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Encyclopedia > Nekhbet

In Egyptian mythology, Nekhbet (of Nekheb) was an early, predynastic, local vulture-goddess, patron of the city of Nekheb. Later, like Buto, she became patron of the pharaohs, in her case becoming the personification of Upper Egypt, and thus said to be the wife of Hapy, the god of the nile. Egypt’s oldest oracle was the shrine of Nekhbet at Nekheb, the original necropolis or city of the dead. The priestesses of Nekhbet were called muu (mothers), and wore robes of vulture feathers. Goddess Nekhbet (at Kom Ombo temple) Photo taken by Hajor, Dec. ... Egyptian mythology (or Egyptian religion) is the name for the succession of beliefs held by the people of Egypt until the coming of Christianity and Islam. ... A Nubian Vulture Vultures are scavenging birds, feeding mostly from carcasses of dead animals. ... A goddess is a female deity in contrast with a male deity known as a god. A great many cultures have goddesses, sometimes alone, but more often as part of a larger pantheon that includes both of the conventional genders and in some cases even hermaphroditic (or gender neutral) deities. ... ... In Egyptian mythology, Buto (papyrus colored--referring to the color of the cobra) was a snake (especially cobra) goddess and patron of the oracle in the city of the same name, located 95 km East of Alexandria: originally two cities, Per and Wadjit merged into one the Greeks called Buto. ... This article refers to the historical Pharaoh. ... Map of Upper and Lower Egypt Ancient Egypt was divided into two kingdoms, known as Upper and Lower Egypt. ... Hapy, meaning runner, was a solar deity in Egyptian mythology, and the symbolisation of the annual flood of the Nile River, which deposited rich silt on the banks, allowing the Egyptians to grow crops. ... For alternate usages of Oracle, see Oracle (disambiguation) An Oracle is a person or agency considered to be a source of wise counsel or prophetic opinion; an infallible authority, usually spiritual in nature. ...


In art, Nekhbet was depicted as the white vulture (representing purification), always seen on the front of pharaoh’s double crown. Nekhbet was usually depicted hovering with her wings spread above the royal image, clutching an ankh in her claws. As patron of the pharaoh, she was sometimes seen to be the mother of the divine aspect of the pharaoh, and it was in this capacity that she was Mother of Mothers, and the Great White Cow of Nekheb (depicted as having very large breasts). Ankh The ankh (pronounced onk) was the Egyptian hieroglyphic character that stood for the word ʿnḫ, which means life. ...


In some texts of the Book of the Dead, Nekhbet is referred to as Father of Fathers, Mother of Mothers, who hath existed from the Beginning, and is Creatrix of this World. The Book of the Dead is the common name for the ancient Egyptian funerary texts known as The Book of Coming [or Going] Forth By Day. ...


Alternative: Nechbet, Nekhebit


  Results from FactBites:
 
Egyptian Wall Plaque - Goddess Nekhbet Relief (181 words)
Dynasty XIX, 1317 B.C. The vulture Goddess Nekhbet was originally worshipped in the city of Nekhbet but later she became a national Goddess representing Upper Egypt in the same way that Lower Egypt was represented by the protective snake Goddess, Edjo of Buto.
Goddess Nekhbet is often shown with her wings outstretched in protection, often hovering over the Pharaoh and holding in her claws the hieroglyphic symbol the “Shem”, which means “to encircle” and “infinity”, and represents lordship over all that the sun encircles.
Nekhbet was also considered a Goddess of childbirth, often shown suckling the royal child or even the King himself.
Nekhbet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (268 words)
In Egyptian mythology, Nekhbet (also spelt Nechbet, and Nekhebit) was an early, predynastic, local goddess who was the patron of the city of Nekheb, her name meaning of Nekheb.
Later, like Wadjet, she became patron of the pharaohs, in her case becoming the personification of Upper Egypt, and thus said to be the wife of Hapy, the god of the nile.
Nekhbet was usually depicted hovering with her wings spread above the royal image, clutching an ankh in her claws.
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