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Encyclopedia > Nemesis (mythology)
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Nemesis, by Alfred Rethel (1837)
Nemesis, by Alfred Rethel (1837)

Nemesis (in Greek, Νέμεσις), also called Rhamnousia/Rhamnusia ("the goddess of Rhamnous"), at her sanctuary at Rhamnous, north of Marathon, in the Greek mythology was the spirit of divine retribution against those who succumb to hubris, vengeful fate personified as a remorseless goddess. The name Nemesis is related to the Greek word νείμειν, meaning "to give what is due". The Romans equated one aspect of Greek Nemesis, which might be interpreted as "indignation at unmerited advantage", as Invidia (Aronoff 2003). The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... In Greek mythology, the Titans (Greek: Titan; plural: Titanes) were a race of powerful deities that ruled during the legendary Golden Age. ... The twelve gods of Olympus. ... The ancient Greeks had a very small number of see gods. ... For other uses, see Chthon (disambiguation). ... Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek , Mousai: perhaps from the Proto-Indo-European root *men- think[1]) are a number of goddesses or spirits who embody the arts and inspire the creation process with their graces through remembered and improvised song and stage, writing, traditional music and dance. ... Fates redirects here. ... In Greek mythology, Cratos (strength) was a son of Styx and Pallas, brother of Nike, Bia and Zelus. ... This Zelos is the Greek personification. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... In Greek mythology, Metis (wisdom or wise counsel) was a Titaness who was the first great spouse of Zeus, indeed his equal (Hesiod, Theogony 896) and the mother of Athena. ... For the game of graces, see Game of graces. ... In Greek mythology, the Oneiroi were the sons of Hypnos, the god of sleep. ... In Greek mythology, Adrasteia (inescapable; also spelled Adrastia, Adrastea, Adrestea) was a nymph who was charged by Rhea to raise Zeus in secret to protect him from his father Cronus (Krónos). ... Horae in Meyers, 1888 In Greek mythology, the Horae were three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... In Greek mythology, Bia (force) was the personification of force, daughter of Pallas and Styx. ... In Greek mythology, Eros was the god responsible for lust, love, and sex; he was also worshipped as a fertility deity. ... Daughter of Nyx in Greek mythology, Apate was the personification of deceit. ... In Greek mythology, Hesiod mentions Themis among the six sons and six daughters—of whom Cronos was one—of Gaia and Ouranos, that is, of Earth with Sky. ... Eris (ca. ... Look up Thanatos in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In Greek mythology, Hypnos was the personification of sleep; the Roman equivalent was known as Somnus . ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1576x3234, 145 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nemesis (mythology) Alfred Rethel ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1576x3234, 145 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nemesis (mythology) Alfred Rethel ... Alfred Rethel (1816 - December 1, 1859) was a German historical painter. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Statue of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture For the 1934 film, see, see The Goddess (1934 film). ... The site of Rhamnous, the northernmost deme of Attica, lies north of Marathon overlooking the Euboean Strait. ... The site of Rhamnous, the northernmost deme of Attica, lies north of Marathon overlooking the Euboean Strait. ... Marathon (Demotic Greek: Μαραθώνας, Marathónas; Attic/ Katharevousa: Μαραθών, Marathón) is a town in Greece, the site of the battle of Marathon in 490 BC, in which the Athenian army defeated the Persians. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... It has been suggested that Proportional justice be merged into this article or section. ... Hubris or hybris (Greek ), according to its modern usage, is exaggerated self pride or self-confidence (overbearing pride), often resulting in fatal retribution. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... In Roman mythology, Invidia was the goddess of jealousy. ...


Nemesis is now used as a term used to describe one's worst enemy, normally someone or something that is the exact opposite of oneself but is also somehow similar. For example, Professor Moriarty is frequently described as the nemesis of Sherlock Holmes. Professor Moriarty, illustration by Sidney Paget which accompanied the original publication of The Final Problem. Professor James Moriarty is a fictional character who is the best known antagonist (and archenemy) of the detective Sherlock Holmes. ... A portrait of Sherlock Holmes by Sidney Paget from the Strand Magazine, 1891 Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. ...

Contents

Background

Inexorable divine retribution is a major theme in the Hellenic world view, providing the unifying theme of the tragedies of Sophocles and many other literary works. In some metaphysical mythology, Nemesis produced the egg from which hatched two sets of twins: Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra, and the Dioscuri, Castor (Kástor) and Polydeukes (Polydeúkes). Tragedy is one of the oldest forms of drama. ... Sophocles (ancient Greek: ; 495 BC - 406 BC) was the second of three great ancient Greek tragedians. ... Helen. ... Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... After the murder (1882 painting) Clytemnestra (or Clytaemestra) ‘‘(Eng. ... Castor (or Kastor) and Polydeuces (sometimes called Pollux), were in Greek mythology the twin sons of Leda and the brothers of Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra. ... The Gemini or Gemini twins, known in Roman mythology as Castor and Pollux and in Greek as Kastor and Polydeuces, are the twin sons of Leda and the brothers of Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra. ... The Gemini or Gemini twins, known in Roman mythology as Castor and Pollux and in Greek as Kastor and Polydeuces, are the twin sons of Leda and the brothers of Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra. ...


The only sense in which nemesis is used in Homer is as an abstract personification. Hesiod states: "Also deadly Nyx bore Nemesis to afflict mortal men." (Theogony, 223, though perhaps an interpolated line). Nemesis appears in a still more concrete form in a fragment of the epic Cypria. Homer (Greek: , ) was an early Greek poet and aoidos (rhapsode) traditionally credited with the composition of the Iliad and the Odyssey. ... Personification- A kind of metaphore in which a non-human thing is talked about as if it were human. ... Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived... In Greek mythology, Nyx (, Nox in Roman translation) was the primordial goddess of the night. ... Theogony is a poem by Hesiod describing the origins of the gods of the ancient Greeks, ca 700 BC. // Hesiods Theogony a large-scale synthesis of a vast variety of local Greek traditions concerning the gods, organized as a narrative that tells how they came to be and how... The Cypria is one of the lost sections of the eight volume cycle that told the full story of the Trojan War. ...


She is the implacable executrix of justice—that of Zeus in the Olympian scheme of things—but it was clear she existed before him, for her images look similar to several goddesses like Cybele, Rhea, Demeter and Artemis. The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Zeús, genitive: Diós), is... The twelve gods of Olympus. ... Cybele with her attributes. ... Rhea (or Ria meaning she who flows) was the Titaness daughter of Uranus and of Gaia. ... Ceres (Demeter), allegory of August: detail of a fresco by Cosimo Tura, Palazzo Schifanoia, Ferrara, 1469-70. ... The Diana of Versailles, a Roman copy of a sculpture by Leochares (Louvre Museum) In Greek mythology, Artemis (Greek: (nominative) , (genitive) ) was the daughter of Zeus and Leto and the twin sister of Apollo. ...


As the "Goddess of Rhamnous", Nemesis was honoured and placated in an archaic sanctuary in the isolated district of Rhamnous in northeastern Attica. There she was a daughter of Oceanus, the primeval river-ocean that encircles the world. Pausanias noted her iconic statue there. It included a crown of stags and little Nikes and was made by Pheidias after the Battle of Marathon (490 BC), crafted from a block of Parian marble brought by the over-confident Persians, who had intended to make a memorial stele after their expected victory. Attica (in Greek: Αττική, Attike; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. ... Oceanus, with his wife, Tethys, ruled the seas before Poseidon. ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Phidias, (or Pheidias), son of Charmides, (circa 490 BC - circa 430 BC) was an ancient Greek sculptor, universally regarded as the greatest of Greek sculptors. ... Combatants Athens, Plataea Persia Commanders Miltiades, Callimachus â€ , Arimnestus Datis â€ ?, Artaphernes Strength 10,000 Athenians, 1,000 Plataeans 20,000 - 100,000 a Casualties 192 Athenians killed, 11 Plataeans killed (Herodotus) 6,400 killed, 7 ships captured (Herodotus) a These are modern consensus estimates. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 540s BC 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC Years: 495 BC 494 BC 493 BC 492 BC 491 BC - 490 BC - 489 BC 488 BC... Paros (Greek: νήσος Πάρος; Venetian: isola di Paro) is an island of Greece in the central Aegean Sea, in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. ... Venus de Milo, front. ...


The word Nemesis originally meant the distributor of fortune, neither good nor bad, simply in due proportion to each according to his deserts; then, nemesis came to suggest the resentment caused by any disturbance of this right proportion, the sense of justice which could not allow it to pass unpunished. O. Gruppe (1906) and others connect the name with "to feel just resentment". From the fourth century onwards, Nemesis, as the just balancer of Fortune's chance, could be associated with Tyche. Otto Gruppe (1851-1901) was a German mythographer, remembered for his Griechische Mythologie und Religion-Geschichte (1906), which summed up the nineteenth century reading of Greek mythology through surviving texts. ... Fortuna governs the circle of the four stages of life, the Wheel of Fortune, in a manuscript of Carmina Burana In Roman mythology, Fortuna (equivalent to the Greek goddess Tyche) was the personification of luck, hopefully of good luck, but she could be represented veiled and blind, as modern depictions... Tyche on the reverse of this coin by Gordian III. In Greek mythology, Tyche (Roman equivalent: Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. ...

Nemesis, Roman marble from Egypt, 2nd century CE (Louvre)
Nemesis, Roman marble from Egypt, 2nd century CE (Louvre)
Nemesis on a brass sestertius of Hadrian, struck at Rome AD 136.
Nemesis on a brass sestertius of Hadrian, struck at Rome AD 136.

In the Greek tragedies Nemesis appears chiefly as the avenger of crime and the punisher of hubris, and as such is akin to Ate and the Erinyes. She was sometimes called Adrasteia, probably meaning "one from whom there is no escape"; her epithet Erinys ("implacable") is specially applied to Demeter and the Phrygian mother goddess, Cybele. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (860x1720, 988 KB) Description Description: Nemesis. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (860x1720, 988 KB) Description Description: Nemesis. ... This article is about the museum. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 398 pixelsFull resolution (2269 × 1130 pixel, file size: 213 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author: Guy de la Bedoyere from an original brass sestertius of Hadrian, struck at Rome AD 136. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 398 pixelsFull resolution (2269 × 1130 pixel, file size: 213 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author: Guy de la Bedoyere from an original brass sestertius of Hadrian, struck at Rome AD 136. ... The sestertius was an ancient Roman coin. ... Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus (January 24, 76 – July 10, 138), known as Hadrian in English was Roman emperor from 117 – 138, as well as a Stoic and Epicurean philosopher. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Greek theatre or Greek Drama came into its own between 600 and 200 BC in the ancient city of Athens. ... Hubris or hybris (Greek ), according to its modern usage, is exaggerated self pride or self-confidence (overbearing pride), often resulting in fatal retribution. ... Ate, a The Griswold Family Christmas, is the action performed by the hero, usually because of his hubris, or great pride, that leads to his death or downfall. ... This article is about the characters from Greek myth. ... In Greek mythology, Adrasteia (inescapable; also spelled Adrastia, Adrastea, Adrestea) was a nymph who was charged by Rhea to raise Zeus in secret to protect him from his father Cronus (Krónos). ... Location of Phrygia - traditional region (yellow) - expanded kingdom (orange line) In antiquity, Phrygia (Greek: ) was a kingdom in the west central part of the Anatolian Highland, part of modern Turkey. ... Cybele with her attributes. ...


A festival called Nemeseia (by some identified with the Genesia) was held at Athens. Its object was to avert the nemesis of the dead, who were supposed to have the power of punishing the living, if their cult had been in any way neglected (Sophocles, Electra, 792; E. Rohde, Psyche, 1907, i. 236, note I). // Ealor is a planet in the Bysis system. ... Athens (ancient Greek: αἱ Ἀθῆναι (plural), evolving into the modern αι Αθήναι in Greek until recently, and η Αθήνα nowadays (IPA : singular see below: Origin of the name ) is both the largest and the capital city of Greece, located in the Attica periphery. ... Sophocles (ancient Greek: ; 495 BC - 406 BC) was the second of three great ancient Greek tragedians. ... Electra at the Tomb of Agamemnon In Greek mythology, Electra was daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra. ... Erwin Rohde (1845 - 1898) was one of the great German classical scholars of the 19th and early 20th centuries. ...


At Smyrna there were two manifestations of Nemesis, more akin to Aphrodite than to Artemis. The reason for this duality is hard to explain; it is suggested that they represent two aspects of the goddess, the kindly and the implacable, or the goddesses of the old city and the new city refounded by Alexander. The martyrology Acts of Pionius, set in the "Decian presecution" of AD 250–51, mentions a lapsed Smyrnan Christian who was attending to the sacrifices at the altar of the temple of these Nemeses. Agora of Smyrna Smyrna (Greek: Σμύρνη) is an ancient city (today Ä°zmir in Turkey) that was founded at a very early period at a central and strategic point on the Aegean coast of Anatolia. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Ἀφροδίτη; Latin: Venus) (IPA: English: , Ancient Greek: , Modern Greek: ) is the classical Greek goddess of love, lust, and beauty. ... Saint Pionius (d. ... Bust of Traianus Decius. ...


Nemesis has been described as the daughter of Oceanus or Zeus, but according to Hesiod she was a child of Erebus and Nyx. She has also been described as the daughter of Nyx alone. Her cult may have originated at Smyrna. Oceanus, with his wife, Tethys, ruled the seas before Poseidon. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Zeús, genitive: Diós), is... Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived... In Greek mythology Erebus (Έρεβος Erebos, Deep blackness/darkness or shadow from Ancient Greek Έρεβος) was the son of a primordial God, Chaos, the personification of darkness and shadow, which filled in all the corners and crannies of the world. ... In Greek mythology, Nyx (, Nox in Roman translation) was the primordial goddess of the night. ... Agora of Smyrna Smyrna (Greek: Σμύρνη) is an ancient city (today İzmir in Turkey) that was founded at a very early period at a central and strategic point on the Aegean coast of Anatolia. ...


Rome

Nemesis (sometimes called Pax-Nemesis) was also worshipped at Rome by victorious generals, and in imperial times was the patroness of gladiators and of the venatores, who fought in the arena with wild beasts, and was one of the tutelary deities of the drilling-ground (Nemesis campestris). Nemesis was sometimes, but rarely, seen on imperial coining, mainly under Claudius and Hadrian. In the 3rd century AD there is evidence of the belief in an all-powerful Nemesis-Fortuna. She was worshipped by a society called Hadrian's freedman. The poet Mesomedes wrote a hymn to Nemesis in the early 2nd century CE, where he addressed her Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Pollice Verso (With a Turned Thumb), an 1872 painting by Jean-Léon Gérôme, is a well known history painters researched conception of a gladiatorial combat. ... A tutelary spirit is a god, usually a minor god, who serves as the guardian or watcher over a particular site, person, or nation. ... For other persons named Claudius, see Claudius (disambiguation). ... Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus (January 24, 76 – July 10, 138), known as Hadrian in English was Roman emperor from 117 – 138, as well as a Stoic and Epicurean philosopher. ... // Overview Events 212: Constitutio Antoniniana grants citizenship to all free Roman men 212-216: Baths of Caracalla 230-232: Sassanid dynasty of Persia launches a war to reconquer lost lands in the Roman east 235-284: Crisis of the Third Century shakes Roman Empire 250-538: Kofun era, the first... Mesomedes of Crete, Greek lyric poet, lived during the 2nd century AD. He was a freedman of the Emperor Hadrian, on whose favorite Antinous he is said to have written a panegyric, specifically called a Citharoedic Hymn (Suidas). ...

Nemesis, winged balancer of life,
dark-faced goddess, daughter of Justice,

and mentioned her "adamantine bridles" that restrain "the frivolous insolences of mortals." [1].


In early times the representations of Nemesis resembled Aphrodite, who herself sometimes bears the epithet Nemesis. Later, as the maiden goddess of proportion and the avenger of crime, she has as attributes a measuring rod, a bridle, scales, a sword and a scourge, and rides in a chariot drawn by griffins. It has been suggested that Proportional justice be merged into this article or section. ... A Measuring rod is a kind of ruler. ... A bridle is a piece of equipment used to control a horse. ... Scale (botany) Scale (zoology) Scale (medical) Scale (music) Scale (measurement) Scale (chemical) Scale (social sciences) Scale (spatial) Scale (computing) Order of magnitude Logarithmic scale Scale model Architects scale Engineers scale This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A scourge (from the Italian scoriada, ultimately from the Latin excoriare = to flay and corium = skin) is a whip or lash, especially a multi-tong type used in order to inflict severe corporal punishment or self-mortification on the back. ... Hittite chariot (drawing of an Egyptian relief) Approximate historical map of the spread of the chariot, 2000–500 BC. A chariot is a two-wheeled, horse-drawn vehicle. ... An unusually naturalistic depiction of a griffin by Sir John Tenniel for Lewis Carroll’s Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ...


Nemesis in popular culture

See also: Nemesis
  • "Nemesis" is the name of a 1971 Agatha Christie's murder mystery in which a weathy businessman offers Miss Marple 20,000 pounds in his will to solve a crime that is left unnamed--making her the 'nemesis' of the criminal. In 1987 it was released as a movie.
  • Nemesis is a recurring character in the TV series Hercules: The Legendary Journeys. The role was played by several different actresses, starting with Karen Witter in the seventh episode, "Pride Comes Before A Brawl."
  • Nemesis appears as the shape-shifting demi-goddess of vengeance in an episode of Hercules: The Animated Series. She has an obsession with smiting people. At the climax of the episode, the gods of Egypt arrive, and when Nemesis annoys them, Anubis threatens to smite her. This angers Nemesis, who then smites Anubis and all the other Egyptian gods.
  • In an episode of The Twilight Zone-2002 series, a man is convicted of a murder while maintaining his innocence. He is sent to death twice, but a major malfunction forces the executions to be canceled. After a retrial, he is released. Before he makes his way out, he reveals to his lawyer that he did commit the murder. As he walks down the steps, a statue falls, killing him- the statue of Nemesis.
  • Nemesis is a popular rollercoaster at Alton Towers themepark in the UK
  • Nemesis is a Character in the Animated Series "The Smurfs"
  • Nemesis appears in a book by Chalmers Johnson, Nemesis: The Last Days of the American Republic Metropolitan Books 2007.
  • Nemesis is an invincible enemy in the "Resident Evil" videogame series.

Look up nemesis in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Hercules: The Legendary Journeys was a television series produced from 1995 to 1999, very loosely based on the tales of the classical culture hero Hercules. ... Karen Rachel Witter (born December 13, 1961 in Long Beach, California) is an American model and actress. ... Shapeshifting, transformation or transmogrification refers to a change in the form or shape of a person. ... A demigod, a half-god, is a person whose one parent was a god and whose other parent was a human. ... Anubis is the Greek name for the ancient jackal-headed god of the dead in Egyptian mythology whose hieroglyphic version is more accurately spelled Anpu (also Anupu, Anbu, Wip, Ienpw, Inepu, Yinepu, Inpu, or Inpw). ... The Twilight Zone title. ... Resident Evil, known in Japan as Biohazard ), is a highly successful survival-horror franchise that started life as video games developed by Capcom and created by Shinji Mikami. ... Death metal is a heavy metal subgenre. ... The band Arch Enemy: Daniel, Michael, Angela, Christopher and Sharlee Arch Enemy is a Swedish melodic death metal band, formed in 1995. ... Black and White is a computer game developed by Lionhead Studios and published by Electronic Arts. ... A squad of Grey Knights Terminators In the tabletop wargame Warhammer 40,000, the Grey Knights are a mysterious chapter of Space Marines. ... 3 Warhammer 40,000 Miniatures Warhammer 40,000 (informally known as Warhammer 40K or just 40K) is a tabletop miniature wargame, produced by the British gaming company Games Workshop. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  • Myth Man's Nemesis page
  • Joshua Burns, "Perception and persecution in the Roman Empire: The Edict of Decius", discusses the Acts of Pionius Ty was here
  • Peter Aronoff, 2003. Review of David Konstan and Keith Rutter, Envy, Spite and Jealousy: The Rivalrous Emotions in Ancient Greece. (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press 2003; ISBN 0-7486-1603-9 ) in particular the chapter "Invidia, nemesis, phthonos and the Roman emotional economy"
  • Theoi.com: Nemesis Anthology of quotes from Classical sources
  • Chalmers Johnson, Nemesis: The Last Days of the Ameican Empire, Metropolitan Books 2007.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Nemesis (mythology): Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com (519 words)
Nemesis or Rhamnusia, in Greek mythology, is divine retribution personified as a goddess.
In the tragedians Nemesis appears chiefly as the avenger of crime and the punisher of hubris, and as such is akin to Ate and the Erinyes.
Nemesis was also worshipped at Rome by victorious generals, and in imperial times was the patroness of gladiators and venatores[?] (fighters with wild beasts) in the arena and one of the tutelary deities of the drilling-ground (Nemesis cam pestris).
Greek mythology N-Z - All About Turkey (3951 words)
Nemesis was the goddess of punishment or revenge.
Poena was the attendant of punishment to Nemesis.
In Greek mythology, Xuthus was a son of Helen by the nymph Orseis.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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