FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
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Encyclopedia > National Republican Party (United States)

it can also be known as NRP.The National Republican Party was a United States political party that existed for a relatively brief period in the 1820s at the start of the Second Party System. A political party is an organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... Events and Trends Nationalistic independence movements helped reshape the world during this decade: Greece declares independence from the Ottoman Empire (1821). ... The Second Party System is the term historians give to the political system existing in the United States from about 1824 to 1854. ...


Before John Quincy Adams's presidency the original Democratic-Republican Party, which had been the only truly national American political party for over a decade, began to dissolve, losing its infrastructure and identity. Its caucuses no longer met to select candidates. Politicians who supported Adams became known as the National Republicans, while others supported Andrew Jackson were called "Jackson Men" and would later form the Democratic Party. In the 1828 election, Adams won 43.63% of the popular vote, and 83 out of 261 electoral votes. In the congressional elections of 1830-31, the number of National Republican seats in the House fell from 74 to 58, while the Democratic total climbed from 139 to 141. Historian Michael Holt blames the leadership: "The National Republican leadership's faith in the ability of national issues and a coalition of congressional leaders to rally grass-roots voters made them blindly insensitive and, in the end, resistant to important popular currents and political developments at the subnational level that had little to do with national concerns." [Holt 11-12] John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was an American lawyer, diplomat, politician, and President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 3, 1829). ... The Democratic-Republican party was a United States political party, which evolved early in the history of the United States. ... Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845), was the seventh President of the United States (1829-1837), hero of the Battle of New Orleans (1815), a founder of the Democratic Party, and the eponym of the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other one being the Republican Party. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


The National Republicans ran Henry Clay against Andrew Jackson in the election of 1832, and Clay's loss convinced Jackson that the people had given him a mandate to abolish the Bank of the United States. Clay won 37.42% of the popular vote, and 49 out of 288 electoral votes. Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia, USA – June 29, 1852 in Washington, D.C.) was a leading American statesman and orator who served in both the House of Representatives and Senate. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Second Bank of the United States was founded in 1816, five years after the expiration of the First Bank of the United States out of desperation to stabilize the currency. ...


After the election of 1832, the National Republican party fell apart. It was not a direct predecessor of the current Republican Party, founded in 1854, although many of its supporters later joined that group. In the short term, many of its members joined the Whig Party. The Republican Party was established in 1854 by a coalition of former Whigs, Northern Democrats, and Free-Soilers who opposed the expansion of slavery and held a Hamiltonian vision for modernizing the United States. ... Whig Party banner from 1848 with candidates Zachary Taylor and Millard Fillmore. ...


Candidates

Order: 6th President Term of Office: March 4, 1825–March 3, 1829 Preceded by: James Monroe Succeeded by: Andrew Jackson Date of birth: July 11, 1767 Place of birth: Braintree, Massachusetts Date of death: February 23, 1848 Place of death: Washington, D.C. First Lady: Louisa Catherine (Johnson) Adams Political... Wikipedia also has an entry for Richard Rush (director) Richard Rush Richard Rush (August 29, 1780–July 30, 1859) was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... 1828 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia, USA – June 29, 1852 in Washington, D.C.) was a leading American statesman and orator who served in both the House of Representatives and Senate. ... John Sergeant was a Pennsylvania politican from a family of American politicans, including his father, Jonathan Dickinson Sergeant, his grandsons, John Sergeant Wise and Richard Alsop Wise, and his great-grandson, John Crain Kunkel. ... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

See also

The American System can mean one of the following: American system of manufacturing American System (economics) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Political parties in the United States lists political parties in the United States. ...

References

  • Carroll, E. Malcolm; Origins of the Whig Party Duke University Press. 1925. chapter 1
  • Michael F. Holt; The Rise and Fall of the American Whig Party: Jacksonian Politics and the Onset of the Civil War. 1999
  • Robert V. Remini, Henry Clay: Statesman for the Union (1993)

 
 

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