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Encyclopedia > Nehalem (CPU architecture)
This article contains information about scheduled or expected future computer chips.
It may contain preliminary or speculative information, and may not reflect the final specification of the product.

Nehalem is a codename for both, a processor microarchitecture and a processor. The microarchitecture is being developed by Intel and is the planned successor to the Core microarchitecture. The processor is expected to debut the microarchitecture. Image File history File links Current_event_marker. ... A code name or cryptonym is a word or name used clandestinely to refer to another name or word. ... Die of an Intel 80486DX2 microprocessor (actual size: 12×6. ... Microarchitecture consists of a set of microprocessor design techniques used to implement the instruction set (including microcode, pipelining, cache systems, etc. ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC, SEHK: 4335), founded in 1968 as Integrated Electronics Corporation, is an American multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ... The Intel Core microarchitecture (previously known as the Intel Next-Generation Micro-Architecture, or NGMA) is a multi-core processor microarchitecture unveiled by Intel in Q1 2006. ...


Intel is already into the development process for Nehalem. Nehalem uses the 45 nm manufacturing methods from Penryn and applies it to the new Nehalem microarchitecture. This processor will debut in the second half of 2008 according to Intel[1] The 45 nanometer (45 nm) process is the next milestone (to be commercially viable in mid 2007 to early 2008) in CMOS fabrication. ... The Intel Core microarchitecture (previously known as the Intel Next-Generation Micro-Architecture, or NGMA) is a multi-core processor microarchitecture unveiled by Intel in Q1 2006. ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC, SEHK: 4335), founded in 1968 as Integrated Electronics Corporation, is an American multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ...

Contents

The codename

The codenames "Bloomfield" (desktop chip), "Gainestown" (server chip), "Gilo" (mobile chip) [1], and "Beckton" (or "Becton") (server chip) [2] have been associated with Nehalem, but with very few details.


The code name itself had been seen on the end of several roadmaps starting in 2000. At that stage it was supposed to be the latest evolution of the NetBurst architecture. 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Intel NetBurst Microarchitecture, called P68 inside Intel, is the successor to the P6 microarchitecture in the x86 family of CPUs made by Intel. ...

 Willamette → Northwood → Prescott → Tejas → Nehalem 

Since the abandonment of NetBurst, the codename had been recycled and refers to a completely different project. The Intel NetBurst Microarchitecture, called P68 inside Intel, is the successor to the P6 microarchitecture in the x86 family of CPUs made by Intel. ...


Details on the processor

Nehalem has the most significant new architectural changes as of today since the Pentium Pro back in 1995. Nehalem is very scalable with different components for different tasks. According to Intel it will have 1 through 8+ cores, integrated memory controllers for DDR3 with 1 to 4 memory channels and be manufactured using the same 45nm manufacturing process as its predecessor, Penryn. Some versions of Nehalem will also have integrated graphics subsystem off die, but in the same CPU package. Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The 45 nanometer (45 nm) process is the next milestone (to be commercially viable in late 2006 to early 2007) in semiconductor manufacturing and fabrication. ...


The successor

Westmere is the name given to the 32 nm shrink of Nehalem. Westmere should be ready for a 2009 release provided that Intel stays on target with its roadmap. Westmere is an Auckland suburb. ... The 32 nanometer (32 nm) process is the next step after the 45 nanometer process in CMOS manufacturing and fabrication. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


According to a French article from June 2005, there would be at least two variants: first will come Whitefield (since cancelled) then Dunnington. This article also gave two versions: dual-core (low-end) and quad-core (normal). Starting from the second generation, the server version would have from 4 to 32 cores. Whitefield would have used the Common System Interface (CSI), a competitor to HyperTransport. The Common System Interface (or CSI) is a processor interconnect standard being developed by Intel, as a competitor to HyperTransport. ... HyperTransport logo HyperTransport (HT), formerly known as Lightning Data Transport (LDT), is a bidirectional serial/parallel high-bandwidth, low-latency point to point link that was introduced on April 2, 2001. ...


The successor to Nehalem will be Sandy Bridge, scheduled for release in 2010. Sandy Bridge is the code name for a processor that is being developed by Intel and is the planned successor to Nehalem. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


References

  1. ^ Intel: More Details on Penryn and Nehalem

See also

P5, P6, NetBurst, Core Intel x86/x86-64 microarchitectures Sandy Bridge

 
 

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