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Encyclopedia > Natural fiber
It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Fiber. (Discuss)

Fiber or fibre (see spelling differences) is a class of hair-like materials that are continuous filaments or are in discrete elongated pieces, similar to pieces of thread. They can be spun into filaments, thread, or rope. They can be used as a component of composite materials. They can also be matted into sheets to make products such as paper or felt. Fibers are of 2 types: natural fiber and man made or synthetic fiber. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Fiber or fibre[1] is a class of materials that are continuous filaments or are in discrete elongated pieces, similar to lengths of thread. ... The differences in the spellings of British English and American English are as follows: Spelling differences between U.S. usage on one side and British and Commonwealth usage on the other are generally more conspicuous than spelling differences within the Commonwealth. ... Materials are inputs to production or manufacturing. ... This article is about yarn fiber. ... Coils of rope used for long-line fishing A rope (IPA: ) is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength for pulling and connecting. ... The term composite can refer to several different things: A dental composite is an type of tooth filling material made of a plastic matrix containing high-strength quartz filler particles. ... Piece of A4 paper Paper is a thin, flat material produced by the amalgamation of plant fibres, which are subsequently held together without extra binder, largely by hydrogen bonds and to a small degree by fiber entanglement. ... A selection of felt cloth. ... Synthetic fibers are the result of an extensive search by scientists to increase and improve upon the supply of naturally occurring animal and plant fibers that have been used in making cloth. ...

Contents

Natural fibers

Natural fibers include those made out of plants, animal and mineral sources. Natural fibers can be classified according to their origin.


Vegetable fibers

Vegetable fibers generally comprise cellulose: examples include cotton, linen, jute, flax, ramie, sisal and hemp. Cellulose fibers serve in the manufacture of paper and cloth. This fiber can be further categorized into the following: Fiber crops are field crops grown for their fibers, which are used to make paper, cloth, or rope. ... Cellulose as polymer of β-D-glucose Cellulose in 3D Cellulose (C6H10O5)n is a long-chain polymeric polysaccharide carbohydrate, of beta-glucose [1][2]. It forms the primary structural component of green plants. ... Cotton ready for harvest. ... Linum usitatissimum L. - Flax Torn linen cloth, recovered from the Dead Sea Linen is a material made from the fibers of the flax plant. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Binomial name Linum usitatissimum Linnaeus. ... Binomial name Boehmeria nivea (L.) Gaudich. ... Binomial name Agave sisalana Perrine Sisal or sisal hemp is an agave Agave sisalana that yields a stiff fiber used in making rope. ... Binomial name Cannabis sativa Linnaeus Cannabis sativa, also known as hemp, is a species of Cannabis. ... Piece of A4 paper Paper is a thin, flat material produced by the amalgamation of plant fibres, which are subsequently held together without extra binder, largely by hydrogen bonds and to a small degree by fiber entanglement. ... It has been suggested that Textile be merged into this article or section. ...

  • Seed fiber: The fiber is collected from the seed. e.g. Cotton and Kapok.
  • Leaf fiber: The fiber is collected from the leaf. e.g. Sisal and Agave.
  • Bast fiber or skin fiber: The fiber is collected from the skin or bast surrounding the stem of the plant. These fibers have higher tensile strength than other fibers. Therefore, these fibers are used for durable yarn and fabric for packaging and paper. Examples are: Jute, Kenaf, industrial Hemp, Ramie, Rattan, Soybean fiber, and even Vine fibers and Banana fibers.
  • Fruit fiber: The fiber is collected from the fruit of the plant. e.g. Coconut (Coir) fiber.
  • Stalk fibre: Straws of wheat, rice, barley, and other crops including Bamboo and Grass.

Cotton ready for harvest. ... Binomial name Ceiba pentandra (L.) Gaertn. ... Binomial name Agave sisalana Perrine Sisal or sisal hemp is an agave Agave sisalana that yields a stiff fiber used in making rope. ... Species Agave americana Agave fourcroydes Agave sisalana many others, see text Agaves are succulent plants of a large botanical genus of the same name, belonging to the family Agavaceae. ... Bast Fiber or Skin Fiber: The fiber is collected from the skin or bast surrounding the stem of the plant. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Binomial name Hibiscus cannabinus L. Kenaf is the name of a hibiscus plant Hibiscus cannabinus and also the term for the fiber obtained from this plant. ... This is one of several related articles about cannabis. ... Binomial name Boehmeria nivea (L.) Gaudich. ... Genera Calamus Calospatha Ceratolobus Daemonorops Eremospatha Eugeissonia Korthalsia Laccosperma Metroxylon Myrialepis Oncocalamus Pigafetta Plectocomia Plectomiopsis Raphia Zalacca Zalacella Rattan (from the Malay rotan), is the name for the roughly six hundred species of palms in the tribe Calameae, native to tropical regions of Africa, Asia and Australasia. ... Binomial name Glycine max (L.) Merr. ... The term vine was originally a term for the plant on which grapes grew, from the word for wine (Greek oinos), for which grapes were grown. ... Species Hybrid origin; see text Banana is the common name used for herbaceous plants in the genus Musa, which because of their size and structure, are often mistaken for trees. ...

Animal fibers

  • Animal Hair (Wool or Hairs): Fiber or wool is taken from animals or hairy mammals. e.g. Wool (sheep wool), goat hair (Alpaca, Cashmere), horse hair, etc.
  • Silk Fibre: Fiber is collected from dried saliva of bugs or insects during preparing cocoons. e.g. Silk from silk worms
  • Avian Fibre: Fiber from Birds. e.g. Feather and feather fiber.

The tough brown cocoon of an Emperor Gum Moth. ... Binomial name Bombyx mori Linnaeus, 1758 For the band named Silkworm, see Silkworm (band). ... Two feathers A white feather Feathers are one of the epidermal growths that form the distinctive outer covering, or plumage, on birds. ...

Mineral fibers

Mineral fibers are naturally occurring fiber or slightly modified fiber procured from minerals. These can be categorized into the following categories:

Fibrous asbestos on muscovite Asbestos Asbestos Asbestos (a misapplication of Latin: asbestos quicklime from Greek : a, not and sbestos, extinguishable) describes any of a group of minerals that can be fibrous, many of which are metamorphic and are hydrous magnesium silicates. ... Serpentine Serpentine is a group of common rock-forming hydrous magnesium iron phyllosilicate ((Mg, Fe)3Si2O5(OH)4) minerals; it is also often rich in other metal ores, including chromium, manganese, cobalt and nickel. ... Chrysotile Asbestos Chrysotile is an asbestiform sub-group within the serpentine group of minerals. ... Amphibole (Hornblende) Amphibole defines an important group of dark-colored rock-forming inosilicate minerals composed of double chain SiO4 tetrahedra linked at the vertices and generally containing ions of iron and/ or magnesium in their structures. ... Amosite is a commonly commercially-used synonym of grunerite first used by Hall. ... Amphibole (Hornblende) Amphibole defines an important group of dark-colored rock-forming inosilicate minerals composed of double chain SiO4 tetrahedra linked at the vertices and generally containing ions of iron and/ or magnesium in their structures. ... A sample of tremolite Tremolite is a member of the amphibole group of silicate minerals with composition: Ca2Mg5Si8O22(OH)2. ... Well-cleaved, dark, fine-grained chlorite-actinolite metadiabase intrudes light granitic gneiss Actinolite is an inosilicate mineral with the chemical formula Ca2(MgFe)5Si8O22(OH)2 // Mineralogy Actinolite is an intermediate member in a series between tremolite (Mg-rich) and ferro-actinolite (Fe-rich). ... Anthophyllite is an amphibole mineral: (Mg, Fe)7Si8O22(OH)2, magnesium iron inosilicate hydroxide. ... Fixed Partial Denture, or Bridge The word ceramic is derived from the Greek word κεραμικος (keramikos, potters earth, or pottery). The term covers inorganic non-metallic materials whose formation is due to the action of heat. ... There is a disputed proposal to merge this article with glass-reinforced plastic. ... Glass wool is similar to steel wool. ... Quartz is amongst one of the most common minerals in the Earths continental crust. ... Aluminium oxide (or aluminum oxide) (Al2O3) is a chemical compound of aluminium and oxygen. ... Silicon carbide (SiC) is a ceramic compound of silicon and carbon. ... Boron Carbide (chemical formula B4C) is an extremely hard ceramic material used in tank armor, bulletproof vests, and numerous industrial applications. ... Hot metal work from a blacksmith In chemistry, a metal (Greek: Metallon) is an element that readily forms positive ions (cations) and has metallic bonds. ...

See also

Fiber or fibre[1] is a class of materials that are continuous filaments or are in discrete elongated pieces, similar to lengths of thread. ...

External links

Classification of natural fibers and list of bast fibers.

  • IJSG

Classification of vegetable & bast fibers.


  Results from FactBites:
 
natural fiber: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (741 words)
The commercially important natural fibers are those cellulosic fibers obtained from the seed hairs, stems, and leaves of plants; protein fibers obtained from the hair, fur, or cocoons of animals; and the crystalline mineral asbestos.
Until the advent of the manufactured fibers near the beginning of the twentieth century, the chief fibers for apparel and home furnishings were linen and wool in the temperate climates and cotton in the tropical climates.
Bast fiber or skin fiber: The fiber is collected from the skin or bast surrounding the stem of the plant.
Natural fiber - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (384 words)
Fibers are of 2 types: natural fiber and man made or synthetic fiber.
Fruit fiber: The fiber is collected from the fruit of the plant.
Mineral fibers are naturally occurring fiber or slightly modified fiber procured from minerals.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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