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Encyclopedia > Nave

Links to full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are also found at the entry Cathedral diagram. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...

Romanesque nave of the abbey church of Saint-Georges-de-Boscherville, Normandy, France has a triforium passage above the aisle vaulting
Romanesque nave of the abbey church of Saint-Georges-de-Boscherville, Normandy, France has a triforium passage above the aisle vaulting
Plan
Plan

In Romanesque and Gothic Christian abbey, cathedral and church architecture, the nave is the central approach to the high altar. "Nave" ( Medieval Latin navis, "ship,") was probably suggested by the keel shape of its vaulting. The nave of a church, whether Romanesque, Gothic or Classical, extends from the entry—which may have a separate vestibule, the narthex— to the chancel and is flanked by lower aisles separated from the nave by an arcade. Download high resolution version (1024x768, 156 KB)Romanesque nave of the abbeychurch of Saint-Georges-de-Boscherville, Normandy/ Picture taken by Urban, december 2004/ GFDL File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 156 KB)Romanesque nave of the abbeychurch of Saint-Georges-de-Boscherville, Normandy/ Picture taken by Urban, december 2004/ GFDL File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Mont Saint Michel, one of the famous symbols of Normandy. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (901x499, 72 KB)Abbey church Saint-Georges Boscherville, Normany. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (901x499, 72 KB)Abbey church Saint-Georges Boscherville, Normany. ... Romanesque St. ... See also Gothic art. ... An abbey (from the Latin abbatia, which is derived from the Syriac abba, father), is a Christian monastery or convent, under the government of an Abbot or an Abbess, who serve as the spiritual father or mother of the community. ... A cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy, such as the Anglican, Catholic and some Lutheran churches, which serves as the central church of a diocese, and thus as a bishops seat. ... Church in Villach, Austria. ... The Parthenon on top of the Acropolis, Athens, Greece Architecture (from Latin, architectura and ultimately from Greek, αρχιτεκτων, a master builder, from αρχι- chief, leader and τεκτων, builder, carpenter) is the art and science of designing buildings and structures. ... An ancient Roman altar PROTESTANTISM RULES!!! An altar is any structure upon which sacrifices or other offerings are offered for religious purposes. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... In architecture, a vault is an arched structure of masonry, forming a ceiling or canopy. ... The narthex of a church is the entrance or lobby area. ... In a modern church an aisle is thought of as a row down the middle of the church with a set of pews on each side. ... The Cleveland Arcade in downtown Cleveland (late 1960s) An arcade is a passage or walkway covered over by a succession of arches or vaults supported by columns, or else it is a covered passage fronted by a series of arches. ...


Though to a modern visitor the impressive nave seems to be the principal part of a Gothic church, ambitious churches were built in a series of campaigns as funds were available, working outward from the liturgically essential sanctuary, and many were consecrated before their nave was completed. Many naves were not completed to the initial plan, as tastes changed, and some naves were never completed at all. In Gothic architecture, the precise number of arcaded bays in the nave was not a material concern.


The height of the nave provides space for clerestory windows above the aisle roofs, which give light to the interior, leaving the apse in shadow, as at the abbey of Saint-Georges-de-Boscherville (illustration, above right). The architectural antecedents of this construction lay in the secular Roman basilica, a kind of covered stoa sited adjacent to a forum, where magistrates met and public business was transacted. Clerestory or (clear storey), in architecture, denotes an upper storey of a Roman basilica or of the nave of a Romanesque or Gothic church, the walls of which rise above the rooflines of the lower aisles and are pierced with windows. ... St. ... The Painted Porch (Stoa poikile), during the 3rd century BC, was where Zeno of Citium taught Stoicism. ... The Forum of Cosa, in Italy. ...

Late Gothic Fan vaulting (1608, restored 1860s) over the nave at Bath Abbey, Bath, England Suppression of the triforium offers a great expanse of clerestory windows.
Late Gothic Fan vaulting (1608, restored 1860s) over the nave at Bath Abbey, Bath, England Suppression of the triforium offers a great expanse of clerestory windows.

In Romanesque constructions, where a gallery was required to allow passage above the aisles, an addition to the elevation of the nave was inserted, called a triforium. In later styles the triforium was eliminated, the aisles lowered and great expanses of stained glass took the place of the clerestory windows, as at Bath Abbey (illustration, left). Download high resolution version (1612x2288, 463 KB) Fan vaulting over the nave at Bath Abbey, Bath, England, dating from a major restoration of the roof in the 1860s. ... Download high resolution version (1612x2288, 463 KB) Fan vaulting over the nave at Bath Abbey, Bath, England, dating from a major restoration of the roof in the 1860s. ... Fan vaulting over the nave at Bath Abbey, Bath, England. ... Bath Abbey at sunset Bath Abbey is the last in a series of monastic churches built in Bath and is still in active use. ... For other uses, see Bath (disambiguation). ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my [birth]right) Englands location (dark green) within the British Isles Languages English (de facto) Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked... Triforium is an architectural term. ... Clerestory or (clear storey), in architecture, denotes an upper storey of a Roman basilica or of the nave of a Romanesque or Gothic church, the walls of which rise above the rooflines of the lower aisles and are pierced with windows. ... Triforium is an architectural term. ...

The Early Renaissance nave of Brunelleschi's San Lorenzo, Florence, built in the 1420s
The Early Renaissance nave of Brunelleschi's San Lorenzo, Florence, built in the 1420s

The crossing is the part of the nave that also belong to the transepts that intersect its space. The crossing may be surmounted by a tower or spire, or by a dome in Eastern churches, a feature that was reintroduced to the West at the Renaissance, first in Filippo Brunelleschi's San Lorenzo (illustration right). Brunelleschi restored the original Roman form of the basilica and consciously revived Roman details, such as the flat coffered ceiling. Clerestory windows still light San Lorenzo's nave, setting apart in dimness the crossing, with its small dome. In other contexts, lanterns and openings above the transept might bathe the crossing in more light instead. The crossing may be further distinguished from the nave by the rhythm of its architecture: wider-spaced piers supporting the higher vaulting of the transepts. Download high resolution version (576x768, 98 KB)Interior of the Basilica di San Lorenzo di Firenze, Florence, looking towards the high altar. ... Download high resolution version (576x768, 98 KB)Interior of the Basilica di San Lorenzo di Firenze, Florence, looking towards the high altar. ... Sculpture of Brunelleschi looking at the dome in Florence Filippo Brunelleschi (1377 – April 15, 1446) was a great Florentine architect of the Italian Renaissance. ... The Basilica di San Lorenzo (Basilica of St Lawrence) is one of the largest churches of Florence, Italy, situated at the centre of the city’s main market district. ... Full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are found at the entry Cathedral diagram. ... St Peters Basilica (topped with a lantern), Rome A dome is a common structural element of architecture that resembles the hollow upper half of a sphere. ... In the traditional view, the Renaissance is understood as an historical age that was preceded by the Middle Ages and followed by the Reformation. ... Sculpture of Brunelleschi looking at the dome in Florence Filippo Brunelleschi (1377 – April 15, 1446) was a great Florentine architect of the Italian Renaissance. ...


The nave, ecclesiastically considered, was the area reserved for the non-clergy (the "laity"), while the chancel and choir were reserved for the clergy, and a rood screen (cancellus) separated the sanctuary from the nave. Rood screens were swept away by Protestant reformers in the 16th century. Fixed pews in the nave are a comparatively modern, Protestant innovation. This article is about an architectural feature; for the astronomical term see apsis. ... The Rood screen was a common feature in late medieval church architecture, dividing the chancel from the nave. ... Pews in rows in a church A pew is a long bench used for seating of a church congregation. ...


Some naves

  • Longest nave: Cathedral of Saint John the Divine, New York City
  • Longest nave in England: [Liverpool Anglican Cathedral] Liverpool
  • Longest nave in France: Bourges (91 meter (300 feet), including choir where a crossing would be if there were transepts)
  • Longest nave in Germany: Cologne cathedral (58 meter (190 feet), including two bays between the towers)
  • Longest nave in Spain: Seville (60 meter (200 feet), in five bays)
  • Longest nave in Italy: St Peter's Basilica in Rome (91 meter (300 feet) in four bays)
  • Highest vaulted nave: Cathedral of Saint John the Divine, 38 meter (124 feet) (Beauvais is 46 meter (150 feet) high in the choir.)

The Cathedral of St. ... The vaulted nave of Bourges Cathedral Bourges (pop. ... The rear of the cathedral, viewed from across the Rhine The Cologne Cathedral (German: Kölner Dom, official name ) is one of the best-known architectural monuments in Germany and has been Colognes most famous landmark for centuries. ... Seville (Spanish: Sevilla, see also different names) is the artistic, cultural, and financial capital of southern Spain, crossed by the river Guadalquivir (, ). It is the capital of Andalusia and of the province of Sevilla. ... Interior view, with the nave of the Cattedra in the back St. ... Beauvais is a city and commune of northern France, préfecture (capital) of the Oise département. ...

Alternate meanings

  • According to an archaic definition, a nave is one's navel
  • A nave can also refer to the hub of a wheel, which is the small knob that protrudes from the wheel's center.

Adjective archaic (more archaic, most archaic) From an earlier period and no longer in common use; of or characterized by antiquity or archaism, antiquated. ...

See also


Nave also refers to the hub of a wheel, as in "bowl the round nave" from a subplay of Hamlet. This can lead to confusion of the architectural nave (supra) with the crossing of the same with the transept. Buckfast Abbey in Buckfastleigh, Devon is one of a small number of active monasteries in Britain today. ... The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity is the Anglican cathedral in the English city of Bristol and is commonly known as Bristol Cathedral. ... St. ... Montreal (Canada) cathedral Cathedrals are among the most ambitious buildings ever conceived, far exceeding the size and complexity of most other constructions and often requiring many years to complete. ... An abbey (from the Latin abbatia, which is derived from the Syriac abba, father), is a Christian monastery or convent, under the government of an Abbot or an Abbess, who serve as the spiritual father or mother of the community. ... A driving wheel on a steam locomotive. ... The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark is a tragedy by William Shakespeare and is one of his best-known and most often quoted plays. ... Full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are found at the entry Cathedral diagram. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
St. Julien: Nave (854 words)
The columns of the nave alternate between plain capitals with square abaci and decorated capitals with octagonal abaci.
According to a couple of sources, all the decorated capitals of the nave are plaster reproductions dating from 1651, and the other capitals were left plain at this time for the sake of economy, but I found it difficult to tell if this was true or not.
It is believed that the nave was originally intended to have Gothic rib vaults, because the unused columns on the two compound piers on either side of the nave look as if they were put there specifically to support the ribs of the nave vault.
Nave - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (762 words)
The nave of a church, whether Romanesque, Gothic or Classical, extends from the entry—which may have a separate vestibule, the narthex— to the chancel and is flanked by lower aisles separated from the nave by an arcade.
The nave, ecclesiastically considered, was the area reserved for the non-clergy (the "laity"), while the chancel and choir were reserved for the clergy, and a rood screen (cancellus) separated the sanctuary from the nave.
Nave also refers to the hub of a wheel, as in "bowl the round nave" from a subplay of Hamlet.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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