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Encyclopedia > National Transcontinental Railway
National Transcontinental Railway
Locale New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba
Dates of operation 19131918
Track gauge ft 8½ in (1435 mm) (standard gauge)

The National Transcontinental Railway (NTR) was a historic Canadian [[Rail transport|rai The completion of construction of Canada's first transcontinental railway, the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) on November 7, 1885 preceded a tremendous economic expansion and immigration boom in western Canada during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. But the monopolistic policies of the CPR, coupled with its southerly routing (new scientific discoveries were pushing the northern boundary of cereal crops), led to increasing western discontent with the railway and federal transportation policies. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English French (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 14 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 15, 1870 (5th) Area  Ranked 8th Total 647,797... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... The dominant rail gauge in each country shown Rail gauge is the distance between the inner sides of the two parallel rails that make up a railway track. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... As railways developed and expanded one of the key issues to be decided was that of the rail gauge (the distance between the two rails of the track) which should be used. ... A transcontinental railroad is a railway across a significant portion of a continent. ... An eastbound CPR freight at Stoney Creek Bridge in Rogers Pass. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Grain redirects here. ...


The federal government had encouraged the Grand Trunk Railway (GTR) system in the 1870s to consider building the transcontinental rail line, but formed the CPR to do the job after the GTR balked. However by the early 1900s, the GTR was willing to consider building a second transcontinental system for the country - provided it received government assistance, similar to the CPR's deal. 1885 map The Grand Trunk Railway (GTR) was a historic railway system which operated in the Canadian provinces of Quebec and Ontario, as well as the American states of Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont. ... // The invention of the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham Bell. ... This article is about the decade starting in 1900 and ending in 1909. ...


The Canadian Northern Railway was an upstart regional system for the prairies that had begun in Manitoba under entrepreneurs William Mackenzie and Donald Mann in 1899 through their amalgamation of several smaller branch lines. The CNoR started the process of building Canada's second transcontinental system between 1903 and 1912. The system was built from Winnipeg west to Vancouver and east to Toronto and Montreal, in addition to branch lines in Nova Scotia. The Canadian Northern Railway (CNoR) is a historic Canadian railway. ... Sir William Mackenzie (October 17, 1849 – December 5, 1923) was a Canadian railway contractor and entrepreneur. ... Sir Donald Mann (March 23, 1853 - November 10, 1934) was a Canadian railway contractor and entrepreneur. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Motto: Template:Unhide = Unum Cum Virtute Multorum (One With the Strength of Many) Location City Information Established: 1738 (Fort Rouge), 1873 (City of Winnipeg) Area: 465. ... This article refers to the city in British Columbia, Canada. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Diversity Our Strength Image:Toronto, Ontario Location. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 11 Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867...


Mackenzie and Mann had spurned the federal government's offer for assistance to expand the CNoR in 1903 and in doing so, the federal government under prime minister Wilfrid Laurier committed to building a trancontinental system in partnership with the GTR. In keeping with the trend of railways to exploit virgin territories, the government-backed "transcon" would run from the port of Prince Rupert, British Columbia across the northern portion of the prairies to Winnipeg, and from there across northern Ontario and Quebec to Quebec City where it would cross the St. Lawrence River and continue on to its eastern terminus at Moncton, New Brunswick by way of a route directly across central New Brunswick. Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Laurier redirects here. ... Orthographic projection centred over Prince Rupert BC Coast, showing Prince Rupert and Vancouver Prince Rupert is a city in the province of British Columbia, Canada. ... Motto: Don de Dieu feray valoir (Gift of God shall make prosper) Area: 547. ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... For other uses, see Moncton (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Canadian province. ...


The GTR board of directors only wished to assume the financial risks for the portion of the system west of Winnipeg, therefore the agreement resulted in two railway systems being funded by government: the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway which would run from Winnipeg-Prince Rupert and be built and operated by GTR as a subsidiary, and the government owned and built National Transcontinental Railway (NTR) which would run from Winnipeg-Moncton and be operated by GTR upon completion. Grand Trunk Pacific Railway logo or herald The Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (GTPR) was a historical Canadian railway. ...


The GTPR/NTR deal came in the heady final days of Canada's railway boom and would soon prove to be the financial straw that broke the back of Canada's railway industry during the First World War. The GTPR/NTR system was surveyed and construction began in 1905 and the entire system was finished (except for the Quebec Bridge) in 1913. The task was monumental and no expense was spared in building a railway system of minimal grades and curvature. In crossing the Appalachian Mountains of eastern Quebec and northern New Brunswick, the NTR used massive bridges to span wide valleys. The Quebec Bridge over the St. Lawrence River - the largest cantilever span in the world - took $40 million of the $170 million total project cost alone. The territory across northern Quebec and Ontario to Winnipeg, through the heart of the Canadian Shield, posed an extremely difficult construction obstacle (the reason why the Canadian Pacific Railway avoided the region, yet in the end, the system was one of the best-constructed railways in the world. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... The Quebec Bridge (Pont de Québec in French) in Canada crosses the lower Saint Lawrence River to the west of Quebec City, and Lévis, Quebec. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... The Quebec Bridge (Pont de Québec in French) in Canada crosses the lower Saint Lawrence River to the west of Quebec City, and Lévis, Quebec. ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Canadian Shield Canadian Shield Landform. ... An eastbound CPR freight at Stoney Creek Bridge in Rogers Pass. ...

Contents

Canadian Government Railways

Unfortunately, the GTR reneged on its deal with the federal government for operating the eastern section (the NTR) and the government folded this railway along with the Intercolonial Railway of Canada (IRC), the Prince Edward Island Railway (PEIR), and the Hudson Bay Railway (as well as some smaller lines) into the Canadian Government Railways in 1915 for administrative and financial purposes, although the individual systems maintained their independent names. CGR and its subsidiaries would last until 1918. The Intercolonial Railway of Canada (IRC or ICR), also referred to as the Intercolonial Railway, was a historic Canadian railway. ... The Prince Edward Island Railway (PEIR) was a historic Canadian railway. ... The Hudson Bay Railway operates two ex-Canadian National branch lines in northern Manitoba. ... Canadian Government Railways (CGR) was the descriptive name used between 1915_1918 for all federal government-owned railways in Canada. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ...


Canadian National Railways

On September 6, 1918 the CNoR was nationalized after becoming insolvent and its government-appointed directors were ordered to assume operation of the CGR system. On December 20, 1918 the federal government created the Canadian National Railways (CNR) under which the CNoR and CGR were to be operated. is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... CN redirects here, as its the most common usage of the abbreviation in Canada; for more uses, see CN (disambiguation). ...


Several years later, on July 12, 1920 the GTPR was nationalized and entered the CNR fold. The GTR itself was placed under government control several weeks earlier on May 21, 1920, however GTR was not merged into the CNR until January 23, 1923. is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


NTR Legacy

The significant cost overruns of the NTR/GTPR construction led to the downfall of Laurier's Liberals in 1911 and Robert Borden's Tories were forced to finish the project, including the disastrous spanning of the St. Lawrence River with the Quebec Bridge. The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Sir Robert Laird Borden, PC, GCMG, KC (June 26, 1854 – June 10, 1937) was the eighth Prime Minister of Canada from October 10, 1911, to July 10, 1920, and the third Nova Scotian to hold this office. ... The Conservative Party of Canada has gone by a variety of names over the years since Canadian Confederation. ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ...


The NTR route across northern Quebec and Ontario, far from the major population centres, had been approved by Laurier's government largely due to the support of his Quebec caucus as the routing made Quebec City the preferred port for western grain shipments. The NTR in these provinces never lived up to its expectations for creating traffic, although it did aid the resource-rich mining communities of northern Ontario and northwestern Quebec for a time.


Under CNR (CN post-1960), the NTR route across northern Quebec and Ontario became a marginal secondary main line with little in the way of through freight or passenger traffic. At Nakina, the CNR had constructed the Longlac-Nakina Cut-Off, a 29.4 mile section of track linking the NTR with the Canadian Northern line at Longlac, completed in 1924. A 122-mile section of the NTR mainline between Nakina and Calstock, Ontario was abandoned in 1986 and the Ontario Northland Railway purchased the section of NTR mainline between Calstock and Cochrane, Ontario in 1993. The mainline was also abandoned by CN for 82 miles east of Cochrane to La Sarre, Quebec in 1997. Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nakina is a community of approximately 500 in the Town of Greenstone in the Thunder Bay District in Northern Ontario, Canada. ... Longlac is a community in Ontario, Canada, in the Thunder Bay District of Northern Ontario. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... A pair of Ontario Northland diesels work in Hearst, in 2003. ... Cochrane, Ontario, Canada is a northern Ontario town situated on Highway 11. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... La Sarre is a town in northwestern Quebec, Canada on the Rivière du Sud and is the seat of the MRC dAbitibi-Ouest. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...


West of Nakina, the combined NTR/GTPR line forms CN's transcontinental mainline through to Tête Jaune Cache, British Columbia and sees very heavy traffic. From Tête Jaune Cache, the GTPR line to Prince Rupert is a secondary mainline as the CNoR line southwest from Tête Jaune Cache to Vancouver forms the CN mainline. In recent decades, congestion at many ports along the west coast of North America is making the GTPR's development of Prince Rupert an attractive alternative. Yellowhead (electoral district) Yellowhead (bird) Inula is the genus or the yellowhead flower in the Asteraceae family. ...


East of La Sarre to Quebec City, the former NTR mainline forms a network of CN branchlines in northern Quebec, although the Quebec Bridge and related trackage in the Quebec City area is heavily used by freight and passenger traffic as part of the Quebec City-Windsor Corridor. The 1,150-kilometre Quebec City-Windsor Corridor is the most densely-populated and heavily-industrialised region of Canada. ...


From Quebec City east to Pelletier, Quebec, the former NTR mainline was abandoned in 1976 following the completion of a 30-mile "cutoff" from the latter station to CN's former Intercolonial Railway mainline in the St. Lawrence River valley west of Rivière-du-Loup. However, from Pelletier east to Moncton the NTR mainline across central New Brunswick, including the massive bridges in the Appalachian Mountains, is still heavily used and forms the core of CN's Montreal-Halifax mainline. Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Halifax skyline at night Halifax neighbourhoods and boundaries of former city in relation to Halifax Regional Municipality Halifax, founded in 1749, is a community and former city in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. ...


References

  • Andreae, Christopher (1997). Lines of Country: an atlas of railway and waterway history in Canada. Boston Mills Press, Erin, Ontario. ISBN 1-55046-133-8. 

 
 

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