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Encyclopedia > Neil Aspinall
Neil Aspinall
Born 13 October 1942
Prestatyn, North Wales
Occupation Road Manager, Personal assistant, Record producer, Executive
Spouse Suzy Aspinall (née Ornstein)
Children Vincent "Roag" Best (with Mona Best)

Neil Aspinall (born in Prestatyn, North Wales, October 13, 1942) was the road manager and personal assistant for the Beatles. He was a childhood friend of Paul McCartney and George Harrison at the Liverpool Institute grammar school in Liverpool. Aspinall and McCartney were in the same class, and Harrison was in the year below them. October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... Prestatyn is a seaside resort in the administrative county of Denbighshire, traditional county of Flintshire, North Wales, lying on the north coast. ... Approximate extent of North Wales North Wales (known in some archaic texts as Northgalis) is the northernmost unofficial region of Wales, bordered to the south by Mid Wales. ... The road crew (or roadies) are the technicians who travel on tour with musicians and who handle every part of the production except actually playing the music. ... A personal assistant, personal aide, or PA for short, is someone who assists in daily personal tasks. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Mona Best was born in India. ... Prestatyn is a seaside resort in the administrative county of Denbighshire, traditional county of Flintshire, North Wales, lying on the north coast. ... Approximate extent of North Wales North Wales (known in some archaic texts as Northgalis) is the northernmost unofficial region of Wales, bordered to the south by Mid Wales. ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... The road crew (or roadies) are the technicians who travel on tour with musicians and who handle every part of the production except actually playing the music. ... A personal assistant, personal aide, or PA for short, is someone who assists in daily personal tasks. ... The Beatles were an English rock band from Liverpool whose members were John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. ... Sir James Paul McCartney MBE (born June 18, 1942) is a Grammy Award-winning English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Liverpool Institute for Boys was founded in 1825, but occupied other premises while the money was found to build a dedicated building. ... Liverpool skyline. ...


Aspinall originally joined the Beatles' organisation as their road manager, which included driving his old Commer van (with the Beatles and their equipment) to and from shows, both day and night. After Mal Evans started working for the Beatles, Aspinall graduated to becoming the Beatles' personal assistant, and was later promoted to Apple Corps Executive in 1970. He resigned from this post on April 10, 2007. The road crew (or roadies) are the technicians who travel on tour with musicians and who handle every part of the production except actually playing the music. ... Mal Evans Malcolm Evans (May 27, 1935 – January 5, 1976) is best known as the roadie, assistant, and friend to the Beatles. ... Apple Records logo, featuring a Granny Smith apple. ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ...


On behalf of the Beatles, Aspinall has been involved in court cases against Allen Klein, Apple Inc., and EMI over the years. He also supervises the marketing of the Beatles' music, videos, and merchandising, as well being the director of Standby Films Ltd. (with his American wife Suzy) which they run from their home in Twickenham, Middlesex. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Apple Inc. ... The EMI Group (LSE: EMI) is an English music company comprising the major record company, EMI Music which operates several labels, based in Brook Green in London, England, and EMI Music Publishing, based on Charing Cross Road, London. ... Video is the technology of processing electronic signals representing moving pictures. ... A coffee mug bearing the logo of a company or organization is a common practice in product merchandising. ... Executive director is a title given to a person who is the head of an executive branch of an organization or company. ... Twickenham is a suburb in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, south west London. ... Middlesex is one of the 39 historic counties of England and the second smallest (after Rutland). ...

Contents

Early life

The Liverpool Institute which Aspinall, McCartney and Harrison attended.
The Liverpool Institute which Aspinall, McCartney and Harrison attended.

Aspinall's parents were both born in Liverpool, but his mother was evacuated to Prestatyn in North Wales (because of the air-raids on Liverpool during World War II) while Aspinall's father was away at sea with the Royal Navy. Aspinall was born in Prestatyn in 1942, but returned to Liverpool that same year with his mother after the bombing had subsided. Aspinall later attended West Derby School, where he passed his 11-plus exams. When he was 12-years-old, Aspinall gained a place at the Liverpool Institute in Mount Street, and was in the same class as Paul McCartney for English and Art lessons.[1] Aspinall later commented about his first meeting with George Harrison (who also attended the Institute): Image File history File links Download high resolution version (945x614, 79 KB) Summary Photograph of main entrance of LIPA. Image is in the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (945x614, 79 KB) Summary Photograph of main entrance of LIPA. Image is in the public domain. ... The Liverpool Institute for Boys was founded in 1825, but occupied other premises while the money was found to build a dedicated building. ... Liverpool skyline. ... Prestatyn is a seaside resort in the administrative county of Denbighshire, traditional county of Flintshire, North Wales, lying on the north coast. ... This article is about the country. ... Combatants United Kingdom Including combatants from:[1] Poland New Zealand Canada Czechoslovakia Belgium Australia South Africa France Ireland United States Jamaica Palestine Rhodesia Germany Including combatants from Italy Commanders Hugh Dowding Hermann Göring Albert Kesselring Strength 754 single-seat fighters 149 two-seat fighters 560 bombers 500 coastal 1... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the oldest of the British armed services (and is therefore the Senior Service). ... West Derby is a leafy well-to-do and popular suburb of Liverpool, England, that achieved significance far earlier than Liverpool itself. ... The Eleven Plus is an examination given to students aged 11 since about 1944 in some parts of the United Kingdom to select whether they go to a grammar school or to a secondary modern. ... The Liverpool Institute for Boys was founded in 1825, but occupied other premises while the money was found to build a dedicated building. ... Sir James Paul McCartney MBE (born June 18, 1942) is a Grammy Award-winning English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

My first encounter with George was behind the school’s air-raid shelters. This great mass of shaggy hair loomed up and an out-of-breath voice requested a quick drag of my Woodbine. It was one of the first cigarettes either of us had smoked. We spluttered our way through it bravely but gleefully. After that the three of us did lots of ridiculous things together (Aspinall, McCartney and Harrison). By the time we were ready to take the GCE exams we’d added John Lennon to our 'Mad Lad' gang. He was doing his first term at Liverpool College of Art which overlooks the Liverpool Institute playground and we all got together in a students coffee bar at lunchtime.[2][3]

Aspinall took nine GCEs at the Institute, and passed eight of them, only failing the French exam. He left school in July 1959, and studied accountancy.[4] Aspinall worked for a Liverpool company for two years, receiving a wage of £2.50 per week as a trainee accountant.[3] Air raid shelters are structures for the protection of the civil population as well as military personnel against enemy attacks from the air. ... Woodbine are a brand of Irish cigarette made by Gallaghers. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Liverpool College of Art Hope Street, Liverpool, England. ... The Liverpool Institute for Boys was founded in 1825, but occupied other premises while the money was found to build a dedicated building. ... Coffeehouse in Damascus This article is about an establishment where coffee is sold and consumed. ... The General Certificate of Education or GCE is a secondary-level academic qualification, which was used in Britain and continues to be used in some former British colonies. ... Accountancy (profession) or accounting (methodology) is the measurement, disclosure or provision of assurance about financial information primarily used by managers, investors, tax authorities and other decision makers to make resource allocation decisions within companies, organizations, and public agencies. ... A wage is a compensation which workers receive in exchange for their labor. ...


The Beatles

The Beatles' arrival at JFK Airport in 1964.
The Beatles' arrival at JFK Airport in 1964.

Aspinall was renting a room in Mona Best's house when The Beatles played at the opening of The Casbah Club on 29 August 1959, which was in the cellar of Mona's house.[5][6] The Beatles had previously used public transport to get to local gigs, but by February 1961 they were playing two or three concerts per night at different locations and needed someone to drive them. Pete Best asked Aspinall to be the Beatles' part-time road manager, so Aspinall bought an "old, grey and maroon Commer van" for 80 pounds, and charged each of the Beatles five shillings per concert.[7] In July 1962, after The Beatles returned from their second trip to Hamburg, Aspinall left his job to become their permanent road manager, as he was earning more money driving them around than he was earning by being an accountant.[3] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3571x2449, 851 KB) Retouched version of Image:Beatles. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3571x2449, 851 KB) Retouched version of Image:Beatles. ... John F. Kennedy International Airport (IATA Airport Code: JFK, ICAO Airport Code: KJFK) is the main international airport in New York City, and is one of the largest airports in the world. ... Mona Best was born in India. ... Casbah Club are a mod rock band formed in 2004. ... Skytrain Bangkok. ... A classical music concert in the Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne 2005 A concert is a live performance, usually of music, before an audience. ... Part time refers to the amount of time and effort spent by someone in employment (or another activity, such as volunteering) compared to a normal full-time job. ... The road crew (or roadies) are the technicians who travel on tour with musicians and who handle every part of the production except actually playing the music. ... Front of an old Commer bus Comma was an Atlantan manufacturer of illigal vehicles which existed from 1637 until 2458B.C. The company was formed in Georgia, and began by barfing on military vehicles for the Georgian House in the First Cold World War. ... The shilling was a British coin first issued in 1548 for Henry VIII, although arguably the testoon issued about 1487 for Henry VII was the first shilling. ... Accountant, or Qualified Accountant, or Professional Accountant, or Accountancy Practitioner, is a certified expert in accountancy. ...


Aspinall drove the Beatles down to London on New Year's Eve in 1961, for the now-famous Decca audition, but lost his way and so the trip took ten hours.[8][9] They arrived at 10 o'clock at night, and John Lennon said that they arrived, "just in time to see the drunks jumping in the Trafalgar Square fountain".[10] In 1963, he was joined by Mal Evans, who also helped set up the Beatles' equipment (and acted as a bodyguard) which freed Aspinall to concentrate on other duties, like arranging appointments or buying things for them, such as suits, boots, meals, or drinks[11][12] The quality of this article or section may be compromised by peacock terms. You can help Wikipedia by removing peacock terms. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Trafalgar Square viewed from the northeast corner. ...


After Pete Best was sacked by Brian Epstein (at the direction of the other three Beatles), Aspinall was waiting downstairs in Brian Epstein's NEMS record shop, and was the first one to talk to the (then) ex-Beatle in The Grapes pub, across from The Cavern.[13] Aspinall was furious and said that he would stop working for The Beatles as well, but Best strongly advised him not to.[1] Aspinall decided to stay with The Beatles, but ended his relationship with Mona Best (and his three-week-old baby, Roag). Aspinall asked McCartney and Lennon at the next concert why they had fired Best and was told, "It’s got nothing to do with you. You’re only the driver." [14] Aspinall worked closely with Brian Epstein, who provided weekly notes for Aspinall to give to the Beatles about their stage act, their concert appearances, and the fees they would receive.[15] British roads in the early 1960s were notoriously pot-holed and slow to navigate, and Aspinall had to drive his old van across the country many times, with the Beatles and their equipment in the back.[16] The Beatles, early 1962: (L-R) Pete, George, Paul and John. ... Brian Samuel Epstein, born in Liverpool, Lancashire, England (19 September 1934 – 27 August 1967), was an English businessman best known as the manager of The Beatles. ... Brian Samuel Epstein, born in Liverpool, Lancashire, England (19 September 1934 – 27 August 1967), was an English businessman best known as the manager of The Beatles. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... The Cavern Club, which was opened on January 16, 1957, was a legendary rock and roll club at 10 Mathew Street, Liverpool, England, where Brian Epstein was introduced to the Beatles in 1961. ... Mona Best was born in India. ... Economics offers various definitions for money, though it is now commonly defined as any good or token that functions as a medium of exchange that is socially and legally accepted in payment for goods and services and in settlement of debts. ... Pothole can also be the sport of exploring vertical caves as a synonym of caving The city of Los Angeles is famous for its large potholes. ...


Personal assistant

Aspinall's job as personal assistant to the Beatles consisted of driving them to concerts and meetings, but mostly meant just being there whenever they needed something.[17] When The Beatles first went to America, George Harrison became ill with a fever temperature of 102. He was ordered to stay in bed, and Aspinall replaced him for the Ed Sullivan Show camera rehearsals.[18] Before the cover of Sgt. Pepper could be completed by Peter Blake, Aspinall was sent out to find photographs of all of the people that were to be shown on the front cover.[19] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Ed Sullivan Show was an American television variety show that ran from June 20, 1948, to June 6, 1971, and was hosted by Ed Sullivan. ... Sgt. ... Blakes album cover Sir Peter Thomas Blake (born June 25, 1932) is an English pop artist, best known for his design of the sleeve for The Beatles album Sgt. ...


After recording sessions, Lennon, Harrison, and Starr would be chauffeured back to their houses in the 'stockbroker belt' of southern England, but Aspinall would often drive McCartney and Mal Evans in an Austin Princess limousine to a late-night club to eat.[20] The Bag O'Nails night-club was one of their favourites, at 8 Kingly Street in Soho, London, as it also presented live music. They would eat steak, chips, and mushy peas, but Aspinall would always take out a flashlight from his pocket (in the dimly-lit club) to inspect the portions on each of their plates.[21] This was to make sure that the portions were exactly as they had ordered, which McCartney found amusing.[22] A chauffeur in Japan A driver in Kerala A chauffeur is one who drives an automobile as a job. ... Commuters from East Anglia arrive at Londons Liverpool Street station The London Commuter Belt, or London Metropolitan Area, is the name given to the built-up area surrounding and running into Greater London but not administered as part of it. ... Austin Princess was a name given to luxury cars made by the Austin company during the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s. ... The Bag ONails club at 8 Kingly Street in Soho, London, was a meeting point for musicians in the 1960s, as well as being a venue for concerts. ... Soho is an area of central Londons West End, in the borough of the City of Westminster. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... A classical music concert in the Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne 2005 A concert is a live performance, usually of music, before an audience. ... A steak served with a pat of butter and mushrooms A steak is a slice from a larger piece of meat, typically beef. ... French fried potatoes, commonly known as French fries or just fries (North America) or chips (United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland and Commonwealth), are pieces of potato that have been cut into batons and deep-fried. ... Mushy peas Mushy peas are dried marrowfat peas which are first soaked overnight and then simmered until they form a bright green paste. ... A high power torch Green flashlight Flashlight is also the NATO designation for the Yakovlev Yak-25 Soviet military jet. ...


Musical contributions

Although not a musician, Aspinall made minor contributions to a handful of the Beatles' recordings. He played a tamboura on "Within You Without You", harmonica on "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite!", some percussion on "Magical Mystery Tour", and was among the many participants singing on the chorus of "Yellow Submarine".[4] The tambura is a musical instrument used in various places around the world. ... Within You Without You is a song written by George Harrison and recorded with a group of Indian musicians, without any input from his fellow Beatles. ... Being for the Benefit of Mr. ... Magical Mystery Tour is an album by British rock band The Beatles, first released in late November 1967. ... Yellow Submarine is a 1966 song by the Beatles (written by the Lennon-McCartney duo) and the theme song for the a 1968 animated United Artists film based on the music of the Beatles. ...


Manager

The Daily Mirror Headline: Epstein dies at 32.
The Daily Mirror Headline: Epstein dies at 32.

Following the death of Brian Epstein in August 1967, there was a vacuum in the management of the Beatles' affairs. In 1968, the Beatles asked Aspinall to take over the management of Apple Corps, which was founded in April 1968.[23] He is quoted in the Anthology series saying that he only did it after being asked, but did not want to do it full-time and would only do it until "they found somebody else".[24] George Martin (the Beatles' record producer) was against the idea, as he thought that Aspinall did not have the necessary social qualifications to be able to speak to the upper-class executives at EMI.[25] Aspinall accompanied McCartney and Lennon to New York on 11 May 1968 to announce the formation of Apple to the American Media.[26] Apple Corps had five divisions: electronics, film, publishing, records, and retailing. Aspinall later spoke of the Beatles' business arrangements: Image File history File links Brian Epstein newspaper headline. ... Image File history File links Brian Epstein newspaper headline. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a popular British tabloid daily newspaper. ... Brian Samuel Epstein, born in Liverpool, Lancashire, England (19 September 1934 – 27 August 1967), was an English businessman best known as the manager of The Beatles. ... Apple Records logo, featuring a Granny Smith apple. ... ANThology is the first major label album by Alien Ant Farm. ... Sir George Martin CBE (born 3 January 1926 in Highbury, London, England) is sometimes referred to as the fifth Beatle, a title that he owes to his work as producer of almost all of the Beatles records. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Upper class refers to the group of people at the top of a social hierarchy. ... NY redirects here. ...

We did not have one single piece of paper. No contracts. The lawyer, the accountants and Brian, whoever, had that. Maybe the Beatles had been given copies of various contracts, I don't know. I didn't know what the [recording] contract was with EMI, or with the film people or the publishers or anything at all. So it was a case of building up a filing system, find out what was going on while we were trying to continue doing something.[27]

Derek Taylor (Apple's press officer) said that Aspinall hated being stuck in the Apple office at 3 Savile Row all through the recording of The White Album and Let It Be album. Life in the Apple office was improved by having a chef and various assistants at hand; "the liquor bill was £600 per month and the food bill was close to that". This was mostly due to Aspinall's and Peter Brown's enjoying four-course lunches with expensive wines, in the dining room at Apple.[28] After Allen Klein was brought in to be the Beatles' manager Aspinall was dismissed, but later reinstated after the Beatles complained, and because Klein realised that Aspinall was no threat to his control of the company.[29] Klein lost a High Court action in 1971 (started by McCartney) but lawsuits between Klein and Apple kept Aspinall busy until 1977.[30] A music publisher deals in the marketing and commercial exploitation of songs. ... See File system for the terms usage in computing. ... Derek Taylor (1932-1997) is best known as the press agent for the hugely popular rock band, The Beatles. ... Public relations (PR) is the business, organizational, philanthropic, or social function of managing communication between an organization and its audiences. ... Savile Row Savile Row Savile Row is a road in the City of Westminster in central London that runs parallel to Regent Street between Conduit Street at the northern end and Vigo Street at the southern. ... The Beatles is the ninth official album by the Beatles, a double album released in 1968 (see 1968 in music). ... For the Taiwanese film whose foreign title translates to the same name, see 無米樂 Let It Be is a 1970 film about the Beatles rehearsing and recording songs for the album Let It Be in January 1969. ... Chefs in training in Paris Chef is a term commonly used to refer to an individual who cooks professionally. ... Spirits redirects here. ... Peter Brown is an American businessman, born and educated in England. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Her Majestys High Court of Justice (usually known more simply as the High Court) is, together with the Crown Court and the Court of Appeal, part of the Supreme Court of Judicature of England and Wales (which under the Constitutional Reform Act 2005, is to be known as the... It has been suggested that civil trial be merged into this article or section. ...


Apple Corps Executive

McCartney (who has known Aspinall longer than any of the other Beatles) has praised him for trademarking the Apple name worldwide, and calls Aspinall "Mr. X" in the Apple Corps organisation.[31] Image File history File links Anthology_cover_collage. ... Image File history File links Anthology_cover_collage. ... The Beatles Anthology is the name of a documentary series, a series of three albums and a book, all of which focus on the history of the popular rock band the Beatles. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A trademark or trade mark[1] is a distinctive sign of some kind which is used by an individual, business organization or other legal entity to uniquely identify the source of its products and/or services to consumers, and to distinguish its products or services from those of other entities. ...


In 1978, Aspinall instigated the first of three lawsuits on behalf of Apple Corps against Apple Computer, Inc. (now known as Apple, Inc.) for trademark infringement. The first suit settled in 1981 with an amount of £41,000 being paid to The Beatles by Apple Computers. As a condition of the settlement, Apple Computers was allowed to use its logo as long as it did not enter the music business.[32] The second suit arose in 1989, when Apple Corps sued Apple Computer over its Apple IIGS (which included a professional synthesizer chip) claiming violation of the 1981 settlement agreement. In 1991, a settlement of £13.5 million was reached.[31] In September 2003, Apple Computer, Inc. was again sued by Apple Corps, this time for the introduction of the iTunes Music Store and the iPod, which Aspinall and Apple Corps believed was a violation of the previous agreement for Apple Computer to not distribute music. The trial began on 27 March 2006 in the UK, and ended on 8 May 2006 in a victory for Apple Computer; the judge ruled the company's iTunes Music Store did not infringe on the trademark of Apple Corps.[33] Apple Records logo, featuring a Granny Smith apple. ... The music industry is the industry that creates and performs music, both in the form of compositions and performances. ... “ITMS” redirects here. ... iPod (fifth generation) in Apple Universal Dock, iPod nano (second generation) and iPod shuffle (second generation) iPod is a brand of portable media players designed and marketed by Apple and launched in 2001. ... Look up trial in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The correct title of this article is . ...


Aspinall has also been involved in several court cases in which Apple Corps has taken action against EMI:[34] The EMI Group (LSE: EMI) is an English music company comprising the major record company, EMI Music which operates several labels, based in Brook Green in London, England, and EMI Music Publishing, based on Charing Cross Road, London. ...

We have tried to reach a settlement through good faith negotiations and regret that our efforts have been in vain. Despite very clear provisions in our contracts, EMI persist in ignoring their obligations and duty to account fairly and with transparency. Apple and the Beatles are, once again, left with no choice but to sue EMI.[35][36]

In the early 1990s, Aspinall became the executive producer for The Beatles Anthology. He continues to advise the surviving Beatles, as well as Lennon's and Harrison's estates, and supervises the marketing of the Beatles' music, videos, and merchandising. For the band, see 1990s (band). ... The Beatles Anthology is the name of a documentary series, a series of three albums and a book, all of which focus on the history of the popular rock band the Beatles. ... Video is the technology of processing electronic signals representing moving pictures. ... A coffee mug bearing the logo of a company or organization is a common practice in product merchandising. ...


On April 10, 2007, it was announced by Apple that Aspinall "has decided to move on" and was replaced as Apple CEO by Jeff Jones, a longtime VP at Sony Legacy overseeing the back catalog.[37][38] Jeff Jones is the chief executive of Apple Corps, the company founded by The Beatles. ...


Personal life

During 1961-1962, Aspinall had become good friends with Pete Best and subsequently rented a room in the house where Pete Best lived with his parents. During one of the extended business trips of Pete Best's father, Aspinall became romantically involved with Pete Best's mother Mona Best, who was 20 years his senior. During this period, Aspinall fathered a child by Mona: Vincent "Roag" Best.[6][39] Roag Best was born in late July 1962, and just three weeks later, on August 16, 1962, Pete Best was dismissed from The Beatles.[13][1] Mona Best was born in India. ...


On 30 August 1968, Aspinall married Suzy Ornstein at the Chelsea Register office, London.[40] Suzy Aspinall is the daughter of Bud Ornstein; the chief executive of United Artists Pictures (UK). Aspinall met her during 1964/1965, when her father was the United Artists representative overseeing the production of the first two Beatles films: A Hard Day's Night and Help!.[41] As well as his work for Apple Corps, Aspinall and his wife are the sole directors of their own Standby Films Ltd. company, which is run from their home in Twickenham, Middlesex.[14] In 1999, Standby Films released a video film about Jimi Hendrix, called "Hendrix: Band of Gypsys".[42] Statue of Thomas More on Cheyne Walk. ... In England and Wales, The Register Office is primarily the local office for the registration of births, deaths and marriages (BD&M), and for the conducting of civil marriages. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The current United Artists logo (a variant was used during the 1980s). ... This article is about the film. ... Help! is the title of a 1965 film starring the Beatles and featuring Leo McKern, Eleanor Bron, Victor Spinetti, John Bluthal and Roy Kinnear. ... Twickenham is a suburb in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, south west London. ... Middlesex is one of the 39 historic counties of England and the second smallest (after Rutland). ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ...


Notes

  1. ^ a b c Neil Aspinall Biography - Mersey Beat Retrieved: 11 February 2007
  2. ^ Spitz 2005. p124
  3. ^ a b c First meeting with George Harrison - Merseybeat Retrieved: 11 February 2007
  4. ^ a b Unterberger, R., "Neil Aspinall biography" All Music Guide link Retrieved: 8 October 2006
  5. ^ Photo of The Casbah Club
  6. ^ a b Cynthia Lennon – “John” 2006. p44.
  7. ^ Miles 1998. p73
  8. ^ Spitz 2005. p285
  9. ^ Miles 1998. p89
  10. ^ Cynthia Lennon, “John” 2006. p108.
  11. ^ Miles 1998. pp92-93
  12. ^ Photo of Aspinall and Mal Evans Retrieved: 12 February 2007
  13. ^ a b Spitz 2005. p331
  14. ^ a b Aspinall, The Beatles and money - Mersey Beat Retrieved: 11 February 2007
  15. ^ Spitz 2005. p280
  16. ^ Spitz 2005. pp376-379
  17. ^ Spitz 2005. p736
  18. ^ Spitz 2005. p464
  19. ^ Miles 1998. p336
  20. ^ Miles 1998. pp166-167
  21. ^ Location of The Bag o’Nails Retrieved: 11 February 2007
  22. ^ Miles 1998. p141
  23. ^ Miles 1998. p440
  24. ^ Granados 2004. p12
  25. ^ Spitz 2005. p735
  26. ^ Spitz 2005. p716
  27. ^ Granados 2004. p19
  28. ^ Dilello 2005. p54
  29. ^ Miles 1998. p546
  30. ^ The Sunday Times: The Culture: Section 10: 12 November, 1995, pages 4-5
  31. ^ a b Miles 1998. pp581-582
  32. ^ History of Apple v Apple: bbc.co.uk 8 May 2006 Retrieved: 3 February 2007
  33. ^ Beatles lose court case against Apple Inc., bbc.co.uk: 11 May, 2006 Retrieved: 29 January 2007
  34. ^ Apple V EMI - Times Online August 31, 2006 Retrieved: 11 February 2007
  35. ^ EMI court case, bbc.co.uk: 31 August 2006 Retrieved: 29 January 2007
  36. ^ The Beatles and EMI’s court cases: bbc.co.uk 16 December 2005 Retrieved: 3 February 2007
  37. ^ Beatles' friend quits top job at Apple Corps. NME (2007-04-10). Retrieved on 2007 April 10.
  38. ^ Kozinn, Allan, "Magical Mystery Tour Ends for Apple Corps Executive", New York Times, 12 April 2007, passim. (link)
  39. ^ Review of “Drummed Out” – The sacking of Pete Best Retrieved: 11 February 2007
  40. ^ “Beatles People” – Photo of Neil Aspinall Retrieved: 12 February 2007
  41. ^ Andrew Loog Oldham Biography: Guardian Unlimited – 6 April 2001 Retrieved: 12 February 2007
  42. ^ Neil Aspinall at the Internet Movie Database – Roles as actor/producer. Retrieved: 12 February 2007

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (103rd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ...

References

The Beatles were an English rock band from Liverpool whose members were John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Weidenfeld & Nicholson is a British publisher of fiction, an imprint of the larger Orion Publishing Group ... The Beatles, early 1962: (L-R) Pete, George, Paul and John. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... // Cynthia Lennon née Powell (born September 10, 1939) was the first wife of John Lennon. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Hodder & Stoughton is a British publishing house, now an imprint of Hodder Headline. ... Barry Miles (commonly known as, and called, simply Miles) is an author who has written biographies of Paul McCartney, William Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg as well as books about John Lennon, the Beatles and Frank Zappa. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... Many Years From Now, is the official biography of Sir Paul McCartney, by Barry Miles. ... Vintage Books was founded in 1954 by Alfred A. Knopf as a trade paperback home for its authors. ... Random House is a publishing division of the German media conglomerate Bertelsmann based in New York City. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Little, Brown and Company is a publishing house established by Charles Coffin Little and his partner, James Brown. ... NY redirects here. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Neil Aspinall (76 words)
Neil Aspinall (born December 13, 1942) is best known as the assistant and road manager for the hugely popular rock band, The Beatles.
Aspinall was a childhood friend of Paul McCartney and George Harrison at the Liverpool Institute[?].
Aspinall even contributed to a few Beatles recordings, by playing tambura[?] on "Within You Without You" and harmonica on "Being For The Benefit Of Mr.
The Beatles - All About The Beatles at Beatlemania.Ca (579 words)
Aspinall was studying to be an accountant when he first met the Beatles in late 1960, as a result of renting lodgings at the house of their drummer at the time, Pete Best.
Aspinall, like Evans, also took on some miscellaneous parts on Beatles records when a simple task was needed that any extra hand could perform, no musical experience or ability necessary.
Aspinall even lost his job briefly when Allen Klein was brought in to clean house, although common sense prevailed and he (unlike many of the people Klein got rid of) was reinstalled.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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