ireland is a class of road not forming a major route (such as a National Primary Route, or National Secondary Route), but nevertheless forming a link in the national road network. ... The N7 road is a National Primary Route in the Republic of Ireland, connecting Dublin and Limerick. ... A directional road sign in the Republic of Ireland on an other road (not a national road) at Portlaoise, County Laois, including patches for national roads and advance warning of bridge height restrictions. ... This article is about the city in Ireland. ... Dublin city centre at night WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Leinster County: Dáil Éireann: Dublin Central, Dublin North Central, Dublin North East, Dublin North West, Dublin South Central, Dublin South East European Parliament: Dublin Dialling Code: +353 1 Postal District(s): D1-24, D6W Area: 114. ... A National Secondary Route is a category of road in the Republic of Ireland. ... A National Secondary Route is a category of road in the Republic of Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ...


Rail

Nenagh has a station on the railway line between Limerick and Ballybrophy. Passengers can connect at Ballybrophy to trains heading northeast to Dublin or southwest to Cork or Tralee. Nenagh railway station opened on 5 October 1863.[6] WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference R574572 Statistics Province: Munster County: Area: 20. ... Ballybrophy (Baile Uí Bhróithe in Irish) is a village in Laois, Ireland, with a population recorded in the 2002 census of 145. ... Dublin city centre at night WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Leinster County: Dáil Éireann: Dublin Central, Dublin North Central, Dublin North East, Dublin North West, Dublin South Central, Dublin South East European Parliament: Dublin Dialling Code: +353 1 Postal District(s): D1-24, D6W Area: 114. ... This article is about the city in the Republic of Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference Q828141 Statistics Province: Munster County: Elevation: 37 m Population (2006)  - Town:  - Rural:   20,258  1,932 Website: www. ... Nenagh railway station serves the town of Nenagh in County Tipperary, Republic of Ireland. ... is the 278th day of the year (279th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The railway line is lightly used due to low passenger numbers. Lack of upkeep means the line is restricted to speeds of 25 miles per hour (40 kilometers per hour) and the existing trains are poorly timetabled for commuters. A committee (the Nenagh Rail Steering Committee) working in conjunction with Irish Railway News, had a meeting with Iarnród Éireann on September 1, 2005 to present the results of a traffic study funded by Nenagh Town Council and North Tipperary County Council, and to seek a morning and evening service between Nenagh and Limerick which would increase commuter traffic. Iarnród Éireann agreed to delay an afternoon service from the December 2005 timetable and to work towards an early service when equipment permitted from 2007. This article is about trains in rail transport. ... Commuting is the process of travelling from a place of residence to a place of work. ... Current Iarnród Eireann (Irish Rail) intercity rail network An IÉ commuter train at Tara Street Station, Dublin, 2006 IÉ no. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Statistics Province: Munster County Town: Nenagh Code: TN Area: 2,046 km² Population (2006) 65,988 Website: www. ... Current Iarnród Eireann (Irish Rail) intercity rail network An IÉ commuter train at Tara Street Station, Dublin, 2006 IÉ no. ... December 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → 31 December 2005 (Saturday) 25-year-old Scottish human rights worker Kate Burton and her parents are freed unharmed in the Gaza Strip by the Palestinian gunmen who kidnapped them two days earlier. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


While the twice-a-day service on the Ballybrophy/Limerick line is poor, Nenagh is only 37 km (23 ml) from Thurles, which is on the main Dublin/Cork line, and which has c. 18 trains daily in each direction, including non-stop services to and from Dublin.


Sport

Nenagh has a strong local sporting culture.


GAA

Nenagh Éire Óg Colours
Nenagh Éire Óg Colours

Éire Óg Nenagh is the local Gaelic Athletic Association club and has had a deal of success in County Championships in both football and hurling. The club has been strongly represented on All-Ireland winning Tipperary hurling teams with players such as Mick Burns, Michael Cleary, John Heffernan and Conor O'Donovan. Image File history File links Nenaghflag. ... Image File history File links Nenaghflag. ... Nenagh Éire Óg GAA club is located in the town of Nenagh in North Tipperary. ... For other uses, see GAA (disambiguation). ... The Tipperary County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cumann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Contae Tiobraid Árainn) or Tipperary GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Tipperary. ... For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ... Michael Cleary AO Order of Australia was an Australian politician, elected as a member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly. ...


Rugby

Local Rugby Union club Nenagh Ormond RFC were promoted to the third division of the Rugby AIB League in 2005. The club has produced two full Irish International players: Tony Courtney in the 1920s and more recently Trevor Hogan. For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Nenagh Ormond RFC is an Irish rugby union club. ... There is a National League system of 50 senior rugby union clubs in Ireland. ... Trevor Hogan (born 19 November 1979) is a professional rugby union player. ...


Athletics

The local athletic club Nenagh Olympic were named after three men (Johnny Hayes, Matt McGrath and Bob Tisdall) with Nenagh connections who won Olympic Gold Medals and the badge of the club is three interlocking Olympic Rings in green, white and orange. A statue of the three has been erected in Banba Square in the grounds of the Courthouse. The club has produced many fine athletes including recently Gary Ryan who also represented Ireland at the Olympics. The club also possesses Ireland's first and to date only international standard indoor athletics track at Tyone. Many championships ar being held there including munster championships and even all Ireland championships John Joseph Johnny Hayes (April 10, 1886 - August 25, 1965) was an American athlete, winner of the marathon race at the 1908 Summer Olympics. ... Matthew J. “Matt” McGrath (December 18, 1878 – January 29 1941) was an Irish-American policeman, thrower and Olympic gold medalist. ... Robert Morton Newburgh Bob Tisdall (May 16, 1907 in Nuwara Eliya, Ceylon now Sri Lanka - July 27, 2004 in Nambour, Queensland, Australia) won a gold medal in the 400 m hurdles at the 1932 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... A womens 400 meter hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ... Statistics Area: 24,607. ... Championship is a term used to refer to various forms of sports competitions in which the aim is to decide which individual or team is the champion; that is, the best competitor. ...


Soccer

Home to Nenagh A.F.C.(1951) and Nenagh Celtic F.C.(1981). Nenagh A.F.C.'s home grounds are Brickfields and Islandbawn. Nenagh Celtic's home ground is Lisbunny.


Famous People with Nenagh Connections

Helen Maria Bayly (1804–1869) was the wife of Irish mathematician William Rowan Hamilton. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... Sir William Rowan Hamilton (August 4, 1805 – September 2, 1865) was an Irish mathematician, physicist, and astronomer who made important contributions to the development of optics, dynamics, and algebra. ... John Desmond Bernal (1901-1971) was an Irish-born scientist (from Nenagh, County Tipperary), known for pioneering X-ray crystallography. ... Patrick Donohoe (born Nenagh, County Tipperary, Ireland, 1820–August 16, 1876) was an Irish recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... The Victoria Cross (VC) is a military decoration awarded for valour in the face of the enemy to members of armed forces of some Commonwealth countries and previous British Empire territories. ... John Doyle (born 1957) is one of the two television critics with the Canadian Globe and Mail newspaper. ... The Globe and Mail is a large Canadian English language national newspaper based in Toronto. ... Bernadette Mary Flynn (born 1 August 1979 in Nenagh, Tipperary, Ireland) is an Irish dancer best known for her work in Lord of the Dance and Feet of Flames. ... Irish dancers at St. ... Toasted Heretic was an Irish rock group who attracted a cult following in the late 1980s and 1990s. ... John Joseph Johnny Hayes (April 10, 1886 - August 25, 1965) was an American athlete, winner of the marathon race at the 1908 Summer Olympics. ... Thomas Patrick (T. P.) Gill (1858–1931) was a prominent member of the Irish Parliamentary Party in the late 19th and early 20th century and a Member of Parliament in the British House of Commons representing the South Louth constituency from 1885 to 1892. ... The Irish Parliamentary Party (IPP) (commonly called the Irish Party) was formed in 1882 by Charles Stewart Parnell, the leader of the Nationalist Party, replacing the Home Rule League, as official parliamentary party for Irish nationalist Members of Parliament (MPs) elected to the House of Commons at Westminster within the... The Chords is a named shared by two unrelated musical groups of the 20th Century. ... Trevor Hogan (born 19 November 1979) is a professional rugby union player. ... John Joseph Jones, known as Jack Jones (8 December 1873 - 21 November 1941), was a Labour Party member of the British House of Commons. ... Tomás Mac Giolla (1924- ) is a former Irish politician. ... Categories: Ireland-related stubs | Irish political parties | Republic of Ireland political parties | Northern Ireland political parties ... The Mansion House The Lord Mayor of Dublin is the symbolic head of the city government in the capital of Ireland. ... Shane Patrick Lysaght MacGowan (born December 25, 1957) is an English-born Irish musician. ... Matthew J. “Matt” McGrath (December 18, 1878 – January 29 1941) was an Irish-American policeman, thrower and Olympic gold medalist. ... Daniel Morrissey was a senior Irish politician. ... Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill (1952-) is an Irish poet. ... Michael OKennedy, (born February, 1936) was a senior Irish Fianna Fáil politician. ... Since Ireland joined the the European Economic Community on Jan 1, 1973, the Taoiseach has the right to nominate one member of the European Commission, known as a Commissioner. ... Kildare scuptress Mary Redmond Mary Redmond was a sculptress, born in Nenagh County Tipperary in 1863 and raised in Ardclough County Kildare, Ireland where her father came to work in the limestone quarries. ... Father Alec Reid is an Irish priest who is noted for his facilitator role in the Northern Ireland peace process. ... When discussing the history of Northern Ireland, the peace process is generally considered to cover the events leading up to the 1994 IRA ceasefire, the end of most of the violence of The Troubles, the Belfast (or Good Friday) Agreement, and subsequent political developments. ... Robert Morton Newburgh Bob Tisdall (May 16, 1907 in Nuwara Eliya, Ceylon now Sri Lanka - July 27, 2004 in Nambour, Queensland, Australia) won a gold medal in the 400 m hurdles at the 1932 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. ...

References

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

  1. ^ http://www.cso.ie/census/documents/2006_prelim_table04.pdf
  2. ^ a b c Murphy, Nancy (1993). Nenagh Castle: Chronology and Architecture. Relay Books. ISBN 0-946327-10-6. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Murphy, Nancy (1994). Walkabout Nenagh. Relay Books. ISBN 0-946327-12-2. 
  4. ^ a b Cotter, Rev. Pat (1990). St. Mary's of the Rosary, Nenagh, 1896-1990. 
  5. ^ ABK
  6. ^ Nenagh station. Railscot - Irish Railways. Retrieved on 2007-09-07.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

This is a link page for cities and towns in the Republic of Ireland, including some larger villages, as well as towns, townships or urban centres in Dublin. ... The Nenagh Guardian is a weekly local newspaper that circulates in North Tipperary, Ireland. ... Ardcroney, near Nenagh in North Tipperary, Ireland, is the ancestral home of the Hogan clan. ... Market Houses are a notable feature of many Irish towns with varying styles of architecture, size and ornamentation making for a most interesting feature of the streetscape. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Places to Visit in and Around Nenagh (919 words)
Nenagh Heritage Centre is located in two stone Georgian buildings which were built in 1840-1842 as the Governor’s House and Gatehouse of an extensive goal complex for North Tipperary.
Nenagh Castle is a main attraction in the town.
Tipperary has beautiful lush mountain scenery and the most famous of these hills is known as the Devil's Bit, named for the bite taken out of it by the devil as he rode over Ireland.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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