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Encyclopedia > Neil Gaiman
Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman (November 14, 2004)
Born November 10, 1960 (1960-11-10) (age 47)
Portchester, Hampshire, England
Occupation Novelist, comics writer, screenwriter
Nationality English
Writing period 1980s — present
Genres Fantasy
Influences Douglas Adams, Jorge Luis Borges, Ray Bradbury, James Branch Cabell, Lord Dunsany, G.K. Chesterton, Harlan Ellison, C. S. Lewis, H.P. Lovecraft, Michael Moorcock, Alan Moore, J. R. R. Tolkien, Gene Wolfe, Roger Zelazny[1]
Influenced Susanna Clarke
Website http://www.neilgaiman.com/

Neil Richard Gaiman (IPA: /ˈgeɪmən/) (born November 10, 1960[2]) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. Notable works include The Sandman comic series, Stardust and American Gods. Image File history File links Photograph taken by me of Neil Gaiman on November of 2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... View of Portchester from Portsdown Hill; castle keep on left, Portsmouth harbour and city in background Portchester is a small suburb to the northwest of Portsmouth, England. ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about work. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... Comics (or, less commonly, sequential art) is a form of visual art consisting of images which are commonly combined with text, often in the form of speech balloons or image captions. ... Screenwriters, scenarists, or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... Douglas Noël Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English author, comic radio dramatist, and musician. ... Borges redirects here. ... Ray Douglas Bradbury (born August 22, 1920) is an American literary, fantasy, horror, science fiction, and mystery writer best known for The Martian Chronicles, a 1950 book which has been described both as a short story collection and a novel, and his 1953 dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451, is widely considered... James Branch Cabell photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1935 James Branch Cabell (April 14, 1879 - May 5, 1958) was an American author of fantasy fiction and belles lettres. ... Best known as Lord Dunsany, Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett, 18th Baron of Dunsany (July 24, 1878–October 25, 1957) was an Irish writer and dramatist notable for his work in fantasy and horror. ... For the town of Chesterton in Cambridgeshire, see Chesterton (Cambridge). ... Harlan Jay Ellison (born May 27, 1934) is a prolific American writer of short stories, novellas, teleplays, essays, and criticism. ... Clive Staples Jack Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author of fantasy, horror and science fiction, noted for combining these three genres within single narratives. ... Michael John Moorcock (born December 18, 1939, in London, England) is a prolific English writer primarily of science fiction and fantasy who has also published a number of literary novels. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... Tolkien redirects here. ... Gene Wolfe (born May 7, 1931, New York, New York) is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. ... Roger Joseph Zelazny (May 13, 1937 – June 14, 1995) was an American writer of fantasy and science fiction short stories and novels. ... Susanna [Mary] Clarke (born November 1, 1959) is a British author best known for her debut novel Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell (2004), a Hugo Award-winning alternate history fantasy. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... For other uses, see Sandman (comics). ... Stardust may refer to several concepts: In space and aviation: another name for cosmic dust Stardust (spacecraft), a comet coma sample return spacecraft Star Dust (aeroplane), a British airliner that vanished in 1947 In music: Stardust (song), a 1927 jazz-pop song by Hoagy Carmichael Stardust (album), a record album... American Gods is a novel by Neil Gaiman. ...


He lives near Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.[3][4][5] He is married to Mary T. McGrath and has two daughters, Holly and Maddy, and a son, Michael. He has two younger sisters.[4] Minneapolis redirects here. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from...

Contents

Biography

Early life

Gaiman's family is of Polish Jewish origins; after emigrating from the Netherlands in 1916, his grandfather eventually settled in the Hampshire city of Portsmouth on the south coast of England and established a chain of grocery stores.[6] His father, David Bernard Gaiman,[7] worked in the same chain of stores;[6] his mother, Sheila Gaiman (née Goldman), was a pharmacist. The family settled in 1965 in the West Sussex town of East Grinstead. Gaiman lived in East Grinstead for many years, from 1965-1980 and again from 1984-1987.[8] For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... David Gaiman is a prominent member of the Church of Scientology who lives in the UK. He and his wife Sheila joined in the early 1960s and he was public relations director and commonly in the media during the British controversies over Scientology in the 1960s and 1970s. ... West Sussex is a county in the south of England, bordering onto East Sussex (with Brighton and Hove), Hampshire and Surrey. ... East Grinstead (archaically spelt Grimstead[1]) is a town and civil parish in the northeastern corner of Mid Sussex, West Sussex in England near the East Sussex, Surrey, and Kent borders. ...


Gaiman was educated at several Church of England schools, including Fonthill School (East Grinstead),[8] Ardingly College (1970-74), and Whitgift School (Croydon) (1974-77).[9] The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Ardingly College is a public (privately funded and independent) co-educational boarding and day school, founded in 1858 by Canon Nathaniel Woodard. ... Whitgift School is an independent day school educating approximately 1,200 boys aged 10 to 18 in South Croydon, London in a 45-acre parkland site. ...


Journalism, early writings, and literary influences

As a child and a teenager, Gaiman grew up reading the works of C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Michael Moorcock, Ursula K. Le Guin and G.K. Chesterton. He later became a fan of science fiction, reading the works of authors as diverse as Samuel R. Delany, Roger Zelazny, Harlan Ellison, H.P. Lovecraft, Thorne Smith, and Gene Wolfe. Clive Staples Jack Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... Michael John Moorcock (born December 18, 1939, in London, England) is a prolific English writer primarily of science fiction and fantasy who has also published a number of literary novels. ... Ursula Kroeber Le Guin [ˌɜɹsÉ™lÉ™ ËŒkɹobɜɹ ləˈgWɪn] (born October 21, 1929) is an American author. ... Gilbert Keith Chesterton (May 29, 1874–June 14, 1936) was an influential English writer of the early 20th century. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Samuel Ray Delany, Jr. ... Roger Joseph Zelazny (May 13, 1937 – June 14, 1995) was an American writer of fantasy and science fiction short stories and novels. ... Harlan Jay Ellison (born May 27, 1934) is a prolific American writer of short stories, novellas, teleplays, essays, and criticism. ... Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author of fantasy, horror and science fiction, noted for combining these three genres within single narratives. ... Wikisource has original works written by or about: Thorne Smith Thorne Smith (1892–1934) was an American writer of fantasy fiction. ... Gene Wolfe (born May 7, 1931, New York, New York) is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. ...


In the early 1980s, Gaiman pursued journalism, conducting interviews and writing book reviews, as a means to learn about the world and to make connections that he hoped would later assist him in getting published. He wrote and reviewed extensively for the British Fantasy Society. [10] His first professional short story publication was "Featherquest", a fantasy story, in Imagine Magazine in May 1984, when he was 23.[11] Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A book review (or book report) is a form of literary criticism in which the work is analyzed based on content, style, and merit. ... Imagine Magazine was a monthly magazine dedicated to the first edition Advanced Dungeons and Dragons and Dungeons and Dragons role playing game systems published by TSR UK Limited between May 1983 and October 1985. ...


In 1984, he wrote his first book, a biography of the band Duran Duran, as well as Ghastly Beyond Belief, a book of quotations, with Kim Newman. He also wrote interviews and articles for many British magazines, including Knave. In the late 1980s, he wrote Don't Panic: The Official Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Companion in what he calls a "classic English humour" style. Following on from that he wrote the opening of what would become his collaboration with Terry Pratchett on the comic novel Good Omens, about the impending apocalypse.[12] Duran Duran are an English pop group notable for a long series of popular singles and vivid music videos. ... Kim Newman (born July 31, 1959) is an English journalist, film critic, and fiction writer. ... Knave magazine is a long-established British pornographic magazine, published by Galaxy Publications. ... Terence David John Pratchett, OBE (born 28 April 1948) is a British fantasy and science fiction author, best known for his Discworld series. ... A comic novel is a work of fiction in which the writer seeks to amuse the reader: sometimes with subtlety and as part of a carefully woven narrative, sometimes above all other considerations. ... Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch (1990) is a fantasy novel written in collaboration between Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. ... Look up Apocalypse in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


After forming a friendship with comic book writer Alan Moore, Gaiman started writing comics, picking up Miracleman after Moore finished his run on the series. Gaiman and artist Mark Buckingham collaborated on several issues of the series before its publisher, Eclipse Comics, collapsed, leaving the series unfinished. His first published comic strips were four short Future Shocks for 2000 AD in 1986-7. He wrote three graphic novels with his favorite collaborator and long-time friend Dave McKean, Violent Cases, Signal to Noise, and The Tragical Comedy or Comical Tragedy of Mr. Punch. In between, he landed a job with DC Comics, his first work being the limited series Black Orchid. For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... Miracleman, originally known as Marvelman in his native United Kingdom, is a fictional character, a comic book superhero created in 1954 by writer-artist Mick Anglo for publisher L. Miller & Son. ... Mark Buckingham is an English comic book artist. ... Eclipse Comics was an American comic book publisher, one of several influential indendent publishers during the 1980s. ... Cover to Alan Moores Shocking Futures. ... Cover of the first issue of 2000 AD, 26 February 1977. ... David Tench McKean (born 29 December 1963 in Maidenhead, England) is an illustrator, photographer, comic book artist, graphic designer, filmmaker and musician. ... Violent Cases, cover art by Dave McKean Violent Cases is a short graphic novel written by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by Dave McKean. ... Signal to Noise (ISBN 1569711445)is a graphic novel by written by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by Dave McKean (Illustrator). ... The Tragical Comedy or Comical Tragedy of Mr. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Lets us talks some realities here before we get into the fictional works here. ...


Comics

Gaiman has written a plethora of comics for several publishers. His award-winning series The Sandman tells the tale of Morpheus, the anthropomorphic personification of Dream. The series began in 1987 and concluded in 1996: the 75 issues of the regular series, along with a special and a seven issue coda, have been collected into 11 volumes that remain in print. For other uses, see Sandman (comics). ... Cover of The Sandman #1, by Dave McKean. ... Anthropomorphism, also referred to as personification or prosopopeia, is the attribution of human characteristics to inanimate objects, animals, forces of nature, and others. ... For other uses, see Dream (disambiguation). ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


In 1989, Gaiman published The Books of Magic (collected in 1991), a four-part mini-series that provided a tour of the mythological and magical parts of the DC Universe through a frame story about an English teenager who discovers that he is destined to be the world's greatest wizard. The miniseries was popular, and sired an ongoing series written by John Ney Rieber. Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Cover for the Italian edition of the series. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


In the mid-90's, he also created a number of new characters and a setting that was to be featured in a title published by Tekno Comix. The concepts were then altered and split between three titles set in the same continuity: Lady Justice, Mr. Hero the Newmatic Man, and Teknophage.[13] They were later featured in Phage: Shadow Death and Wheel of Worlds. Although Neil Gaiman's name appeared prominently on all titles, he was not involved in writing of any of the above-mentioned books (though he helped plot the zero issue of Wheel of Worlds). Tekno Comix, later renamed BIG Entertainment, published comic books between 1995 and 1996. ... Mr. ...


Gaiman wrote a semi-autobiographical story about a boy's fascination with Michael Moorcock's anti-hero Elric for Ed Kramer's anthology Tales of the White Wolf. In 1996, Gaiman and Ed Kramer co-edited The Sandman: Book of Dreams. Nominated for the British Fantasy Award, the original fiction anthology featured stories and contributions by Tori Amos, Clive Barker, Gene Wolfe, Tad Williams, and others. Michael John Moorcock (born December 18, 1939, in London, England) is a prolific English writer primarily of science fiction and fantasy who has also published a number of literary novels. ... Stormbringer (Lancer, 1967) Elric of Melniboné is a fictional character created by Michael Moorcock. ... Edward E. Kramer was born on March 20, 1961 in Brooklyn, New York. ... Edward E. Kramer was born on March 20, 1961 in Brooklyn, New York. ... The Sandman: Book of Dreams (1996), edited by Ed Kramer and Neil Gaiman, is an anthology of short stories based on The Sandman comic book series. ... The British Fantasy Awards are administered annually by the British Fantasy Society and were first awarded in 1971. ... Tori Amos (born Myra Ellen Amos on August 22, 1963) is an American pianist and singer-songwriter. ... For the South African football (soccer) coach, see Clive Barker (soccer). ... Gene Wolfe (born May 7, 1931, New York, New York) is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. ... Robert Paul Tad Williams (born March 14, 1957) is the author of several fantasy and science fiction novels, including Tailchasers Song, the Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn series, the Otherland series, and The War of the Flowers. ...


Novels and films

Gaiman also writes songs, poems, short stories, and novels, and wrote the 1996 BBC dark fantasy television series Neverwhere, which he later adapted into a novel. He also wrote the screenplay for the movie MirrorMask with his old friend Dave McKean for McKean to direct. In addition, he wrote the English language script to the anime movie Princess Mononoke, based on a translation of the Japanese script. Several of his works have been optioned or greenlighted for film adaptation, most notably Stardust, which premiered in August of 2007 and stars Robert De Niro, Michelle Pfeiffer and Claire Danes. Coraline is currently in production with Dakota Fanning and Teri Hatcher in the leading roles. Poetry (ancient Greek: poieo = create) is an art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ... This article is in need of attention. ... This article is about the literary concept. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Heavy Metal It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... MirrorMask is a 2005 film from the Jim Henson Company, Samuel Goldwyn Films, and Destination Films. ... David Tench McKean (born 29 December 1963 in Maidenhead, England) is an illustrator, photographer, comic book artist, graphic designer, filmmaker and musician. ... “Animé” redirects here. ... Princess Mononoke ) is a Japanese animated film by Hayao Miyazaki that was first released in Japan on July 12, 1997 and in the United States on October 29, 1999 in select cities and on November 26, 1999. ... Stardust (1998) is the second solo prose novel by Neil Gaiman. ... Robert De Niro in 1988 Robert De Niro (born August 17, 1943) is a two-time Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American film actor, director, and producer. ... Michelle Marie Pfeiffer (born April 29, 1958) is a three-time Academy Award-nominated and internationally known American actress. ... Claire Catherine Danes (born on April 12, 1979) is a Golden Globe Award-winning and Emmy Award-nominated American film, television, and theater actress. ... Coraline is an upcoming film based on Neil Gaimans book, ... Dakota Fanning (born Hannah Dakota Fanning on February 23, 1994) is an American actress. ... Teri Lynn Hatcher (born December 8, 1964) is an Emmy-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actress and author as well. ...


He cowrote the script for Robert Zemeckis's Beowulf with Roger Avary. He has expressed interest in collaborating on a film adaptation of the Epic of Gilgamesh.[14] Robert Lee Bob Zemeckis (born May 14, 1952) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American movie director, producer and writer. ... Beowulf is a 2007 fantasy film directed by Robert Zemeckis, a film adaptation of the Anglo-Saxon epic poem of the same name. ... Roger Avary, photographed for Score Magazine at the Hotel Costes K, Paris. ... Film adaptation is the transfer of a written work to a feature film. ... The Epic of Gilgamesh is an epic poem from Babylonia and is among the earliest known literary works. ...


He was the only person other than J. Michael Straczynski to write a Babylon 5 script in the last 3 seasons, contributing the season 5 episode "Day of the Dead". Joseph Michael Straczynski (born July 17, 1954) is an award-winning American writer/producer of television series, novels, short stories, comic books, and radio dramas. ... Babylon 5 is an epic American science fiction television series created, produced, and largely written by J. Michael Straczynski. ... Day of the Dead is an episode from the fifth season of the science fiction television series Babylon 5. ...


In February 2001, when Gaiman had completed writing American Gods, his publishers set up a promotional web site featuring a weblog in which Gaiman described the day-to-day process of revising, publishing, and promoting the novel. After the novel was published, the web site evolved into a more general Official Neil Gaiman Web Site, and Gaiman regularly adds to the weblog, describing the day-to-day process of being Neil Gaiman and writing, revising, publishing, or promoting whatever the current project is. American Gods is a novel by Neil Gaiman. ... A weblog (now more commonly known as a blog) is a web-based publication consisting primarily of periodic articles (normally, but not always, in reverse chronological order). ...


The original American Gods blog was extracted for publication in the NESFA Press collection of Gaiman miscellany, Adventures in the Dream Trade. American Gods is a novel by Neil Gaiman. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


In 2007 Gaiman announced that after ten years in development the feature film of Death: The High Cost of Living would finally begin production with a screenplay by Gaiman that he would direct for Warner Independent. Don Murphy and Susan Montford are the producers, and Guillermo del Toro is the film's executive producer.[15][16] Death as illustrated by Chris Bachalo. ... Don Murphy (born ca. ... Filmmaker- Director, Writer and Producer - short films include Hairpin and Strangers. Screenwriter of THE FAMILY JAM, a screenplay about the early days of the Charles Manson Family based on the book by Ed Sanders. ... Guillermo del Toro Gómez (born October 9, 1964 in Guadalajara, Jalisco) is an Academy Award-nominated Mexican film director. ...


Adaptations

Gaiman has also written at least three drafts of a screenplay adaptation of Nicholson Baker's novel The Fermata for director Robert Zemeckis, although the project was stalled while Zemeckis made Polar Express and the Gaiman-Roger Avary written Beowulf film. Beowulf is a motion capture film starring Ray Winstone and Angelina Jolie with a scheduled release date of October 2007. Nicholson Baker (born January 7, 1957) is a contemporary American novelist. ... Robert Lee Bob Zemeckis (born May 14, 1952) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American movie director, producer and writer. ... The Polar Express is a 2004 feature film based on the childrens book of the same title by Chris Van Allsburg. ... Roger Avary, photographed for Score Magazine at the Hotel Costes K, Paris. ... Beowulf is a 2007 fantasy film directed by Robert Zemeckis, a film adaptation of the Anglo-Saxon epic poem of the same name. ... Beowulf is a 2007 fantasy film directed by Robert Zemeckis, a film adaptation of the Anglo-Saxon epic poem of the same name. ... Motion capture, or mocap, is a technique of digitally recording the movements of real things — usually humans — it originally developed as an analysis tool in biomechanics research, but has grown increasingly important as a source of motion data for computer animation. ... Raymond Andrew Winstone (born February 19, 1957) is an Emmy Award winning English film and television actor. ... Angelina Jolie (born June 4, 1975) is an American film actress, a former fashion model and a Goodwill Ambassador for the UN Refugee Agency. ...


Several of Gaiman's original works are in various stages of being adapted for film. Matthew Vaughn directed the film adaptation of Stardust, and Henry Selick is directing a stop-motion version of Coraline. Matthew Vaughn (born 7 March 1971) is a film producer (Layer Cake, Snatch, Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels among others), director (Layer Cake) and husband of Claudia Schiffer, whom he married in 2002. ... Stardust is an upcoming film to be directed by Matthew Vaughn set for a 2007 release. ... Stardust (1998) is the second solo prose novel by Neil Gaiman. ... Henry Selick (November 30 1952 - ), is an American stop motion animation director who directed both The Nightmare Before Christmas, and James and the Giant Peach. ... Coraline (2002) is a novella for children and adults by the British author Neil Gaiman. ...


"Snow, Glass, Apples," Gaiman's retelling of Snow White, was published in the collection Smoke and Mirrors in 1998. It was also performed by Seeing Ear Theatre as an audio play. Snow, Glass, Apples is a short story written by Neil Gaiman. ... This article is about the Snow White character. ... The cover of Smoke and Mirrors Smoke and Mirrors is a collection of short fiction by Neil Gaiman. ...


Friendships

Gaiman maintains friendships with several celebrities outside the comic book and science fiction fields, including author Terry Pratchett (it is not uncommon to see Terry Pratchett in the "thank yous" in Gaiman's books, and Gaiman in Pratchett's), singers Thea Gilmore and Tori Amos (a Sandman fan who has mentioned him in some of her songs, and whom he included as a character (a talking tree) in 'Stardust'),[17] actor/comedian Lenny Henry (a fan of Black Orchid who pitched the idea that eventually became Neverwhere to Gaiman),[18], Jonathan Ross and his wife Jane Goldman (who appear as 'themselves' in Gaiman's short story 'The Mysterious Disappearance of Miss Finch', collected in his Smoke and Mirrors collection), and illusionist Penn Jillette of Penn & Teller (who has mentioned Gaiman on his Free FM radio show, and appeared in the Gaiman-written Day of the Dead episode of Babylon 5). Terence David John Pratchett, OBE (born 28 April 1948) is a British fantasy and science fiction author, best known for his Discworld series. ... Thea Eve Gilmore (b. ... Tori Amos (born Myra Ellen Amos on August 22, 1963) is an American pianist and singer-songwriter. ... Lenworth George Henry CBE, BA (Hons) English Literature (born 29 August 1958), better known as that black guy on the telly whos married to the fat one, is an English writer, comedian and actor. ... Lets us talks some realities here before we get into the fictional works here. ... Heavy Metal It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... This article is about the British television presenter. ... Jane Goldman (born June 11, 1970) is an English writer and presenter of LivingTVs news series, Jane Goldman Investigates. ... Smoke and mirrors in programming is used to describe a program or functionality that doesnt exist yet, but appears as though it does. ... Penn Fraser Jillette (born March 5, 1955 in Greenfield, Massachusetts) is an American comedian, illusionist, juggler and writer known for his work with fellow illusionist Teller in the team known as Penn & Teller. ... Penn & Teller at the 1988 Emmy Awards Penn & Teller are Las Vegas headliners whose act is an amalgam of illusion and comedy. ... Primary Free FM logo Free FM is the moniker and on-air brand of several FM talk radio stations in the United States owned by CBS Radio, created because of Howard Sterns departure to Sirius Satellite Radio in January 2006. ... Day of the Dead is an episode from the fifth season of the science fiction television series Babylon 5. ... Babylon 5 is an epic American science fiction television series created, produced, and largely written by J. Michael Straczynski. ...


Litigations

In 1993, Gaiman was contracted by Todd McFarlane to write a single issue of Spawn, a popular title at the newly created Image Comics company. McFarlane was promoting his new title by having guest authors Gaiman, Alan Moore, Frank Miller, and Dave Sim each write a single issue. Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Todd McFarlane (born March 16, 1961 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada) is a Canadian comic book artist, writer, toy manufacturer/designer, and media entrepreneur who is best known as the creator of the epic religious fantasy series Spawn. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Image Comics is an American comic book publisher. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... This article is about Frank Miller, the comic book writer and artist. ... David Victor Sim (born May 17, 1956 in Hamilton, Ontario) is a Canadian comic book writer and artist, best known as the creator of the 6,000 page graphic novel Cerebus the Aardvark. ...


In issue #9 of the series, Gaiman introduced the characters Angela, Cogliostro, and Medieval Spawn. Prior to this issue, Spawn was an assassin who worked for the government and came back as a reluctant agent of Hell but had no direction. In Angela, a cruel and malicious angel, Gaiman introduced a character that threatened Spawn's existence, as well as providing a moral opposite. Cogliostro was introduced as a mentor character for exposition and instruction, providing guidance. Medieval Spawn introduced a history and precedent that not all Spawns were self-serving or evil, giving additional character development to Malebolgia, the demon that creates Hellspawn. Angela is a fictional character in Todd McFarlanes Spawn comic book series. ... Cogliostro (Cog, initially rendered Cagliostro) is a supporting character in Todd McFarlanes Spawn comic series. ... A Hellspawn is fictitious creature from the popular comic book Spawn. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Malebolgia is the name of a fictional demon in the Spawn universe. ...


All three characters were used repeatedly through the next decade by Todd McFarlane. Gaiman claimed that the characters were owned by their creator, not by the creator of the series. As McFarlane used the characters without Gaiman's permission or royalty payments, Gaiman believed his copyrighted work was being infringed upon, which violated their original agreement. McFarlane initially agreed that Gaiman had not signed away any rights to the characters but later claimed that Gaiman's work had been work-for-hire and that McFarlane owned all of Gaiman's creations entirely. McFarlane had also refused to pay Gaiman for the volumes of Gaiman's work he republished and kept in print.


In 2002, Neil Gaiman filed a lawsuit against Todd McFarlane and Image Comics and won a sizable judgment. The characters are now owned 50/50 by both men. Also see: 2002 (number). ... Todd McFarlane (born March 16, 1961 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada) is a Canadian comic book artist, writer, toy manufacturer/designer, and media entrepreneur who is best known as the creator of the epic religious fantasy series Spawn. ... Image Comics is an American comic book publisher. ...


This legal battle was in part funded by Marvels and Miracles, LLC, which Gaiman created in order to help sort out the legal copyrights surrounding Miracleman (see the ownership of Miracleman sub-section of the Miracleman article). Gaiman wrote Marvel 1602 in 2003 to help fund this project. All of Marvel Comics' profits for the series go to Marvels and Miracles. The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view. ... Miracleman, originally known as Marvelman in his native United Kingdom, is a fictional character, a comic book superhero created in 1954 by writer-artist Mick Anglo for publisher L. Miller & Son. ... Miracleman, originally known as Marvelman in his native United Kingdom, is a fictional character, a comic book superhero created in 1954 by writer-artist Mick Anglo for publisher L. Miller & Son. ... Marvel 1602 is an eight-issue Marvel comic limited series, published in 2003, written by Neil Gaiman, illustrated by Andy Kubert, and digitally painted by Richard Isanove. ...


Gaiman is strongly committed with the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund. The Comic Book Legal Defense Fund is a United States non-profit organization created in 1986 to protect the First Amendment rights of comics creators, publishers, and retailers covering legal expenses. ...


2005 onwards

In 2005, his novel Anansi Boys was released worldwide. The book deals with Anansi ('Mr. Nancy'), a supporting character in American Gods. Specifically it traces the relationship of his two sons, one semi-divine and the other an unaware Englishman of American origin, as they explore their common heritage. It hit the New York Times bestseller list at number one.[19] Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anansi Boys is a novel by Neil Gaiman. ... Anansi is one of the most important characters of West African lore. ... American Gods is a novel by Neil Gaiman. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


In 2006, Gaiman relaunched Jack Kirby's Eternals for Marvel Comics. Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... The Eternals are a fictional race of superhumans in the Marvel Comics universe. ...


Awards

Gamain at the 2007 Scream Awards
Gamain at the 2007 Scream Awards

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 399 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (853 × 1280 pixels, file size: 111 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 399 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (853 × 1280 pixels, file size: 111 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... First awarded in 1975, the World Fantasy Awards are handed out annually at the World Fantasy Convention (WFC) to recognize outstanding achievement in the field of fantasy. ... Dream Country is the third graphic novel collection of the comic book series The Sandman, published by DC Comics. ... Comics Buyers Guide (CBG) is the longest-running periodical reporting on the comic book industry. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Stardust (1998) is the second solo prose novel by Neil Gaiman. ... The Mythopoeic Awards for literature and literary studies are given by the Mythopoeic Society to authors of outstanding works in the fields of myth, fantasy, and the scholarly study of these areas. ... This article is about the year. ... American Gods is a novel by Neil Gaiman. ... The Hugo Awards are given annually for the best science fiction or fantasy works. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Winners of the Nebula Award for Best Novel. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Nominees are listed below the winner(s) for each year 1987: Misery by Stephen King (tie) 1987: Swan Song by Robert R. McCammon (tie) Live Girls by Ray Garton Unassigned Territory by Kem Hunn Ash Wednesday by Chet Williamson 1988: The Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris Stinger by... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Coraline (2002) is a novella for children and adults by the British author Neil Gaiman. ... The Hugo Awards are given annually for the best science fiction or fantasy works. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Winners of the Nebula Award for Best Novella. ... Nominees are listed below the winner(s) for each year. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Study in Emerald is a short story written by British fantasy and comic book author Neil Gaiman. ... Marvel 1602 is an eight-issue Marvel comic limited series, published in 2003, written by Neil Gaiman, illustrated by Andy Kubert, and digitally painted by Richard Isanove. ... Cover of Batman #655, the first issue of Batman & Son Andy Kubert is an American comic book artist, the son of Joe Kubert and brother of Adam Kubert, both of whom are also artists. ... Anansi Boys is a novel by Neil Gaiman. ... The Mythopoeic Awards for literature and literary studies are given by the Mythopoeic Society to authors of outstanding works in the fields of myth, fantasy, and the scholarly study of these areas. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Will Eisner Comic Industry Award is given for creative achievement in comic books. ... The Squiddy Awards, also known as The Squiddies are the annual awards given by the participants in the Usenet newsgroup rec. ... The Scream Awards is the first Award Ceremony dedicated to horror, sci-fi and the fantasy genres. ...

Shakespeare references

  • Neil Gaiman draws on Shakespeare as a literary source. Allusions to Shakespeare's writings can be found in Anansi Boys, in which several lines of Hamlet appear, and the protagonist is compared to Macbeth more than once.
  • In The Sandman series, Shakespeare himself appears in three stories. In these appearances he makes and fulfills a deal with Morpheus, who grants Shakespeare the gift of inspiration in exchange for two plays celebrating dreams: A Midsummer Night's Dream and The Tempest. (Sandman #13, "Men of Good Fortune"; "Midsummer Night's Dream"; and "The Tempest.")
  • In Neverwhere the protagonist misquotes the line "Lead On, Macduff" from Macbeth, to which a character reacts: "Actually, it's 'Lay on, Macduff' but I didn't have the heart to correct him".
  • In the film Stardust Robert Deniro's character is named after the Bard. (However, this character was created by Matthew Vaughn and Jane Goldman and replaces Gaiman's original character of Captain Alberic from the Stardust novel.)

Shakespeare redirects here. ... Anansi Boys is a novel by Neil Gaiman. ... For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ... This article is about Shakespeares play. ... For other uses, see Sandman (comics). ... Cover of The Sandman #1, by Dave McKean. ... For other uses, see A Midsummer Nights Dream (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Heavy Metal It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... This article is about Shakespeares play. ... For the book, see Stardust (novel). ... For the movie based on this novel, see Stardust (2007 film). ...

Bibliography

Neil Gaiman has written many comics and graphic novels, as well as numerous books (including 5 novels). He has also created a number of audio books, a TV miniseries, and the scripts for several movies. This is a bibliography of works by Neil Gaiman. ...


See also

This partial list of fantasy authors, perhaps unsurprisingly, contains many overlaps with the list of science fiction authors. ... This is a list of some (not all notable) authors in the horror fiction genre. ... Note that this partial list contains some authors whose works of fantastic fiction would today be called science fiction, even if they predate, or did not work in that genre. ...

References

The Internet Speculative Fiction Database is a database of bibliographic information on science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. ... The Internet Book List (IBList) is an online database with information about books, authors, short stories, etc. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Hy Bender is an author who has written or cowritten 14 books. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ "Gaiman Interrupted: An Interview with Neil Gaiman (Part 2)" conducted by Lawrence Person, Nova Express, Volume 5, Number 4, Fall/Winter 2000, page 5.
  2. ^ Comics Buyers Guide #1636 (December 2007); Page 135
  3. ^ McGinty, Stephen. "Dream weaver", The Scotsman, February 25, 2006. 
  4. ^ a b "A writer's life: Neil Gaiman", The Telegraph, December 12, 2005. 
  5. ^ Neil Gaiman - Biography. Biography. Retrieved on 2006-06-21.
  6. ^ a b Lancaster, James. "Everyone has the potential to be great", The Argus (Brighton), 2005-10-11, pp. 10-11. 
  7. ^ Lancaster, James. "Everyone has the potential to be great", The Argus (Brighton), 2005-10-11, pp. 10-11.  David Gaiman quote: "It's not me you should be interviewing. It's my son. Neil Gaiman. He's in the New York Times Bestsellers list. Fantasy. He's flavour of the month, very famous."
  8. ^ a b "East Grinstead Hall of Fame - Neil Gaiman", East Grinstead Community Web Site.
  9. ^ "Neil Gaiman". Exclusive Books.
  10. ^ [1]
  11. ^ [2]
  12. ^ Science Fiction Weekly Interview
  13. ^ ref?
  14. ^ Tom Ambrose. "He Is Legend", Empire, December 2007, pp. 142. 
  15. ^ Sanchez, Robert (2006-08-02). Neil Gaiman on Stardust and Death: High Cost of Living!. IESB.net. Retrieved on 2007-02-25.
  16. ^ Gaiman, Neil (2007-01-09). The best film of 2006 was.... Neil Gaiman's Journal. Neil Gaiman. Retrieved on 2007-02-25.
  17. ^ Tori Amos, "Tear in Your Hand," Little Earthquakes
  18. ^ "Gaiman Interrupted: An Interview with Neil Gaiman (Part 2)" conducted by Lawrence Person, Nova Express, Volume 5, Number 4, Fall/Winter 2000, page 2.
  19. ^ "There's a first time for everything", Neil Gaiman's journal, 28 September 2005
  20. ^ Honor roll:Fiction books. Award Annals (2007-08-14). Retrieved on 2007-08-14.
  21. ^ Hugo words.... Neil Gaiman's homepage (2006-08-27). Retrieved on 2007-04-17.
  22. ^ [3]

Lawrence Person is a science fiction writer and editor of SF critical magazine Nova Express. ... CBG #1600 Comics Buyers Guide (CBG) is the longest-running periodical reporting on the comic book industry. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Argus is a local newspaper based in Brighton in East Sussex, with editions serving the city of Brighton and Hove and the other parts of both East and West Sussex. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Argus is a local newspaper based in Brighton in East Sussex, with editions serving the city of Brighton and Hove and the other parts of both East and West Sussex. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Empire is a British film magazine published monthly by Emap Consumer Media since July 1989. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Little Earthquakes (1992) was the solo debut album of singer Tori Amos, featuring the singles Winter, China, Silent All These Years and Crucify. It helped usher in the success of other female singer/songwriters in the 1990s. ... Lawrence Person is a science fiction writer and editor of SF critical magazine Nova Express. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Preceded by
Grant Morrison
Hellblazer writer
1990
Succeeded by
Jamie Delano
Persondata
NAME Gaiman, Neil Richard
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION English fantasy writer
DATE OF BIRTH November 10, 1960
PLACE OF BIRTH Portchester, Hampshire, England
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Neil Gaiman - FORA.tv (303 words)
Neil Gaiman is the critically acclaimed and award-winning author of the novels "American Gods," "Neverwhere," "Stardust," "Coraline," and "Anansi Boys;" "The Sandman" series of graphic novels; and "Smoke and Mirrors," a collection of short fiction - Cody's Books
Gaiman is also the coauthor of the novel Good Omens with Terry Pratchett.
Gaiman reads his stories well, and I guess I'm surprised he's so quirky and congenial.
The Sandman (DC Comics Modern Age) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2955 words)
Gaiman has since admitted that this was a joke on his part, and that he made up the "legend" out of whole cloth.
Neil Gaiman's blog already talks about an Absolute Sandman which would be a new edition of all the 10 volumes [1].
Gaiman became one of the most popular comic book creators of the era (launching his career as a novelist), and DC did not dare to continue The Sandman after he felt the series had come to a suitable conclusion.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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