FACTOID # 27: If you're itching to live in a trailer park, hitch up your home and head to South Carolina, where a whopping 18% of residences are mobile homes.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > National Middle School Science Bowl

Science Bowl is a middle school academic competition, similar to Quiz Bowl, held in the United States. Two teams of four students each compete to answer various science-related questions. In order to determine which student has the right to answer the question, a buzzer system (or "lockout system") is used, similar to those seen on popular television game shows such as Jeopardy!. The National Middle School Science Bowl ("NMSB") has been organized and sponsored by the United States Department of Energy since the competition's inception in 2002. Middle school and junior high school cover a period of education that straddles primary education and secondary education and serve as a bridge between them. ... Quizbowl (or Quiz-bowl or quiz bowl) is a family of games of questions and answers on all topics of human knowledge, commonly played in high school and college. ... For the scientific journal named Science, see Science (journal). ... A buzzer or beeper is a signalling device, usually electronic, typically used in automobiles, household appliances such as a microwave oven, or game shows. ... A game show is a radio or television program involving members of the public or celebrities, sometimes as part of a team, playing a game, perhaps involving answering quiz questions, for points or prizes. ... Jeopardy! is a popular international television game show, originally devised by Merv Griffin, who also devised Wheel of Fortune. ... The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government responsible for energy policy and nuclear safety. ...

Contents

Subject Areas

Questions are asked in the categories of General Science, Physical Science, Life Science, Earth Science, and Pre-Algebra. Although they are not subcategorized, the questions fall into the subcategories of Chemistry, Computer Science, Biology, Physics, Astronomy, and Current Events. General Science covers science-related items that don't fall under any specific type of science such as items common to all sciences. The Department of Energy recently announced the addition of Current Events for the 2005 National Competition, as a new contractor was hired to write the questions. Physical science is the branch of science including chemistry and physics, usually contrasted with the social sciences and sometimes including and sometimes contrasted with natural or biological science. ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology is the science of life (from the Greek words bios = life and logos = word). ... Earth science (also known as geoscience or the geosciences), is an all-embracing term for the sciences related to the planet Earth. ... -1... Computer science (academically, CS, CSC or compsci) encompasses a variety of topics that relates to computation, like abstract analysis of algorithms, formal grammars, and subjects such as programming languages, program design, software and computer hardware. ... Biology is the science of life (from the Greek words bios = life and logos = reasoned account). ... Physics (from the Greek, φυσικός (physikos), natural, and φύσις (physis), Nature) is the science of Nature in the broadest sense. ... Astronomy, which etymologically means law of the stars, (from Greek: αστρονομία = άστρον + νόμος) is a science involving the observation and explanation of events occurring outside Earth and its atmosphere. ...


Regional Competitions

Each year, in late June, the National Science Bowl competition is held in Golden, Colorado at the Colorado School of Mines. Downtown Golden, Colorado Golden, Colorado lies at the mouth of Clear Creek at the edge of the foothills of the Front Range. ... Guggenheim Hall with the famous M in the background The Colorado School of Mines, located in the town of Golden, was originally founded in 1873 by the Episcopal Church, but in 1874 it was transferred to the Territory of Colorado. ...


The winning team of each regional Science Bowl competition is invited to participate in the National Science Bowl all expenses paid. There are a number of regional competitions all over the United States; the exact amount changes from year to year. For example, in 2004 there were 20 regionals, while in 2005 there were 24 regionals.


Typically, any high school that meets the eligibility rules of the National Middle School Science Bowl competition is permitted to register for any regional competition in the country, but no middle school or student group may compete in multiple regionals. In addition, some regional competitions permmit schools to register up to three teams. Teams comprised entirely of homeschooled students are also permitted to enter; a perennial qualifier to the national competition is the Edmond Home Cooperative from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Homeschooling (also called home education) is the education of children at home and in the community, in contrast to education in an institution such as a public or parochial school. ...


Rules

This section is concerned with the rules of the national competition. The rules of regional competitions vary greatly. There are very few prescribed rules for regional competitions. Some regionals are run nearly identically to the national competition, while others use variations of the rules or different methods of scoring.


General rules

A team consists of four or five students from a single middle school (unless the team is comprised entirely of homeschooled students). Only four students play at any one time, while the fifth is designated as the "alternate." Substitutions may be made at halftime and between rounds.


Two teams compete against each other in each match. Each match has exactly 25 questions (that is, 25 toss-ups and 25 corresponding bonuses). The match is over when all the toss-up questions have been read, or after two eight-minute halves have elapsed, whichever occurs first. The team with the most points at this time is the winner.


Toss-ups

Every match begins with a toss-up question. The moderator announces the subject of the question (see "Subject Areas" above), as well as its type (Multiple Choice or Short Answer). Once the moderator completes the reading of the question, students have ten seconds to buzz in and give an answer. Students may buzz in at any time after the category has been read — there is no need to wait for the moderator to finish. However, there is a penalty for interrupting the moderator and giving an incorrect answer. Once a student from a team has buzzed in, that team may not buzz in again on that question. Conferring between members of a team is not allowed on toss-up questions; if conferring occurs on a question, the team is disqualified from answering that question. The rules regarding conferring are typically very strict: excessive noise, eye contact, or even noticeable shifts in position can be considered conferring, as they convey information to teammates.


An answer given by a student is ruled correct or incorrect by the moderator. On short answer questions, if the answer given differs from the official one, the moderator uses his or her judgment to make a ruling (which is subject to challenge by the competitors). On multiple choice questions, the answer given by the student is only correct if it matches the official answer exactly. Alternatively, the student may give the letter choice that corresponds to the correct answer. The letters W, X, Y and Z are used in lieu of A, B, C and D to avoid confusion between similar-sounding letters.


The decision to require multiple-choice answers to be exact has been a controversial one, but experience has shown that it is the best way to avoid complicated disputes during matches.


Bonuses ("Boni")

If a student answers a toss-up question correctly, that student's team receives a bonus question. The bonus question is always in the same category as the corresponding toss-up question. Since only that team has the opportunity to answer the bonus question, there is no need to buzz in to answer it. After the moderator finishes reading the question, the team has thirty seconds to answer. Conferring between team members is permitted, but the designated team captain must give the team's final answer.


The same rules apply to the judging of responses to bonus questions as apply to responses to toss-up questions. Once the team's answer has been ruled right or wrong, the moderator proceeds to the next toss-up question.


If neither team answers the toss-up question correctly, the bonus question is not read, and the moderator proceeds to the next toss-up question.


Scoring

The scoring at NMSB is similar to scoring for Quiz Bowl, although with different numbers.


Correct responses to toss-up questions are worth 4 points each, and correct responses to bonus questions are worth 10 points each.


If a student buzzes in on a toss-up question before the moderator has completely read the question ("interrupting" the question) and responds incorrectly, then 4 points are awarded to the opposing team, and the question is re-read in its entirety so that the opposing team has an opportunity to buzz in.


Note the difference between interrupt scoring in Science Bowl and in Quiz Bowl: the interrupt penalty in Quiz Bowl is -5 to the interrupting team, while in Science Bowl it is +4 to the non-interrupting team.


Competition Format

This section is concerned with the format of the national competition only. As is the case with competition rules, the competition format varies greatly among the different regional competitions.


The national competition always consists of two stages: round robin and double elimination.


Round Robin

All competing teams are randomly arranged into several round robin groups of seven or eight teams each. Every team plays every other team in its group once, receiving 2 points for a win, 1 point for a tie, or 0 points for a loss. The top two teams from each group advance to the double elimination round. The term round-robin is used in several contexts and usually means that a number of things are taking turns at something, for example a round-robin-party where participants walk door to door for small parties at each participants habitat. ...


Tiebreaks

In the event that two or more teams are tied for one of the top two spots in a round robin group, there are several tiebreak procedures, applied in the following order:

  1. The head-to-head record of all the tied teams is compared. The team(s) with the best record against the other tied teams win(s) the tiebreak.
  2. The team(s) with the fewest losses win(s) the tiebreak.
  3. If the top two teams still cannot be determined, the following procedures are used:
    • If more than two teams are still tied, each team is placed in a separate room and is read ten toss-up questions. Each team's score is determined by the number of questions answered correctly minus the number answered incorrectly. The team(s) with the highest score win(s) the tiebreak.
    • If exactly two teams are still tied, the two teams compete head-to-head, receiving five toss-up questions (no bonus questions are used). All the usual toss-up rules are in effect, including the interrupt penalty. The team with the higher score wins the tiebreak.

If a tie still exists after the third tiebreak step, the third step is reapplied until the tie is resolved.


Double Elimination

Approximately 8 teams advance from the round robin (depending on the number of round robin groups). A team's position in the draw is determined by random draw; teams are not seeded in any way. The competition then proceeds like a typical double elimination tournament bracket. Unlike in the round robin, a match in double elimination cannot be tied. If a match is tied at the end of regulation, overtime periods of five questions each are played until the tie is broken. A tournament is an organized competition in which many participants play each other in individual games. ... A tournament is an organized competition in which many participants play each other in individual games. ... In tournaments, bracket is commonly used to refer to the diagrammatic representation of the series of games played during the tournament. ...


The double elimination system produces a first-place, second-place, third-place and fourth-place team.


Sponsors

Several companies and organizations sponsor the National Middle School Science Bowl competition, the most prominent being the United States Department of Energy. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory sponsors NMSB, and General Motors is also a regular sponsor of the event and has in recent years sponsored the Hydrogen Fuel Cell Car competition held at NMSB, where teams compete to build the fastest or most powerful fuel cell-powered miniature car. FeulCellStore.com and the Colorado School of Mines also sponsor the NMSB. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government responsible for energy policy and nuclear safety. ... The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), located in Golden, Colorado, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy, is the United Statess primary laboratory for renewable energy and energy efficiency research and development. ... GM redirects here. ... A fuel cell is an electrochemical device similar to a battery, but differing from the latter in that it is designed for continuous replenishment of the reactants consumed; i. ... Guggenheim Hall with the famous M in the background The Colorado School of Mines, located in the town of Golden, was originally founded in 1873 by the Episcopal Church, but in 1874 it was transferred to the Territory of Colorado. ...


Results of the National Competition

The top three teams at the 2004 National Middle School Science Bowl Academic Competition were

The top three teams at the 2004 National Middle School Science Bowl Hydrogen Fuel Cell Car Competition (Stock Class) were: Cocoa is a city located in Brevard County, Florida. ... Lincoln is the capital city of the State of Nebraska, in the United States of America. ... Los Alamos is an unincorporated townsite in Los Alamos County, New Mexico. ... Cincinnati, Ohio viewed from the SW, across the Ohio River in Kentucky. ...

The top three teams at the 2004 National Middle School Science Bowl Hydrogen Fuel Cell Car Competition (Open Class) were:

The top three teams at the 2003 National Middle School Science Bowl were

The top three teams at the 2003 National Middle School Science Bowl Solar Car Competition were: City nicknames: Aggieland, heart of the Research Valley Location in the State of Texas County Brazos County Mayor Ron Silvia Area  - Land  - Water 104. ... River Forest is a wealthy suburban village located in Cook County, Illinois. ... The Albuquerque Academy is a private co-educational institution located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. ... This article is about the largest city of New Mexico. ... Columbus is the county seat of Bartholomew County, Indiana. ...

Titusville is a city located in Brevard County, Florida. ... Wilsonville is a city located in Clackamas County, Oregon. ... Downtown Golden, Colorado Golden, Colorado lies at the mouth of Clear Creek at the edge of the foothills of the Front Range. ... La Salle is a town located in Weld County, Colorado. ...

See Also

Quizbowl (or Quiz-bowl or quiz bowl) is a family of games of questions and answers on all topics of human knowledge, commonly played in high school and college. ... -1...

External Links

  • Official National Science Bowl Website (http://www.scied.science.doe.gov/nmsb/) - includes registration information for all regional competitions
  • United States Department of Energy (http://www.doe.gov/)
  • Science Bowl Test Program (http://www.netl.doe.gov/coolscience/funstuff/sb_test.html) - Windows program that asks Science Bowl questions

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m