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Encyclopedia > National Review
National Review

National Review cover dated January 29, 2007 Image File history File links Size of this preview: 454 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (588 × 777 pixel, file size: 451 KB, MIME type: image/png) National Review cover taken from digital edition This image is of a magazine cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Editor Rich Lowry
Categories Editorial magazine
Frequency biweekly
Circulation 155,000
Publisher Jack Fowler
First issue November 19, 1955
Company National Review, Inc.
Country Flag of the United States United States
Language English
Website www.nationalreview.com
ISSN 0028-0038

National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley, Jr. in 1955 and based in New York City. While the print version of the magazine is available online to subscribers, the web site's free content is essentially a separate publication. Generally the magazine provides conservative views and analysis on the world's current events. Rich Lowry on C-SPAN Rich Lowry (born 1968 in Arlington, Virginia) is editor of the conservative monthly magazine, National Review. ... Most circulated periodical magazines in the U.S. as of 2003. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the conservative journalist and commentator. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ...

Contents

Origins

Prior to National Review's founding in 1955, some conservatives believed that the American Right was a largely unorganized collection of individuals who shared intertwining philosophies but had little opportunity for a united public voice. They also wanted to marginalize what they saw as the isolationist views of the Old Right. Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Isolationism is a diplomatic policy whereby a nation seeks to avoid alliances with other nations. ... The Old Right refers to separate political groups in the United Kingdom and the United States. ...


At the time several major magazines such as the Saturday Evening Post, The American Mercury and Reader's Digest were generally conservative and anti-communist, as were a number of newspapers including the Chicago Tribune and St Louis Globe-Democrat. Also, Human Events and The Freeman preceded National Review in developing cold war conservatism in the 1950s. There have been many publications called the Saturday Evening Post; several were/are local British newspapers. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... The St. ... Human Events is a weekly conservative magazine founded in 1944. ... The Freeman is a monthly journal; it is the principal publication of the Foundation for Economic Education (FEE), located in Irvington-on-Hudson, New York. ...


During the Eisenhower years, many American intellectuals considered President Calvin Coolidge and the laissez-faire economics philosophy he was perceived to have practiced anachronistic following the The Great Depression. After Franklin Roosevelt defeated Herbert Hoover in 1932, they believed that the country tilted permanently leftward -- and soon turned to government to solve the country's socio-economic problems. As the "anti-Wall Street" Democratic Party gained control of the political landscape, the Republicans assumed the role of an almost permanent contrarian minority. John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Laissez-faire is short for laissez faire, laissez passer, a French phrase meaning to let things alone, let them pass. First used by the eighteenth century Physiocrats as an injunction against government interference with trade, it is now used as a synonym for strict free market economics. ... The Great Depression was a global economic slump that began in 1929 and bottomed in 1933. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), often referred to as FDR, was the 32nd (1933–1945) President of the United States. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ...


Anti-FDR forces, known today as the Old Right, had sprouted up to oppose the New Deal. This group included traditionalists (followers of T. S. Eliot and George Santayana), monarchists (Erik von Kuehnelt-Leddihn), traditionalist southern agrarians (Allen Tate, Donald Davidson, Richard Weaver), libertarians (H.L. Mencken, Albert Jay Nock, Frank Chodorov), the Objectivist Ayn Rand, and anti-interventionists (John T. Flynn, Garet Garrett, Robert R. McCormick). This group influenced both the early National Review and modern paleoconservatism, which emerged in the 1980s in opposition to neoconservatism. The Old Right refers to separate political groups in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... The New Deal was the title President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave to the series of programs he initiated between 1933 and 1938 with the goal of providing relief, recovery, and reform (3 Rs) to the people and economy of the United States during the Great Depression. ... Thomas Stearns Eliot, OM (September 26, 1888 – January 4, 1965), was a poet, dramatist and literary critic. ... George Santayana George Santayana (December 16, 1863, Madrid – September 26, 1952, Rome), was a philosopher, essayist, poet, and novelist. ... Erik Maria Ritter von Kuehnelt-Leddihn (July 31, 1909–May 26, 1999) was an Austrian Catholic aristocrat intellectual who described himself as an extreme conservative arch-liberal. ... John Orley Allen Tate (November 19, 1899 - February 9, 1979) was an American poet, essayist, and social commentator, and Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress, 1943 - 1944. ... There are two Donald Davidsons: Donald Davidson (poet) Donald Davidson (philosopher) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Richard Weaver may refer to: Richard Weaver, better known as the Handshake Man Richard M. Weaver (U.S. scholar) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... H. L. (Henry Louis) Mencken (September 12, 1880 - January 29, 1956) was a twentieth century journalist and social critic, a cynic and a freethinker, known as the Sage of Baltimore and the American Nietzsche. He is often regarded as one of the most influential American writers of the early 20th... Albert Jay Nock (October 13, 1870 or 1872 - August 19, 1945) was an influential American libertarian author, educational theorist, and social critic of the early and middle 20th century. ... Frank Chodorov (1887-1966) was a U.S. thinker and member of the Old Right, a group of libertarian ideologists who were minarchist, anti-war, anti-imperialist, and (later) anti-New Dealers. ... Ayn Rand (IPA: , February 2 [O.S. January 20] 1905 – March 6, 1982), born Alisa Zinovyevna Rosenbaum (Russian: ), was a Russian-born American novelist and philosopher,[1] known for creating a philosophy she named Objectivism and for writing the novels We the Living, The Fountainhead, Atlas Shrugged and the... John T. Flynn John Thomas Flynn (October 25, 1882-1964) was a U.S. journalist. ... Garet Garrett (1878-1954) was an American journalist and author who was noted for his critiques of the New Deal and U.S. involvement in the Second World War. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about Neoconservatism in the United States, for neoconservatism in other regions, see Neoconservatism (disambiguation). ...


The Republican party had effectively marginalized its remaining conservative members by the 1950s. Although a few Republican statesman such as Senator Robert Taft of Ohio maintained a rear-guard action against the growth of the state during Roosevelt's New Deal, the party was firmly in the camp of its liberal and pro-government Eastern establishment. The moderates in 1952 nominated Dwight D. Eisenhower over Taft for the presidency, a popular centerist Republican who publicly supported most of the New Deal. Eisenhower won in 1952, and with the death of Senator Taft, conservatism in America was left with few identifiable leaders. For the former Governor of Ohio and Robert Tafts grandson, see Bob Taft. ... The New Deal was the title President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave to the series of programs he initiated between 1933 and 1938 with the goal of providing relief, recovery, and reform (3 Rs) to the people and economy of the United States during the Great Depression. ... Dwight David Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American General and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ...


History

Early years

In 1953, Russell Kirk published The Conservative Mind, which sought to trace an intellectual bloodline from Edmund Burke to the Old Right in the early 1950s. This challenged the popular notion that no coherent conservative tradition existed in the United States. A young William F. Buckley Jr was greatly influenced by it. Russell Kirk Russell Kirk (1918, Plymouth, Michigan – 29 April 1994, Mecosta, Michigan), was an American political theorist, historian, social critic, and man of letters, best known for his influence on 20th century American conservatism. ... Edmund Burke (January 12, 1729[1] – July 9, 1797) was an Anglo-Irish statesman, author, orator, political theorist, and philosopher, who served for many years in the British House of Commons as a member of the Whig party. ... The Old Right refers to separate political groups in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... William F. Buckley William Frank Buckley Jr. ...


Two years before, Buckley published God and Man at Yale, criticizing his alma mater for its abandonment of its founding principles. Buckley, a Skull and Bones fraternity member, champion debater and former editor of The Yale Daily News, soon rose to national prominence. After a short stint in the CIA, he toured the country debating for The Intercollegiate Society of Individualists (ISI), contributed to The American Mercury, and soon decided to start his own magazine. God and Man at Yale: The Superstitions of Academic Freedom, is a book that was published in 1951, and was written by William F. Buckley, who eventually became the leading voice in the conservative movement of the twentieth century. ... For the pirate flag, see Jolly Roger. ... The Intercollegiate Studies Institute, Inc. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Buckley first tried to purchase Human Events, but was turned down. He then met Willi Schlamm, the ex-communist editor of The Freeman; they would spend the next two years raising the $300,000 necessary to start their own weekly magazine, originally to be called National Weekly. (A magazine holding the copyright to the name prompted the change to National Review.) The statement of intentions read: Human Events is a weekly conservative magazine founded in 1944. ... The Freeman is a monthly journal; it is the principal publication of the Foundation for Economic Education (FEE), located in Irvington-on-Hudson, New York. ...

Middle-of-the-Road, qua Middle of the Road, is politically, intellectually, and morally repugnant. We shall recommend policies for the simple reason that we consider them right (rather than “non-controversial”); and we consider them right because they are based on principles we deem right (rather than on popularity polls)...The New Deal revolution, for instance, could hardly have happened save for the cumulative impact of The Nation and The New Republic, and a few other publications, on several American college generations during the twenties and thirties. The Nation (ISSN 0027-8378) is a weekly [1] U.S. periodical devoted to politics and culture, self-described as the flagship of the left. [2] Founded on July 6, 1865 as an Abolitionist publication, it is the oldest continuously published weekly magazine in the United States. ... For other uses, see New Republic. ...

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On November 19th, 1955, Buckley’s magazine would take shape. Buckley assembled an eclectic group of writers: traditionalists, Catholic intellectuals, libertarians and ex-communists. They included: Russell Kirk (the traditionalist admirer of Burke and author of The Conservative Mind), ex-Marxists James Burnham, Frank Meyer, and Willmoore Kendall, L. Brent Bozell, and Gary Wills. Whittaker Chambers, the Communist-party defector and former Time editor who had given the key congressional testimony against Alger Hiss in the latter's espionage hearing, was also invited to join. Chambers initially declined, but eventually became a senior editor. In the magazine’s founding statement Buckley wrote: Ths article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... Cultural conservatism is conservatism with respect to culture. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Social conservatism generally refers to a political ideology or personal belief system that advocates the conservation or resurrection of what one, or ones community, considers to be traditional morality and social structure. ... National conservatism is a political term used primarily in Europe to describe a variant of conservatism which concentrates more on national interests than standard conservatism, while not being nationalist or a far-right approach. ... This article is about Neoconservatism in the United States, for neoconservatism in other regions, see Neoconservatism (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Libertarianism is a political philosophy that holds that individuals should be allowed complete freedom of action as long as they do not infringe on the freedom of others. ... Fiscal conservatism (also known as economic liberalism) is a term used in the United States to refer to economic and political policy that advocates restraint of government taxation, government expenditures and deficits, and government debt. ... This page deals with property as ownership rights. ... The rule of law is the principle that governmental authority is legitimately exercised only in accordance with written, publicly disclosed laws adopted and enforced in accordance with established procedure. ... Social order is a concept used in sociology, history and other social sciences. ... Social conservatism generally refers to a political ideology or personal belief system that advocates the conservation or resurrection of what one, or ones community, considers to be traditional morality and social structure. ... Many countries have political parties that are deemed to represent conservative, center-right, or Tory views which may be referred to informally as conservative parties even if not explicitly named so. ... The International Democrat Union (IDU) is an international grouping of conservative, neoconservative and Christian democratic political parties. ... For other uses, see European Democrats (disambiguation). ... James Burnham (1905–1987) was an American popular political theorist, former Communist activist and intellectual, known for his work The Managerial Revolution, published in 1941, which heavily influenced George Orwells Nineteen Eighty-Four. // Burnham was of English Catholic stock, although he was an atheist for much of his life... Frank Meyer (born 1909, died 1972) was a conservative political philosopher and co-founding editor of National Review. ... Willmoore Kendall (1909-1968) was an American conservative writer and Professor of political philosophy. ... L. Brent Bozell, Jr. ... Garry Wills (born May 22, 1934) is a celebrated author and historian, and a frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books. ... Whittaker Chambers, 1948 Jay Vivian (David Whittaker) Chambers (April 1, 1901 – July 9, 1961) was an American writer, editor, Communist party member and spy for the Soviet Union who defected and became an outspoken opponent of communism. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... “TIME” redirects here. ... Alger Hiss testifying Alger Hiss (November 11, 1904 – November 15, 1996) was a U.S. State Department official involved in the establishment of the United Nations. ...

Let’s Face it: Unlike Vienna, it seems altogether possible that did National Review not exist, no one would have invented it. The launching of a conservative weekly journal of opinion in a country widely assumed to be a bastion of conservatism at first glance looks like a work of supererogation, rather like publishing a royalist weekly within the walls of Buckingham Palace. It is not that of course; if National Review is superfluous, it is so for very different reasons: It stands athwart history, yelling Stop, at a time when no other is inclined to do so, or to have much patience with those who so urge it.

National Review aimed to make conservative ideas respectable, in an age when the dominant view of conservative thought was expressed by Lionel Trilling in 1950:[1] Lionel Trilling (July 4, 1905 – November 5, 1975) was an American literary critic, author, and teacher. ...

In the United States at this time liberalism is not only the dominant but even the sole intellectual tradition. For it is the plain fact that nowadays there are no conservative or reactionary ideas in general circulation... the conservative impulse and the reactionary impulse do not... express themselves in ideas but only... in irritable mental gestures which seek to resemble ideas.

Buckley attacked Robert Welch, the founder of the John Birch Society, as part of his efforts to build a respectable conservative movement: Robert Welch (1929-2000) is one of Britains most important and influential silversmiths. ... The John Birch Society is a conservative American exceptionalist organization founded in 1958 to fight what it saw as growing threats to the Constitution of the United States, especially a suspected communist infiltration of the United States government, and to support free enterprise. ...

Mr. Buckley's first great achievement was to purge the American right of its kooks. He marginalized the anti-Semites, the John Birchers, the nativists and their sort.[2]

Buckley and Frank Meyer also promoted the idea of fusionism, whereby different schools of conservatives, including libertarians, would work together to combat what were seen as their common opponents. Fusionism is an American political term for the combination or fusion of libertarians and traditional conservatives in the American conservative movement. ... This article deals with the libertarianism as defined in America and several other nations. ...


National Review promoted Barry Goldwater heavily during the early 1960s. Buckley and others involved with the magazine took a major role in the "Draft Goldwater" movement in 1960 and the 1964 presidential campaign. Buckley also helped found Young Americans for Freedom; it and National Review spread his vision of conservatism throughout the country. Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for president in the 1964 election. ... Official seal of Young Americans for Freedom. ...


The early National Review faced high-profile defections from both left and right. Garry Wills broke with NR and became a popular liberal -- yet still religious -- commentator. Buckley’s brother-in-law, L. Brent Bozell Jr., who ghostwrote The Conscience of a Conservative for Barry Goldwater, left and started the short-lived traditionalist Catholic magazine, Triumph in 1966. Garry Wills (born May 22, 1934 in Atlanta, Georgia) is an author and historian, and a frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books. ... L. Brent Bozell, Jr. ... A traditionalist Catholic is a Roman Catholic who believes that there should be a restoration of the liturgical forms, public and private devotions, and presentation of Catholic teachings that prevailed in the Catholic Church just before the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965). ...


After Goldwater

After defeat by Lyndon Johnson in 1964, Buckley and National Review continued to champion the idea of a conservative movement, which was increasingly embodied in Ronald Reagan. Reagan, a longtime subscriber of National Review, first became politically prominent during Goldwater's campaign. National Review supported his challenge to President Gerald Ford in 1976 and his successful 1980 campaign. Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Reagan redirects here. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ...


During the 1970s, NR began to embrace the rising neoconservative movement -- former liberal intellectuals revolting against the New Left counterculture. Many believe that this mindset slowly replaced the magazine's original worldview by the end of the Reagan era. Buckley himself began turning to other interests (such as a series of spy novels) and would retire as full-time editor in 1990. Neoconservatism describes several distinct political ideologies which are considered new forms of conservatism. ...


During the 1980s NR called for tax cuts, supply-side economics, the Strategic Defense Initiative, and support for President Reagan's foreign policy against the Soviet Union. The magazine criticized the Welfare state and would support the Welfare reform proposals of the 1990s. The magazine also regularly criticized President Bill Clinton. It first embraced, then rejected, Pat Buchanan in his political campaigns. A lengthy 1996 National Review editorial called for a "movement toward" drug legalization [3]. Supply-side economics is a school of macroeconomic thought that argues that economic growth can be most effectively managed using incentives for people to produce (supply) goods and services, such as adjusting income tax and capital gains tax rates. ... The Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) was proposed by U.S. President Ronald Reagan on March 23, 1983[1] to use ground-based and space-based systems to protect the United States from attack by strategic nuclear ballistic missiles. ... The Welfare State of the United Kingdom was prefigured in the William Beveridge Report in 1942, which identified five Giant Evils in society: squalor, ignorance, want, idleness and disease. ... Welfare reform is the name for a policy change in countries with a state-administered social welfare system to reduce dependence on welfare, as demanded by political conservatives. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Patrick Joseph Buchanan (born November 2, 1938) is an American politician, author, syndicated columnist, and broadcaster. ...


Current editor and contributing writers

The magazine's current editor is Rich Lowry. Many of the magazine's commentators are affiliated with think-tanks such as the Heritage Foundation and the neoconservative American Enterprise Institute. Rich Lowry on C-SPAN Rich Lowry (born 1968 in Arlington, Virginia) is editor of the conservative monthly magazine, National Review. ... The Heritage Foundation is a public policy research institute based in Washington, D.C., in the United States. ... The American Enterprise Institutes Logo The American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research (AEI) is a conservative to right-wing[1] think tank, founded in 1943. ...


Criticism

In recent years, some conservatives have criticized NR's policy stances as supporting particular liberal programs and also blindly supporting the free market at the expense of all other principles. They claim it has ceased to be conservative and now simply toes a neoconservative party-line.[4]


Jeffery Hart, a longtime NR editor, criticizes the magazine's current crop of writers as being too topical, too ideological, and no longer grounded in serious political philosophy. In his 2005 book, The Making of the American Conservative Mind: National Review and Its Times, he laments the loss of the Eastern Conservatives as a dominant force in the GOP. Hart relays how co-founder James Burnham (a leading theorist), supported Nelson Rockefeller's 1964 presidential campaign. This critical view concludes that National Review turned its back on the Taft and Rockefeller wings of the GOP, abandoning its principles to become a coalition of Southern evangelicals and populists, best exemplified by George W. Bush. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... James Burnham (1905–1987) was an American popular political theorist, former Communist activist and intellectual, known for his work The Managerial Revolution, published in 1941, which heavily influenced George Orwells Nineteen Eighty-Four. // Burnham was of English Catholic stock, although he was an atheist for much of his life... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


National Review Online

A popular feature of National Review is the web version of the magazine, National Review Online ("NRO"), which includes a digital version of the magazine, with articles updated daily by National Review writers, and conservative blogs. The Online version is called NRO to distinguish it from the paper magazine (referred to as "NRODT" or National Review On Dead Tree.) The site's editor is Kathryn Jean Lopez, known to the NRO community as "K-Lo". The website receives about one million hits per day -- more than all other conservative-magazine websites combined. Each day, the site posts new content comprised of neo-conservative, conservative and neo-liberal opinion articles. It also features ten blogs: Kathryn Jean Lopez Kathryn Jean Lopez, (born March 22), a native of Manhattan, is an American conservative columnist, who is nationally syndicated by the United Feature Syndicate/Newspaper Enterprise Association. ... It has been suggested that Online diary be merged into this article or section. ...

Markos Moulitsas, who runs the left-wing Daily Kos Web site, told reporters in August 2007 that he doesn't read conservative blogs, with the exception of those on NRO: "I do like the blogs at the National Review — I do think their writers are the best in the [conservative] blogosphere," he said.[3] David J. Frum (born 1960) is a former speechwriter for President George W. Bush, and the author of the first insider book about the Bush presidency. ... Jim Geraghty is a regular contributor to National Review Online and National Review. ... Mark Reed Levin (b. ... David Pryce-Jones (1936-) is a conservative British author and commenter. ... Global warming refers to the increase in the average temperature of the Earths near-surface air and oceans in recent decades and its projected continuation. ... Markos Moulitsas Zúniga (born 11 September 1971), often known by his username and former military moniker Kos (kōs), is the ambiguously homosexual founder and main author of Anti-American, Pinko Daily Kos, a weblog focusing on Communism and Democratic Party politics. ... Daily Kos (IPA: ) is an American political blog, publishing news and opinion from a progressive point of view. ...


Finances

As with most partisan opinion magazines in the United States, National Review carries little corporate advertising and has never turned a profit. The magazine stays afloat by donations from subscribers and black-tie fundraisers around the country. The magazine also sponsors cruises featuring National Review editors and contributors as lecturers.


Buckley said in 2005 that the magazine had lost about $25 million over 50 years.[4]


Notable current contributors

Current contributors to National Review magazine, National Review Online, or both:

Jed Babbin was a deputy undersecretary of defense during the first Bush administration in the United States, and the author of the political book Inside the Asylum as well as Showdown. He is a conservative commentator, a contributing editor to The American Spectator, and a contributor to National Review Online. ... Bruce Bartlett (b. ... Myrna Blyth is a neoconservative contributor to New York Post, National Review and National Review Online, and the former editor of Ladies Home Journal. ... Denis Boyles is a writer, editor, former university lecturer and the author/editor of several books of poetry, travel/history, criticism, practical advice and essays, including Design Poetics (1975), The Modern Mans Guide to Life (1986), African Lives (1989), Man Eaters Motel (1991), A Mans Life: The Complete... Richard Brookhiser, a journalist, biographer and historian, is a senior editor at National Review and columnist for the New York Observer. ... William Frank Buckley Jr. ... Mona Charen is a nationally syndicated columnist, political analyst, and the best-selling author of two books, Useful Idiots: How Liberals Got it Wrong in the Cold War and Still Blame America First (2003) and Do-Gooders: How Liberals Harm Those They Claim to Help — and the Rest of Us... John Derbyshire (born June 3, 1945) is a British-born author who lives in the United States and became a naturalized citizen in 2002. ... Dinesh DSouza Dinesh DSouza (born April 25, 1961 in Bombay, India) is an author and the Robert and Karen Rishwain Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. ... David J. Frum (born 1960) is a former speechwriter for President George W. Bush, and the author of the first insider book about the Bush presidency. ... Jim Geraghty is a regular contributor to National Review Online and National Review. ... Jonah Jacob Goldberg (born March 21, 1969), is an American political commentator and writer. ... Mark Reed Levin (b. ... Michael Graham pictured on the cover of his 2002 book Redneck Nation. ... Victor Davis Hanson giving a lecture at Kenyon College. ... Jeffrey Hart is a cultural critic, former professor in the Ivy League institution of Dartmouth College, essayist and syndicated columnist who lives in the state of New York. ... Paul Johnson (born Paul Bede Johnson on 2 November 1928 in Manchester, England) is a British Roman Catholic journalist, historian, speechwriter and author. ... Phil Kerpen is a well-known figure in both high school and college policy debate, a policy analyst in Washington, D.C. and a regular columnist in several papers. ... Dave Kopel is an attorney, researcher and contributing editor to several publications. ... Charles Krauthammer Charles Krauthammer (born 13 March 1950), is a neoconservative, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist, and commentator. ... Larry Kudlow is the Economics editor of National Review and the co-host of CNBCs Kudlow and Cramer with Jim Cramer. ... Michael Ledeen (born August 1, 1941) is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. ... Kathryn Jean Lopez Kathryn Jean Lopez, (born March 22), a native of Manhattan, is an American conservative columnist, who is nationally syndicated by the United Feature Syndicate/Newspaper Enterprise Association. ... Rich Lowry on C-SPAN Rich Lowry (born 1968 in Arlington, Virginia) is editor of the conservative monthly magazine, National Review. ... Donald Luskin is the Chief Investment Officer for Trend Macrolytics LLC, an investment consulting firm. ... Clifford May is the president of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies and Chairman of the Policy Committee of the Committee on the Present Danger (CPD). ... John J. Miller (b. ... Stephen Moore refers to multiple people: Stephen Moore is an English actor. ... Deroy Murdock is a conservative syndicated columnist, a contributing editor with National Review Online, and a political commentator for the Washington Times. ... Jay Nordlinger is an U.S conservative journalist and columnist. ... Michael Novak (born September 9, 1933) is a conservative Roman Catholic American philosopher and diplomat. ... Kate OBeirne is the Washington editor of National Review. ... John OSullivan, (April 25, 1942-)is Editor-in-Chief of the prestigious international affairs magazine, The National Interest, Editor-at-Large of the prominent magazine the National Review, and a senior Fellow at the Nixon Center. ... John Podhoretz (born April 18, 1961) is a U.S. neoconservative commentator for a variety of media sources, the author of several books on politics, and a former presidential speechwriter. ... Ramesh Ponnuru (born August 16, 1974) is a Washington, D.C.-based Indian American columnist and a senior editor for National Review magazine. ... David Pryce-Jones (1936-) is a conservative British author and commenter. ... Claudia Rosett is an American writer and journalist. ... Pat Sajak (born Patrick Leonard Sajdak on October 26, 1946), is an Emmy Award-winning television personality and one-time talk show host, best known as the host of the popular and long-running American television game show, Wheel of Fortune. ... Catherine Seipp is a Los Angeles freelance writer and media critic who writes the weekly From the Left Coast column for National Review Online and a monthly column for the Independent Womens Forum. ... Dr. Joseph Skelly is an Associate Professor of History at the College of Mt. ... W. Thomas Smith Jr. ... Thomas Sowell (born June 30, 1930), is an American economist, political writer, and commentator. ... Mark Steyn (born 1959) is a Canadian journalist, columnist, and film and music critic. ... James Matthes Jim Talent (born October 18, 1956) is an American politician and former Senator from Missouri. ... Byron York is a conservative American author and journalist who lives in Washington, D.C.. He is a White House correspondent for National Review magazine and a columnist for The Hill. ... Robert V. Young, Jr. ... Tom Wolfe gives a speech at the White House. ... Jack Dunphy (1915–1992) was a novelist and playwright born in a working class neighborhood of Philadelphia. ...

Notable past contributors

Robert Heron Bork (born March 1, 1927) is a conservative American legal scholar who advocates the judicial philosophy of originalism. ... James Burnham (1905–1987) was an American popular political theorist, former Communist activist and intellectual, known for his work The Managerial Revolution, published in 1941, which heavily influenced George Orwells Nineteen Eighty-Four. // Burnham was of English Catholic stock, although he was an atheist for much of his life... Peter Brimelow Peter Brimelow (born 1947) is a British American financial journalist, author, and founder of VDARE. Brimelow has been the editor of many publications, including Forbes, the Financial Post, and National Review. ... John Curtis Chamberlain (1772-1834) was a United States Representative from New Hampshire. ... Whittaker Chambers, 1948 Jay Vivian (David Whittaker) Chambers (April 1, 1901 – July 9, 1961) was an American writer, editor, Communist party member and spy for the Soviet Union who defected and became an outspoken opponent of communism. ... Shannen W. Coffin (born ca. ... Ann Hart Coulter (born December 8, 1961)[1] is an American best-selling author, columnist and political commentator. ... Joan Didion (born December 5, 1934) is an American writer, known as a journalist, essayist, and novelist. ... Ernest van den Haag (September 15, 1919 – March 21, 2002) was a Dutch-American sociologist, social critic, and John M. Olin Professor of Jurisprudence and Public Policy at Fordham University best known for his contributions to National Review. ... Willmoore Kendall (1909-1968) was an American conservative writer and Professor of political philosophy. ... Florence King Miss Florence Virginia King (b. ... Russell Kirk Russell Kirk (1918, Plymouth, Michigan – 29 April 1994, Mecosta, Michigan), was an American political theorist, historian, social critic, and man of letters, best known for his influence on 20th century American conservatism. ... Frank Meyer (born 1909, died 1972) was a conservative political philosopher and co-founding editor of National Review. ... Scott McConnell (born 1953) is an American journalist best known as the current editor of The American Conservative. ... Ludwig Heinrich Edler von Mises (September 29, 1881 – October 10, 1973) (pronounced was a notable economist and a major influence on the modern libertarian movement. ... Raymond Moley, a leading New Dealer who became its bitter opponent. ... Revilo P. Oliver in 1963 Revilo Pendleton Oliver (7 July 1908-10 August 1994) was an American professor of Classical philology, Spanish, and Italian at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, who wrote and polemicized extensively for Racial Nationalist causes. ... Murray Newton Rothbard (March 2, 1926 – January 7, 1995) was an influential American economist, historian and natural law theorist belonging to the Austrian School of Economics who helped define modern libertarianism. ... William A. Rusher (born 1923, Chicago, Illinois), lawyer, publisher, conservative activist. ... John Simon (born Ivan Simon on May 12, 1925, in Subotica, Serbia) is a Serbian-American author and literary, theater, and film critic. ... Joseph Sobran (b. ... Taki Theodoracopulos (born August 11, 1937), better known as Taki, is a Greek born conservative journalist and writer, living in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... John Orley Allen Tate (November 19, 1899 - February 9, 1979) was an American poet, essayist, and social commentator, and Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress, 1943 - 1944. ... Ralph de Toledano (August 14, 1916 - February 3, 2007) was a major figure in the conservative movement in the United States throughout the second half of the 20th century. ... George Frederick Will (born May 4, 1941 in Champaign, Illinois) is a American conservative editorialist, journalist, and author. ... Garry Wills (born May 22, 1934 in Atlanta, Georgia) is an author and historian, and a frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books. ...

National Review in popular culture

National Review is featured in a dry comedic scene in the 1977 movie Annie Hall, starring Woody Allen and Diane Keaton. When Allen visits Keaton's New York City apartment, he sees that Keaton has copies of both National Review and Rolling Stone magazines in her apartment. The following scene transpires: Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Annie Hall is a 1977 romantic comedy film directed by Woody Allen from a script he co-wrote with Marshall Brickman. ... Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Königsberg on December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian, and playwright. ... Diane Keaton (born Diane Hall on January 5, 1946) is an Academy Award-winning American film actress, director and producer. ... This article is about the magazine. ...

  • (Allen staring at National Review and Rolling Stone magazines in Keaton's apartment).
  • Allen: "Are you going with a right-wing rock n' roll star?"
  • Allen: "Honey, there's a spider in your bathroom the size of a Buick."
  • (Allen grabs Keaton's copy of National Review, rolls it up, and slams the magazine down on the spiders).
  • Allen: "I did it. I killed 'em both."
  • (Keaton starts crying).
  • Allen: "What's the matter? What are you sad about? What did you want me to do? Capture 'em and rehabilitate 'em?" [5]

Allen also featured National Review in the 1971 film Bananas, situating a single issue against rows and rows of pornography on a store's magazine rack. Buick is a brand of automobile built in the United States, Canada, China and in Spain by General Motors Corporation. ... Bananas is a film written and directed by Woody Allen in 1971 and starring him and Louise Lasser. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Golden Days October 27, 2005
  2. ^ A Personal Retrospective August 9, 2004
  3. ^ [1]Ben Smith blog at the Web site of The Politico, "Markos speaks" post, August 2, 2007, accessed same day
  4. ^ [2]Shapiro, Gary, "An 'Encounter' With Conservative Publishing", "Knickerbocker" column, The New York Sun, December 9, 2005

The Politico is a Washington, D.C.-based political journalism organization that distributes its content via television, the internet, newspaper, and radio. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


 
 

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