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Encyclopedia > National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related artifacts and exhibits, and the honoring of persons who have excelled in playing, managing, and serving the sport. The Japanese Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum (野球体育博物館; Yakyû Taiiku Hakubutsukan) first opened in 1959 next door to Korakuen Stadium in Tokyo, Japan. ... National Baseball Hall of Fame logo This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... Cooperstown is a village in Otsego County, New York and is the County Seat. ... The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... This article is about the sport. ...


The Hall's motto is "Preserving History, Honoring Excellence, Connecting Generations". The current President of the Hall of Fame is Dale Petroskey. Dale Petroskey is the President of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. ...

Contents

History

The Entrance to the Baseball Hall of Fame.
The Entrance to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

The Hall of Fame was dedicated on June 12, 1939 by Lee Ferrick Andrews, grandson of Edward Clark, who was a founder of the Singer Sewing Machine Company. Stephen C. Clark was owner of a local hotel and sought to bring tourists to Cooperstown, which had been damaged by the Great Depression, which significantly reduced the local tourist trade, and by Prohibition, which had devastated the local hops industry. A claim that U.S. Civil War hero Abner Doubleday invented baseball in Cooperstown was instrumental in the early marketing of the Hall. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 915 KB) Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown, NY, Feb. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 915 KB) Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown, NY, Feb. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Edward Clark (d. ... A Singer treadle sewing machine Singer Corporation is a United States of America manufacturer of sewing machines, first established as I.M. Singer & Co. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... The term Prohibition, also known as A Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ... Hop umbel (branched floral structure resembling nested-inverted umbrellas) in a Hallertau hop yard Hops are a flower used primarily as a flavouring and stability agent in beer, as well as in herbal medicine. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Abner Doubleday Abner Doubleday (June 26, 1819 – January 26, 1893), was a career U.S. Army officer and Union general in the American Civil War. ...


Major League Baseball, seeing the marketing opportunity, soon began cooperating with the Hall of Fame in promotion and the acquisition of artifacts for display. MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ...


Recent improvements to the museum include an $8 million library and research facility that opened in 1994, and other renovations which were completed in spring 2005.


In 2002, Baseball As America was launched, a traveling exhibit that toured ten American museums over six years. The Hall of Fame has also sponsored educational programming on the Internet to bring the Hall of Fame to schoolchildren who might not see it. In January 2006, the Hall of Fame also announced a partnership with Citgo to launch a traveling exhibit about Latin America's contributions to baseball. It is also an annual presence at the Major League Baseball All-Star Game, as it receives space at the FanFest. Citgo Petroleum Corporation or Citgo, a subsidiary of Petróleos de Venezuela S.A., the Venezuelan state-owned petroleum company, is a United States-incorporated firm refiner and marketer of gasoline, lubricants, petrochemicals and other petroleum products. ... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the respective managers (from the previous years World...


The village of Cooperstown also includes Doubleday Field, where the "Hall of Fame Game" featuring two major league teams is held every year. In the past, the game was held during induction weekend, but in recent years it has been scheduled in May or June, when it is easier on a team's travel schedule. The Hall of Fame Game weekend usually includes a home run derby, relevant museum programming (often with Hall of Fame inductees from the two teams), a parade down Cooperstown's Main Street and, finally, the game itself. The game is an exhibition: statistics are not recorded and teams are not bound to roster restrictions. Therefore, the regulars are usually replaced by minor league players after one time through the batting order. Doubleday Field is a baseball stadium in Cooperstown, New York. ... The Home Run Derby is an event played prior to the Major League Baseball All-Star Game. ...


Inductees

Among baseball fans, "Hall of Fame" means not only the museum and facility in Cooperstown, but the pantheon of players, managers, umpires and builders who have been named to enshrinement there. The first five men elected were superstars Ty Cobb, Babe Ruth, Honus Wagner, Christy Mathewson and Walter Johnson, named in 1936. As of January 2007, 280 individuals had been elected to the Hall of Fame, including 227 players, 17 managers (many of whom also played), 8 umpires, and 28 builders, executives, and organizers. Thirty men have also been awarded the Ford C. Frick Award for excellence in broadcasting, while 57 have received the J. G. Taylor Spink Award for excellence in baseball writing. New York Yankees manager Joe Torre returning to the dugout (September 2005) In baseball, the head coach of a team is called the manager (or more formally, the field manager); this individual controls matters of team batting order to more closely communicate with baserunners, but most managers delegate this responsibility... Home plate umpire Gary Darling signals that the last pitch was a strike In baseball, the umpire is the person charged with officiating the game, including beginning and ending the game, enforcing the rules of the game and the grounds, making judgment calls on plays, and meting out discipline. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ... This article is about the pitcher and outfielder. ... Johannes Peter Honus Wagner (February 24, 1874 - December 6, 1955), nicknamed The Flying Dutchman, was an American baseball player who played during the 1890s until the 1910s. ... Christopher Christy Mathewson (August 12, 1880 - October 7, 1925), nicknamed Big Six, The Christian Gentleman, or Matty, was a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887-December 10, 1946), American professional baseball pitcher. ... The Ford C. Frick Award is an award bestowed annually by the Baseball Hall of Fame in the United States to a broadcaster for major contributions to baseball. ... The J.G. Taylor Spink Award is the highest award given by the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) to its members. ...

Plaques of the First Class of Inductees
Plaques of the First Class of Inductees

Players are currently inducted into the Hall of Fame through election by either the Baseball Writers Association of America (or BBWAA), or the Veterans Committee, which is now composed of living Hall of Famers; additional special committees, some including recipients of the two major awards, are also regularly formed to make selections. Five years after retirement, any player with 10 years of major league experience who passes a screening committee (which removes from consideration players of clearly lesser qualification) is eligible to be elected by BBWAA members with 10 years' membership or more. From a final ballot typically including 25–40 candidates, each writer may vote for up to 10 players; until the late 1950s, voters were advised to cast votes for the maximum 10 candidates. Any player named on 75% or more of all ballots cast is elected. A player who is named on fewer than 5% of ballots is dropped from future elections. In some instances, the screening committee had restored their names to later ballots, but in the mid-1990s, dropped players were made permanently ineligible for Hall of Fame consideration, even by the Veterans Committee. A 2001 change in the election procedures restored the eligibility of these dropped players; while their names will not appear on future BBWAA ballots, they may be considered by the Veterans Committee. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 1103 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Baseball Hall of Fame User:Friejose/Photo gallery Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 1103 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Baseball Hall of Fame User:Friejose/Photo gallery Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... official logo The Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) is a professional association for baseball journalists writing for daily newspapers and magazines. ... The Veterans Committee, officially the Committee on Baseball Veterans, is a committee of the National Baseball Hall of Fame that provides a second chance for Hall of Fame election to players passed over in regular Hall of Fame balloting. ...


Under special circumstances, certain players may be deemed eligible for induction even though they have not met all requirements. This resulted in the induction of Addie Joss, who was elected in 1978 despite only playing in nine seasons due to his death from meningitis. Additionally, if an otherwise eligible player dies before their fifth year of retirement, then that player may be placed on the ballot at the first election at least six months after their death. Roberto Clemente's induction in 1973 set the precedent, when the writers chose to put him up for consideration after his death on New Year's Eve, 1972, and the shortened waiting period was added thereafter. Addie Joss, 1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card Adrian Joss (April 12, 1880 – April 14, 1911) was a Major League Baseball pitcher in the early 20th century. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1978 throughout the world. ... Roberto Clemente Walker (August 18, 1934 – December 31, 1972) was a Major League Baseball right fielder and right-handed batter. ... This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January-March January 3 - A group of investors, headed by shipbuilder George Steinbrenner, purchases the New York Yankees from CBS for $10 million. ... For other articles with similar names, see New Year (disambiguation). ... The following are the events of the year 1972 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ...


The five-year waiting period was established in 1954 after an evolutionary process. In 1936 all players were eligible, including active ones. From the 1937 election until the 1945 election, there was no waiting period, so any retired player was eligible, but writers were discouraged from voting for current major leaguers. Since there was no formal rule preventing a writer from casting a ballot for an active player, the scribes did not always comply with the informal guideline; Joe DiMaggio received a vote in 1945, for example. From the 1946 election until the 1954 election, an official one-year waiting period was in effect. (DiMaggio, for example, retired after the 1951 season and was first eligible in the 1953 election.) The modern rule establishing a wait of five years was passed in 1954, although an exception was made for Joe DiMaggio because of his high level of previous support, thus permitting him to be elected within four years of his retirement. Contrary to popular belief, no formal exception was made for Lou Gehrig, other than to hold a special one-man election for him. There was no waiting period at that time and Gehrig met all other qualifications, so he would have been eligible for the next regular election after he retired during the 1939 season, but the BBWAA decided to hold a special election at the 1939 Winter Meetings in Cincinnati, specifically to elect Gehrig (most likely because it was known that he was terminally ill and it was uncertain that he would live long enough to see another election). Nobody else was on that ballot, and the numerical results have never been made public. Since no elections were held in 1940 or 1941, the special election permitted Gehrig to enter the Hall while still alive. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ... Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, sometimes called Lou Gehrigs Disease, Maladie de Charcot or motor neurone disease) is a progressive, fatal, neurodegenerative disease caused by the degeneration of motor neurons, the nerve cells in the central nervous system that control voluntary muscle movement. ...


If a player fails to be elected by the BBWAA within 20 years of his retirement from active play, he may be selected by the Veterans Committee, which now votes every odd-numbered year. However, only players whose careers began in 1943 or later will be eligible for election by the main Veterans Committee, in accordance with changes to the voting process for that body instituted in July 2007. These changes also established three separate committees to select other figures:

  • One committee will vote on managers and umpires in every even-numbered year, starting in 2008.
  • One committee will vote on executives and builders in every even-numbered year, also starting in 2008.
  • One committee will vote every five years on players whose careers began in 1942 or earlier, starting in 2009.

Players of the Negro Leagues have also been considered at various times, beginning in 1971. In 2005 the Hall completed a study on African American players between the late 19th century and the integration of the major leagues in 1947, and conducted a special election for such players in February 2006; seventeen figures from the Negro Leagues were chosen in that election, in addition to the eighteen previously selected. Bud Fowler, the first professional black baseball player with one of his teams, Western of Keokuk, Iowa The Negro Leagues were American professional baseball leagues comprising predominantly African-American teams. ...


Predictably, the selection process catalyzes endless debate among baseball fans over the merits of various candidates. Even players already elected remain for years the subjects of discussions as to whether their elections were deserved or in error. For example, Bill James' book Whatever Happened to the Hall of Fame? goes into detail about who he believes does and does not belong in the Hall of Fame. George William “Bill” James (born October 5, 1949 in Holton, Kansas) is a baseball writer, historian and statistician whose work has been widely influential. ... Whatever Happened to the Hall of Fame? Baseball, Cooperstown, and the Politics of Glory is a book by famed baseball sabermetrician and author Bill James. ...


The museum

According to the Hall of Fame, approximately 350,000 visitors enter the museum each year, and the running total has surpassed 14 million. These visitors see only a fraction of its 35,000 artifacts, 2.6 million library items (such as newspaper clippings and photos) and 130,000 baseball cards. A quick rundown of what there is to see at the museum follows.


First floor

Plaque Gallery in 2001
Plaque Gallery in 2001
Gallery during 2007 HOF induction weekend
Gallery during 2007 HOF induction weekend
  • Baseball at the Movies houses baseball movie memorabilia while a screen shows footage from those movies.
  • The Bullpen Theater is the site of daily programming at the museum (trivia games, book discussions, etc.) and is decorated with pictures of famous relief pitchers.
  • The Halper Gallery contains rotating exhibits.
  • Induction Row contains artifacts pertinent to the most recent inductees and photos of past Hall of Fame Weekends.
  • The Perez-Steele Art Gallery features art of all media related to baseball.
  • The Plaque Gallery, the most recognizable site at the museum, contains induction plaques of all members.
  • The Sandlot Kids Clubhouse has various interactive displays for young children.
  • Scribes and Mikemen honors Spink and Frick winners with a headshot display and has artifacts related to baseball writing and broadcasting.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 643 KB)The dog photo (smartest dog alive) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 643 KB)The dog photo (smartest dog alive) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... // Overview A Sports Film is a film genre that uses sport as the theme of a film. ... While the game goes on, a relief pitcher warms up in the bullpen, beyond the outfield fence In baseball, the bullpen is the area where pitchers warm-up before entering a game. ... A relief pitcher warms up in the bullpen as the game goes on A relief pitcher or reliever is a baseball or softball pitcher who enters the game after the starting pitcher is removed due to injury, ineffectiveness and/or fatigue. ... The 2007 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame are proceeding according to revised rules enacted in 2001. ... John Joseph Johnny Podres (born September 30, 1932 in Witherbee, New York) is a former Major League Baseball left-handed starting pitcher who played with the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers (1953-55, 1957-67); Detroit Tigers (1966-67), and San Diego Padres (1969). ... Roy Campanella (November 19, 1921 – June 26, 1993) was an American catcher in the Negro leagues and Major League Baseball. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1913) Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899... The All-American Girls Professional Baseball League was a womens professional baseball league which existed from 1943 to 1954. ... Leroy Robert Satchel Paige (July 7, 1906–June 8, 1982)[1] was an American baseball player who pitched in several different Negro Leagues and in Major League Baseball. ...

Second floor

  • The Grandstand Theater features a 12 minute multimedia film. The 200 seat theater, complete with replica stadium seats, is decorated to resemble old Comiskey Park. [1]
  • The Game is the major feature of the second floor. It is where the most artifacts are displayed. The Game is set up in a timeline format, starting with baseball's beginnings and culminating with the game we know today. There are several offshoots of this meandering timeline:
  • The Today's Game exhibit is built like a baseball clubhouse, with 30 glass-enclosed locker stalls, one for each Major League franchise. In each stall there is a jersey and other items from the designated big league team, along with a brief team history. A center display case holds objects donated to the Hall of Fame from the past year or two. Fans can also look into a room designed to look like a manager's office. Outside is a display case with rotating artifacts. Currently the space is devoted to the World Baseball Classic.

This article is about the original Comiskey Park. ... This article is about the pitcher and outfielder. ... Henry Louis Hank Aaron (born February 5, 1934 in Mobile, Alabama), nicknamed Hammer, Hammerin Hank”, or Bad Henry”, is a retired American baseball player whose Major League Baseball (MLB) career spanned the 1950s through the 1970s. ... In Major League Baseball, the 500 Home Run Club is an informal term applied to the group of players who have hit 500 or more career home runs. ... Part of the History of baseball series. ... The World Baseball Classic, sometimes abbreviated WBC, is an international baseball tournament, first held in March 2006. ...

Third floor

The display of Ichiro Suzuki
The display of Ichiro Suzuki
  • Autumn Glory is devoted to post-season baseball and has, among other artifacts, replicas of World Series rings.
  • An Education Gallery hosts school groups and, in the summer, presentations about artifacts from the museum's collection. In the gallery foyer is a TV that continually plays baseball bloopers and the popular Abbott and Costello routine "Who's on First?" and a display case with rotating exhibits.
  • The Records Room has charts showing active and all-time leaders in various baseball statistical categories. The statistics charts are posted on the walls, leaving the center space for other purposes:
    • BBWAA awards: Replicas of various awards distributed by the BBWAA at the end of each season, along with a list of past winners.
    • A case dedicated to Ichiro Suzuki setting the major league record for base hits, with 262 in 2004.
    • An inductee database touch-screen computer with statistics for every inductee.
    • Programs from every World Series.
  • Sacred Ground is the newest museum section, opened after the 2003–05 renovation. It is devoted entirely to ballparks and everything about them, especially the fan experience and the business of a ballpark. The centerpiece is a computer tour of Boston's old South End Grounds. Currently the Hall is working on adding Comiskey Park and Ebbets Field to the computer tour.

Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Whos on First? is a comedy routine made famous by Abbott and Costello. ... Founded in 1908 as the Baseball Writers Association of America, the BBWAA is a professional association for baseball journalists writing for daily newspapers and magazines. ... Ichiro Suzuki ), often known simply as Ichiro ), is a Japanese outfielder for the Seattle Mariners Major League Baseball team. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... South End Grounds is the most commonly used informal name for a major league baseball park that was the home ground to the Boston entry, first in the National Association of Professional Baseball Players, and then in the National League, from 1871-1914. ... This article is about the original Comiskey Park. ... Ebbets Field was a Major League Baseball park located in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn, New York. ...

Controversies

Veterans Committee

Main article: Veterans Committee

The most lasting controversy in Hall of Fame elections has been the role and composition of the Veterans Committee.[2] While few of the BBWAA selections have been particularly controversial, prior to its 2001 restructuring the Veterans Committee had, at times, seemed to pass over the most worthy candidates in order to enshrine contemporaries and teammates of the committee members. Beginning in 1970, the Veterans Committee elected members to the Hall of Fame, which sportswriter and baseball analyst Bill James describes as "simply appalling".[3] These selections included Jesse Haines, Dave Bancroft, Chick Hafey, Ross Youngs, George Kelly, Jim Bottomley and Travis Jackson, all of whom played for either the New York Giants or St. Louis Cardinals of the 1920s, when Committee chairman Frankie Frisch was their teammate. Bottomley and Bancroft are the only two who James concedes to be "marginal Hall of Famers". The Veterans Committee, officially the Committee on Baseball Veterans, is a committee of the National Baseball Hall of Fame that provides a second chance for Hall of Fame election to players passed over in regular Hall of Fame balloting. ... The Veterans Committee, officially the Committee on Baseball Veterans, is a committee of the National Baseball Hall of Fame that provides a second chance for Hall of Fame election to players passed over in regular Hall of Fame balloting. ... George William “Bill” James (born October 5, 1949 in Holton, Kansas) is a baseball writer, historian and statistician whose work has been widely influential. ... Jesse Joseph Haines (July 22, 1893 - August 5, 1978) was a right-handed Major League Baseball pitcher and knuckleballer. ... David James Beauty Bancroft (April 20, 1891 - October 9, 1972) was an American baseball player who played Major League Baseball from 1915 to 1930. ... Charles James Chick Hafey (February 12, 1903 - July 2, 1973) was an American player in Major League Baseball. ... Ross Youngs Ross Middlebrook Youngs (April 10, 1897 - October 22, 1927) was a Major League Baseball outfielder best known for his superb defense and consistent hitting. ... George Lucas Kelly (September 10, 1895 - October 13, 1984), nicknamed Highpockets, was a Major League Baseball player known for his solid all-round hitting and slick fielding at first base. ... James Leroy Bottomley (April 23, 1900 - December 11, 1959), nicknamed Sunny Jim, was a left-handed Major League Baseball player. ... Travis Calvin Jackson (November 2, 1903 - July 27, 1987) was a Major League Baseball player during the 1920s and 1930s. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–1885) Other nicknames Jints, Gigantes, G-Men Ballpark AT... Major league affiliations National League (1892–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 6, 9, 14, 17, 20, 42, 42, 45, 85 Name St. ... Francis Frankie Frisch (September 9, 1898 - March 12, 1973), nicknamed the Fordham Flash, was an American Major League Baseball player of the early 20th century. ...


In 2001, the Veterans Committee was reformed to become primarily composed of all living Hall of Fame members.[4] The revamped Committee held three elections—in 2003 and 2007 for both players and non-players, and in 2005 for players only. No individual was elected in that time, sparking criticism among some observers who expressed doubt whether the new Veterans Committee would ever elect a player. The Committee members – most of whom were Hall members – were accused of being reluctant to elect new candidates in the hope of heightening the value of their own selection. After no one was selected for the third consecutive election in 2007, Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt noted, "The same thing happens every year. The current members want to preserve the prestige as much as possible, and are unwilling to open the doors."[5] In 2007, the committee and its selection processes were again reorganized; the main committee now includes all living members of the Hall, and will vote on a reduced number of candidates from among players whose careers began in 1943 or later. Separate committees, including sportswriters and broadcasters, will select umpires, managers and executives, as well as players from earlier eras. The 2003 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame proceeded in keeping with rules enacted in 2001. ... The 2007 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame are proceeding according to revised rules enacted in 2001. ... The 2005 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame proceeded in keeping with rules enacted in 2001. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Sale of historic items

A further controversy erupted in 1982, when it emerged that some historic items given to the Hall had been sold on the collectibles market. It subsequently transpired that these had been lent to the Baseball Commissioner's Office, from where they had been taken and sold to offset personal financial problems by Joe Reichler, an assistant to Commissioner Bowie Kuhn, possibly without verifying their ownership. Under pressure from the New York Attorney General, the Commissioner's Office made reparations, but damage had been done to the Hall of Fame's reputation. In 1920, the owners of Major League Baseball, in order to reestablish confidence of fans in the sport following the Black Sox Scandal, established the office of Commissioner of Baseball. ... Bowie Kent Kuhn (born October 28, 1926 in Takoma Park, Maryland) was commissioner of Major League Baseball from February 4, 1969 to September 30, 1984. ...


Non-induction of banned players

An ongoing controversy facing the Hall of Fame is that of the status of Joe Jackson and Pete Rose. Jackson and Rose were both banned from baseball for life for actions related to gambling on their own teams—Jackson was determined to have cooperated with those who conspired to lose the 1919 World Series on purpose, and Rose voluntarily accepted a permanent spot on the ineligible list in return for MLB's promise to make no official finding in relation to alleged betting on the Cincinnati Reds when he was their manager in the 1980s. (Baseball's Rule 21, prominently posted in every clubhouse locker room, mandates permanent banishment from the sport for having a gambling interest of any sort on a game in which a player or manager is directly involved.) While Jackson and Rose had outstanding playing careers that would usually merit Hall of Fame induction, the Hall of Fame disallows election of anyone on the permanent suspension list. (Many others have been permanently suspended, but none have Hall of Fame qualifications on the level of Jackson or Rose. A select few, such as Hal Chase and Eddie Cicotte, would be reasonable candidates had they not been barred.) Baseball fans are deeply split on the issue of whether these two should be exonerated or remain banned. Sportswriter Bill James, though he advocates Rose eventually making it into the Hall of Fame, compared the people who want to put Jackson in the Hall of Fame to "those women who show up at murder trials wanting to marry the cute murderer."[6] Joseph Jefferson Shoeless Joe Jackson (July 16, 1888 – December 5, 1951) was a left fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Athletics, Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. ... Peter Edward Pete Rose, Sr. ... The 1919 World Series was played between the Chicago White Sox of the American League and the Cincinnati Reds of the National League. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames The Redlegs, The Big Red Machine... Hal Chase, of the Chicago White Sox, at Comiskey Park. ... Edward Victor Cicotte (June 19, 1884 - May 5, 1969 Born and Died in Detroit, Michigan) (pronounced See-Cot) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball best known for his time with the Chicago White Sox. ...


Players with multiple teams

The Hall has also recently changed its stance regarding team membership. Although all the teams for which a player played are usually listed in the text of the plaque, most are depicted wearing the cap of one specific team. Until recently, it was the player's choice which cap they would wear, and the players did not always make the most popular choice. For example, Nolan Ryan entered the Hall in 1999 wearing a Texas Rangers cap on his plaque, even though he only spent five seasons with the Rangers, and had longer and more successful tenures with the Astros (nine seasons, 1980–88) and Angels (eight seasons, 1972–79), and won his only championship as a member of the Mets in 1969. He did however, get his 5000th strikeout, 300th win, and his last two no-hitters as a Ranger, which is most likely why Ryan chose to go in as a Ranger. Another notable was Reggie Jackson, who chose a New York Yankees cap over an Oakland A's cap, even though he had played twice as long for the Kansas City/Oakland A's and won three World Series in ten seasons, as opposed to two in five seasons with the Yankees. Carlton Fisk went into the hall with a Boston Red Sox cap on his plaque in 2000 despite playing with the Chicago White Sox longer and posting up more significant numbers with the White Sox; his choice of the Red Sox, however, was likely because of Fisk being a New England native as well as his famous walk-off home run in Game Six of the 1975 World Series that he's been most associated with. Lynn Nolan Ryan, Jr. ... Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1972–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 26, 34, 42 Name Texas Rangers (1972–present) Washington Senators (1961-1971) Other nicknames None in common use Ballpark Rangers Ballpark in Arlington (1994–present) a. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 24, 25, 32, 33, 34, 40, 42, 49 Name Houston Astros (1965–present) Houston Colt . ... Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 11, 26, 29, 30, 42, 50 Name Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (2005–present) Anaheim Angels (1997-2004) California Angels (1965-1996) Los Angeles Angels (1961-1965) Other nicknames The Halos, The Wings, The Seraphs... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... The 1969 World Series was played between the New York Mets and the Baltimore Orioles, with the Mets prevailing in 5 games to accomplish one of the greatest upsets in Series history, as that particular Orioles squad was (and still is by some baseball pundits) considered to be one of... Reginald Martinez Reggie Jackson (born May 18, 1946), nicknamed Mr. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... Carlton Ernest Fisk (born December 26, 1947 in Bellows Falls, Vermont) is a former Major League Baseball catcher who played for 24 years with the Boston Red Sox and Chicago White Sox. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72, Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) Other nicknames The Sox, The South Siders, The ChiSox, The Pale Hose, The Good Guys, The Go-Go Sox, The... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... The 1975 World Series was between the Boston Red Sox and Cincinnati Reds. ...


However, in light of rumors that teams were offering number retirement, money or organizational jobs in exchange for the cap designation, the Hall decided to change the policy. Although the decision-making process would be a mutual responsibility, the Hall, not the players, would have the final say in such matters. Gary Carter, inducted in 2003, was the first to test this policy; he won his only championship with the 1986 New York Mets, and wanted his induction plaque to depict him wearing a Mets cap, even though he had spent more than twice as much time with the Montreal Expos (twelve years as opposed to five with the Mets). The Hall of Fame decided that his plaque would instead show Carter with an Expos cap. Wade Boggs was in a similar situation for his 2005 induction; he won his only championship as a member of the 1996 New York Yankees, but posted his best career numbers in more than twice as much time while wearing the Boston Red Sox uniform (eleven years as opposed to five with the Yankees). He went in wearing the "B" on his cap despite his acrimonious relationship with Red Sox management. Catfish Hunter, though harboring no ill will towards either of his employers (the Oakland Athletics and New York Yankees) could not decide which cap he preferred; he was a successful pitcher with both teams. He instead went in wearing a cap without a logo. Gary Edmund Carter (born April 8, 1954), nicknamed Kid, is a former Major League Baseball Hall Of Fame catcher from 1974-1992. ... This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 8 - Willie McCovey is the only player elected this year to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America, and becomes the 16th player elected in his first year of eligibility. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... The Montreal Expos (French: Les Expos de Montréal) were a Major League Baseball team located in Montreal, Quebec, Canada from 1969 until 2004. ... Wade Anthony Boggs (born June 15, 1958 in Omaha, Nebraska) is a former third baseman in Major League Baseball, primarily with the Boston Red Sox. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1996 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... James Augustus Catfish Hunter (April 8, 1946 – September 9, 1999), son of Abbott and Millie Hunter, was a prolific Major League Baseball right-handed starting pitcher between 1965 and 1979. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... In 1936, elections commenced for selection of worthy individuals to be honored by induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame. ... Elections commenced in 1936 for selection of worthy individuals to be honored by induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame, though the first induction ceremonies were not held until the Hall opened in 1939. ... The Nisei Baseball Research Project (NBRP) is a non-profit 501(c)3 organization documenting, preserving and exhibiting history of Japanese American baseball. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ http://web.baseballhalloffame.org/news/article.jsp?ymd=20070221&content_id=1047&vkey=hof_news
  2. ^ The official name is "Committee on Baseball Veterans", but the short form is regularly used by the Hall itself, and is universally used by baseball media.
  3. ^ James, Bill (1995). Whatever Happened to the Hall of Fame?:Baseball, Cooperstown, and the Politics of Glory. Simon & Schuster, p. 163–166. ISBN 978-0-684080088-2. 
  4. ^ "Changes to Veterans Committee Procedures". baseballhalloffame.org. National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved on 2007-01-06.
  5. ^ Walker, Ben (2007-02-28). Vets committee throws another shutout at Hall of Fame. Associated Press. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
  6. ^ James (1995:358)

George William “Bill” James (born October 5, 1949 in Holton, Kansas) is a baseball writer, historian and statistician whose work has been widely influential. ... Whatever Happened to the Hall of Fame? Baseball, Cooperstown, and the Politics of Glory is a book by famed baseball sabermetrician and author Bill James. ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

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2001 The 2001 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame introduced a new election system. ...

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2002 See previous election: 1939 and next election: 1944 The 1942 election to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame was the first to be conducted in three years, and the only regular election in the years 1940 to 1944; in 1939 the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) had... The 2002 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame proceeded in keeping with rules enacted in 2001. ...

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2004 See previous election: 1942 and next election: 1945 There was no regular election in 1944 to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame; in 1939 the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) had moved to hold elections every three years rather than annually, and the next scheduled election was... The 2004 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame proceeded in keeping with rules enacted in 2001. ...

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2005 See previous election: 1944 and next election: 1946 The 1945 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame included the first regular election to be conducted in three years, and only the second since 1939; in that year, the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) had moved to... The 2005 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame proceeded in keeping with rules enacted in 2001. ...

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2006 The Bitch ass elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame were held in 1936. ... See previous election: 1945 and next election: 1947 The 1946 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame marked a dramatic revision of the methods used one year earlier. ... The 1996 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame followed the same system in use since 1995. ... The 2006 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame proceeded in keeping with rules enacted in 2001, augmented by a special election; the result was the largest class of inductees (18) in the Halls history, including the first woman ever elected. ...

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2007 See previous election: 1936 and next election: 1938 The 1937 process of selecting inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame was markedly different from the initial elections the previous year. ... See previous election: 1946 and next election: 1948 The 1947 election to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame again followed a major revision of the methods used one year earlier. ... The 1997 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame followed the same system in use since 1995. ... The 2007 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame are proceeding according to revised rules enacted in 2001. ...

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The 1938 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame were conducted along much the same lines as the 1937 vote. ... See previous election: 1947 and next election: 1949 The 1948 election to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame proceeded using the same rules as the highly successful election one year earlier, with the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) again authorized to elect players retired less than 25... The 1998 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame followed the same system in use since 1995. ... The 2008 election to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame will proceed according to revised rules enacted in 2001. ...

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2009 See previous election: 1938 and next election: 1942 The 1939 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame were the last ones conducted prior to the Halls opening that year. ... See previous election: 1948 and next election: 1950 The 1949 election to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame proceeded using the same rules as the successful elections in the previous two years, with the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) again authorized to elect players retired less than... The 1999 elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame followed the same system in use since 1995. ...

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