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Encyclopedia > Ned Lamont
Ned Lamont

Born January 3, 1954 (1954-01-03) (age 54)
Washington DC, U.S.
Occupation Chairman, Lamont Digital Systems
Spouse Annie Lamont

Edward Miner "Ned" Lamont, Jr. (born January 3, 1954[1]) was the unsuccessful Democratic nominee for the United States Senate in the Connecticut United States Senate election held on on November 7, 2006. He faced incumbent Senator Joe Lieberman, who ran as the nominee of the Connecticut for Lieberman party, as well as Republican nominee Alan Schlesinger in a three-way general election in November, having defeated Lieberman 51.8% - 48.2%[2] among Democratic voters in a primary election on August 8, 2006. [3] [4] [5] In the election, Lamont lost to Lieberman - Lieberman won 50% of the vote while Lamont won 40%, with 10% voting for Schlesinger and a neglible percent voting for Green Party candidate Ralph Ferrucci.[6] He currently serves as a Fellow at the Harvard Institute of Politics, and is an adjunct faculty member of Central Connecticut State University. Image File history File links NedLamont2006. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... Flag Seal Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location Location of Washington, D.C., with regard to the surrounding states of Maryland and Virginia. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... A chairperson is the political correct term for the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... Lamont Digital Systems (LDS), a privately held company founded in 1984, is focused on building advanced telecommunications platforms for residential gated communities and colleges and universities. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Ned Lamont (left) debated Joe Lieberman, pictured here during a July 6 NBC 30 debate, in the August 8 Democratic primary The 2006 election of a United States Senator from the state of Connecticut was held on November 7, 2006. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is a United States Senator from Connecticut. ... Connecticut for Lieberman is the Connecticut political party created by twenty-five supporters of Senator Joe Lieberman, its sole candidate for office. ... GOP redirects here. ... Alan Schlesinger Alan Schlesinger (1960-) is an attorney, former Derby, Connecticut mayor, former Connecticut State Representative, and three-time unsuccessful Congressional candidate who received the Republican nomination for the seat representing Connecticut that is currently held by U.S. Senator Joe Lieberman and was contested in the 2006 election. ... For other uses, see Primary. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the American political party, Green Party. ... The Kennedy family and its friends founded Harvards Institute of Politics (IOP) to serve as a living memorial to President John F. Kennedy shortly after his death. ... 2006 NEC CHAMPS BABY! GO CCSU BLUE DEVILS WHOOO!!! Central Connecticut State University is a state university in New Britain, Connecticut. ...

Contents

Background

Lamont was born in Washington, D.C. to Camille Helene Buzby and Edward Miner Lamont.[7] He grew up in Syosset, New York, and is an heir to the fortune of his great-grandfather, Thomas W. Lamont, who was a partner of the banking and finance firm J. P. Morgan & Co. After graduating from Phillips Exeter Academy (home of the Lamont Infirmary and Lamont Hall named for his great-grandfather) in 1972, Ned Lamont earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University (home of the Lamont Library, named for his great-grandfather)[8] in 1976, and a master's degree in Public and Private Management from the Yale School of Management in 1980. While at Phillips Exeter, Lamont was the chairman of the student newspaper, The Exonian. He began his career working for a small newspaper in Ludlow, Vermont.[9] For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Syosset is a hamlet (and a census-designated place) in Nassau County, New York, within the Town of Oyster Bay. ... Thomas William Lamont (1870-1948) was a American banker. ... J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. ... , Phillips Exeter Academy (most commonly called Exeter, Phillips Exeter or PEA) is a co-educational independent boarding school for grades 9–12, located on 619 acres in Exeter, New Hampshire, U.S., fifty miles north of Boston [1]. In over two centuries of its existence, Phillips Exeter Academy has played... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Yale School of Management (also known as Yale SOM) is the graduate business school of Yale University and is located on Hillhouse Avenue in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Yale SOM offers M.B.A. and Ph. ... Ludlow, Vermont Ludlow is a town located in Windsor County, Vermont. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Lamont then entered the cable television industry, managing the startup of Cablevision's operation in Fairfield County, Connecticut. In 1984, he founded, and is currently president and chairman of, Lamont Digital Systems, a builder and operator of advanced telecommunications networks for college campuses and residential gated communities, with over 150,000 subscribers. The company's finances are private, though it currently has 35 employees, down from 100 in 2001.[citation needed] His most recent salary was reported as $546,000 per year [10] A trade publication reported Lamont and his partners tried unsuccessfully to sell the firm two years ago.[11] For other uses, see Cablevision (disambiguation). ... Fairfield County is located in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Lamont Digital Systems (LDS), a privately held company founded in 1984, is focused on building advanced telecommunications platforms for residential gated communities and colleges and universities. ... In its modern form, a gated community is a form of closed community, characterized by a controlled entrance for pedestrians, bicycles, and automobiles, usually staffed by full-time, private security guards, that leads into one or more small residential streets, with walls or fences surrounding the perimeter of the entire...


Before running for the U.S. Senate, Lamont was elected and served as selectman in the town of Greenwich, Connecticut, for eight years (two terms), chaired the state investment advisory council, and served on many civic boards. Lamont unsuccessfully ran for a state Senate seat in 1990, finishing in third place.[12] Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Settled 1640 Joined Connecticut 1656 Government  - Type Representative town meeting  - First selectman Peter Tesei  - Town administrator Edward Gomeau  - Town meeting moderator Thomas J. Byrne Area  - Total 174. ... This article is about the year. ...


Family

Lamont and his wife, the former Ann "Annie" Greenlee Huntress, a venture capitalist, have three teenaged children.[13][14] Ann Lamont seconded her husband's nomination at the Connecticut Democratic Convention in May 2006. Their 19-year-old daughter, Emily, Harvard class of 2009, has campaigned frequently for her father across Connecticut, introducing him at various events. Her effort to vote for her father in the primary failed, as her ballot was rejected since she had not registered as a Democrat.[15] This fault turned out to be one on the part of the Greenwich Registrar. Emily was registered as a Democrat.[citation needed] Her younger siblings, sister Lindsay (14) and brother Teddy (13), have generally remained out of the spotlight. Venture capital is a general term to describe financing for startup and early stage businesses as well as businesses in turn around situations. ...


Lamont's 2005 state tax returns indicate he is an art enthusiast as he paid $64,311 in sales tax on art purchases, including a piece worth over $1 million. The tax returns also show that he and his wife donated to a family philanthropic fund that donated over $213,000 to charities, schools, and organizations. Lamont also donated over $10,000 in cash to other charities, but his campaign manager says he donated more, just chose not to deduct those donations.[10]


Lamont is the great-grandson of former J.P. Morgan & Co. Chairman Thomas W. Lamont and the grandnephew (not the grandson, as has been widely reported) of Corliss Lamont (a director of the American Civil Liberties Union from 1932 to 1954).[16] His self-reported net worth lies somewhere between $90 million and $300 million.[17] Corliss Lamont (March 28, 1902 – April 26, 1995), was a humanist philosopher and civil liberties advocate. ... The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is an American organization consisting of two separate entities: the ACLU Foundation, a non-profit organization that focuses on litigation and communication efforts, and the American Civil Liberties Union which focuses on legislative lobbying and does not have non-profit status. ...


His father, Ted (Edward M. Sr.), was an economist who worked with the Marshall Plan which helped reconstruct Europe after World War II.[18] He later served in the Nixon administration in Housing and Urban Development. Ted Lamont is now an unaffiliated voter, having last voted for a Republican in 1988. Since then he has voted Democratic. He told The Hartford Courant that "Eastern Moderates no longer have a place in the GOP."[19] Ned Lamont contributed to one Republican as late as 1998, when he contributed $500 to the re-election effort of Congressman Chris Shays,[20] but since 1999 has contributed over $57,000 to Democrats, including $1,500 to Joe Lieberman.[21][22] Map of Cold-War era Europe and the Near East showing countries that received Marshall Plan aid. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Nixon redirects here. ... The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, often abbreviated HUD, is a Cabinet department of the United States government. ... The Hartford Courant is Connecticuts largest daily newspaper, and is a morning newspaper for most of the state north of New Haven and east of Waterbury. ... Christopher H. Shays, usually known as Chris Shays (born October 18, 1945), American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1987, representing the 4th District of Connecticut, which includes 17 towns in Southwest Connecticut. ...


His mother, Camille Buzby "Buz" Lamont, was born in Puerto Rico, the daughter of an American salesman (a Quaker veteran of World War I) and a Catholic missionary. She is of French and U.S. descent and she studied at the George School in Pennsylvania, Middlebury College in Vermont, and at the University of Geneva in Switzerland.[23] She speaks fluent Spanish but never taught Ned.[24] The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... For other uses, see Missionary (disambiguation). ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... George School is a private Quaker boarding and day high school near Newtown, Pennsylvania, USA. // George School was founded in 1891 and opened in 1893 as a school for Hicksite members of the Society of Friends (Quakers) who wanted an alternative to Orthodox Westtown School; Although most of the early... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Middlebury College is a small, private liberal arts college located in the rural town of Middlebury, Vermont, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The University of Geneva (Université de Genève) is a university in Geneva, Switzerland. ...


2006 U.S. Senate campaign

Lamont began showing signs of considering a run against Lieberman around February 2005. In March 2006, Lamont officially announced his campaign for the United States Senate against Lieberman. As of July 19, 2006, Lamont had spent over $2.5 million of his own personal fortune on his campaign.[25] It was reported that as of September 11 Lamont had spent another $1.5 million of his own money on the campaign, with two months yet to go. [26] Lamont continued to pour personal funds into the campaign during September, with reports indicating his total contributions now exceed $12.7 million.[27] Also, Lamont pledged not to take money from lobbyists.[28] Lamont's campaign manager, Tom Swan, is however a registered lobbyist with the state of Connecticut. [29] In early 2006, Lamont received the backing of former independent Connecticut Governor and Republican U.S. Senator Lowell Weicker, who was unseated by Lieberman in 1988.[30] Ned Lamont (left) debated Joe Lieberman, pictured here during a July 6 NBC 30 debate, in the August 8 Democratic primary The 2006 election of a United States Senator from the state of Connecticut was held on November 7, 2006. ... March 2006 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Fijian Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase announces that the 2006 Fiji general elections will be held in the second week of May 2006 from the 6th to the 13th. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lobbying is the practice of private advocacy with the goal of influencing a governing body, in order to ensure that an individuals or organizations point of view is represented in the government. ... Lobbying is the practice of private advocacy with the goal of influencing a governing body, in order to ensure that an individuals or organizations point of view is represented in the government. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ...


Lamont eventually portrayed himself as an anti-war candidate calling for an immediate withdrawal of U.S. forces from Iraq, in contrast to Lieberman, who supports the continued presence of U.S. troops in Iraq and advocated for a troop increase proposed by President Bush.[31] His campaign was mostly supported by anti-war activists who oppose the Iraq war and are calling for an immediate withdrawal from Iraq, including MoveOn.org, which donated $251,156 from its contributors to the campaign. [32][33] MoveOn is a progressive public policy organization that has raised millions of dollars for Democratic Party candidates in the United States. ...


On July 6, 2006, Lamont faced off against Lieberman in a 51-minute televised debate which covered issues ranging from the war in Iraq to energy policy to immigration. [34] Lieberman argued that he was being subjected to a "litmus test" on the war, insisted that he was a "bread and butter Democrat" and on a number of occasions asked, "Who is Ned Lamont?" Lieberman asked Lamont if he would disclose his income tax returns. After the debate, Lamont did release his 2005 tax return and financial details about prior years. Lamont focused on Lieberman's supportive relationship with Republicans ("...if you won't challenge President Bush and his failed agenda, I will") and criticized his vote for the "Bush/Cheney/Lieberman energy bill." Lieberman stated, in response to Lamont's assertion that he supported Republican policies, that he had voted with the Democratic caucus in the Senate 90% of the time. However, Lamont argued that the three-term incumbent lacked the courage to challenge the Bush administration's handling of the Iraq war.[34] is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the unit of time, angle and right ascension. ... Debate (North American English) or debating (British English) is a formal method of interactive and position representational argument. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ...


Lamont began as a "dark-horse" candidate, but was at a statistical dead heat with Lieberman in July, and went on to win the primary in August. Polls taken prior to the primary vote showed Lieberman, if running as an independent, polling better among Republicans and independents in a three-way race, including Republican candidate Alan Schlesinger, who greatly trailed both Lamont and Lieberman.[35] Early August polls, however, showed Lamont increasing his lead significantly[36], and many speculate on the effect of the primary outcome (and expected high Democratic endorsement) on the general election. The initial post primary poll showed Lieberman holding a narrow lead in a general election, however.[37] Alan Schlesinger Alan Schlesinger (1960-) is an attorney, former Derby, Connecticut mayor, former Connecticut State Representative, and three-time unsuccessful Congressional candidate who received the Republican nomination for the seat representing Connecticut that is currently held by U.S. Senator Joe Lieberman and was contested in the 2006 election. ...


On July 30, 2006, the London Sunday Times reported that former president Bill Clinton is believed to have warned Lieberman not to run as an independent if he lost the primary to Lamont.[38] Many Democratic leaders pledged to support the winner of the Connecticut Democratic primary. Most Democratic leaders, however, supported Lieberman's campaign for the Democratic nomination, and some, including Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, allegedly asked Lamont not to run.[39] is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. ...


Lamont resigned his membership in a Greenwich country club shortly before his campaign began, as the club was "too white and too rich and he did not want it to become a campaign issue."[40] It became an issue, however, following the release of a flier from the Lieberman campaign questioning Lamont's record on race.[41] A country club is a private club that offers a variety of recreational sports facilities to its members. ...


Lamont criticized Wal-Mart during the campaign and lambasted Lieberman for previously receiving campaign contributions from Wal-Mart, which he later returned. On August 4, 2006, The Washington Times reported that Ned "Lamont, his wife and a dependent child own as much as $31,000 in Wal-Mart stock. Mr. Lamont and his wife jointly own two accounts containing as much as $16,000 in Wal-Mart stock. Their Wal-Mart holdings spin off as much as $3,500 in annual dividends. In addition, a trust fund he set up for one of his children contains as much as $15,000 in Wal-Mart stock and spins off as much as $1,000 in dividends."[42] Time magazine reported on August 4, 2006, that Lamont's campaign manager, Tom Swan, said the candidate was not actively controlling the investment. "He does not own any stock directly, it's not a direct holding," he said. Part of the Wal-Mart stock is held in a Goldman Sachs "Tax Advantaged Core Strategies managed account", according to a letter released Thursday by Swan. He said the account is designed to track the S+P 500 index, and that Goldman Sachs makes the investment decisions for the account."[43] Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the newspaper founded in 1893 by William Randolph Hearst, see Washington Times-Herald. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. ...


On August 21, Lamont distanced himself from the demands of some supporters that Joe Lieberman be purged from the Democratic voter rolls.[44] is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Ned Lamont lost the general election and conceded to Lieberman at approximately 10:30 EST, November 7. [45] is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Later political activity

Lamont was one of the key supporters in Connecticut for the Chris Dodd presidential campaign. [46] After Dodd dropped out of the race, Lamont became the Connecticut campaign co-chair for Barack Obama's presidential campaign.[47] Lamont was credited for bringing the types of voters he attracted to provide Obama's win in the Connecticut Democratic primary.[48] Christopher John Dodd (born May 27, 1944) is an American lawyer and politician from Willimantic, Connecticut. ... “Barack” redirects here. ...


Footnotes

  1. ^ Associated press profile from Boston Globe accessed 10 August 2006
  2. ^ "Connecticut Primary Results", Hartford Courant, 2006-08-10. Retrieved on 2006-08-16. 
  3. ^ NY Times: Lieberman Camp Blames Rivals for Web Site Crash. Patrick Healy and Jennifer Medina. 8 August 2006. URL accessed 8 August 2006
  4. ^ AP: Key races in Tuesday's primaries. 8 August 2006. URL accessed 8 August 2006
  5. ^ AP: Lieberman Race Tops Primaries. Robert Tanner. 8 August 2006. URL accessed 8 August 2006
  6. ^ Lieberman Prevails Against Lamont in Connecticut. New York Times. November 7 2006
  7. ^ Ancestry of Ned Lamont
  8. ^ History - Lamont Library: Harvard University Libraries - Lamont Library History. 12 September 2005. URL Accessed 3 August 2006.
  9. ^ DFA Link: Ned Lamont for US Senate. URL accessed 3 August 2006
  10. ^ a b Andrew Miga. "Lieberman challenger Lamont sheds light on his wealth", The Boston Globe, 2006-05-17. Retrieved on 2006-08-16. 
  11. ^ John M. Higgins. "Connecticut Candidate's Cable Connections", Broadcasting and Cable, 2006-08-13. Retrieved on 2006-08-16. 
  12. ^ My Left Nutmeg: Lamont Grants MyLeftNutmeg First Blogger Interview. 13 Jan 2006. URL accessed 3 August 2006.
  13. ^ NY Times: Ann Huntress to Wed E.M. Lamont Jr.
  14. ^ NedLamont.com: Family photo. URL accessed 3 August 2006
  15. ^ Hartford Courant: Candidate's daughter has ballot disqualified, Associated Press. 11 August 2006. [1]
  16. ^ Historic Humanist Series: Corliss Lamont. URL accessed 3 August 2006.
  17. ^ Hartford Courant: Wealth: Touchy Political Issue; Lieberman Plays Up Lamont's Millions, But Will Voters Care? Mark Pazniokas. 4 June 2006. Original URL dead, reprint at NedLamont.com.
  18. ^ The Nation: A Fight for the Party's Soul. John Nichols, 27 July 2006. URL accessed 3 August 2006
  19. ^ Hartford Courant: Out of the Political Shadows. Mark Pazniokas. 23 April 2006. URL accessed 3 August 2006.
  20. ^ Indivs search
  21. ^ 1998 and 2000 election cycle contributions
  22. ^ 2002, 2004, and 2006 election cycle contributions
  23. ^ "Camille H. Buzby Becomes Fiancee", New York Times, 1950-11-03, p. 22. 
  24. ^ Ken Krayeske (January 24, 2006). Ned Lamont (interview). Retrieved on 2006-08-10.
  25. ^ Open Secrets 2006 CT Senate Race [2]
  26. ^ Lamont Taps His Own Funds for Conn. Race
  27. ^ http://www.courant.com/news/local/hc-money1022.artoct22,0,7210160.story
  28. ^ "This campaign has not solicited, and will not accept, Washington lobbyist money" – Lamont campaign email
  29. ^ Office of State Ethics: Lobbyist List
  30. ^ Lowell P. Weicker Jr.. "Enough Of The War - And Enough Of Lieberman", The Hartford Courant, 2006-05-17. Retrieved on 2006-08-17. 
  31. ^ Congressional Quarterly: The CQ Politics Interview: Ned Lamont. 23 June 2006. URL accessed 3 August 2006.
  32. ^ BBC: Lieberman fights for political life. Matt Wells. 3 July 2006. URL accessed 3 August 2006.
  33. ^ PoliticalMoneyLine: MoveOn.org Political Action Raises $2.6 Million. 14 July 2006. URL accessed 3 August 2006.
  34. ^ a b NBC30: Lieberman, Lamont Face Off In NBC 30 Debate. 6 July 2006. URL accessed 3 August 2006.
  35. ^ Quinnipiac University: Polling results. 20 July 2006. URL accessed 3 August 2006
  36. ^ Bloomberg: Lieberman Trails Lamont by 13 Points in Connecticut, Poll Says. 3 August 2006. URL accessed 3 August 2006
  37. ^ Hartford Courant: Post-Primary Poll Gives Lieberman Narrow Lead
  38. ^ The Sunday Times: The anti-war tycoon splits Democrats. Tony Allen-Mills. 30 July 2006. URL accessed 3 August 2006.
  39. ^ Wall Street Journal: Kos Celeb. Joe Taranto. 13 May 2006. URL accessed 2 August 2006.
  40. ^ New York Times: Lieberman Rival Seeks Support Beyond Iraq Issue. Patrick Healy, 19 July 2006. URL accessed 2 August 2006.
  41. ^ Talking Points Memo: Scan of flier. URL accessed 3 August 2006.
  42. ^ The Washington Times: Lieberman rival owns stock in Wal-Mart. Charles Hurt. URL accessed 4 August 2006.
  43. ^ TIME: An Embarrassment of Riches for Lieberman's Challenger. Massimo Calabresi. URL accessed 4 August 2006.
  44. ^ http://www.courant.com/news/local/statewire/hc-22013108.apds.m0522.bc-ct--connaug22,0,806951.story?coll=hc-headlines-local-wire
  45. ^ http://www.courant.com/news/elections/hc-senmain1108.artnov08233813,0,576058.story?coll=hc-electionsstorytop-fea
  46. ^ Ned Lamont Backs Habeas Corpus - and Chris Dodd
  47. ^ Ned Lamont: Why I'm Supporting Barack Obama - Politics on The Huffington Post
  48. ^ Obama Takes Connecticut, Helped by Lamont Voters - New York Times

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Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

In These Times is a biweekly magazine of news and opinion published in Chicago. ... Sam Seder (born November 28, 1966) is a comedian, writer, actor, film director, television producer-director, and Air America Radio host. ...

 
 

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