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Encyclopedia > Nazi occultism
Nazism

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Nazi occultism is an occult undercurrent of Nazism, of minor overall importance. Some historians attest semi-religious elements in Nazism.[1] Nevertheless, an occult side of Nazism did not exist as such.[2] The persistent idea that the Nazis were directed by occult agencies is modern cryptohistory, in the sense that such an agency "has remained concealed to previous historians of National Socialism."[3] For other uses, see Occult (disambiguation). ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual... Pseudohistory is a pejorative term applied to texts which purport to be historical in nature but which depart from standard historiographical conventions in a way which undermines their conclusions. ...

Contents

Nazism as political religion?

This article owes much to the research of a single historian, Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke. His book The Occult Roots of Nazism, first published 1985, is the most important work of reference for this topic. In a new preface to the 2004 edition, Goodrick-Clarke mentions some other serious writers who have examined "the religious and occult aspects of German National Socialism" before him:[4] Raymond Aron, Albert Camus, Romano Guardini, Denis de Rougemeont, Eric Voegelin, George Mosse, Klaus Vondung and Friedrich Heer. Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke is the author of several books on modern occultism and esotericism with the history of its intersection with fascist politics. ... The Occult Roots of Nazism: Secret Aryan Cults and Their Influence on Nazi Ideology : The Ariosophists of Austria and Germany, 1890-1935 is a book by Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke. ... Raymond-Claude-Ferdinand Aron (March 14, 1905 — October 17, 1983) was a French philosopher, sociologist and political scientist. ... For other uses, see Camus. ... Romano Guardini (1885 – 1968) was a Roman Catholic priest, author, and academic. ... Eric Voegelin, born Erich Hermann Wilhelm Vögelin, (January 3, 1901 – January 19, 1985) was a political philosopher. ... George Lachmann Mosse (September 20, 1918, Berlin, Germany-January 22, 1999, Madison, United States) was a German-born American left-wing Jewish gay historian of fascism in general and Nazi Germany in particular. ... Friedrich Heer (1916 - 1983) was a historian born in Vienna . ...


The Occult Roots of Nazism includes a definition of occultism, but Goodrick-Clarke does not put forward a theoretical concept that specifies his view of the relation between Nazism and Religion / Nazism and Occultism. Some other historians would prefer to deal with this topic under the term Political religion, a concept elaborated by Eric Voegelin. For other uses, see Occult (disambiguation). ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... In the terminology of some scholars working in sociology, a political religion is a political ideology with cultural and political power equivalent to those of a religion, and often having many sociological and ideological similarities with religion. ... Eric Voegelin, born Erich Hermann Wilhelm Vögelin, (January 3, 1901 – January 19, 1985) was a political philosopher. ...


Among high-ranking Nazis, Richard Walther Darré, Rudolf Hess, Heinrich Himmler and Alfred Rosenberg are credited with an interest in the occult. Adolf Hitler's religious beliefs in particular have been a question of examination. However, The Occult Roots of Nazism is not about Nazism as such. Instead it focusses, as the title indicates, on its possible occult roots, an occult or esoteric movement of the 1900s to 1930s in Germany and Austria that is generally referred as Ariosophy. R. Walther Darré in a 1939 calendar Richard Oscar Walther Darré (14 July 1895 - 5 September 1953), SS-Obergruppenführer, was one of the Nazi leading ‘blood and soil’ ideologists. ... Not to be confused with Rudolf Hoess. ... Heinrich Luitpold Himmler ( ; 7 October 1900 – 23 May 1945) was commander of the Schutzstaffel (SS) and one of the most powerful men in Nazi Germany and the Nazi hierarchy. ...   (January 12, 1893 Reval (nowadays Tallinn) – October 16, 1946) was an early and intellectually influential member of the Nazi party, who later held several important posts in the Nazi government. ... Adolf Hitlers religious beliefs have been a matter of dispute, in part because of apparently inconsistent statements made by and attributed to him. ... Etymology Esoteric is an adjective originating during Hellenic Greece under the domain of the Roman Empire; it comes from the Greek esôterikos, from esôtero, the comparative form of esô: within. It is a word meaning anything that is inner and occult, a latinate word meaning hidden (from which... Thule Society emblem Nazi mysticism is a term used to describe a philosophical undercurrent of Nazism; it denotes the combination of Nazism with occultism, esotericism, cryptohistory, and/or the paranormal. ...


Ariosophy

According to Goodrick-Clarke, the Ariosophists wove occult ideas into the völkisch ideology that existed in Germany and Austria during that time.[5] Racism was current in both Ariosophy and völkisch ideology,[6] but the Ariosophist went as far as to draw on the notion of root races from Theosophy, thus postulating locations such as Atlantis, Thule and Hyperborea as the original homeland of the Aryan race (and its alleged purest branch, the Teutons or Germanic peoples). The ariosophic writings described a time of a glorious ancient Germanic past, in which an elitist priesthood had "expounded occult-racist doctrines and ruled over a superior and racially pure society."[7] The downfall of this imaginary golden age was explained as the result of the interbreeding between the master race and those considered untermenschen (lesser races). The "abstruse ideas and weird cults [of Ariosophy] anticipated the political doctrines and institutions of the Third Reich"[8] as Goodrick-Clarke writes in the introduction of his book, motivating the phrase of the occult Roots of Nazism. However, with the exception of Karl Maria Wiligut,[9] Goodrick-Clarke has not found evidence that prominent 'Ariosophists' directly influenced Nazism. The völkisch movement is the German interpretation of the Populist movement, with a romantic focus on folklore and the organic. ... Root Race is a term first used by Helena Petrovna Blavatsky in her book The Secret Doctrine. ... Theosophy is a word and a concept known anciently, commonly understood in the modern era to describe the studies of religious philosophy and metaphysics originating with Helena Petrovna Blavatsky from the 1870s. ... For other uses, see Atlantis (disambiguation). ... Thule as Tile on the Carta Marina by Olaus Magnus. ... For other uses, see Hyperborea (disambiguation). ... The Aryan race is a concept in European culture that was influential in the period of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. ... This entry is about the tribe of the Teutons. ... Thor/Donar, Germanic thunder god. ... Frederick Douglass with his second wife Helen Pitts Douglass (sitting) who was white, a famous 19th century American example of miscegenation. ... The master race (German: die Herrenrasse,  ) is a concept in Nazi ideology, which holds that the Germanic and Nordic people represent an ideal and pure race. It derives from nineteenth century racial theory, which posited a hierarchy of races placing African Bushmen and Indigenous Australians at the bottom of the... Untermensch (German: subhuman) is a term from Nazi racial ideology. ... Karl Maria Wiligut (alias Weisthor) (December 10, 1866 - January 3, 1946) was also known as Himmlers Rasputin. He was born in Vienna in what was then Austria-Hungary. ...


After 1945, esoteric elements within Nazism were continued and expanded into new völkisch religions of white identity, collectively described as Esoteric Nazism. After 1945 also Shambhala and the star Aldebaran have been proposed as the original homeland of the Aryans. This article describes semi-religious developments of Nazism after 1945. ... Kalachakra [1] thangka from Sera Monastery (private collection). ... Aldebaran from the Arabic (الدبران al-dabarān) meaning the follower, (α Tau / α Tauri / Alpha Tauri) is the brightest star in the constellation Taurus and one of the brightest stars in the nighttime sky. ...


Nazism and Occultism

When it comes to the potentially occult aspects, the difficulty with this topic lies also therein that it can be regarded "as a topic for sensational authors in pursuit of strong sales."[10] Following again Goodrick-Clarke, this field of sensational (pseudo-)history can be termed the modern mythology of Nazi occultism. The relation between Nazism and Occultism has even found its way into the popular culture. The best known example of the representations of Nazi occultism in popular culture would be Indiana Jones. In his third film, this popular American movie character battles the Nazis over the Holy Grail. (Some might find it hard to believe but there is actually a connection between a section of the RuSHA department of the SS and the Holy Grail, centering on the person of Otto Rahn.) Whereas these are fictional accounts, some modern mythology goes as far to resemble conspiracy theories, this concerns e.g. the Vril Society or rumors about Karl Haushofer's connection to the occult. Well known examples of the modern mythology of Nazi occultism would be Trevor Ravenscroft's The Spear of Destiny or Le Matin des Magiciens. Popular culture, sometimes abbreviated to pop culture, consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ... Representations of the Ahnenerbe and Nazi occultism are common in fantasy fiction, and they have become part of the background several conspiracy theories. ... Dr. Henry Walden Jones, Jr. ... Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade is a 1989 adventure film directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Harrison Ford, Sean Connery, Denholm Elliott, Julian Glover, Alison Doody, River Phoenix, and John Rhys-Davies. ... For other uses, see Holy Grail (disambiguation). ... Karl Maria Wiligut (alias Weisthor) (December 10, 1866 - January 3, 1946) was also known as Himmlers Rasputin. He was born in Vienna in what was then Austria-Hungary. ... Otto Wilhelm Rahn (February 18, 1904—March 13, 1939) A German medievalist and a Obersturmführer of the SS. He was born in Michelstadt, Germany. ... FicTioNaL is a Gaming Legend. ... A conspiracy theory is a theory that defies common historical or current understanding of events, under the claim that those events are the result of manipulations by two or more individuals or various secretive powers or conspiracies. ... The Coming Race (original title), also reprinted as Vril: The Power of the Coming Race, is a novel by Edward Bulwer-Lytton published in 1870. ... General Karl Haushofer General Karl Ernst Haushofer (August 27, 1869, Munich - March 13, 1946, Pähl) was a German geopolitician. ... Le Matin des Magiciens (translates as The Dawn of Magic) was a book written by Louis Pauwels and Jacques Bergier in 1960 or in October 1959. ...


Occult aspects within Nazism

Since there has been no independent movement of Nazi occultism, one can not possibly write a history of it. There are only certain occult elements within Nazism that are difficult to connect to each other.


Adolf Hitler's religious beliefs

Since 1957, when the Austrian psychologist Wilfried Daim published the important study on Lanz von Liebenfels[11] enough evidence exists to say that Hitler had been exposed to the ariosophic Weltanschauung in Vienna. However, to which extent he was influenced by it, is not clear. In the research into this question, Hitler's Mein Kampf has even been compared to Liebenfels' Theozoologie in detail. [12] According to an online article from the Simon Wiesenthal Center[13], the influence of the anti-Judaic, Gnostic and root race teachings of H.P. Blavatsky, the founder of Theosophy, and the adaptations of her ideas by her followers, constituted a popularly unacknowledged but decisive influence over the developing mind of Hitler. Adolf Hitlers religious beliefs have been a matter of dispute, in part because of apparently inconsistent statements made by and attributed to him. ... Wilfried Daim (July 21, 1923 in Vienna) is an Austrian psychologist, psychotherapist, writer and art collector. ... The Simon Wiesenthal Center The Simon Wiesenthal Center is an international Jewish organization that declares itself to be a human rights group dedicated to preserving the memory of the Holocaust by fostering tolerance and understanding through community involvement, educational outreach and social action. ... Gnosticism is a blanket term for various religions and sects most prominent in the first few centuries A.D. General characteristics The word gnosticism comes from the Greek word for knowledge, gnosis (γνῶσις), referring to the idea that there is special, hidden mysticism (esoteric knowledge... Root Race is a term first used by Helena Petrovna Blavatsky in her book The Secret Doctrine. ... Helena Blavatsky Helena Petrovna Hahn (also Hélène) (July 31, 1831 (O.S.) (August 12, 1831 (N.S.)) - May 8, 1891 London, England), better known as Helena Blavatsky or Madame Blavatsky was the founder of Theosophy. ...


Thule Society and the origins of the NSDAP

Thule emblem
Main article: Thule Society

The Thule Society, from which the NSDAP ultimately originated, was one of the ariosophic groups of the late 1910s.[14] Thule Gesellschaft had initially been the name of the Munich branch of the Germanenorden Walvater of the Holy Grail, a lodge-based organisation which was built up by Rudolf von Sebottendorff in 1917.[15] For this task he had received about a hundred addresses of potential members in Bavaria from Hermann Pohl, and from 1918 he was also supported by Walter Nauhaus.[16] According to an account by Sebottendorff, the Bavarian province of the Germanenorden Walvater had 200 members in spring 1918, which had risen to 1500 in autumn 1918, of these 250 in Munich.[17] Five rooms, capable of accommodating 300 people, were leased from the fashionable Hotel Vierjahreszeiten ('Four Seasons') in Munich and decorated with the Thule emblem showing a dagger superimposed on a swastika.[18] Since the lodge's ceremonial activities were accompanied by overtly right-wing meetings, the name Thule Gesellschaft was adopted to arouse less attention from socialists and pro-Republicans.[19] Thule-gesellschaft_emblem, I got it from [1], which states that it is public domain. ... Thule-gesellschaft_emblem, I got it from [1], which states that it is public domain. ... Thule Society emblem The Thule Society (German: Thule-Gesellschaft), originally the Studiengruppe für germanisches Altertum Study Group for Germanic Antiquity, was a German occultist and Völkisch group in Munich, named after a mythical northern country from Greek legend. ... Thule Society emblem The Thule Society (German: Thule-Gesellschaft), originally the Studiengruppe für germanisches Altertum Study Group for Germanic Antiquity, was a German occultist and Völkisch group in Munich, named after a mythical northern country from Greek legend. ... The Nazi swastika The National Socialist German Workers Party (German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei), better known as the NSDAP or the Nazi Party was a political party that was led to power in Germany by Adolf Hitler in 1933. ... Thule Society emblem Nazi mysticism is a term used to describe a philosophical undercurrent of Nazism; it denotes the combination of Nazism with occultism, esotericism, cryptohistory, and/or the paranormal. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... The Germanenorden or Germanic Order, was a secret society in Germany early in the 20th century. ... Rudolf Freiherr von Sebottendorf was the alias of Adam Alfred Rudolf Glauer (November 9, 1875 – May 8, 1945), who also occasionally used another alias, Erwin Torre. ...


The Aryan race and Lost lands

The Thule Society took its name from Thule, an alleged lost land. Sebottendorff identified Ultima Thule as Iceland.[20] Within the Armanism of Guido von List, to which Sebottendorff made distinct references,[21] it was believed that the Aryan race had originated from the mythical homeland of Atlantis and taken refuge in Thule/Iceland after Atlantis had become deluged under the sea.[22] Hyperborea was also mentioned by Guido von List, with direct references to the theosophic author William Scott-Elliot.[23] In The Myth of the Twentieth Century by Alfred Rosenberg, the second most important Nazi book after Mein Kampf, Thule was also referred to as a lost land or as an Aryan cultural center.[24] The superiority of Aryans over all other races was a key concept and the members of various Germanenorden lodges saw themselves (the Teutons or Germanic peoples) as the 'purest' branch of the Aryan race. Thule as Tile on the Carta Marina by Olaus Magnus. ... Lost Lands are islands or continents believed by some to have existed during pre-history, but to have since disappeared as a result of catastrophic geological phenomena. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Aryan race is a concept in European culture that was influential in the period of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. ... For other uses, see Atlantis (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hyperborea (disambiguation). ... Theosophy is a word and a concept known anciently, commonly understood in the modern era to describe the studies of religious philosophy and metaphysics originating with Helena Petrovna Blavatsky from the 1870s. ... The Myth of the Twentieth Century (Ger. ...   (January 12, 1893 Reval (nowadays Tallinn) – October 16, 1946) was an early and intellectually influential member of the Nazi party, who later held several important posts in the Nazi government. ... The Germanenorden or Germanic Order, was a secret society in Germany early in the 20th century. ... This entry is about the tribe of the Teutons. ... Thor/Donar, Germanic thunder god. ...


Formation of DAP and NSDAP

In autumn 1918 Sebottendorff attempted to extend the appeal of the Thule Society's nationalist ideology to people from a working class background. He entrusted the Munich sports reporter Karl Harrer with the formation of a workers' ring, called the Deutscher Arbeiterverein ('German workers' club') or Politischer Arbeiterzirkel ('Political workers' ring').[25] The secretary of this ring was a certain Michael Lotter, who seems to be of no further relevance, but the most active member was the historically better known Anton Drexler.[26] Drexler urged the foundation of a political party, and on 5 January 1919 the Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (DAP, German Workers' Party) was formally founded.[27] When Adolf Hitler first encountered the DAP on 12 September 1919, Sebottendorff had already left the Thule Society (in June 1919).[28] By the end of February 1920, Hitler had transformed the Deutsche Arbeiterpartei into the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP, National Socialist German Workers Party).[29] Apparently meetings of the Thule Society continued until 1923. A certain Johannes Hering kept a diary of these meetings which mentions the attendance of other Nazi leaders between 1920 and 1923, but not of Hitler.[30] Karl Harrer (8 October 1890 - 5 September 1926) was a German journalist and politician, one of the founding members of the Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (German Workers Party, DAP) in 1919, the party that soon would become the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP). ... Anton Drexler (June 13, 1884 - February 24, 1942) was a German Nazi political leader of 1920s. ... The German Workers Party (German: Deutsche Arbeiterpartei, short DAP) was a briefly existing progenitor of the NSDAP (National Socialist German Workers Party). ... Hitler redirects here. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         The National Socialist German Workers Party, (German: , or NSDAP, commonly known as the Nazi Party), was a political party in Germany between 1919 and 1945. ...


That the origins of the Nazi party can be traced to the lodge organisation of the Thule Society is fact. However, the only point in which the NSDAP was a successor to the Thule Society was the use of the swastika. It is possible to trace the origins of the Nazi symbol back through the Thule Society and the Germanenorden to Guido von List,[31] but it is not evident that the Thulean ideology filtered through the DAP into the NSDAP. Goodrick-Clarke implies that ariosophical ideas were of no consequence: "the DAP line was predominantly one of extreme political and social nationalism, and not based on the Aryan-racist-occult pattern of the Germanenorden [and Thule Society]".[32] Godwin summarises the differences in outlook which separated the Thule Society from the direction taken by the Nazis: To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

"Hitler...had little time for the whole Thule business, once it had carried him where he needed to be...he could see the political worthlessness of paganism in Christian Germany. Neither did the Führer's plans for his Thousand-year Reich have any room whatever for the heady love of individual liberty with which the Thuleans romantically endowed their Nordic ancestors."[33]

Nevertheless, the formative connection with Nazism has made the Thule Society a popular subject of modern cryptohistory. Among other things, it is hinted that Karl Haushofer and G. I. Gurdjieff were connected to the Society,[34] but this is completely unsustainable. General Karl Haushofer General Karl Ernst Haushofer (August 27, 1869, Munich - March 13, 1946, Pähl) was a German geopolitician. ... Georges Ivanovich Gurdjieff (Георгий Иванович Гюрджиев, Georgiy Ivanovich Gyurdzhiev (or Gurdjiev); (January 13, 1866? – October 29, 1949), was an Armenian-Greek mystic, a teacher of sacred dances, and a spiritual teacher. ...


Aftermath

In January 1933 Sebottendorff published Bevor Hitler kam: Urkundlich aus der Frühzeit der Nationalsozialistischen Bewegung (Before Hitler Came: Documents from the Early Days of the National Socialist Movement). Nazi authorities (Hitler himself?) understandably disliked the book, which was banned in the following year. Sebottendorff was arrested but managed to flee to Turkey.


Himmler and the SS

Credited retrospectively with being the founder of "Esoteric Hitlerism", and certainly a figure of major importance for the officially-sanctioned research and practice of mysticism by a Nazi elite, was Heinrich Himmler who, more than any other high official in the Third Reich (including Hitler) was fascinated by pan-Aryan (i.e. broader than Germanic) racialism and by certain forms of Germanic neopaganism. Himmler's capacity for rational planning was accompanied by an "enthusiasm for the utopian, the romantic and even the occult."[35] Himmler has been claimed to have considered himself the spiritual successor or even reincarnation of Heinrich the Fowler[citation needed], having established special SS rituals for the old king and returned his bones to the crypt at Quedlinburg Cathedral. Himmler even had his personal quarters at Wewelsburg castle decorated in commemoration of him. The castle was redesigned in a way which reminds on a certain Grails' character; see The "SS-School House Wewelsburg". This article describes semi-religious developments of Nazism after 1945. ... Heinrich Luitpold Himmler ( ; 7 October 1900 – 23 May 1945) was commander of the Schutzstaffel (SS) and one of the most powerful men in Nazi Germany and the Nazi hierarchy. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Aryan (/eÉ™rjÉ™n/ or /ɑːrjÉ™n/, Sanskrit: ) is a Sanskrit and Avestan word meaning noble/spiritual one. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Mjolnir is one of the primary symbols of Germanic neopaganism. ... Heinrich I depicted as The Bamberg Knight Henry I, the Fowler (German: Heinrich der Finkler or Heinrich der Vogler) (876 - July 2, 936), was Duke of Saxony from 912 and king of the Germans from 919 until his death in 936. ... Wewelsburg Wewelsburg (pronounced ) is a Renaissance castle located in the northeast of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, in the village of Wewelsburg (the same name as the castle) which is a quarter of the city Büren, Westphalia, in district of Paderborn in the Alme Valley. ... Wewelsburg Wewelsburg (pronounced ) is a Renaissance castle located in the northeast of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, in the village of Wewelsburg (the same name as the castle) which is a quarter of the city Büren, Westphalia, in district of Paderborn in the Alme Valley. ...


Himmler had visited the Wewelsburg on 3 November 1933 and in April 1934, the SS took official possession of it in August 1934.[36] At first the Wewelsburg was a museum and officer's college for ideological education within the SS, but was then placed under the direct control of the office ot the Reichsführer SS (Himmler) in February 1935.[37]


It also seems that Himmler had an interest in Astrology. The astrologer Wilhelm Wulff was consulted by Himmler in the last weeks of the Second World War.[38] One detailed but difficult source for this is a book written by Wulff himself, Tierkreis und Hakenkreuz, published in Germany in 1968. That Walter Schellenberg had discovered an astrologer called Wulf is also mentioned in Hugh Trevor-Roper's The Last Days of Hitler. Wilhelm Wulff an astrologer who was forced by the S.S. into working for the Ahnenerbe, in order to harness not only natural, but also supernatural forces. ... Zodiac and Swastika: Astrologer to Himmlers Court (German and English title) or Zodiac and Swastika: How Astrology Guided Hitlers Germany (English title) is a book by Wilhelm Wulff with a forward by Walter Laqueur. ... Correctly: Walther Schellenberg, full name Walther Friedrich Schellenberg (January 16, 1910 - March 31, 1952) was a German Nazi and second-in-command of the Gestapo. ... Hugh Redwald Trevor-Roper, Baron Dacre of Glanton (January 15, 1914 – January 26, 2003) was a notable historian of Early Modern Britain and Nazi Germany. ...


In Bramwell's assessment: "Too much can be made of the importance of bizarre cultism in Himmler's activities...but it did exist, and was one of the reasons behind the split between Himmler and Darré that took place in the late 1930s."[39]


The SS had invented its own mystical religion, based very loosely upon imagery taken from Germanic tribal faiths combined with Christianity and "visions" from those figures in order to counter what they viewed as the Jewish-influenced religion of Christianity.[40] Mystical organizations were created, usually connected with elite SS corps, and adopting specific rituals, initiations and beliefs.[41] This religion was seen as the German original race-cult religion (ursprüngliche Rassenkult-Religion, a phrase attributed to SS-member Rudolf J. Mund), however, what exactly was indoctrinated in the SS about it is not known.[42] SS or ss or Ss may be: The Schutzstaffel, a Nazi paramilitary force Steamship (SS) (ship prefix) The United States Secret Service A submarine not powered by nuclear energy (SS) (United States Navy designator), see SSN A Soviet/Russian surface-to-surface missile, as listed by NATO reporting name Shortstop... The Vienna Circle, or Landig Group, was an occultic, völkisch and Germanic mysticist group formed in 1950 that first gathered for discussions at the studio of the designer Wilhelm Landig in Viennas 4th district of Wieden in Austria. ...


Nazi archaeology

In 1935 Himmler established with Darré the Ahnenerbe.[43] At first independent, it became the ancestral heritage branch of the SS. Headed by Dr. Hermann Wirth, it was dedicated primarily to archaeological research, but it was also involved in proving the superiority of the 'Aryan race' and in occult practices.[citation needed] A great deal of time and resources were spent on researching or creating a popularly accepted “historical”, “cultural” and “scientific” background so the ideas about a “superior” Aryan race could prosper in the German society of the time. For example an expedition to Tibet was organized in order to search for the origins of the Aryan race.[44] To this end, the expedition leader, Ernst Schäfer, had his anthropologist Bruno Beger make face masks and skull and nose measurements. Another expedition was sent to the Andes. Emblem Founded by Heinrich Himmler, Hermann Wirth, and Walter Darré on July 1 1935, Forschungs- und Lehrgemeinschaft Ahnenerbe e. ... A Dutch historian, Hermann Wirth was the leader of the Nazi research division Ahnenerbe until 1937 when he left the group entirely, succeeded by Walter Wüst. ... Nazi archaeology refers to the movement led by various Nazi leaders, archaeologists, and other scholars, such as Adolf Hitler and Heinrich Himmler, to recreate the German past in order to strengthen nationalism. ... The Aryan race is a concept in European culture that was influential in the period of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. ... This article is about historical/cultural Tibet. ... Ernst Schäfer (1910-1992) was a famous German hunter and zoologist in the 1930s, specializing in ornithology. ... See Anthropology. ... Bruno Beger (1911 - 1998) was a German Rassenkunde expert who worked for the Ahnenerbe. ... This article is about the mountain system in South America. ...


Bramwell, however, comments that Himmler "is supposed to have sent a party of SS men to Tibet in order to search for Shangri-La, an expedition which is more likely to have had straightforward espionage as its purpose".[45] Shangri-La is a fictional place described in the novel, Lost Horizon, written by British writer James Hilton in 1933. ...


Karl Maria Wiligut

Among the personal of the SS, Karl Maria Wiligut could most of all be described as a Nazi occultist. The (first?) biography of him, written by Rudolf J. Mund, was titled: Himmler's Rasputin[46] (German: Der Rasputin Himmlers, not translated into English). After his retirement from the Austrian military, Wiligut had been active in the 'ariosophic' milieu. Ariosophy was only one of the threads of Esotericism in Germany and Austria during this time. When he was involuntarily committed to the Salzburg mental asylum between November 1924 and early 1927, he received support from several other occultists.[47] Wiligut was clearly sympathic to the Nazi Revolution of January 1933.[48] When he was introduced to Himmler by an old friend who had become an SS officer, he got the opportunity to join the SS under the pseudonym 'Weisthor'.[48] He was appointed head of the Department for Pre- and Early history within the Race and Settlement Main Office (Rasse- and Siedlungshauptamt, RuSHA) of the SS.[48] His bureau could (much rather than the Ahnenerbe) be described as the occult department of the SS: Wiligut's main duty appears "to have consisted in committing examples of his ancestral memory to paper."[48] Wiligut's work for the SS also included the designt of the Totenkopfring (death's head ring) that was worn by SS members.[49] He is even supposed to have designed a chair for Himmler or at least this chair and its covers are offered for sale on the web.[50][51] Karl Maria Wiligut (alias Weisthor) (December 10, 1866 - January 3, 1946) was also known as Himmlers Rasputin. He was born in Vienna in what was then Austria-Hungary. ... Grigori Rasputin Grigori Yefimovich Rasputin (Russian: ) (22 January [O.S. 10 January] 1869 – 29 December [O.S. 16 December] 1916) was a Russian mystic with an influence in the later days of Russias Romanov dynasty. ... Thule Society emblem Nazi mysticism is a term used to describe a philosophical undercurrent of Nazism; it denotes the combination of Nazism with occultism, esotericism, cryptohistory, and/or the paranormal. ... This article gives an overview of Esotericism in Germany and Austria, mainly since 1880. ...


Rudolf Hess

According to Goodrick-Clarke, Rudolf Hess had been a member of the Thule Society before attaining prominence in the Nazi party.[52] As Adolf Hitler's official deputy, Hess had also been attracted and influenced by the organic farming theories of Rudolf Steiner and Anthroposophy.[53] In the wake of his flight to Scotland, Reinhard Heydrich, the head of the security police, banned lodge organizations and esoteric groups on 9 June 1941.[54] When organic farmers and their supporters — and even nudists — were arrested, Agriculture Minister Richard Walther Darré protested to Himmler and Heydrich, "despite a letter from Bormann, warning Darré that Hitler was behind the arrests."[55] Not to be confused with Rudolf Hoess. ... Organic farming is a psuedoscientific form of agriculture which avoids or largely excludes the use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, plant growth regulators, and livestock feed additives. ... Rudolf Steiner. ... Anthroposophy, also called spiritual science, is a spiritual philosophy based on the teachings of Rudolf Steiner,[1] which states that anyone who conscientiously cultivates sense-free thinking can attain experience of and insights into the spiritual world. ... Reinhard Tristan Eugen Heydrich (7 March 1904 – 4 June 1942) was an SS-Obergruppenführer, chief of the Reich Security Main Office (including the Gestapo, SD and Kripo Nazi police agencies) and Reichsprotektor (Reich Protector) of Bohemia and Moravia. ... Naturists find going without clothing both enjoyable and relaxing. ... R. Walther Darré in a 1939 calendar Richard Oscar Walther Darré (14 July 1895 - 5 September 1953), SS-Obergruppenführer, was one of the Nazi leading ‘blood and soil’ ideologists. ... Martin Bormann Martin Bormann (June 17, 1900 - c. ...


However, the suppression of esoteric organisations began very soon after the Nazis acquired governmental power. This also affected ariosophic authors and organisations: "One of the most important early Germanic racialists, Lanz von Liebenfels, had his writings banned in 1938 while other occultist racialists were banned as early as 1934."[56] This article gives an overview of Esotericism in Germany and Austria, mainly since 1880. ... Thule Society emblem Nazi mysticism is a term used to describe a philosophical undercurrent of Nazism; it denotes the combination of Nazism with occultism, esotericism, cryptohistory, and/or the paranormal. ... Lanz von Liebenfels Adolf Josef Lanz (aka Jörg Lanz), who called himself Lanz von Liebenfels (July 19, 1874 - April 22, 1954) was a former monk and the founder of the right-wing magazine Ostara, in which he published anti-semitic and folkish theories. ...


The Nazis, occult relics and Atlantis

Surrounding the Ahnenerbe Society there was also speculation about Atlantis and the Holy Grail. For other uses, see Atlantis (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Holy Grail (disambiguation). ...

The Fortress of Montségur from the 16th century. If the castle that is linked to the myth of the Holy Grail had existed, it was destroyed in 1244.
The Fortress of Montségur from the 16th century. If the castle that is linked to the myth of the Holy Grail had existed, it was destroyed in 1244.

Otto Rahn had written a book Crusade against the Grail (Kreuzzug gegen den Gral) in 1933.[57] In May 1935 he joined the Ahnenerbe, in March 1936 he also joined the SS formally.[58] In September 1935 Rahn wrote excitingly to Weisthor [Karl Maria Wiligut] about the places he was visiting in his hunt for grail traditions in Germany, asking complete confidence in the matter with the exception of Himmler.[59] Rahn's connection of the Cathars with the Holy Grail ultimately leads to Montségur in France, which had been the last remaining fortress of the Cathars in the Middle Ages. According to eyewitnesses, Nazi archaeologists and military officers had been present at that castle. [60] Image File history File links Montsegur-w02. ... Image File history File links Montsegur-w02. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... This article is about the year 1244. ... Otto Wilhelm Rahn (February 18, 1904—March 13, 1939) A German medievalist and a Obersturmführer of the SS. He was born in Michelstadt, Germany. ... The Fortress of Montségur June 22, 1987. ... Cathars being expelled from Carcassonne in 1209. ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... An officer is a member of a military, naval, or if applicable, other uniformed services who holds a position of responsibility. ...


Notwithstanding Trever Ravenscroft's theory on this, the Nazis did not need to search for the Spear of Destiny. With the annexation of Austria in 1938, the Hofburg Spear, a relic stored in Vienna, had already come into the possession of the Third Reich and Hitler subsequently had it moved to Germany (Berlin most likely). It was returned to Austria after the war. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Holy Lance. ... German troops march into Austria on 12 March 1938. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ...


The modern mythology of Nazi occultism

By its very nature the study of the occultist influences on the Nazis attracts sensationalistic authors who often seem to lack the ability or the patience to conform to the scientific method of history. There is a persistent idea, widely canvassed in a sensational genre of literature, that the Nazis were principally inspired and directed by occult agencies from 1920 to 1945.[61] Appendix E of Goodrick-Clarke's book discusses The Modern Mythology of Nazi Occultism.[62] He refers to the writers of this genre as crypto-historians.[63] As their possible motive he mentions a post-war fascination with Nazism.[64] Mattias Gardell, a historian who researches a related field, points at another explanation: The historical method comprises the techniques and guidelines by which historians use primary sources and other evidence to research and then to write history. ... Pseudohistory is a pejorative term applied to texts which purport to be historical in nature but which depart from standard historiographical conventions in a way which undermines their conclusions. ... Mattias Gardell (born 1958) is a reader for religious history at the University of Stockholm. ...

"Occultists believe, Hanussen may also have imparted occult techniques of mind control and crowd domination" on Hitler. —Hitler and the Occult
"In documentaries portraying the Third Reich, Hitler is cast as a master magician; these documentaries typically include scenes in which Hitler is speaking at huge mass meetings. [...] Cuts mix Hitler screaming with regiments marching under the sign of the swastika. Instead of providing a translation of his verbal crescendos, the sequence is overlaid with a speaker talking about something different. All this combines to demonize Hitler as an evil wizard spellbinding an unwitting German people to become his zombified servants until they are liberated from the spell by the Allied victory after which, suddenly, there were no German Nazis left among the populace. How convenient it would be if this image were correct. National socialism could be defeated with garlic. Watchdog groups could be replaced with a few vampire killers, and resources being directed into antiracist community programs could be directed at something else."[65]

Gardell obviously refers to documentaries such as History Channel's documentary Hitler and the Occult.[66][67] As evidence of Hitler's "occult power" this documentary offers e.g. the infamous statement by Joachim von Ribbentrop of his continued subservience to Hitler at the Nuremberg Trials.[68] After the author Dusty Sklar has pointed out that Hitler's suicide happened at the night of April 30/May 1, which is Walpurgis Night, the narrator continues: "With Hitler gone, it was as if a spell had been broken". A much more plausible reason for Hitler's suicide (that does not involve the paranormal) is that the Russians had already closed in about several hundred meters on Hitler's bunker and he did not want to be captured alive. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Hanussen, also known as Erik Jan Hanussen (2 June 1889, Vienna - after 25 March 1933, Berlin), was a mentalist, occultist, and astrologer, active in Weimar Republic Germany and also at the beginning of Nazi Germany. ... For the book (nothing to do with the documentary) by the same name by Ken Anderson please see Hitler and the Occult (book) Hitler and the Occult, directed by unknown , narrated by unknown, is an English language unknown, 50 minute, History Channel documentary regarding the occult influences and history of... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... For the Canadian equivalent of this channel, see History Television. ... For the book (nothing to do with the documentary) by the same name by Ken Anderson please see Hitler and the Occult (book) Hitler and the Occult, directed by unknown , narrated by unknown, is an English language unknown, 50 minute, History Channel documentary regarding the occult influences and history of... Ulrich Friedrich Wilhelm Joachim von Ribbentrop (born Ulrich Friedrich Wilhelm Joachim Ribbentrop) (April 30, 1893 – October 16, 1946) was Foreign Minister of Germany from 1938 until 1945. ... For the 1947 Soviet film about the trials, see Nuremberg Trials (film). ... Walpurgis Night in Sweden. ...


Well-known religious figures like Pope Pius XII and Pope Benedict XVI claim that Hitler was possessed by devils; Pope Pius XII even performed an exorcism on Hitler at a distance, but failed every time[69][70]. For a demonic influence on Hitler, Hermann Rauschning's Hitler Speaks is brought forward as source,[71] although most modern scholars do not consider Rauschning reliable.[72] (As Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke summarises: "recent scholarship has almost certainly proved that Rauschning's conversations were mostly invented".)[73] Similarly to Rauschning, August Kubizek, one of Hitler's closest friends since childhood, claims that Hitler--17 years old at the time--once spoke to him of "returning Germany to its former glory"; of this comment, August said: "It was as if another being spoke out of his body, and moved him as much as it did me."[74] The Venerable Pius XII, born Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Eugenio Pacelli (Rome, March 2, 1876 - October 9, 1958) served as the Pope from March 2, 1939 to 1958. ... Papal Arms of Pope Benedict XVI. The papal tiara was replaced with a bishops mitre, and pallium of the Pope was added beneath the coat of arms. ... Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler (April 20, 1889 – April 30, 1945, standard German pronunciation in the IPA) was the Führer (leader) of the National Socialist German Workers Party (Nazi Party) and of Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945. ... This is an overview of the Devil. ... Saint Francis exorcised demons in Arezzo, fresco of Giotto Exorcism (from Late Latin exorcismus, from Greek exorkizein - to adjure, correctly pronounced exercism) is the practice of evicting demons or other evil spiritual entities from a person or place which they are believed to have possessed (taken control of). ... Hermann Rauschning (7 August 1887, Thorn, Imperial Germany (present ToruÅ„, Poland) — February 1982, Portland, Oregon, United States) was a German conservative and reactionary who joined the Nazi Party, and became the president of the Danzig Senate. ... August Kubizek was a childhood friend and one time room mate of Adolf Hitler. ...


In his later ambition of imposing a National Socialist regime throughout Europe, Hitler used the term "die neue Ordnung" (the new Order),[75] so one could probably say that the Nazis pursued 'a' new world order. But the claim that Hitler and the Thule Society conspired to create 'the' New World Order (as put forward on some webapges)[76] is completely unfounded; the Thule Society did not have this impact on Nazism and Hitler never attended any of their meetings[77]. The term new world order has been used to refer to a new period of history evidencing a dramatic change in world political thought and the balance of power. ... One World Government redirects here. ...


Various conspiracy theory homepages also claim that the infamous occultist Aleister Crowley sought to contact Hitler during World War II as well.[78][79] For other uses of this term, see occult (disambiguation). ... Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley, (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947; the surname is pronounced // i. ... Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler (April 20, 1889 – April 30, 1945, standard German pronunciation in the IPA) was the Führer (leader) of the National Socialist German Workers Party (Nazi Party) and of Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Indeed, if Hitler (and also Stalin) or the Nazis in general, were the agents of Satan, or 'black forces', 'invisible hierarchies', 'unknown superiors' or any other discarnate entity[80], this would be a convenient explanation. Explaining Hitler's rise to power, the Second World War and possibly even The Holocaust by the means of the paranormal seems to serve the function of protecting the authors and readers alike from having to deal with this rationally. Iosif (usually anglicized as Joseph) Vissarionovich Stalin (Russian: Иосиф Виссарионович Сталин), original name Ioseb Jughashvili (Georgian: იოსებ ჯუღაშვი&#4314... This article is about the concept of Satan. ... Hitlers rise to power was marked at first by a period of the NSDAP as a fringe party before the events of the Beer hall putsch and the release of Mein Kampf introduced Hitler to a wider audience. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... “Shoah” redirects here. ... Paranormal is an umbrella term used to describe a wide variety of reported anomalous phenomena. ... This article is about functionalism in sociology. ... For other uses, see Rationalism (disambiguation). ...

"The truth, however, is that millions of ordinary German workers, farmers and businessmen supported the national socialist program. [...] They were people who probably considered themselves good citizens, which is far more frightening than had they merely been demons."[81]

Crypto-historic books on Nazi occultism

Goodrick-Clarke examines several pseudo-historic "books written about Nazi occultism between 1960 and 1975", that "were typically sensational and under-researched".[82] He terms this genre 'crypto-history', as its defining element and "final point of explanatory reference is an agent which has remained concealed to previous historians of National Socialism".[83] Characteristic tendencies of this literature include: (1) "a complete ignorance of primary sources" and (2) the repetition of "inaccuracies and wild claims", without the attempt being made to confirm even "wholly spurious 'facts'".[84] Books debunked in Appendix E of The Occult Roots of Nazism are: Pseudohistory is a pejorative term applied to texts which purport to be historical in nature but which depart from standard historiographical conventions in a way which undermines their conclusions. ... The Occult Roots of Nazism: Secret Aryan Cults and Their Influence on Nazi Ideology : The Ariosophists of Austria and Germany, 1890-1935 is a book by Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke. ...

These books are only mentioned in the Appendix, otherwise the whole book by Goodrick-Clarke does without any reference to this kind of literature; it uses other sources. This literature is not reliable. However, books published after the emergence of The occult roots of Nazism continue to repeat claims that have been proven false: Louis Pauwels (born in Belgium, August 2, 1920 - January 28, 1997) was a French journalist and writer. ... Jacques Bergier (born Yakov Mikhailovich Berger (Russian: Яков Михайлович Бéргер)) (Odessa, August 8, 1912 - Paris, November 23, 1978), was a chemical engineer, member of the French-resistance, spy, journalist and writer. ... Le Matin des Magiciens (translates as The Dawn of Magic) was a book written by Louis Pauwels and Jacques Bergier in 1960 or in October 1959. ... J. H. Herbie Brennan (Born Ireland, 1940) began his career as a journalist at the age of 18. ... Occult Reich by J.H. Brennan is a British account of Occultism during the Third Reich. ...

  • Wulf Schwarzwaller, 1988, The Unknown Hitler[90]
  • Alan Baker, 2000, Invisible Eagle. The History of Nazi Occultism[91]

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Neopaganism

The use of runic symbology and the existence of an official Nazi government department for the study of the Germanic ancestral heritage (including paganism) have lent some credence to the idea that there was a pagan component to Nazism. As early as 1940, the occult scholar and folklorist Lewis Spence identified a neopagan undercurrent in Nazism,[92] for which he largely blamed Alfred Rosenberg, and which he equated with “satanism”. He further connected Nazism to the Illuminati.[citation needed] Lewis Spence (November 25, 1874 - March 3, 1955) was a Scottish journalist and writer. ... Neopaganism or Neo-Paganism is any of a heterogeneous group of new religious movements, particularly those influenced by ancient, primarily pre-Christian and sometimes pre-Judaic religions. ... Satanism can refer to a number of belief systems depending on the user and contexts. ... For other uses, see Illuminati (disambiguation). ...


Occultist or neopagan authors like Stephen McNallen, Stephen Flowers (translator of The Secret King) and Michael Moynihan argue however that the Nazis' occult and runic pretensions amounted to a distortion and misrepresentation of the ancestral religion, Odinism.[93] Thus McNallen denounces "the lie that 'Hitler was a pagan' or that 'Asatruar trace their roots to Nazi Germany'".[94] In an article entitled "The Wiligut Saga" featured in The Secret King, Adolf Schleipfer points out the differences between Wiligut's beliefs and those generally accepted within Odinism. Flowers, who is also a scholar of Germanic religious history, contends: Stephen A. McNallen (born October 15, 1948) is an influential Germanic Neopagan leader and writer. ... Stephen Edred Flowers Ph. ... The Secret King The Secret King, subtitled Karl Maria Wiligut, Himmlers Lord of the Runes, is a 2005 published book documenting the actual written works of Karl Maria Wiligut, the official leading occultist employed by Heinrich Himmler during the Third Reich, rather than the speculation. ... Michael Moynihan, (b. ... Reconstructions of the traditions of Germanic paganism began with 19th century Romanticism. ... satr , also known as Odinism, describes a number of attempts to reconstruct the indigenous religions of Northern Europe. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...

"The Ahnenerbe and the Totenkopf Orden made more practical use of Judeo-Christian and Manichean techniques and ideas in their magical traditions and organizational principles....One brief glance at a book on ancient Germanic and old Scandinavian culture and religion will show the massive degree to which the Nazis perverted the egalitarian systems of the ancients into a totalitarian scheme....just as the Christian evangelists would employ old pagan symbols (such as the cross) to convert the heathens and then gradually infuse those venerable symbols with a contrary significance, so too did the Nazis employ old Germanic symbolism (which was very popular at that time) and infuse it with non-Germanic concepts for manipulative purposes."[95] Emblem Founded by Heinrich Himmler, Hermann Wirth, and Walter Darré on July 1 1935, Forschungs- und Lehrgemeinschaft Ahnenerbe e. ... Manichaeism was one of the major ancient religions. ...

This is not only the opinion of occultists. Heinz Höhne, an authority on the SS, observes that in practice the organisation was modelled on Ignatius Loyola's Jesuit order and that "Himmler's neo-pagan customs remained primarily a paper exercise".[96] Heinz Höhne (also Hoehne) is a German journalist who specializes in Nazi and intelligence history. ... SS or ss or Ss may be: The Schutzstaffel, a Nazi paramilitary force Steamship (SS) (ship prefix) The United States Secret Service A submarine not powered by nuclear energy (SS) (United States Navy designator), see SSN A Soviet/Russian surface-to-surface missile, as listed by NATO reporting name Shortstop... Ignatius of Loyola Saint Ignatius of Loyola (December 24, 1491? – July 31, 1556), baptized Íñigo López de Loyola, was the founder of the Society of Jesus, a Roman Catholic religious order commonly known as the Jesuits that was established to strengthen the Church, initially against Protestantism. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ...


Notes

  1. ^ "Semi-religious beliefs in a race of Aryan god-men, the needful extermination of inferiors, and a wonderful millennial future of German world-domination obsessed Hitler, Himmler and many other high-ranking Nazi leaders." Goodrick-Clarke, 1985, 203
  2. ^ "The occult side of Nazism can be easily dismissed as a popular [post-45] fantasy." The Occult Roots of Nazism, Short article by Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke at www.lapismagazine.org
  3. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 218
  4. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 2004: vi.
  5. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 5
  6. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: '
  7. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 2
  8. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 1
  9. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 177
  10. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 2004: vi.
  11. ^ W. Daim: Der Mann, der Hitler die Ideen gab, 1. Edition 1957, 2. rev. ed. 1985, 3.rev.ed.1994
  12. ^ Harald Strohm, Gnosis und Nationalsozialismus, 1997, p.46-52
  13. ^ Jackson Spielvogel and David Redles: Hitler's Racial Ideology: Content and Occult Sources
  14. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 135-152 (chapter 11, "Rudolf von Sebottendorff and the Thule Society").
  15. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 142.
  16. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 142.
  17. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 143.
  18. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 144.
  19. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 144.
  20. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 145.
  21. ^ See: Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 145.
  22. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 145.
  23. ^ See: Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 54.
  24. ^ Strohm 1997: 57.
  25. ^ <Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 150.
  26. ^ <Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 150.
  27. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 150.
  28. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 150, 201.
  29. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 150.
  30. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 201; Johannes Hering, Beiträge zur Geschichte der Thule-Gesellschaft, typescript dated June 21, 1939, Bundesarchiv, Koblenz, NS26/865.
  31. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 151.
  32. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 150.
  33. ^ Godwin 1996: 57.
  34. ^ The Thule Gesellshaft (sic)
  35. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 178; Joachim C. Fest, The Face of the Third Reich (London, 1970); pp.111-24; Bradley F. Smith, Heinrich Himmler: a Nazi in the making 1900-26 (Stanford, Calif., 1971); Josef Ackermann, Heinrich Himmler als Ideologie (Göttingen, 1970) (German)
  36. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 186
  37. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 186
  38. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 165; Wilhelm Th. H. Wulff, 1968, Tierkreis und Hakenkreuz
  39. ^ Bramwell 1985: 90.
  40. ^ Aside from general books on the Third Reich, the following would be of use.
    Levenda, Peter. "Unholy Alliance: A History of Nazi Involvement with the Occult" 2002.
    Heinrichsdorff, Dr. Wolff. "Westfalia Landeszeitung" January 9, 1938.
    Ravenscroft, Trevor. "The Spear of Destiny" 5th Edition, 1988.
  41. ^ Erich Halik (Claude Schweikhart), "Um Krone und Gipfel der Welt", Mensch und Schicksal 6, no. 10 (1 August 1952), pp 3-5.
  42. ^ Harald Strohm, Gnosis und Nationalsozialismus, 1997, p. 89
  43. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 178
  44. ^ See Himmler's Crusade by Christopher Hale.
  45. ^ Bramwell 1985: 90.
  46. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 285
  47. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 182
  48. ^ a b c d Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 183.
  49. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 177
  50. ^ The great Chair of Heinrich Himmler
  51. ^ Genuine Leather Covers from Heinrich Himmler's SS-Castle Wewelsburg
  52. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 2003: 114. Note that Goodrick-Clarke had previously (1985: 149) maintained that Hess was no more than a guest to whom the Thule Society extended hospitality during the Bavarian revolution of 1918.
  53. ^ Bramwell 1985: 175, 177.
  54. ^ Bramwell 1985: 178.
  55. ^ Bramwell 1985: 178.
  56. ^ Bramwell 1985: 42.
  57. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 189
  58. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 189
  59. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 189; Rahn to Weisthor, Letter dated 27 September 1935, Bundesarchiv, Koblenz, Himmler Nachlass 19.
  60. ^ Strohm 1997, 99; Strohm refers to René Nelli, Die Katharer, p.21
  61. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985, 217
  62. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985, 217-225
  63. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985, 218
  64. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985, 217
  65. ^ Gardell 2003, 331
  66. ^ The History Channel online Store: The Unknown Hitler DVD Collection
  67. ^ Another critique of Hitler documentaries: Mark Schone - All Hitler, all the time
  68. ^ "Even with all I know, if in this cell Hitler should come to me and say 'Do this!', I would still do it." - Joachim von Ribbentrop, 1946
  69. ^ The Daily Mail newspaper. Hitler and Stalin were possessed by the Devil, says Vatican exorcist. Retrieved on August 2007
  70. ^ Vatican exorcist: Hitler Knew the Devil
  71. ^ Demonic Possession of World Leaders
  72. ^ Theodor Schieder (1972), Hermann Rauschnings "Gespräche mit Hitler" als Geschichtsquelle (Oppladen, Germany: Westdeutscher Verlag) and Wolfgang Hänel (1984), Hermann Rauschnings "Gespräche mit Hitler": Eine Geschichtsfälschung (Ingolstadt, Germany: Zeitgeschichtliche Forschungsstelle), cit. in Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke (2003), Black Sun, p. 321.
  73. ^ Goodrick-Clarke (2003: 110). The best that can be said for Rauschning's claims may be Goodrick-Clarke's judgment that they "record...the authentic voice of Hitler by inspired guesswork and imagination" (ibid.).
  74. ^ “Hitler and the Holy Roman Empire”
  75. ^ Safire, William. The New York Times. Retrieved on November,2007
  76. ^ Historic Results of Hitler's Thule Societies pursuit of the NWO
  77. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 201; Johannes Hering, Beiträge zur Geschichte der Thule-Gesellschaft, typescript dated June 21, 1939, Bundesarchiv, Koblenz, NS26/865.
  78. ^ Illiminati-News: Aleister Crowley
  79. ^ Occult Symbolism: As American as Baseball at Alex Jones' prisonplanet.com
  80. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985, 218
  81. ^ Gardell 2003, 331,332
  82. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 224, 225.
  83. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 218.
  84. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 225.
  85. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 219-220.
  86. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 221.
  87. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 221-223.
  88. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 224.
  89. ^ Goodrick-Clarke 1985: 221.
  90. ^ If The Unknown Hitler is quoted correctly in The Vril Society, the Luminous Lodge and the Realization of the Great Work, then this book makes false allegations about Karl Haushofer and G. I. Gurdjieff.
  91. ^ Chapter 5 of the Free online version of Invisible Eagle is mainly based on Ravenscroft.
  92. ^ Spence 1940.
  93. ^ http://www.runestone.org/RS32/books/index.htm, http://www.runestone.org/lep4.html, http://www.angelfire.com/wy/wyrd/odinvsnazi.html; "The Myth and Reality of Occultism in the Third Reich" lecture by S. E. Flowers, November 12th, 2006. http://www.woodharrow.com/lectureseries.html.
  94. ^ Review of The Secret King by Stephen A. McNallen, (http://www.runestone.org/RS32/books/index.htm).
  95. ^ Flowers 1984: 16.
  96. ^ Höhne 1969: 138, 143-5, 156-57.

Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke is the author of several books on modern occultism and esotericism with the history of its intersection with fascist politics. ... The Federal Archives in Koblenz The German Federal Archives or Bundesarchiv (BArch) are the National Archives of Germany. ... Joachim C. Fest (born December 8, 1926 in Berlin) is a German journalist and author, best known in English-speaking countries for his biography of Adolf Hitler. ... Wilhelm Landig The Vienna Circle, or Landig Group, was an occultic, völkisch and Germanic mysticist group formed in 1950 that first gathered for discussions at the studio of the designer Wilhelm Landig in Viennas 4th district of Wieden in Austria. ... The Bavarian Soviet Republic (Bayrische Räterepublik) — also known as the Munich Soviet Republic (Münchner Räterepublik) — was a short-lived revolutionary government in the German state of Bavaria in 1919 that sought to replace the fledgling Weimar Republic in its early days. ... The Federal Archives in Koblenz The German Federal Archives or Bundesarchiv (BArch) are the National Archives of Germany. ... Ulrich Friedrich Wilhelm Joachim von Ribbentrop (born Ulrich Friedrich Wilhelm Joachim Ribbentrop) (April 30, 1893 – October 16, 1946) was Foreign Minister of Germany from 1938 until 1945. ... The Federal Archives in Koblenz The German Federal Archives or Bundesarchiv (BArch) are the National Archives of Germany. ... For other persons of the same name, see Alex Jones. ... General Karl Haushofer General Karl Ernst Haushofer (August 27, 1869, Munich - March 13, 1946, Pähl) was a German geopolitician. ... Georges Ivanovich Gurdjieff (Георгий Иванович Гюрджиев, Georgiy Ivanovich Gyurdzhiev (or Gurdjiev); (January 13, 1866? – October 29, 1949), was an Armenian-Greek mystic, a teacher of sacred dances, and a spiritual teacher. ...

Referred Literature

  • Anna Bramwell. 1985. Blood and Soil: Richard Walther Darré and Hitler's 'Green Party'. Abbotsbrook, England: The Kensal Press. ISBN 0-946041-33-4
  • Stephen E. Flowers (as Edred Thorsson). 1984. Futhark: A Handbook of Rune Magic. York Beach, Maine: Samuel Weiser, Inc. ISBN 0-87728-548-9
  • Mattias Gardell. 2003. Gods of the Blood: The Pagan Revival and White Separatism. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. ISBN 978-0-8223-3071-4
  • Joscelyn Godwin. 1996. Arktos: The Polar Myth in Science, Symbolism, and Nazi Survival. Kempton, Ill.: Adventures Unlimited Press. ISBN 0-932813-35-6
  • Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke. 1985. The Occult Roots of Nazism: Secret Aryan Cults and Their Influence on Nazi Ideology: The Ariosophists of Austria and Germany, 1890-1935. Wellingborough, England: The Aquarian Press. ISBN 0-85030-402-4. (Several reprints.) Expanded with a new Preface, 2004, I.B. Tauris & Co. ISBN 1-86064-973-4
  • ———. 2002. Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism and the Politics of Identity. New York University Press. ISBN 0-8147-3124-4. (Paperback, 2003. ISBN 0-8147-3155-4)
  • Heinz Höhne. 1969. The Order of the Death's Head: The Story of Hitler's SS. Martin Secker & Warburg.
  • Lewis Spence. 1940. Occult Causes of the Present War. London: Rider & Co. (Reprint, 1997. Kessinger Publishing. ISBN 0-7661-0051-0)
  • Harald Strohm. 1997. Die Gnosis und der Nationalsozialismus. (German). Suhrkamp.

Stephen Edred Flowers Ph. ... Dr. Stephen Edred Flowers, Ph. ... Mattias Gardell (born 1958) is a reader for religious history at the University of Stockholm. ... Gods of the Blood: The Pagan Revival and White Separatism is a book by Swedish scholar Mattias Gardell. ... Joscelyn Godwin (born 16 January 1945 at Kelmscott, Oxfordshire, England) is a musicologist, writer and translator. ... Arktos, Greek αρκτος, means bear. The Arctic is named from this Greek word in reference to the northern constellations of Ursa Major, Great Bear, and Ursa Minor, Little Bear. ... Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke is the author of several books on modern occultism and esotericism with the history of its intersection with fascist politics. ... The Occult Roots of Nazism: Secret Aryan Cults and Their Influence on Nazi Ideology : The Ariosophists of Austria and Germany, 1890-1935 is a book by Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke. ... Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism and the Politics of Identity is a book by Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke. ... Heinz Höhne (also Hoehne) is a German journalist who specializes in Nazi and intelligence history. ... Lewis Spence (November 25, 1874 - March 3, 1955) was a Scottish journalist and writer. ...

List of books about Nazi occultism

  • Wiligut, Karl Maria (2001). in Michael Moynihan (editor): The Secret King: Karl Maria Wiligut, Himmler's Lord of the Runes, translated by Stephen E. Flowers, Dominion Press and Runa-Raven Press. ISBN 1-885972-21-0. 
  • Hitler's Secret Sciences: His Quest for the Hidden Knowledge of the Ancients by Nigel Pennick
  • Runic Astrology: Starcraft and Timekeeping in the Northern Tradition by Nigel Pennick
  • The SS Family Book: Procedure for Conducting Family Celebrations, authored by Charles Barger & Ulric of England. Ulric Publishing. - SS Pagan rituals.
  • Reveal the Power of the Pendulum: Secrets of the Sidereal Pendulum, A Complete Survey of Pendulum Dowsing, by Karl Spiesberger, (1962) ISBN 0-572-01419-8 (Der erfolgreiche Pendel-Praktiker) - 1962 [1]
  • Rune Might: History and Practices of the Early 20th Century German Rune Magicians by Stephen Flowers
  • Mythos Schwarze Sonne by Gerhard von Werfenstein
  • Odinism and Christianity under the Third Reich by John Yeowell, published by the Odinic Rite in 1993.
  • Unholy Alliance: History of the Nazi Involvement With the Occult by Peter Levenda, (May 1, 2002, ISBN 0-8264-1409-5)
  • Nazis and the Occult by Dusty Sklar
  • Hitler and the Occult by Ken Anderson
  • Zodiac and Swastika: Astrologer to Himmler's Court by Wilhelm Wulff
  • The Occult Understanding of Hitler and the Nazis by Cyril Scott
  • Unknown Sources: National Socialism and the Occult by Hans Thomas Hakl & Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke (Translator)
  • Hitlers Visionäre. Die okkulten Wegbereiter des Dritten Reiches [[[Hitler's Visionaries]]. Nazism's Occult Roots] by Eduard Gugenberger [2]
  • Astrology and the Third Reich: A Historical Study of Astrological Beliefs in Western Europe Since 1700 and in Hitler's Germany, 1933-45 by Ellic Howe
  • Astrology: A Recent History Including the Untold Story of its Role in World War II by Ellic Howe (1968)
  • Astrology and Psychological Warfare During World War II by Ellic Howe (1972)
  • Himmler's Crusade: The Nazi Expedition to Find the Origins of the Aryan Race by Christopher Hale (Wiley 2003. ISBN 0-471-26292-7)
  • Heinrich Himmler's Camelot: Pictorial/documentary: The Wewelsburg Ideological Center of the SS, 1934-1945 by Stephen Cook (Kressmann-Backmeyer, 1999)
  • Spence, Lewis: Occult Causes of the Present War; 1940, Rider and Co, London.
  • The Occult Establishment by James Webb
  • Storm Troopers of Satan by Michael FitzGerald
  • Das Ende des Hitlermythos by Josef Greiner
  • Himmler's Black Order 1923-45 by Robin Lumsden
  • Himmler's Crusade: The True Story of the 1938 Nazi Expedition into Tibet by Christopher Hale
  • Nietzsche, Prophet of Nazism: The Cult of the Superman--Unveiling the Nazi Secret Doctrine by Abir Taha
  • Reich Of The Black Sun: Nazi Secret Weapons & The Cold War Allied Legend by Joseph P. Farrell
  • Satan and Swastika: The Occult and the Nazi Party by Francis X. King
  • Himmler's Castle by Stuart Russell, J A Bowman (Editor)
  • Hitler and his God: The Background to the Hitler Phenomenon by Georges van Vrekhem, Rupa & Co. ISBN 81-291-0953-0
  • Hitler: Black Magician by Gerald Suster, ISBN 1-871438-82-9.
  • Hanussen: Hitler's Jewish Clairvoyant by Mel Gordon
  • Hitler: The Occult Messiah by Gerald Suster (1981)
  • Schwarze Sonne (book) by Rüdiger Sünner

Karl Maria Wiligut (alias Weisthor) (December 10, 1866 - January 3, 1946) was also known as Himmlers Rasputin. He was born in Vienna in what was then Austria-Hungary. ... Michael Moynihan, (b. ... The Secret King The Secret King, subtitled Karl Maria Wiligut, Himmlers Lord of the Runes, is a 2005 published book documenting the actual written works of Karl Maria Wiligut, the official leading occultist employed by Heinrich Himmler during the Third Reich, rather than the speculation. ... Stephen Edred Flowers Ph. ... Nigel Campbell Pennick Nigel Campbell Pennick, born 1946 in Guildford, Surrey, England in the United Kingdom, is a widely known and respected practitioner in, and authority on, Occultism, Germanic history, Runology or Odinic Runosophy, history, Magick and Natural Magic. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Nigel Campbell Pennick Nigel Campbell Pennick, born 1946 in Guildford, Surrey, England in the United Kingdom, is a widely known and respected practitioner in, and authority on, Occultism, Germanic history, Runology or Odinic Runosophy, history, Magick and Natural Magic. ... Reveal the Power of the Pendulum: Secrets of the Sidereal Pendulum, A Complete Survey of Pendulum Dowsing (ISBN 0-572-01419-8) is a book by Karl Spiesberger. ... Karl Spiesberger (Spiesßerger), also known as Frater Eratus or Fra Eratus, because of his involvement with the Fraternitas Saturni (Brotherhood of Saturn), is a German mysticist, occultist and Germanic revivalist. ... Stephen Edred Flowers Ph. ... The Odinic Rite (OR) is a Germanic neopagan organization, practicing a form of Germanic neopaganism termed Odinism after the chief god of Norse mythology, Odin. ... The Odinic Rite (OR) is a Germanic pagan reconstructivist society whose aims are to promote all aspects of Germanic paganism, termed Odinism after the chief god of Norse mythology, Odin. ... The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... Hitler and the Occult (ISBN 0879759739) is a book by Ken Anderson. ... Kenneth Allan Ken Anderson (born February 15, 1949 in Batavia, Illinois) is an American football quarterback who spent his entire professional career playing for the Cincinnati Bengals of the NFL and later returned as a position coach. ... Zodiac and Swastika: Astrologer to Himmlers Court (German and English title) or Zodiac and Swastika: How Astrology Guided Hitlers Germany (English title) is a book by Wilhelm Wulff with a forward by Walter Laqueur. ... Wilhelm Wulff an astrologer who was forced by the S.S. into working for the Ahnenerbe, in order to harness not only natural, but also supernatural forces. ... Cyril Scott (1879–1970) was an English romanticist composer with some impressionist qualities. ... Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke is the author of several books on modern occultism and esotericism with the history of its intersection with fascist politics. ... Ellic Howe (20 September 1910–28 September 1991) was a British author who wrote extensively on occultism and the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn as well as on typography and military history. ... Ellic Howe (20 September 1910–28 September 1991) was a British author who wrote extensively on occultism and the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn as well as on typography and military history. ... Ellic Howe (20 September 1910–28 September 1991) was a British author who wrote extensively on occultism and the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn as well as on typography and military history. ... Stephen A. Cook is a noted computer scientist. ... James Webb or Jim Webb may refer to: Politics Jim Webb (born 1946), former US Secretary of the Navy and Senator-elect from Virginia Jim Webb (Canada), a Canadian politician James Webb (governor) (died 1761), Commodore Governor for the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador for 1760 Sciences James Edwin... Francis X. King (1939–1994) was a British occult writer and editor who wrote about tarot, divination, witchcraft, magic, and holistic medicine. ... Stuart Russell (born 1962) is a computer scientist known for his contributions to artificial intelligence. ... Georges van Vrekhem is a Flemish-speaking Belgian journalist, poet and playwright, who was the artistic manager of a professional theater company, the Nederlands Toneel te Gent. He became acquainted with the teachings of Sri Aurobindo and the Mother in 1964. ... Gerald Suster (1951-3 February 2001) was a British historian, occult writer, and novelist. ... Hanussen, also known as Erich Jan Hanussen, was German mentalist, occultist, and astrologer, active in Germany during the time of the Third Reich. ... Gerald Suster (1951-3 February 2001) was a British historian, occult writer, and novelist. ... Schwarze Sonne book Schwarze Sonne (Black Sun) is a 2001 German book by Rüdiger Sünner that explores the occult roots of Nazism . ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Schwarze Sonne (book). ...

See also

Representations of the Ahnenerbe and Nazi occultism are common in fantasy fiction, and they have become part of the background several conspiracy theories. ... // The idea that Nazi Germany developed highly advanced aircraft or spacecraft appears in fiction as early as 1947. ... Adolf Hitlers religious beliefs have been a matter of dispute, in part because of apparently inconsistent statements made by and attributed to him. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... The study of Neofascism and religion is a controversial area that examines the parallels and intersections between what are purported to be various forms of neofascism and contemporary religions and religious movements. ... A Sun cross, adopted as the sign of the German Faith Movement because it resembles both a cross and a swastika Positive Christianity is a term used in Nazi ideology to refer to a form of Christianity consistent with Nazism. ... German Christians was formed in 1932 and led by Ludwig Mueller. ... The Protestant Reich Church was formed by Adolf Hitler in 1933, by merging 29 regional churches into one church. ... Nazi archaeology refers to the movement led by various Nazi leaders, archaeologists, and other scholars, such as Adolf Hitler and Heinrich Himmler, to recreate the German past in order to strengthen nationalism. ... This is a reconstruction of the layout of the Führerbunker. ... Walter Johannes Stein, cc1930 Walter Johannes Stein (February 6, 1891, Vienna – July 7, 1957, London) was an Austrian philosopher, Waldorf teacher, Grail reseacher, and one of the pioneers of anthroposophy – the science of the spirit founded by the Austrian philosopher Rudolf Steiner. ...

External links

The Reformed branch of Protestantism in Switzerland was started in Zurich by Huldrych Zwingli and spread within a few years to Basle (Johannes Oecolampadius), Berne (Berchtold Haller and Niklaus Manuel), St. ... The United States National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is an independent agency of the U.S. federal government charged with preserving and documenting government and historical records. ...

Pages on the Nazis and the Occult that may not be reliable


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Swastika and the Nazis. Page 2. (2772 words)
While visiting Berlin during the height of Nazi power he and a small group of disciples were watching a street parade, which he begin to satirize loudly.
The mission assigned to the Ahnenerbe was to locate the origins of the "Nordic" race which, according to Nazi lore, was of Aryan stock.
Their purpose was to locate the origins of the "Nordic" race which was, according to the Nazi theoreticians, of Indo-Germanic stock.
Books on ?Nazi Occultism? :: Press-Release << - Paranormal Phenomenon Hot Spots (2491 words)
The Nazis were sufficiently impressed to give their leader Werner von Braun a rocket base and test-firing range at Peenemunde on the Baltic coast.
Himmler's Fortress of Fear: Rumours of prominent Nazis' involvement with the realm of the occult have persisted for decades.
The upper echelon was privy to the hard-core Nazi mystical teachings,perhaps as many claim, by the Unseen and Unknown Occult Superiors who taught Hitler and who were assumed by his associates to endow him with his uncanny and mesmerizing hypnotic powers.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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