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Encyclopedia > Neil Kinnock
The Right Honourable
 Neil Kinnock 
Baron Kinnock
Neil Kinnock

In office
2 October 1983 – 18 July 1992
Preceded by Michael Foot
Succeeded by John Smith

Born 28 March 1942 (1942-03-28) (age 66)
Tredegar, Wales, UK
Political party Labour
Religion Methodist, but Humanist (Atheist)

Neil Gordon Kinnock, Baron Kinnock, PC (born 28 March 1942) is a British politician. He was a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1970 to 1995, and was Leader of the Opposition and Labour Party leader from 1983 to 1992, when he resigned after the 1992 general election defeat. The Right Honourable (abbreviated as or ) is an honorific prefix that is traditionally applied to certain people in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the Anglophone Caribbean and in other Commonwealth Realms, and elsewhere. ... The Leader of the Opposition in the United Kingdom is the politician who leads Her Majestys Most Loyal Opposition. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Michael Mackintosh Foot (born 23 July 1913) is an English politician and writer. ... John Smith QC (September 13, 1938 – May 12, 1994) was a British politician who served as leader of the Labour Party from July 1992 until his sudden and unexpected death from a heart attack on 12 May 1994. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tredegar is a town in the county borough of Blaenau Gwent, traditional county of Monmouthshire, lying on the Sirhowy River in southern Wales, United Kingdom. ... This article is about the country. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... The Leader of the Opposition in the United Kingdom is the politician who leads Her Majestys Most Loyal Opposition. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1992 was held on 9 April 1992, and was the fourth consecutive victory for the Conservative Party. ...


He subsequently served as a UK Commissioner of the European Commission from 1995 until 2004, and is now Chairman of the British Council and President of Cardiff University. Berlaymont, the Commissions seat The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive branch of the European Union. ... Logo of the British Council British Council building in London British Council, Hong Kong The British Council is one of the United Kingdoms cultural relations organisations and which specialises in educational opportunities. ... The main building of Cardiff University Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Cardiff University Cardiff University (Welsh: Prifysgol Caerdydd) is a leading university located in the civic centre of Cardiff, Wales. ...

Contents

Early life

Kinnock, an only child, was born in Tredegar, Wales. His father was a coal miner who suffered from dermatitis and had to find work as a labourer and his mother was a district nurse. In 1953 Kinnock went to the Lewis School, Pengam from where he won a place to University College, Cardiff, obtaining a degree in industrial relations and history in 1965. A year later, Kinnock obtained a postgraduate diploma in education and between August 1966 and May 1970 Kinnock worked as a tutor for a WEA. An only child is a child with no siblings, either biological or adopted. ... Tredegar is a town in the county borough of Blaenau Gwent, traditional county of Monmouthshire, lying on the Sirhowy River in southern Wales, United Kingdom. ... This article is about the country. ... Wyoming coal mine Coal mining is the mining of coal. ... Dermatitis is a blanket term literally meaning inflammation of the skin. It is usually used to refer to eczema, which is also known as Dermatitis eczema. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lewis School, Pengam is a comprehensive education school situated in the town of Pengam and, latterly, nearby Gilfach, in the Rhymney Valley in Wales. ... University College can refer to several institutions: in Canada University College, University of Toronto University College of the North, The Pas, Manitoba University College of the Cariboo, Kamloops, British Columbia, merged with British Columbia Open University and renamed Thompson Rivers University Kings University College (Edmonton), Alberta in England University... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Quaternary education or postgraduate education is the fourth-stage educational level which follows the completion of an undergraduate degree at a college or university. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Workers’ Educational Association (WEA) seeks to provide access to education and lifelong learning for adults from all backgrounds, and in particular those who have previously missed out on education. ...


Member of Parliament

In June 1969 he won the Labour Party nomination for the constituency of Bedwellty in South Wales (later Islwyn). He was elected on 18 June 1970 and became a member of the National Executive Committee of the Labour Party in October 1978. On becoming an MP for the first time, his father said "Remember Neil, MP stands not just for Member of Parliament, but also for Man of Principle". Labour government policy at the time was in favour of devolution for Wales, but the wider party was split. Kinnock was one of six south Wales Labour MPs to campaign against devolution. In the Wales referendum, 1979, the proposal for devolution was rejected. Though he had no previous ministerial experience, having rejected ministerial offers from Callaghan in both the April 1976 and February 1977 reshuffles, following Labour's defeat in the 1979 General Election, James Callaghan appointed him to the Shadow Cabinet as Education spokesman. His ambition was noted by other MPs and David Owen's opposition to the changes to the electoral college was thought to be motivated by the realisation that they would favour Kinnock's succession. He was known as a left-winger, and gained notoriety for his attacks on Margaret Thatcher's handling of the Falklands War. Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Bedwellty was a constituency in Monmouthshire, Wales which returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1918 until it was abolished for the 1983 general election. ... Approximate extent of South East Wales. ... Islwyn is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Executive Committee or NEC is the chief administrative body of the Labour Party (UK). ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... In a referendum on St Davids Day (March 1) 1979, the people of Wales voted against proposals by the Labour government of the United Kingdom to establish a Welsh Assembly. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1979 was held on 3 May 1979 and is regarded as a pivotal point in 20th century British politics. ... Leonard James Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff, KG, PC (27 March 1912 – 26 March 2005), was Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979. ... The Shadow Cabinet (also called the Shadow Front Bench) is a senior group of opposition spokespeople in the Westminster system of government who together under the leadership of the Leader of the Opposition (or the leader of other smaller opposition parties) form an alternative cabinet to the governments, whose... For other persons named David Owen, see David Owen (disambiguation). ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and only woman to hold either post. ... Belligerents Argentina United Kingdom Commanders President Leopoldo Galtieri Vice-Admiral Juan Lombardo Brigadier-General Ernesto Crespo Brigade-General Mario Menéndez Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher Admiral Sir John Fieldhouse Rear-Admiral John “Sandy” Woodward Major-General Jeremy Moore Casualties and losses 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner...


Leadership of the Labour Party

First period (1983-1987)

His first period as party leader—between the 1983 and 1987 elections—was dominated by his struggle with the hard left. Although Kinnock had come from the left of the party he parted company with many of his previous allies on his appointment to the shadow cabinet. In 1981, Kinnock was alleged to have effectively scuppered Tony Benn's attempt to replace Denis Healey as Labour's deputy leader by first supporting the candidacy of the more traditionalist Tribunite John Silkin and then urging Silkin supporters to abstain on the second, run-off, ballot. Far left is a vague term used to refer to people or ideas falling into the general category of left wing which the speaker considers to be extreme. ... Anthony Tony Neil Wedgwood Benn (born 3 April 1925), formerly 2nd Viscount Stansgate, is a British socialist politician. ... Denis Winston Healey, Baron Healey, CH, MBE, PC (born 30 August 1917), is a British Labour politician. ... Tribune is a democratic socialist weekly, currently a magazine though in the past more often a newspaper, published in London. ... John Silkin was working with Cargo Press on his collection Testament Without Breath at the time of his death in November 1997. ...


All this meant that Kinnock had made plenty of enemies on the left by the time he was elected as leader, though a substantial number of former Bennites gave him strong backing. He was almost immediately in serious difficulty as a result of Arthur Scargill's decision to lead his union, the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) into a national strike (in opposition to pit closures) without a members' ballot. The NUM was widely regarded as the Labour movement's praetorian guard and the strike convulsed the Labour movement. Kinnock supported the aim of the strike - which he famously dubbed the "case for coal" - but, as an MP from a mining area, was bitterly critical of the tactics employed. In 1985, he made his criticisms public in a speech to Labour's conference widely regarded as the best he ever delivered stating: Arthur Scargill (born January 11, 1938) led the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) from 1981 to 2000. ... The National Union of Mineworkers is a trade union for coal miners in the United Kingdom. ... In Egyptian mythology, Chnum was the god of the Nile River delta, and the creator of human children, whom he makes from clay and places in their mothers uteruses. ... The labour movement or labor movement is a broad term for the development of a collective organization of working people, to campaign in their own interest for better treatment from their employers and political governments, in particular through the implementation of specific laws governing labor relations. ... The Praetorian Guard of Augustus - 1st century. ...

The strike wore on. The violence built up because the single tactic chosen was that of mass picketing, and so we saw policing on a scale and with a system that has never been seen in Britain before. The court actions came, and by the attitude to the court actions, the NUM leadership ensured that they would face crippling damages as a consequence. To the question: "How did this position arise?", the man from the lodge in my constituency said: "It arose because nobody really thought it out."

The strike's defeat and the rise of the Militant tendency meant that 1985's Labour conference in Bournemouth should have been a disaster for Kinnock (as 1984's - in the middle of the strike - had been). Instead, by sheer force of personal will, Kinnock turned it into a triumph[1] with a powerful attack on the Militant-dominated Liverpool City Council and the direct confrontation with Scargill referred to above. The passage of his speech referring to Militant and Liverpool is one of the most famous of any post-war British politician's: Picketing is a form of non-violent resistance in which people congregate outside a place of work or location where an event is taking place and attempt to dissuade others from going in (crossing the picket line). It has two main aims: to harm the business or activity by losing... The Militant tendency was a group within the UK Labour Party founded in 1964. ... , Bournemouth ( ) is a large town and tourist resort, situated on the south coast of England. ... See City of Liverpool for other meanings Liverpool City Council is the governing body for the city of Liverpool in Merseyside, England. ... Scargill is a hamlet in the Pennines of England, situated close to the River Greta. ... The word militant has come to refer to any individual or party engaged in aggressive physical or verbal combat, normally for a cause. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ...

I'll tell you what happens with impossible promises. You start with far fetched resolutions. They are then pickled into a rigid dogma, a code, and you go through the years sticking to that, out-dated, misplaced, irrelevant to the real needs, and you end in the grotesque chaos of a Labour council - a Labour council - hiring taxis to scuttle round a city handing out redundancy notices to its own workers.

In 1986, the party's position appeared to strengthen further with excellent election results and a thorough rebranding of the party under the direction of Kinnock's director of communications Peter Mandelson. Labour, now sporting a continental social democratic style emblem of a rose, appeared to be able to run the governing Conservatives close, but Margaret Thatcher did not let Labour's makeover go unchallenged. Look up redundancy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... For other uses, see Rose (disambiguation). ... The Conservative and Unionist Party, more commonly known as the Conservative Party, is currently the largest majortiy opposition party in the United Knigdom. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and only woman to hold either post. ...


The Conservatives' 1986 conference was well-managed and effectively relaunched the Conservatives as a party of radical free-market liberalism. Labour suffered from a persistent image of extremism, especially as Kinnock's campaign to root out the Militants dragged on as figures on the hard left of the party tried to stop its progress. Opinion polls showed that voters favoured retaining Britain's nuclear weapons and believed that the Conservatives would be better than Labour at defending the country.[1] A free market is a market where prices of goods and services are arranged completely by the mutual non-coerced consent of sellers and buyers, determined generally by the supply and demand law with no government interference in the regulation of costs, supply and demand. ... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... Extremism is a term used to describe the actions or ideologies of individuals or groups outside the perceived political center of a society; or otherwise claimed to violate common standards of ethics and reciprocity. ... Far left is a vague term used to refer to people or ideas falling into the general category of left wing which the speaker considers to be extreme. ... An opinion poll is a survey of opinion from a particular sample. ...


1987 general election

In early 1987, Labour lost a by-election in Greenwich to the Social Democratic Party's Rosie Barnes. As a result, Labour faced the 1987 election in some danger of coming third in the popular vote. In secret, Labour's aim became to secure second place with a good 35% of the vote - effectively cutting into the Tory majority but not yet in government. Social Democratic Party may refer to: Afghan Social Democratic Party Social Democratic Party (Albania) Social Democratic Party (Andorra) Social Democratic Party of Austria Brazilian Social Democracy Party Social Democratic Party (Central African Republic) Social Democratic Party of Croatia Czech Social Democratic Party Socialdemokratiet, Denmark Social Democratic Party (East Timor) Social... Rosemary Barnes, known as Rosie Barnes (born May 16, 1946, as Rosemary Allen) is a British politician. ... Margaret Thatcher David Steel Election 1987 Titles The United Kingdom general election of 1987 was held on 11 June 1987 and was the third consecutive victory for the Conservative Party under the leadership of Margaret Thatcher. ...


Labour fought a professional campaign that at one point scared the Tories into thinking they might lose. Mandelson and his team had revolutionised Labour's communications - a transformation symbolised by a party election broadcast popularly known as "Kinnock: The Movie". This was directed by Hugh Hudson and featured Kinnock's 1985 conference speech, and shots of him and Glenys walking on the Great Orme in Llandudno (so emphasising his appeal as a family man and associating him with images of Wales away from the coal mining communities where he grew up), and a speech to that year's Welsh Labour conference (that was later appropriated disastrously by Joe Biden) asking why he was the "first Kinnock in a thousand generations" to go to university. A party political broadcast is a short television or radio broadcast made by a political party. ... Hugh Hudson (born 25 August 1936) is a British Academy award-nominated film director. ... Almost all that remains above ground of the Bishop of Bangors 13th century palace at Gogarth is the short wall on the left, the narrow column to the right of centre collapsed into the sea during the storms of March 2005 Saint Tudnos church, the original parish church... , This article is about the town in Wales. ... The Wales Labour Party, also known as Welsh Labour, is the part of the Labour Party which operates in Wales. ... Biden redirects here. ...


On polling day, Labour easily took second place, but with only 31 per cent to the SDP-Liberal Alliance's 22 per cent. Labour was still more than ten percentage points behind the Conservatives, who retained a three-figure majority in the House of Commons. However, the Conservative government's majority had come down from 144 in 1983 to 102. Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin...


Second period (1987-1992)

The second period of Kinnock's leadership was dominated by his drive to reform the party's policies and so win power. This began with an exercise dubbed the policy review, the most high-profile aspect of which was a series of consultations with the public known as "Labour Listens" in autumn 1987.


In organisational terms, the party leadership continued to battle with the Militant, though by now Militant was in retreat in the party and was simultaneously attracted by the opportunities to grow outside Labour's ranks - opportunities largely created by Margaret Thatcher's hugely unpopular poll tax. Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and only woman to hold either post. ... A poll tax, head tax, or capitation is a tax of a uniform, fixed amount per individual (as opposed to a percentage of income). ...


After Labour Listens, the party went on, in 1988, to produce a new statement of aims and values - meant to supplement and supplant the formulation of Clause IV of the party's constitution (though, crucially, this was not actually replaced until 1995 under the leadership of Tony Blair) and was closely modelled on Anthony Crosland's social democratic thinking - emphasising equality and not public ownership. Clause IV of the United Kingdom Labour Party constitution sets out the aims and values of the party, and has been the object of political fights over its direction. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... Charles Anthony Raven Crosland (29 August 1918 - 19 February 1977) was a member of the Labour Party and an important socialist theorist. ... This article is about state ownership. ...


In 1988, Kinnock was challenged by Tony Benn for the party leadership. Later many identified this as a particular low period in Kinnock's leadership - as he appeared mired in internal battles after five years of leadership and the Conservatives still dominating the scene. In the end, though, Kinnock won a decisive victory over Benn. The Labour Party leadership election of 1988 arose when Tony Benn, identified with the left-wing of the British Labour Party, challenged the incumbent Neil Kinnock. ... Anthony Tony Neil Wedgwood Benn (born 3 April 1925), formerly 2nd Viscount Stansgate, is a British socialist politician. ...


The policy review - reporting in 1989 - saw Labour move ahead in the polls just as the poll tax row was destroying Conservative support and Labour won big victories in local by-elections. Kinnock also scored hits on Margaret Thatcher in the Commons - previously an area in which he was seen as weak - and finally Conservative MPs voted to remove Thatcher as their leader, after disagreements with her on Europe and the poll tax, installing John Major. Public reaction to Major's elevation was highly positive. A new Prime Minister and the fact that Kinnock became the longest serving current leader of a major party reduced the impact of calls for "Time for a Change". For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ...


1992 general election, backbenches and retirement

Famous Sun headline
Famous Sun headline

In the 1992 election, Labour made considerable progress - reducing the Conservative majority to just 21 seats. It came as a shock to many when the Conservatives remained in power, but the perceived triumphalism of a Labour party rally in Sheffield (together with Kinnock's performance on the podium) may have contributed to putting off voters. (Although most of those directly involved in the campaign believe that the rally only really came to widespread attention following the election itself). On the day of the general election, The Sun ran a famous front page featuring Kinnock (headline: "If Kinnock wins today, will the last person to leave Britain please turn out the lights") that he blamed in his resignation speech for losing Labour the election. Image File history File links Sunkinnock. ... Image File history File links Sunkinnock. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1992 was held on 9 April 1992, and was the fourth consecutive victory for the Conservative Party. ... The Sheffield Rally was a political convention held by the Labour Party on Wednesday 1st April 1992, a week ahead of the 1992 UK general election. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ... A resignation speech is a speech made by a public figure upon resigning from office. ...


Kinnock himself later claimed to have half-expected the loss and proceeded to turn himself into a media personality, even hosting a chat show on BBC Wales and twice appearing - with considerable success - on topical panel show Have I Got News For You within a year of the defeat. Many years later, he returned to appear as a guest host of the programme, though this was less memorable for the right reasons. A talk show (U.S.) or chat show (Brit. ... BBC Wales (Welsh: ) is a division of the British Broadcasting Corporation for Wales. ... Have I Got News for You is a British television panel show; produced by Hat Trick Productions for the BBC. It is based loosely on the BBC Radio 4 show The News Quiz, and has been running since 1990. ...


He remains on the Advisory Council of the Institute for Public Policy Research, which he helped set up in the 1980s. The Institute for Public Policy Research is a think tank in the United Kingdom, with close links to the ruling Labour Party. ...


European Union Commissioner

He was appointed one of Britain's two members of the European Commission, which he served as Transport Commissioner under Commission president Jacques Santer. Following the forced resignation of the Commission in 1999, Kinnock was also forced to resign under corruption charges prior to his being re-appointed to the Commission under new president Romano Prodi. He became vice-president of the European Commission, his term of office as a Commissioner was due to expire on 30 October 2004, but was delayed owing to the withdrawal of the new commissioners. On 20 February 2004 it was announced that with effect from 1 November 2004 he would become head of the British Council and his son Stephen Kinnock would become head of the British Council in St. Petersburg, Russia. At the end of October, it was announced that he would become a member of the House of Lords (intending to be a working peer), when he was able to leave his EU responsibilities. In 1977, he had remained in the House of Commons, with Dennis Skinner, while other MPs walked to the Lords to hear the Queen's speech opening the new parliament. He had dismissed going to the Lords in recent interviews. Kinnock explained his change of attitude, despite the continuing presence of 90 hereditary peers and appointment by patronage, by asserting that the Lords was a good base for campaigning. Berlaymont, the Commissions seat The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive branch of the European Union. ... Jacques Santer (born May 18, 1937) is a politician from Luxembourg. ... The Santer Commission was the European Commission that held office from 1995 until 15 March 1999. ... Prodi redirects here. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Logo of the British Council British Council building in London British Council, Hong Kong The British Council is one of the United Kingdoms cultural relations organisations and which specialises in educational opportunities. ... Saint Petersburg  listen (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of... Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... Skinner in the House of Commons. ... Queen Beatrix of The Netherlands reads her countrys Speech from the Throne Queen Elizabeth II reads Canadas Speech from the Throne in 1977 The Speech from the Throne, sometimes referred to by the shorter term Throne Speech, is an event in certain monarchies in which the monarch (or...

See also: Prodi Commission

The Prodi Commission was the European Commission from 1999 to 2004. ...

Life peerage

He was introduced to the House of Lords on 31 January 2005, after being created Baron Kinnock, of Bedwellty in the County of Gwent. On assuming his seat he stated, "I accepted the kind invitation to enter the House of Lords as a working peer for practical political reasons." When his peerage was first announced, he said "It will give me the opportunity... to contribute to the national debate on issues like higher education, research, Europe and foreign policy." His peerage meant that the Labour and Conservative parties were equal in numbers in the upper house of Parliament (since then, the number of Labour members has overtaken the number of Conservative members). Kinnock was a long-time critic of the House of Lords and his acceptance of a peerage led him to be accused of hypocrisy, by Will Self * , amongst others. ( * Notably when Kinnock appeared in an episode of ' Have I Got News For You ', whilst he was the guest presenter on Friday 3rd December 2004) This article is about the British House of Lords. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bedwellty was a parish and urban district in Monmouthshire, South Wales, until 1974. ... Gwent as a preserved county since 2003. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... Will Self William Self (born September 26, 1961) is an English novelist, reviewer and columnist. ... Have I Got News for You is a British television panel show; produced by Hat Trick Productions for the BBC. It is based loosely on the BBC Radio 4 show The News Quiz, and has been running since 1990. ...


BBC Article on his Introduction to the House


Personal life

He is married to Glenys Kinnock, Labour Member of the European Parliament (MEP) for Wales from 1999 to present, and MEP for South Wales East from 1994 to 1999. The two met while studying at University College, Cardiff and they married on 25 March 1967. Previously living together in Peterston-Super-Ely, a village near the western outskirts of Cardiff, in 2008 they moved to Tufnell Park to be closer to their daughter and grandchildren[2] Image:GlenysKinnock. ... A Member of the European Parliament (English abbreviation MEP)[1] is a member of the European Unions directly-elected legislative body, the European Parliament. ... The main building of Cardiff University Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Cardiff University Cardiff University (Welsh: Prifysgol Caerdydd) is a leading university located in the civic centre of Cardiff, Wales. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... A small village situated about eight miles from the centre of Cardiff in the Vale of Glamorgan. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... The Boston Arms at the centre of Tufnell Park looking towards Archway on the right , Tufnell Park is an area of north London which straddles the border of the London Borough of Islington and the London Borough of Camden. ...


They have two children, Stephen and Rachel. Stephen is married to Helle Thorning-Schmidt, who is the leader of the Danish Social Democrats political party. He is director of the British Council, which is Chaired by his father, in St. Petersburg, Russia. Rachel works in the Political Office at No 10 under Gordon Brown. Helle Thorning-Schmidt Helle Thorning-Schmidt (born 14 December 1966) is a Danish politician. ... The Social Democrats (Socialdemokraterne), is a Danish political party. ... Saint Petersburg  listen (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of... For others with the same or similar names, see Gordon Brown (disambiguation). ...


In 1984 he appeared in the video for the Tracy Ullman song "My Guy" as a someone with a clipboard canvassing on a council estate. The record reached #24 in the charts. This article is about the year. ... Tracey Ullman (born December 30, 1959) is a British comedienne, actress, and singer who is most famous for being the host of a variety television show bearing her name. ...


Before university, Kinnock attended Lewis School, Pengam, which he criticised for its record on corporal punishment (caning). Lewis School, Pengam is a comprehensive education school situated in the town of Pengam and, latterly, nearby Gilfach, in the Rhymney Valley in Wales. ... Corporal punishment is the deliberate infliction of pain and suffering intended to change a persons behavior or to punish them. ... This article is about the physical punishment. ...


On 26 April 2006, Neil Kinnock was given a six-month driving ban after being found guilty of two speeding offences along the M4 motorway, west of London.


Though originally a Methodist, according to a biography of him pubished in 1994, Kinnock is an Atheist[3]. The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... For information about the band, see Atheist (band). ...


Satire

Nicknamed "the Welsh Windbag" by Private Eye magazine, an image repeated on Spitting Image, and "Kinocchio" by the Conservatives, he had the thankless task of leading the Labour Party during a protracted period out of government.[2] A derogatory term for a Welsh person, used mostly by English people, for those from Wales who are thought to talk too much or too fluently. ... Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio... Spitting Image was a British satirical puppet show that ran on the ITV television network from 1984 to 1996. ...


Further reading

  • Kinnock, a biography of Neil Kinnock written by Martin Westlake and Ian St. John has been published by Little Brown Book Group Limited, on January 1, 2001 with ISBN 0-316-84871-9.
  • Peter Kellner contributed an essay on Neil Kinnock to the Dictionary of Labour Biography, edited by Greg Rosen, Politicos Publishing, 2001. ISBN 1902301188
  • Kinnock by Michael Leapman was published by Unwin Hyman in 1987.
  • Kinnock by George Drower was published by The Publishing Corporation in 1994.
  • Old Labour to New by Greg Rosen, Politicos Publishing, 2005, is an account of the Labour Party before, during and after the Kinnock years.ISBN 1842750453
  • Labour Rebuilt by Patrick Wintour and Colin Hughes Fourth Estate, 1990 is an account of the Kinnock modernisation of the Labour Party

Little, Brown and Company is a publishing house established by Charles Coffin Little and his partner, James Brown. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Peter Kellner is a journalist, political commentator and Chairman of the YouGov opinion polling organisation. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Anthony King (ed.), British Political Opinion, 1937-2000: The Gallup Polls (Politico's, 2001), pp. 105-7.
  2. ^ Camden New Journal, 10-Jan-2008, p10
  3. ^ George Drower's biography "Kinnock" - published in 1994

References

  • Announcement of his introduction at the House of Lords House of Lords minutes of proceedings, 31 January 2005
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Neil Kinnock

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Offices held

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Harold Finch
Member of Parliament for Bedwellty
19701983
Succeeded by
(constituency abolished/renamed)
Preceded by
(new constituency)
Member of Parliament for Islwyn
1983–1995
Succeeded by
Don Touhig
Political offices
Preceded by
Michael Foot
Leader of the British Labour Party
1983–1992
Succeeded by
John Smith
Leader of the Opposition
1983–1992
Preceded by
Syd Tierney
Chair of the Labour Party
1987–1988
Succeeded by
Dennis Skinner
Preceded by
Karel van Miert
European Commissioner for Transport
1995–1999
Succeeded by
Loyola de Palacio
Preceded by
(new post)
European Commissioner for Administrative Reform
1999–2004
Succeeded by
Siim Kallas
Preceded by
Leon Brittan
Vice-President of the European Commission
1999–2004
Succeeded by
Günter Verheugen
Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Speaker of the House of Lords Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist... Harold Josiah Finch (2 May 1898 – 1979) was a Welsh Labour Party politician. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Bedwellty was a constituency in Monmouthshire, Wales which returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1918 until it was abolished for the 1983 general election. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1970 was held on June 18, 1970, and resulted in a surprise loss of power for Labour under Harold Wilson, who was replaced as Prime Minister by the Conservative leader, Edward Heath. ... The UK general election, 1983 was held on June 9, 1983 and gave the Conservatives and Margaret Thatcher the most decisive election victory since that of Labour in 1945. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Islwyn is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The UK general election, 1983 was held on June 9, 1983 and gave the Conservatives and Margaret Thatcher the most decisive election victory since that of Labour in 1945. ... A by-election was held in the Welsh seat of Islwyn on 16 February 1995 following the resignation of Neil Kinnock who was appointed as a European Commissioner. ... James Donnelly Touhig, known as Don Toulhig (born December 5, 1947) is the Welsh Labour and Co-operative member of Parliament for Islwyn, and is a junior minister at the Wales Office. ... Michael Mackintosh Foot (born 23 July 1913) is an English politician and writer. ... The Labour Party is a centre-left or social democratic political party in Britain (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... John Smith QC (September 13, 1938 – May 12, 1994) was a British politician who served as leader of the Labour Party from July 1992 until his sudden and unexpected death from a heart attack on 12 May 1994. ... The Leader of the Opposition in the United Kingdom is the politician who leads Her Majestys Loyal Opposition (the body in Parliament recognized as the Official Opposition). ... Sydney Tierney (born 16 September 1923) was a British Labour Party politician. ... The National Executive Committee or NEC is the chief administrative body of the Labour Party. ... Skinner in the House of Commons. ... Karel Van Miert (b. ... The Santer Commission was the European Commission that held office from 1995 until 15 March 1999. ... Loyola de Palacio (Madrid, September 16, 1950 - ) is a Spanish politician. ... The Prodi Commission was the European Commission from 1999 to 2004. ... Siim Kallas (born 2 October 1948 in Tallinn) is an Estonian politician, currently serving as European Commissioner for Administrative Affairs, Audit and Anti-Fraud. ... Leon Brittan, Baron Brittan of Spennithorne, PC (born September 25, 1939), is a barrister, a British politician, and a former Conservative Member of Parliament and former member of the European Commission. ... The Prodi Commission was the European Commission from 1999 to 2004. ... Günter Verheugen (born 28 April 1944 in Bad Kreuznach, Rhineland-Palatinate) is a German politician, currently serving as European Commissioner for Enterprise and Industry. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... James Keir Hardie (15 August 1856 - 26 September 1915) was a Scottish socialist and labour leader, and one of the first two Labour Party Members of Parliament (MPs) elected to the UK Parliament after the establishment of the Labour Party. ... The Right Honourable Arthur Henderson (September 13, 1863 – October 20, 1935) was a British politician and union leader. ... George Nicoll Barnes (January 2, 1859 - April 21, 1940) was a Scottish politician. ... James Ramsay MacDonald (12 October 1866 – 9 November 1937) was a British politician and three times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... The Right Honourable Arthur Henderson (September 13, 1863 – October 20, 1935) was a British politician and union leader. ... William Adamson (1863–1936) was born in Dunfermline, Scotland and worked as a miner in Fife where he became involved with the National Union of Mineworkers. ... Rt. ... James Ramsay MacDonald (12 October 1866 – 9 November 1937) was a British politician and three times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... The Right Honourable Arthur Henderson (September 13, 1863 – October 20, 1935) was a British politician and union leader. ... George Lansbury (21 February 1859 – 7 May 1940) was a British politician, socialist, Christian pacifist and newspaper editor. ... Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, PC (3 January 1883 – 8 October 1967) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1945 to 1951. ... Hugh Todd Naylor Gaitskell (April 9, 1906 – January 18, 1963) was a British politician, leader of the Labour Party from 1955 until his death in 1963. ... George Alfred Brown, later George Alfred George-Brown, Baron George-Brown, PC (2 September 1914 – 2 June 1985) was a British politician who served as Deputy Leader of the Labour Party from 1960 to 1970, and was a senior Cabinet minister (including as Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs) in... James Harold Wilson, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx, KG, OBE, FRS, PC (11 March 1916 – 24 May 1995) was one of the most prominent British politicians of the 20th century. ... Leonard James Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff, KG, PC (27 March 1912 – 26 March 2005), was Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979. ... Michael Mackintosh Foot (born 23 July 1913) is an English politician and writer. ... John Smith QC (September 13, 1938 – May 12, 1994) was a British politician who served as leader of the Labour Party from July 1992 until his sudden and unexpected death from a heart attack on 12 May 1994. ... Margaret Mary Beckett (née Jackson; born 15 January 1943) is a British Labour politician and Member of Parliament (MP) for Derby South. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... For others with the same or similar names, see Gordon Brown (disambiguation). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Neil Kinnock - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1864 words)
Kinnock was responsible for many of the reforms to the party which were built upon by John Smith and Tony Blair until Labour was elected in 1997.
Kinnock supported the aim of the strike - which he famously dubbed the "case for coal" - but, as an MP from a mining area, was bitterly critical of the tactics employed.
Kinnock explained his change of attitude, despite the continuing presence of 90 hereditary peers and appointment by patronage, by asserting that the Lords was a good base for campaigning.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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